By on July 22, 2019

TTAC Commentator Znueni writes:

Dear Sajeev,

We have a 2007 Honda CRV with nice Continental winter tires mounted, speed rating of H. We only put around 8k miles a year on it with short hops and maybe one long 800 mile trip in the summer. Living in a moderate climate (couple snows a year, summers max out high 80’s for a month or two) and using the car so little, we’re considering running winter tires year round.

Think doing so will ruin them quickly? Your sage opinion welcomed!

Sajeev answers:

There’s a significant perk to not having a second set of wheels/tires when you only drive 8,000 miles annually: they’ll possibly “age out” before they run out of usable tread.

So check the Winter Tires’ tread-wear warranty, as some offer none.  But if you can get 40,000 miles like these Michelins, that’s a full 5 years of use!  And 5 years is close enough to the age out threshold for old rubber donuts.  So let’s see the pros and cons to running winter tires year round, given your low mileage usage:

  • Con #1: winter tires’ inferior performance when it gets hot outside, a significant concern depending on driving style.
  • Con #2: winter tires’ soft compound means more summer rolling resistance, which impacts fuel economy.  Maybe extra air pressure will offset?
  • Pro #1: dry rotted all season tires (that you pull out every spring) likely won’t perform well relative to newer rubber, either.
  • Pro #2: storing an extra set of tires (or wheels/tires) is a hassle and/or an unwelcome extra cost

Because you drive relatively low mileage annually, this is a tough one to give a definitive Yes/No answer. I’m leaning toward running winter tires year round, maybe just adding 2-3 PSI to each donut in the summertime.  (Which would be an interesting test to measure fuel economy losses-gains!)

Best and Brightest?

Send your queries to [email protected]com. Spare no details and ask for a speedy resolution if you’re in a hurry…but be realistic, and use your make/model specific forums instead of TTAC for more timely advice.

 

[Image: Honda]

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71 Comments on “Piston Slap: A Winter Tire for All Seasons? (Part II)...”


  • avatar
    retrocrank

    I used to have a similar situation, VW Jetta though. Bought it used, it needed new tires, so I put Blizzak WS50s on it. Don’t know if it hurt the mileage, I still routinely got 30-35 mpg. Never thought of the car as a sports car, so was not unhappy with the performance. Braking distances might have been a little longer but that might have been the car also – never felt unsafe though. I sure had the impression though that any decrements in non-winter were way offset by the benefit of being on a real snow tire in wintertime. In the five years/35k miles I drove that car, that one set of tires were still working well. Got terminally t-boned by an inattentive dolt….passenger side, I wasn’t hurt and fortunately the person behind me saw the whole thing so I got a new car at no cost out of the deal. So I can’t say how long that setup would have lasted…

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Sajeev, This might be the most hotly debated subject in auto circles, at least in northern climes.

    Last year, I purchased a set of ‘all weather’ tires for one of our family vehicles. The one that gets driven the least number of miles. Based exactly on the premise that if we went with 2 sets that they would age out.

    Well the ‘all weather’ tires are on a vehicle that is the same make, model and year as one of our other cars.

    The combined average gas mileage for the car with the all weathers is considerably worse, the all weather tires are not as good on ice, or on dry pavement. And they are slightly noisier than the ‘summer’ tires on the other car. Ironically they are a bit better on packed snow than the Michelin X-Ice tires on the other car.

    Despite all of the above, I may just swap another of our cars to ‘all weathers’, next year when it will require replacement tires.

    After all, I am getting tired of swapping and storing 4 sets of winter tires.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    If you drive on the highway on an 85 degree sunny day on your winter tires, you will change the rubber compound and have considerably less grip in all conditions.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      The noise from those winter tires will also be cacophonous. I had a rental Malibu in New Brunswick a few summers ago, and the rental agency left winter tires on the rear. That was awful.

    • 0 avatar
      Flipper35

      Depending on the tire. There was a test a couple years ago where they ran a Focus around a track and the lap times were not significantly different between all seasons to winter tires.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Just run all-season tires. They are safer and cheaper to run. Besides, I assume you already have AWD in the CRV.

    Winter tires are only good at one thing – winter traction. They have longer stopping distances in normal weather, worse cornering, worse ride quality, more noise, less treadwear, and much worse fuel economy. But they’re great for a few days of the year.

    I gave up swapping winters and all-seasons years ago because it’s a pain to store them and change them twice a year. And here in the Pittsburgh area, I’ve never even owned AWD in 40 years of driving.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      There is a considerable difference between all season and all weather tires.

      All weather tires are rated for winter use, are eligible for the winter tire insurance discount and are compliant with the compulsory winter tire legislation in Quebec.

      The greatest benefit of winter tires is that they provide greater stopping power at temperatures below +7 degrees C.

      And we all know that a great many studies have demonstrated that FWD with winter tires, performs much better in the winter than AWD with all season tires.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      The 7 degree C thing is a myth.

      http://www.skstuds.ca/2015/10/07/do-winter-tires-really-outperform-all-seasons-on-cold-dry-roads/

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        If it is a myth then why does every tire shop and web site list under 7C as the cut off for winters.

        If one lives in a mild climate one might not need winter tires.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        @rpn453: Thanks for that link. So based on the part of the site cut and pasted below, the 7 degree statement is a general guideline, used to warn drivers regarding when approximately to swap their tires? If they wait too late, or take them off too early they could meet the conditions warned about in the linked report.

        “If the ground is cold and the air is warm, a thin layer of ice could form on the road that would render any tire without a suitable rubber compound and adequate biting edges – particularly in the form of siping – ineffective. This is primarily a concern in the spring. In the fall, when the ground is still too warm for ice formation, bridges can be colder than the ground and become dangerously slippery with a thin layer of ice if the air temperature is near freezing.”

        • 0 avatar
          rpn453

          Yeah, I think somewhere between the engineers and marketers and salespeople the details of the recommendation have been exaggerated.

          For the average person who doesn’t obsess over automotive details like us, it’s better for people to have 90% of the possible grip all the time than 100% until it becomes 30% when they can’t get a last-minute booking at a tire shop.

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        I wasn’t there for the test, but I call shenanigans. The Pilot MXM4 is absolutely terrible when it gets cold. Family members have had two cars where those were factory equipment. Both cars slid on completely dry pavement under 32F almost like they were on ice. Same cars with winter tires never had an issue. Even a set of Hankook IceBears were fine in those conditions.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          Is it possible you’re confusing the Pilot HX MXM4 with the later Pilot MXM4? I don’t know if the MXM4 is better or not, but the HX MXM4 certainly didn’t have much to recommend it and was standard on a plethora of cars.

          • 0 avatar
            MBella

            The HX MXM4 is the one I’m talking about, but so is the test referenced. If you click the link to Car and Driver, they say as much.

            “Representing the mainstream is the Pilot HX MXM4, which is standard equipment on big-time sellers such as the Honda Accord and the Ford Fusion. “

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            If those tires were fairly new and in good condition with deep tread and minimal heat cycling, it’s possible that the rubber compound on those particular OE tires was compromised for the sake of fuel economy at the request of the vehicle manufacturer. As a common OE tire, I’m sure there are dramatic differences in properties between tire sizes. I see some are even low-rolling-resistance “Green X” tires, which is never a good thing for cold or wet traction.

            But maybe age is another factor to consider. After the rubber hardens due to multiple heat cycles, the siping probably would help to provide some bite on a rough paved surface, and a tire that is only used in winter shouldn’t be exposed to any serious heat cycles anyway.

            My own Pilot A/S tires had far more dry and wet pavement grip in cold temps than my winter tires when new but were quite poor near the end of life after a few years, including a few track days. At that point, it would make sense to put the winters on a little earlier and just go easy on them until the real winter conditions arrive.

            I’d suggest that the older a tire is, and the lower the tread depth, the better it is to avoid cold weather use.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Car and Driver has been spreading ignorance through misinformation to serve their sponsors for a long time.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            What’s your theory on the motivation behind Michelin paying Car and Driver to make their winter tires appear to perform poorly in those conditions?

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Maybe that’s the HX MXM4’s hot app. What I do know is that I’ve bought two new cars that came on them, and both cars were greatly improved by replacing them with Bridgestone RE960 Pole Positions and Continental ExtremeContact DWSs. Those tires have since been replaced with General Altimax RT43s and DWS06s, also without degrading performance and noise to the level of the Pilot HX MXM4 OEM tires. I’m saying this having been in the tire business and knowing just how well Michelin has historically met customer expectations and avoided wear pattern noise. The HX MXM4 was a miserable POS and an outlier from Michelin’s product line.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      “worse ride quality”

      I’ll disagree with that one. I can’t think of a single instance among my cars or family’s cars where the snow tire setup didn’t ride softer. And not just from a taller sidewall like you might think, but the actual softer rubber compound deals with small road imperfections better IMO.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        I agree with your disagreement. Winter tires tend to have very flexible single-ply sidewalls, allowing for plenty of deformation to keep the tread in contact with the road on bumpy snow and ice surfaces.

        And I think cold weather is the biggest influence in the perceived fuel economy disadvantage of winter tires. The primary factor is tread mass, and winter tires have a lot of tread void area and lighter tread carcass construction (and associated lower speed ratings) to accommodate the aforementioned deformation. High performance summer-oriented tires seem to adversely affect fuel economy more than winter tires.

    • 0 avatar
      Flipper35

      AWD does nothing to help you stop or steer, but it can help you back out of the ditch.

      In OP, they can probably stay home when it snows., though snow isn’t the worst thing to drive on. If it is a light snow I still take the car with BFG Comp TA 2 A/S and it gets around good.

      That said, I still prefer a winter tire and take the truck if it gets heavy, even though it is RWD. I used to get stuck in the driveway (and other places) all the time in the truck. With winter tires I only got stuck once when the snow was above the bumper and hard.

  • avatar
    bradfa

    I’ve run Nokian WRG4 tires on my Subaru Legacy now for about 20k miles (about 16 months) in western NY. They’re decent in the snow, better than a normal all season tire but not as good as a real snow tire, and decent in the summer too. My fuel economy has actually gone up by 1-2 MPG as compared to the OEM all season tires the car came with and as compared to the Firestone Winterforce tires I have previously run in the winters.

    Wet traction is very good all year. Dry traction feels less confidence inspiring than normal all season tires, but still feels safe.

    Only down sides are that they are loud like a snow tire all year round and that I don’t think they’ll be safe for snow use beyond about 35k miles even though they came with a 50k+ warranty (to 2/32nds) so they’ll only last me a little over 2 years. But the OP should get 4+ years of use out of such a tire, so that might be perfect. And the SUV version of the WRG4 is out now, too, which might better match the weight/speed rating needs of a CR-V.

  • avatar
    Dilrod

    I got to find out this summer. My sister-in-law has Blizzaks and I advised her last spring to get them swapped off. She hasn’t, but I worked on her car recently after hot summer driving and they look like they are holding up.

    On the other hand, last fall I put a different brand (I can’t remember it, but I know they are expensive) on our car. I looked at those at the same time and the treads seemed to be melting together in spots, or at least wearing fast! I got it into Discount Tire as soon as I could for some all-seasons.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Personally I’ve found that some of the newest tread patterns and silica enhanced compounds have made true winter tires almost unnecessary.

    https://www.liveabout.com/silica-enhanced-rubber-compounds-3234486

    I put silica enhanced all-terrains on my old F150 (2wd) and Highlander 4wd and found them to be extremely sure footed in the snow and on ice. No tire can repeal the laws of physics but they were superior to regular all-season or all-terrain tires and the bonus was not having to store tires or switch sets during the year.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    NO WAY. I’d 100% advise NOT running snows year round. Especially a “couple snows a year”….that doesn’t sound particularly severe.

    If you only want one set of tires, get an all season with a very high snow rating.

    I live in an area where we average over 70″ a year. The last few seasons we’ve nearly hit 100”. We nearly hit 175″ about 8-9 years ago (OK, you Michigan Yoopers, New York snowbelters, or high-mountain dwellers might laugh at our lack of snow)…. X-Ice or Blizzak are awesome in this stuff. Performance Winters (eg Michelin Pilot Alpin…not enough of a benefit for a dedicated winter tire IMHO). Winter tires in summer heat are terrible. Good-in-snow all-seasons are much more acceptable. Skip the performance snows. Either go summer + winter or an all-season with good snow performance.

    I’d also ask that based on the low miles you put on, and the fact you have only a couple snows a year, could you also adjust your schedule to simply avoid driving on most days with significant snowfall?

    I’ve run dedicated snows and swear by them…if you drive enough and it gets deep enough or where you have to drive (plowed and melted or snow packed?) and you can afford them. And yes that might mean throwing away aged-out tires.

    But I currently don’t have to drive much, I’ve skipped snows the last 3 seasons and bought General RT43s all seasons, and I’ve been honestly very pleasantly happy with them in the snow. But I did go looking for a quality tire in snow and ice as well as long lasting and well priced.

    I’ve heard good things about the Yokohama AVID Ascend GT. As well as the Pirelli Cinturato P7 All Season Plus.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I’m with Jerome. with an AWD CRV in your situation, I’d buy an all season with good ratings for snow (within the context of all seasons). General RT43 is likewise a go-to for me and my brother, he puts it on a ton of customer cars in Central PA. Good quality, Continental at a budget price-ish. Excellent wet performance, better than average snow, at a cost of being a bit noisier and a bit rougher riding (a bit, not a lot) as they wear in than some name brand all seasons.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      My ’15 Golf SportWagen TDI SEL had 18″ Pirelli Cinturato P7 all-seasons. They had great grip, but were noisier than I’d have liked. That might have been due to the particular size, though.

  • avatar
    Dan R

    Stop whining.
    get winter tires on steel wheels.
    You know.

  • avatar
    Big Smoke

    You can wear your STAN SMITH tennis shoes all year if you like.
    If you are in the snow belt? Expect some soakers.
    Boots in the snow, shoes in the summer.
    Birkenstock’s and socks. Never.
    Here, snow tires are not required. But my insurance company offers me a 5% discount. $2ooo ins x 5% = $100/year? x 5 years. Pays for most of the snow tires. And tires are a wear item anyway.

  • avatar
    Carrera

    I had luck with Nokian WG2 SUV…I think they moved to WG3 now like another poster said in a previous post.
    The only issue is, they wont last as long as a Michelin all season. All I got out of them on a Ridgeline was 35,000 miles. Also a bit pricy but sure beats the swap twice per year. While not as good as a dedicated winter tire, they were pretty good, better than all seasons.

  • avatar
    Mnemic

    There is a Uniroyal Tigerpaw that is technically a snowtire but in reality is just an aggressive all season. These were recommended for grandma’s malibu who wouldn’t be changing from winter to summer tires and wanted one that could do both with a tip towards winter. The car worked great in the snow and they didn’t melt off in the summer like a true winter or ice tire will.

  • avatar
    dusterdude

    Short answer – don’t run winter tires year-round, based on those summer temperatures..

  • avatar
    spookiness

    I had an early flavor of the Nokian W series “all weather” tire on a Protégé5 a decade ago, mounted on separate wheels as my winter tires. They were quieter and more comfortable than the OEM Dunlops, with no mpg penalty. But also 15′ vs 17′ so a lot more sidewall and not really an apples/apples comparison. Since then I have usually sought an allseason tire reputed to have the best winter traction. In my climate doing the changeover wasn’t worth the hassle.

  • avatar
    notapreppie

    If you only get a couple of snowfalls a year, go with a good set of all-seasons.

    If you want to try to straddle the difference, look into the Nokian WRG4.

    • 0 avatar
      six42

      Nokian also makes a cheaper sub brand, Nordman. I put those on my 2nd car (Maxima) which is 20 years old and moves only in bad weather. Nokian Hakk’s Are swapped out on the primary car.

      The Nordman were cheaper than the Nokian All Weathers and have performed well for the last two years through some fun winters with plenty of snow and -20C.

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        Just looked those up. They look like previous generation normal Nokians. Might be a good deal. I’d like to hear people compare them to normal Nokians and the competitors.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    As mentioned many times in many other articles, the cost of 2 sets (winter and summer tires) is generally no greater than with one set.

    1) 2 sets of tires mean your summer’s last twice as long. So if you drive average or above average annual mileage, you will have to buy tires half as often if you have two sets. So the cost of purchasing tires is a wash.
    2) You get an insurance discount for using winter tires.
    3) Since you are swapping tires, you don’t have to worry about rotating your tires. So again, a wash.
    4) You do have to buy another set of rims. But get steelies and you can easily sell them when you change cars. And this saves your ‘good’ rims.

    So no extra cost, no extra hassle, except for the storage space.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      What do you do about switching out the TPMS?

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        4 of our vehicles don’t have TPMS. I just left the ‘idiot light’ on all winter on the vehicle that does have it.

        • 0 avatar
          FormerFF

          TPMS has saved us a couple of times, alerting us of a puncture before the tire became visibly deflated. I wouldn’t want to do without it, and i certainly wouldn’t want my wife and daughters to do without it.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            If you are truly worried about safety then there are 2 better options.

            Either purchase all weathers (winter rated) unlike all seasons, or dedicated winters and the dealer/installer can reset you TPMS when they mount the tires each season.

            Both are better than having them driving on tires not meant for the road conditions.

      • 0 avatar

        ateq quickset

        TireRack carried it then stopped then carried it again. Hit or miss if it works and TireRack dropped it because of that. I have a 2011 CRV which needs to change over the codes. PITA. Sometimes it can take 20 minutes of retrying to get it to work. I have dedicated snows. Chinese product. Docs are horrible. Software came on CD-ROM and didn’t work. Found the software online. Your car might be in the menu but you might have to pick something close for it to work.

        I think from 2012 on all Hondas worked on the honor system concerning TPMS instead of feeding Hex Code values into the car via the ODBD II port.

        Let’s say your car is traveling 50 MPH and the car determines there’s a low tire. Whose tires can it be with low air other than your car. Pretty sure if I had a 2012 I wouldn’t need this tool.

        Check out some Youtube videos.

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      One of our local tire places will store your winter or summer tires on site. They will also swap ’em on your current rims. I have a set of winter tires there, waiting until November. Only way I can drive a Mustang all seasons in Michigan. It still isn’t a “great” car in the snow – maybe I should put some sand out in the trunk, but it’s bearable.

      Of course I grew up driving a 2WD Nissan truck here in Michigan so I’m used to RWD in the winter.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      I’ve never heard of an insurance discount for using winter tires.

      Two sets of tires – which I used to do – doesn’t necessarily mean your summers last twice as long. I ran winters only 3 months (mid-Dec through mid-March), living in the Pittsburgh area. This would be doubly true for the writer, who cited only “a couple of snows” each year.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        An insurance discount for winter tires is standard practice in Ontario. We have had it for years.

        As for swapping tires, do it around anytime between Halloween and Remembrance Day, and Easter, so approximately 5+ months on the winter. So yes, doubling the tire life.

        And it is not snowfall as much as temperature. All season and summer tires have a harder compound that at any temperature below 7 degrees celsius has seriously impacted performance. Winter tires key performance is improved stopping, not traction.

        As for the TPMS, I check the tire pressure manually every 2nd weekend. Have a portable pump/compressor with a digital read out that I keep in each vehicle. And have taught all of the kids how to use one.

        I believe that statistics demonstrate that the safety of winter tires, outweighs the safety provided by a TPMS. Mandatory TPMS is late coming to Canada.

        • 0 avatar
          six42

          I decline the discount in Ontario as the savings is minimal and ionotefer to change the tires when it makes sense based on temperature, not their arbitrary date. If the savings were better I’d consider, but the penalty for switching early or late isn’t worth it for me.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            As I am currently insuring 5 vehicles, the savings I get each year, is equal to approximately the cost of 2 ‘good’ or 3 ‘OK’ new tires.

            Still can’t get over that so many of the B&B have not grasped the difference between ‘all weather’ and ‘all season’ tires.

            ‘All weather’ are relatively new, and while they are year round tires, they are winter rated, carrying the ‘snowflake’ symbol. ‘All seasons’ are not winter rated. And therefore do not get the insurance discount nor are they legal for winter driving in areas that mandate winter tires, such as Quebec.

            Below is how Kal Tire’s website explains the difference:
            ‘You might be wondering why tires marked M+S (‘mud’ and ‘snow’), also known as all-season tires, don’t have the severe service symbol. That’s because all-season tires are safe for most conditions, but they’re not designed to give grip on ice or in sub-zero weather.

            In fact, all-season and summer tires become hard at temperatures below 7 C, leaving you with reduced traction and unsafe handling. The new symbol was created to distinguish winter tires from all-season tires.

            Now, there are all-weather tires marked with the peaked mountain and snowflake. Nokian, which pioneered the all-weather tire concept with the introduction of the Nokian WR in 2008, has just released its third generation with the WR G3. These tires are considered winter tires designed for year-round use.’

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    My daughter is taking her car to central Pennsylvania for school this year, and I’m getting ready to replace her Jeep’s tires with an all season tire that has the three peak winter service rating.

    I’ll let you know what she has to say next spring.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      State College?

      My brother lives there, he runs snow tires on both of their cars but that is more of a function of living out in the boonies with a 1/2 mile unpaved driveway to deal with. Most people get by absolutely fine with all seasons. If the Jeep is a more traditional SUV (GC, Liberty), General Grabber HTS for something fairly mild (quiet, good MPG), Cooper Discoverer AT3W is an all terrain with extra siping built in, my buddy put some on his ’02 4Runner and has been loving them, not too loud at all, MPG only took a minor hit.

      • 0 avatar
        FormerFF

        Yes. Her Jeep is a Patriot, and as such has a more carlike tire fitted. The best choice seems to ba the Goodyear Assurance Weatheready, which has gotten very good reviews.

        She’s in town, and if the weather gets too heavy, she can just stay put until the roads are cleared.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          I’d not heard of those weatherreadys, yes they look like they would indeed be a fantastic fit, tons of siping! I might actually consider a set of those for our Town&Country if I decide to not go with a dedicated set of snow tires.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    I bought an old beater Toyota T100 truck that came with winter tires. The car was my daily for two years, and I never changed the tires to all-season/summer.

    Of course the T100 was no performance vehicle, but traction did feel a littler looser/slicker than I would have liked.

    Same with a 2004 BMW 325i with RWD that I also drove for two years, the car couldn’t go anywhere in the snow until I got a set of Blizzaks. The previous all-seasons weren’t in the best condition, so, being cheap, I drove on the Blizzaks the next summer. When it was hot out you could tell, when taking a corner, that the softer compound made the rear a little sloppier.

    It should be noted I only drive ~6k miles a year so neither vehicles were seeing a lot of use. And neither were owned all that long, so I didn’t want to invest a lot of money into new rubber.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    You don’t need or even want a true snow tire for “a moderate climate” that gets maybe “two snowfalls per year,” regardless as to whether you drive 8,000 or 20,000 miles per gear.

    Any true snow tire is the wrong tool for the job in such a climate with that temperature envelope and # of incidents of frozen precipitation.

    The end.

  • avatar
    mikey

    The driving dynamics on my EB Mustang are completely different with the Michelin X winter tires. Here in southern Ontario winter tires are a must driving RWD..

    Would I run winters all summer ..? Not a chance.

  • avatar
    jalop1991

    There is but One Answer: Nokian WR.

    Not an all-season tire–no, it’s an all-weather tire. Rated for winter–complete with the snowflake emblem.

    NOBODY does tires for winter like Nokia. That they broke the code on having those tires perform well in summer, to create a single tire to solve the problem for millions of people who can’t/won’t go dedicated separate summer/winter rubber.

    Do not pass Go, do not waste $200. There is but One Answer.

  • avatar
    Newsy1904

    Consider the Michelin CrossClimate All Weather tires.

    https://www.michelin.ca/en/cross-climate-plus.html

    I put a set on my wife’s low km 2008 CRV after the previous Goodyear all seasons were getting low on tread depth. We have another vehicle with dedicated winter tires for heavy snow days so I wanted her to have something that was good for light snowfalls and slush days as well as good on cold (<7C) wet pavement like we get here most of the winter in Vancouver.

    The tires are no noisier, fuel mileage no worse, maybe better (hard to say – she has a lead foot), and the ride is softer (oooofff that CRV suspension).

    Consumer Reports has tested them and rated them "very good" in all categories, substantially better than the Nokian all weathers, particularly on wet pavement.

    .

  • avatar
    dwford

    If you only drive 8000 miles a year, why would you need snow tires at all? Chances are you are able to just stay home on the snow days anyway, so just get all season tires and call it a day.

  • avatar
    Michael S6

    Drive the winter tires until they need replacement and then change to all season tires. It’s a waste of time and money to have winter tires for several snowfalls per year.

  • avatar
    Michael S6

    Drive the winter tires until they need replacement and then change to all season tires. It’s a waste of time and money to have winter tires for several snowfalls per year.

  • avatar
    EAF

    Used a set of Blizzaks during summer months in the past. Didn’t notice any difference in handling, cornering, braking, acceleration, rolling resistance, etc.

    The drive wheels did suffer accelerated wear.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    For those who have to drive through real winters, put on minimal annual mileage, do not drive fast or aggressively, and do not change their own tires, running a single set of winter tires year-round makes sense to me. I have my elderly neighbors set up that way. We have 4 to 5 months of real winter every year where the roads are slippery every day, so even I would prefer a winter tire to an all-season here if I could only choose one. But I currently have four sets of wheels/tires for my car . . .

    Winter tires can perform adequately in warm weather testing. There was once a good comparison on Car and Driver’s site, but they edited the warm test out, as with almost all the test information I used to get from that site. I reference it here:

    https://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php/topics/780849/re-michelin-artic-alpine-studless-tires-summer#Post780849

    However, I would avoid the premium studless tires for this use. The heavy siping and soft compounds provide mushy handling and relatively poor performance on dry pavement. Cheaper winter tires – particularly unstudded studdable tires – tend to function better in summer conditions.

    Myself, I like to use up the last half of a winter tire’s tread in summer.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    “We have a 2007 Honda CRV with nice Continental winter tires mounted…”

    My life is better when I don’t drive Honda vehicles or ride on Continental tires.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Yes you’ll be fine on those tires year round. Just keep in mind that once they are down to 6/32″ of tread they are no longer suitable for snow use. From there on out they are summer tires.

  • avatar
    NoID

    I just made the decision to run Mastercraft MTX winter tires on my E-350 van year round, instead of swapping annually, because it’s no longer the daily family hauler. I figure we’ll still put 10k on it per year, but nothing like we were. So far the tires are holding up just fine over the summer, though they’re due for a rotation.

    Granted the MTX isn’t a very aggressive winter tire, and as a truck tire it’s already going to be more resilient than a passenger car tire, but it’s still nice to know that’s one less swap to worry about. I live in Michigan so I can count on a relatively short & mild summer compared to many other locales. We did drive to Florida in May and I didn’t notice either accelerated tire wear nor decreased fuel economy or performance, but then again the bruiser already can’t pass a gas station. I keep all four tires at 70 PSI (that’s technically 10 high in the front and 10 low in the back…but I never tow with it so keeping the rears at 80 seems silly and keeping the fronts a little high helps with wear and fuel economy.)

  • avatar

    I had this with a BMW which came on summer tires.
    I ran it a few seasons with the low profile summers, until I got tired of paying a wheelsmith, and a set of winter tires on a -1 setup.

    The winter tires save your summer wheels from moonscape, at least here in my area. At some point I did run the winter tires (Dunlop winter sport) into the summer. They are soft and mushy, and in my experience wear quickly . I eventually switched to all seasons (Conti DWS) and left it that way for the last four years or so of ownership.

    If you are going to do this, summer tires or all seasons, + winter tires on other wheels. The advantage is you can do winters on steelies, and laugh at the potholes…Also, there are times when it snows huge, and some people go out and drive far away…we are called skiers…

  • avatar
    rpn453

    I will point out that an H-rated Continental winter tire would probably be a performance winter tire, meaning that it is closer to a winter-capable all-season tire like the Nokian WRG than to the more winter-oriented tires. Like the WRG, it compromises some winter capability for dry road performance. It’s just not marketed the same way.

    In 2016, the NAF tested a Continental performance winter tire against the more serious winter tires. It was easily the worst in snow and ice conditions but also easily the best on wet and dry pavement. I would expect similar results from the Nokian WRG line.

    http://www.skstuds.ca/2016/10/14/the-english-speakers-guide-to-the-2016-naf-winter-tire-test/

    This is probably a decent tire in terms of warm pavement performance, for anybody who does not slide or spin their tires enough to tear the tread up.


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