By on July 19, 2019

Following a scathing analysis from the Detroit Free Press regarding Ford’s handling of their dual-clutch transmission troubles in the Focus and Fiesta, the company has apparently ordered dealerships to fix all affected cars for free, regardless of warranty status.

Automotive News is reporting that the company sent a memo out to dealerships instructing them to fix transmissions if the customer is having issues:

In the July 12 memo, Ford says dealerships should “arrange to diagnose the vehicle and repair as necessary.” The fixes can be applied to 2011-17 models, many of which are out of warranty.

Dealerships were also told to expect another update later today.

I personally own a 2011 Fiesta hatchback with the referenced dual-clutch transmission. I have also had quite a few issues with it, but not as many as some people I know. Nearly every repair was covered under warranty or the extended service bulletin. Unfortunately an issue I had earlier this year was out of even that coverage’s timeframe, meaning I had to pay out of pocket for the fix.

If this above memo is true, and it looks to be, I’ll hopefully not have to worry about footing the cost for another repair when I need it in the near future. In the business I’m in, my car spends a considerable amount of time sitting at airport parking. It’s a nice car for doing that and I’m not eager to get rid of it.

Once we learn more about the specifics of Ford’s memo and their plans we’ll be sure to pass them along to you. I’m not the only one with one of these vehicles and based on the Free Press’ report, there are people out there who desperately do need to get their cars into the shop and taken care of.

 

[Image: Ford]

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90 Comments on “Ford Ordering Dealerships to Fix Dual-clutch Fiesta and Focus Models: Report...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Ya think?

    That’s what I love about Ford they always give in to bad press, Windstar anyone?

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Free fixes are nice, but free loaners are better.

    And seriously, how much can the shop do with a crap design? These vehicles will be a warranty nightmare forever. 1980s GM 350 diesels come to mind, and that ended with total fleet replacement.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      Are you saying that GM replaced all those Oldsmobiles, Cadillacs and Chevy trucks?

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        Not that I’m aware of – a lot of people just dumped them, and others paid for conversion to gas engines. I knew two people that owned 350 diesels – a cousin of mine with a GMC pickup, and a friend’s parent that owned an Olds 98. Both of them had repeated issues (head gaskets, and the Stanadyne Roosamaster injector pumps) with them, and sold them at a loss.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        I didn’t type enough words…

        Should have said: “…that ended with total fleet replacement of those engines with 350 gas engines.”

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      That’s exactly what some of the shop guys quoted in the Free Press article said. Once you’ve had to replace the transmission three times, it’s probably not the shop’s fault. One mechanic was quoted as saying the replacement parts provided by Ford were only good for 10K miles, and then the car would be back in the shop.

      Still a miserable experience for any buyer that’s going to be without their car multiple times during the ownership experience.

    • 0 avatar

      Thats the problem with Ford – they do not give a damn, sorry, loaner and pay only for three rental days. And that “fix” may last 30 days (if more you can declare car a lemon). In contrast Subaru gave free loaner for a month – that much it took to “fix” failed transmission (at 100K miles).

  • avatar
    Best_Ever

    LOL love it. Any other company does this, “Good job on so and so for moving so quickly! Really shows how much they care about customers!”. Ford does it? OMG FORD SUCKS!

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      This is an issue Ford has known about for eight years and it took public humiliation for them to act. There are ’11 and ’12 models in junkyards because of this transmission. Buy a Ford if you want to, but Ford finally fixing cars that have been failing off warranty for five years isn’t going to un-shaft a bunch of their customers. Actually, fixing isn’t the right word. There is no fix. The dealers are just going to renew these clunky short-lived transmissions for the people who still have their crummy cars.

      • 0 avatar
        tomLU86

        What’s interesting is, a couple of weeks before the Free Press devoted 6 pages to Ford’s craptastic automatic trans, the Free Press devoted 4-5 pages to Jim Farley, overwhelmingly positive.

        Some one unfamiliar with the Detroit scene, or the auto industry, might think Farley was the next Alfred Sloane/Henry Ford/Soichiro Honda combined–what a guy!

        I felt the reporter who did the piece really overdid it.

        Perhaps, that was to butter up Ford, to ‘relax’ Ford, in preparation for this truly embarrassing article.

        And maybe Farley, to embellish his credentials, said “ladies and gentlemen, I know it’s not my job, but, we have to fix this! At Toyota, we would’ve replaced given the customers new, conventional transmissions”

        It would be funny if it wasn’t so pathetic.

        The Free Press expose also lends credence to the fact that Ford is abandoning small cars is because these are the Vega of our time.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        On top of that, go ahead and read the Free Press article from the people screwed by their cars built by Ford. People with 3-year old cars that they’re afraid to drive. Bumming rides from other people to get to work while the Fiesta sits in the driveway. Swapping cars with family matters so the kids don’t have to drive the Ford.

        Ford should be raked over the coals for this. Even Ford knows their small cars are so bad, it gave up on selling them in the US market.

      • 0 avatar
        larrystew

        I’m on my 4th? 5th? clutchpack in my 2013 Focus, so yes, Ford has known about this problem for years now and done nothing, because you’re right, there is nothing they can do except replace the sealed, unrepairable clutchpack. I nailed down the service manager during my last replacement, and he said all they do is check the specs, and if they’re out, they do a swap of the clutchpack. They send the old one back to Ford apparently. I’ve finally come to accept that I will simply have my clutchpack replaced every 1.25 years, which is the going timeframe before it begins shuddering again. I highly doubt Ford will offer buybacks when they still have thousands of dual clutchpacks just waiting for an eager Fiesta or Focus! Even though I have an extended warranty that should take care of any replacements after 100,000 miles, I hope that Ford is at least forced to offer a full warranty on these things for the lifetime use of the cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      Right? If this was Tesla folks here would give them a standing ovation. And don’t get me started on the Baruths hatred of Ford spewed all over this site. The bias against Ford is obvious.

      • 0 avatar
        DC Bruce

        Baruths’ hatred of Ford? Really? Jack Baruth did a glowing, gushy review of the Focus when it came out (not the ST, but the standard model).

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          He’s replying to the shill who claimed Ford doesn’t get a fair shake here, the same way GM shills say GM doesn’t get a fair shake here, and that Tesla fans say that Tesla doesn’t get a fair shake here. It’s called sarcasm. You can look it up.

          There must be a shill style guide, where they learn clever phrases like, “if this were anyone other than (insert name of your employer), everyone would be showering them with praise for (insert latest embarrassment of said employer)!”

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Every marque has its ‘fan boys’. Cognitive dissonance.

            And perhaps Deadweight might way in on how so many of them are purchasing parts from the same lowest price Chinese suppliers?

            This issue probably also confirms the bias of those who purchased 3 pedal vehicles.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Are saying fans experience cognitive dissonance when they find out that the company that made the car they loved as a kid is capable of unleashing death and economic destruction upon its customers? They’d actually have to believe that the company they support is in the wrong. I’m not seeing that from obvious shills who say their company doesn’t get fair treatment when they defecate in the bed.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            They don’t have to ‘believe that the company is in the wrong’. They may believe that it made an honest mistake, that it’s competitors will or have make bigger mistakes (what aboutism), or attempt rationalize their continuing support/faith in the company or the company’s ability to learn from/correct its mistake.

            I don’t believe that there are paid ‘company shills’ posting on TTAC, just committed ‘fans’ of or haters of different marques.

            “Cognitive dissonance (def): the state of having inconsistent thoughts, beliefs, or attitudes, especially as relating to behavioral decisions and attitude change.”

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    In the recent car shopping for Daughter No. 2 (The Used Car Search From Hell), I avoided the Focus and Fiesta because of the PowerShift DCTs.

  • avatar
    TR4

    Solution: manual transmission

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      A conventional 6AT will do fine. Hyundai’s is excellent, for example.

    • 0 avatar
      65corvair

      You’d think that would be true, but it isn’t. I had one with the manual transmission. It was overhauled under warrantee because all the oil leaked out. I never had any oil spots under the car in the garage, but the underside of the car was covered with oil, which they did a nice job of cleaning. Even if the transmission was good, the rest of the car was crap. Multiple front end and steering repairs. An electrical problem that put the car into limp home mode took months and countless trips to the dealer. A bad gas gauge from day one that Ford took six months to fix because they were working on a software fix. Had to replace the sending unit. Speedo was way off, but “within Ford specs”. I could go on but I won’t. Took a big hit and traded it at four years.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        I’ll be a counter point here. 42K on my Fiesta 1.0L 5 speed manual without a single problem apart from a Sync module that is not Fiesta specific. Fine car for what it is and consistent 38 mpg in winter, 42-43 in summer.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          The 6 speed manual in mine is pretty sweet too. Id never get an auto in any car like this. I had hope for the VAG dct, but I hate the one in my rental too.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          Russian Roulette is invigorating when you win.

        • 0 avatar
          eng_alvarado90

          That was the one to get. When I sold my Powershift equipped 2011 Fiesta (82K miles, no issues but the occasional jerk when taking off), I looked for used 3 cyl Fiestas. They were so hard to find. It was a shame such configuration was unpopular, although that was expected w/o Auto trans option. I really liked the car but I didn’t want to deal with trans issues down the line. I ended getting a 2010 Accord EX with a 5 spd (an unicorn on its own).

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        “but the underside of the car was covered with oil, which they did a nice job of cleaning.”

        Hey why’d you remove the free udnercoating?!

    • 0 avatar
      DJ None

      that is true, but i have to go and fix the Blend Door Actuator since it is making a knocking sound when i turn on the blower. i also have to see if the temperature sensor is screwed up and telling my car that it is overheating when it isnt.

  • avatar
    stangmatt66

    Fix them with what? New torque converter automatics?

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      Anybody got the scoop on what fails on these?

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      It actually would probably be cheaper for Ford to design, from scratch, a new torque converter auto for these used cars, than to replace the DCT in each one an additional 2-3 times.

      • 0 avatar
        tankinbeans

        Would a modified version of the Escape’s transmission fit? Or would it need to be approved for the smaller application? The Escape already rides on the Focus’ basic bits.

        • 0 avatar
          bumpy ii

          Supposedly the Escape box is too big to fit between the frame rails. The 6-speed auto from the Ecosport should work, though.

          “Hack your ride, hack your life!”

          • 0 avatar
            eng_alvarado90

            The 1.0 Ecoboost Focus already had a 6 spd conventional Auto. I think it was labeled as 6F15. Not sure if such transmission is the same as the Ecosport, but it should since both cars hav the NA 2.0 and 1.0 EB

  • avatar
    spookiness

    My ugly plasticky stop-gap facelifted 2010 Focus has been surprisingly solid. I’ve been telling people for years now, “of all the crappy used cars I’ve owned, this one is the best.” The interior still looks nearly new, pleather seats and all. Just had the old-school 4AT trans serviced for the second time. I’m at 118k now. It’s a shame Ford blew it with the 2012+. I’m a hatchback fan, and for a time would have liked one, but given my driving context, an autotrans is preferred.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      That opinion seems to be shared by a lot of owners of those “Gen 1.5” Focus. They’re hideous, basic, uncomfortable and outdated for their model year, but they’re dependable and simple.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        The first generation sold in the US had turn signals that could wake the dead! Several times while walking to and from my parking lot, I’ve heard the signals clicking in adjacent first-gen Foci with driver’s windows down, sitting and waiting to turn. It’s the first thing you notice in the cabin!

        That revamped car was reasonable. Not the greatest, but no penalty box either!

        Rode in a newer Focus for about a mile from the Enterprise lot to where my new Accord was waiting for pickup after having paint-protection film installed, the other day. No judders or anything out of the ordinary. My best friend and her husband bought a used 2017 Focus back in February, and haven’t had any issues with it that I know of.

    • 0 avatar
      eng_alvarado90

      That’s true, the Facelifted Gen 1 Focus (08-11) are pretty solid reliability-wise. Personally I don’t like the front end (the SES models with greyed’out accents looked the part), but mechanically they had every kink sorted out. The 2.0 is bulletproof with a chain driven camshaft and no DI. The 4F27 had always been solid and the 5 spd was enjoyable. Somehow the interior was better laid out than the 3rd gens, with more legroom to spare and easier controls.
      Better yet, they are dirt cheap nowadays. I’d have no trouble recommending those.

  • avatar
    MKizzy

    If you think the resale values of these permanently defective Foci and Fiestas is bad now? Just wait.

    The only people driving these in a few years will be low income suckers buying them off relatives and jack leg corner auto dealers.

  • avatar

    How they could not develop working transmission in 8 years (since 2011)? Let me guess – they laid off all experienced engineers and outsourced development to Chinese company or even better – to Indian contractors just fresh from (Indian) college. Whatever is cheaper.

    May be Ford is not capable of designing working transmissions but on the other side they have diverse workforce and promote accordingly.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      Is Getrag Chinese?

      Story is Getrag did not have enough time to engineer this properly. Ford, in a surprising act of competency, knew designing a working transmission was outside of their capability. But they demanded Getrag finish engineering when far more was needed.

      This is similar to the 6.0 Diesel engine issues. Because of Fords demands, the product they bought from someone else was crap.

      • 0 avatar

        Thats the difference between American and Japanese companies. Americans expect suppliers to do miracles for below minimum rate and do not give a damn about how it could be possible in real physical world while Japanese take into account the reality and work together with supplier to achieve their goals. I do not know what Ford’s goal was – to get transmission that pretends that works occasionally and in process try to bankrupt Getrag.

      • 0 avatar

        I pretty sure that Getrag already had well designed transmission but Ford demanded to cut corners, cheapify design, use substandard materials to cut the cost.

        • 0 avatar
          geozinger

          “…while Japanese take into account the reality and work together with supplier to achieve their goals.”

          Takata.

          Or has the domestic hate train forgotten about this already?

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            That or people aren’t blinded by hatred to the point that they lose proportionality. How many scandals against the UAW3 is Takata supposed to excuse? They all used Takata air bags too, or did you forget?

          • 0 avatar
            geozinger

            Takata is the supplier who falsified documents (remember Honda played along, too) certifying their products as meeting standards. The domestics used them because they were told they were good.

            I just like to point this out when the Japanese saints get mentioned. Along with bad Honda odometers, Honda motors not meeting SAE standards, Toyota gas pedals (or floor mats, take your choice), Toyota rusty truck frames, shaky Sienna sliding doors and sludgy motors…

            No, no loss of proportionality here. Just keeping it fair and balanced.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Toyota frames were made by a UAW supplier who falsified rustproofing treatments. The floor mat fiasco was a perfect storm of user error and a crooked regime in DC beholden to the UAW and ambulance chasers.

            What are SAE standards for engines? Is this the same SAE that picks a bunch of lemons to bestow engines of the year awards on half the time?

        • 0 avatar

          This. Automatic Transmissions aren’t new technology, I’m reminded of the adage you can have it done right, done fast, or done cheap, pick any two….

          Somewhere there’s a memo ” $50 transmission”….

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            This is the company that told their tire suppliers to get the cost of a tire down to the retail price of a Dominos pizza on what was then their most profitable model line.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Certainly sounds like what could have been happening in the last round of Ford layoffs. “Diversity,” and all that garbage!

  • avatar
    theoldguard

    I had two of these PowerShud-d-d-er transmissions. Clutch packs pulled on both. I used to follow the treads on the Focus Fanatics website. I don’t think Ford can fix it. There have been several models of fixes. I believe they were on “G” when I stopped following it.

  • avatar
    ABC-2000

    I don’t understand why it took that long?
    Back in June 2011, I was looking for a new car to replace a 2006 Mazda 3 hatch, I went to my Ford/Mazda dealer to test drive the brand new 2012 Focus, I drove it for about 30 min, it was clear to me that something is wrong with that AT, so, I got a 2011 Mazda 3 hatch instead and only after a few month I realized how lucky I was since Focus owners start complaining about that AT.

  • avatar
    Kenn

    I used to know someone who believed large companies are typically run by sociopaths. As time goes on, I do believe he was right. And now, I’m remembering all the dealer excuses for what should have been warranty fixes for various vehicles I’ve owned, always an argument for any kind of potential warranty work, from “We weren’t able to replicate the issue” (until I personally take the service manager for a drive), to “They all do that” or “It’s within factory specs, there’s nothing we can do,” or “You caused the problem because you… “(accused of doing something I never do). And I feel the anger returning…

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      That’s a bit short sighted. Dealers only get paid by the manufacturer if the issue falls within a certain criteria.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Studies have demonstrated that sociopaths do tend to get promoted more and to higher levels in large corporations.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        What do you know about monkeyspheres? It could be that having responsibility for the well-being of more people than your brain and recognize as individuals makes you act like a sociopath. This is also why only local governments should have any level of authority over individuals.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          No opportunity to edit the above comment, which should say, “It could be that having responsibility for the well-being of more people than your brain can recognize as individuals makes you act like a sociopath.”

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    You bought a garbage car from a company known to make garbage products and, at the time, had a moron CEO that only know how to turn a profit by eliminating any sort of quality or reliability and people have the audacity to be upset at Ford?

    It’s a Ford people what did you expect? You are getting what you paid for

    • 0 avatar
      Best_Ever

      “You are getting what you paid for” A fixed car that otherwise performs well and meets expectations? Great job Ford!

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        You think any of this will actually fix the issue?

        You think Ford has any clue as to what they are doing?

        This will not fix the cars. The only thing that will fix them is replacing the DCT with a traditional automatic.

        You realize that, despite multiple class action lawsuits around the world in which they lost, Ford is STILL blaming the customer, shoddy reporting, etc for this being such a big issue right?

        “In its lengthy response, Ford admitted that the transmissions experience “a degree of vibration, or shudder” but that the vibration is “effectively a tradeoff for the higher level of fuel efficiency” and there was no negative effect on durability or safety.”

        “Addressing the claim of sudden acceleration, Ford says it has “not seen that occur with the DPS6” and there is no engineering cause-and-effect basis for the allegation.

        “Ford has been persistent in addressing these quality problems,” the company said. “We have gone to great lengths investigating the issues, alerting dealers and consumers, recommending and making repairs, and extending warranties. Resolving the problems took longer than we expected. We regret the frustration and inconvenience this has caused.”

        The automaker claims the Free Press declined an invitation to talk with engineers and wrote a story based on information “shopped to reporters by attorneys attempting to call attention to an old topic.””

        But again, when your business model is “profits now, recalls/class action lawsuits later”, you just know this kind of crap is going to happen. Alan Mulally was a buffoon. And the desk salesman they have now is no better.

        This is what happens when you buy Ford products.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          This makes me think of Chrysler’s responses to Clarence Ditlow regarding the A604 DisasterDrive transmission. “Accolades, not criticism” should be expected for this design. I nearly passed out from laughing so hard.

  • avatar
    ericb91

    Ford service advisor here. These things are so annoying. Customers are pissed and get all upset at the dealership when it’s a bad design. My trans guy probably does a dozen of these a month, maybe more. Doesn’t sound like a lot but they pay 5-8 hours labor. He’s obviously very good at them because it’s basically all he does anymore but it’s definitely annoying.

    Today is actually my last day as a Ford service advisor; I’ll be starting at a Honda dealer at the end of the month. I’ve been with Ford for three years and this trans is nothing but bad news.

    I will say the Focus 1.0L 3cyl EcoBoost with the 6-speed conventional automatic is actually quite nice and would be an excellent daily driver. The PowerShift is just garbage, unfortunately.

  • avatar
    Michael S6

    Ford should just buy back these cars and end this nightmare for it’s customers and itself. This way the customers will get most of the money rather than the law firms.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenn

      Buying cars back would be nice, but Ford, we may remember, is the company that took its lawyers’ advice to not recall the Pinto for its proclivity to burst into flames upon impact from the rear, but rather, to simply pay and gag those who decide to sue the company for damages. Doing what’s right for its customers (for virtually all large companies) is not foremost in their executives’ minds.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Ford has the biggest executive suite MORONS running the show – they are d!ckheads and incompetent morons only rivaled by their cross town cohorts at Guangzhou Motors.

    The Detroit Free Press article already cited internal’docs proving that these transmissions can’t be “fixed” -‘they are inherently defective in from a design defect manner.’Replacing them is only a short term solution, and they will catastrophically break again in 5,000 to 15,000 miles. Senior dealership service supervisors have complained in written correspondence to Ford HQ about this.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      Ford and Tesla are equal in terms of quality, reliability, and having morons running the place

      GENERAL Motors, despite recent blunders (new trucks) is far better

    • 0 avatar

      I rarely have much sympathy for anyone in the dealership organization, but having to look at folks, sincere working pissed off people, day after day, with the same complaint, that you KNOW isn’t them, and you KNOW is [email protected] product, and you can not let them know “yes, it’s crap, sorry”….

      Nor can you fix it….period.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    “The only thing that will fix them is replacing the DCT with a traditional automatic.”

    Why? There are plenty of good dual clutch transmissions in existence. (Two of our three vehicles have them; the other is a stick). The fact that Ford have f’d theirs up doesn’t mean that a traditional auto is the only fix.

  • avatar
    Mathias

    This story doesn’t make a lot of sense. I read the Free Press article. One of the things I learned is that Ford does not have a fix and isn’t confident they will find one.
    Apparently, the car got rushed to production, and decisions like using dry clutches caused the problems. It’s worse in the Focus than the Fiesta, because the car is a lot heavier. So this latest move sounds like pure Kabuki on Ford’s part.

    One thing I don’t get: My dad owns a 2008 Ford C-Max turbo Diesel with an automated manual. This is not a U.S. model. I warned him not to buy it, because of all the short-distance driving he does, but so far — it’s been like 5 years — no problem at all. The transmission is fantastic, much as I’d prefer a real manual. The thing shifts when it should, is smooth, none of the problems of this one. It’s impressive. How could they screw the new one up so badly, then?

    • 0 avatar
      eng_alvarado90

      Your C-Max has a different kind of Powershift transmission, that one operates with a wet clutch, similar to VW’s DSG and is much more reliable.
      For smaller cars like the Focus and Fiesta powered by gasoline engines, a dry clutch powershift was later revealed, of course the reason was to reduce costs; that’s the one presenting issues.

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    “I used to know someone who believed large companies are typically run by sociopaths. As time goes on, I do believe he was right.”

    How do you know the company I work for?

  • avatar
    theoldguard

    One of my two PowerShud-d-d-ers was a 2012 Focus. After a few years I gave it to my son in college. He said anytime someone else drove it (that wasn’t supposed to happen) they thought they had broken the car. He wrecked it (a college student wrecks a car?) and as soon as I found out no one was hurt, I was happy. For everyone with PowerShud-d-d-er problems, there is really only one way to fix it. In the scrap yard it works fine.

  • avatar
    geo

    A new Focus was a multi-year commitment and a great expense for many buyers. To buy a vehicle is, in a sense, to put your life and much of your financial security in the hands of the automaker. You’re committing to pay large sums of your hard-earned money, plus you’re using the vehicle to get to work to earn it.

    Because of Ford’s utter incompetence and traditional Ford distain for entry-level vehicle buyers, hundreds of thousands have suffered financially and emotionally. Many physically.

    Every Ford exec with any hand in the PowerShift issue should, at worst, be imprisoned. At best, they should never again be allowed to be involved in the auto industry again.

    Perhaps then domestic executives would finally grasp the seriousness of what they’re involved in. This was NOT okay.

    I will never, ever buy a Ford again.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Can you imagine what the auto industry would be if they jailed every exec that ever tried to pull a fast one? I would say they’d all be in jail, maybe that’s not such a bad idea if it means the consumer gets a better, safer car

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        I’m going to say that GM would have never put an ignition switch into production that they knew was defective. Ford would have never started delivering transmissions that they didn’t know how to make work. I don’t have a problem with that as opposed to our system of executive compensation in the tens of millions per year in exchange for making the tough decisions to kill customers for short term profits.

      • 0 avatar
        geo

        The “invisible hand” of the free market is supposed to eventually take care of issues like this, and in a sense it is; Ford is being forced out of the car market.

        My sense of justice is violated when I see how the executives responsible for this catastrophe remain happy, wealthy, and gainfully employed.

        There are no excuses for how incompetently-run the big three have all been. The marketing, the engineering, the design, everything.

        But the execs responsible bask in retirement glory and blame “the unions” for the problems they created themselves.

        If the free market can’t bring any sort of justice for the victims of endless domestic Lemons over decades, then perhaps the government needs to; especially if a company exists because of government intervention.

        It sickens how people buy domestics out of goodwill and a desire to “buy American”, and they’re endlessly robbed of their money, time, health, and sometimes their lives.

        I’ve rooted for the domestics since I was a kid. No longer. I’m done.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          The government is the reason the free market doesn’t work. There would be no more GM or Chrysler without government intervention, and there would be new vehicle manufacturers entering and leaving the market constantly without regulatory barriers to entry. Tesla only came into being because of DOE loans and rent-seeking opportunities created by regulations. Without government interference in markets, we’d have new car companies which make vehicles people would pay for voluntarily.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            In theory, however in practice whenever government restrictions have been removed the ‘free market’ has entered into a ‘bubble’ then burst.

            And created insufferable levels of income disparity.

            Or as per Chris Brown’s post in Quora:
            I hate to be the one to break this to everyone, but Adam Smith only mentions the “Invisible hand” 3 times in all of his works and only once in the Wealth of Nations

            “Adam Smith suggested the invisible hand in an otherwise obscure passage in his Inquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations in 1776. He mentioned it only once in the book, while he repeatedly noted situations where “natural liberty” does not work. “Let banks charge much more than 5% interest, and they will lend to “prodigals and projectors,” precipitating bubbles and crashes. Let “people of the same trade” meet, and their conversation turns to “some contrivance to raise prices.” Let market competition continue to drive the division of labor, and it produces workers as “stupid and ignorant as it is possible for a human creature to become.”

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            If you really think the boom/bust cycle is bad, you should see what unfunded government obligations are going to do to our civilization. You just might have time to figure out the causal relationship before your belief that governments consist of better people than businesses costs you your life.

  • avatar

    Looks like all those people lamenting the “outdated Americanized” ’08-11 Focus in favor of the new “correct European” one are the real fools now. Those are truly the Cutlass Cieras of the second decade of the 2000s.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      How about the people who bashed the 2012 Civic in favor of the 2012 Focus?

      • 0 avatar
        geo

        1998
        Ford gets their compact car right, but it’s become outdated.
        Ford introduced the new Focus, which shames its competitors in every way. Sales take off.
        Customers find that Ford has heavily cut corners, resulting in endless, frustrating trips to the dealer.
        The Focus’s Euro reputation goes into the Euro trash.

        2012:
        Repeat.

        Never again will Ford be trusted. When trucks inevitably go out of style, Ford will be done.

        Ford and GM make me wonder if America is truly a third-world country with a nice infrastructure.

    • 0 avatar
      eng_alvarado90

      Actually, the lamenting was more about not getting the 2nd generation sold elsewehere (even more about those sweet ST and RS 2 door HB with the I-5). Since I live near the border, I have seen quite a few 2nd gens with Mexican plates. I drove a 2nd gen Focus and it was a nice little ride. The owner has owned it for 10 years and he has only replaced batteries, tires and brakes. It has the same gas engine and transmission from the warmed over 08-11 North American Focus, it just looked way better and handled a bit tighter.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Ugh – I just read the Freep article and it was damning.

    ::looks at his own Mustang:: at least I got the manual, oh wait!

    • 0 avatar
      RideTheCliche

      I had a 2011 Mustang with the “Getrag” MT82. That piece of garbage transmission ruined what was an otherwise excellent car. It was my first Ford and I absolutely loved everything else about that car, but 5 visits to the dealership with various explanations of “You’re driving it wrong” “Could not replicate” and “They all do that” wore me down to the point where I just wanted to get clear of the vehicle, which I did after 18 months. Even under mildly-spirited driving I could not get a clean shift from 1st to 2nd without a grind, or worse yet, throwing the shifter from 1st to 2nd and having it stop mid-way, as if the gate into 2nd disappeared. The ‘fix’ is to wait a half-to-full second between the neutral-to-2nd part of the throw

      Surprise! The MT82 is built in China under a joint-venture with… Jiangling?

      Thanks to this and the terrible dealership experience I will never own another Ford, and if anyone asks I make sure they know about my ownership experience. Ford screwed me to the wall so I’m happy to return the favor.

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