By on May 14, 2019

As much as it pains us to say it, manual transmissions are on their way out. While car enthusiasts bemoan the matter incessantly, as we just did, the reality is that most drivers aren’t interested in owning something with a stick. It’s gotten to a point where many automakers no longer offer vehicles with a manual transmission, or just keep one high-performance model around with an optional clutch pedal just to appease a subset of their customer base.

Toyota, which sells more manual models than most, recently spilled its guts to CarBuzz after the outlet requested the company reveal the percentage of its new cars still sold with a manual while attending the Supra launch event.

The resulting figures are about what you’d expect. 

At the time of this writing, Toyota still sells manual variants of the Yaris, Corolla, 86 coupe, and Tacoma pickup — albeit not in every trim. However, the world’s most prolific automobile (the Corolla) saw less than 1 percent of U.S. buyers opt for a manual transmission in 2018. Toyota spokesperson Nancy Hubbell said that breaks down to roughly 2,800 vehicles. “It’s not very high for the Corolla as a whole, but it is better if you just count the hatchback,” Hubbell said, adding that roughly 15 percent were sold with a stick.

Once again, hatchback owners prove themselves to be the real automotive enthusiast — or perhaps this author’s disgusting bias is showing. Still, it should be said that Toyota intentionally positioned the new-for-2019 hatch as the more performance-oriented choice, even if we were to go by looks alone. It’s possible the company could boost those manual numbers a bit if it found a way to run with the hatch’s diet-performance image while adding some power, but without breaking the bank.

The 86, which you might expect to have a more even split, as it is quite literally an enthusiast car, only saw a third of its brethren shipped with a stick in 2018. Considering that a six-speed manual was supposed to be part of its overall appeal, and that stick-shift models actually boast five additional horsepower, this was quite the surprise.

Meanwhile, the Yaris and Tacoma saw around 5 percent of U.S. customers choosing to row their own gears in 2018. That breaks down to about 12,280 pickups and just 97 examples of the itty-bitty hatchback.

2020_Tacoma_TRD_Off_Road_01_50A9E609C6722DED1EB517DDEAC1D10E71825716

With that in mind, it should be no surprise as to why Toyota decided against providing the Yaris with a manual option for the 2020 model year and has already relegated clutch pedals to well-equipped Tacoma TRDs with the beefier V6.

Yeah, yeah. We know you hate it. But the manual is living on borrowed time, continuing to lose prominence as fewer and fewer adults bother to learn how to drive stick. We’re just glad some manufacturers still bothering providing them, as there’s not much of a financial case to be made anymore.

[Images: Toyota Motor Corp.]

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96 Comments on “Here’s How Many Manual Transmission-equipped Vehicles Toyota Sold Last Year...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I drove a stick for most of 33 years until 2012, and I don’t miss it. But when I step into a friend’s car to drive a stick, it’s like putting on old shoes.

    My preferred transmission these days has 1 speed.

    • 0 avatar
      Matt Posky

      If the industry hype is to be believed, that’ll likely be all of our futures. Not terrible but I’m a real whore for variety. Fortunately motorcycles are cheap and half stuck in the dark ages so I’ll be okay for the foreseeable future in terms of “driving” engagement.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      @SCE: My preferred commuter vehicle has one speed too! Actually, it’s closer to a manual than an automatic since regen gives you the engine braking effect. Its garage-mate (that I rarely talk about here) has a manual, but never sees commutes. Only country roads and highways outside of commute hours.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      In traffic the EV provides so much better of a driving experience.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Corolla simply doesn’t resonate with enthusiasm. Its more like fridge to many people

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    The last Toyota I test-drove with a manual was the Scion tC, would have been a 2013 I believe (the most recent generation before the car was cancelled) and it was impossible to drive smoothly. How much of the lack of interest in manuals comes from the fact that they’re hit or miss in terms of driveability? Had my Kia from 2011 been my only experience driving a manual I would have given up. It wasn’t until I got into my 2013 Focus that I started feeling really confident and comfortable.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      “Impossible” just means you need some practice. People manage to “drive” unsynchronized-transmission diesel walk behind tractors smoothly, given some practice. And those things ain’t no modern Toyota.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        The question is why you should, though, when a computer can do the job nearly perfectly (and its attention never lapses).

      • 0 avatar
        tankinbeans

        While I generally agree, if a random buyer coming in off the street wants buy a car he’s going to form his first impression based on that test-drive. If the car is difficult to drive smoothly during his test-drive he’s not likely to buy it so he can practice. He’ll March over to the automatic and plunk down his cash.

        I’ve only had such an experience test-driving 2 manuals, a 2014 Cruze with the 1.8 and later a 2013 tC. I discount my troubles with the Kia because it was my first manual.

        The day I test drove the tC I also drove an 07 Acura TL. I was able to drive that smoothly right out of the gate.

        Every other manual I’ve personally driven have been smoother than the tC, Cruze and Forte.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Some cars are definitely easier to drive smoother than others with at stick, many factors at play but throttle calibration and clutch travel/bite-point are the big ones. My dad’s ’07 Fit is truly difficult with it’s on/off clutch and awkwardly suspended pedals (for people with larger legs and feet). My 2012 Civic was a dream, except if you had the A/C on, then you had to factor in a noticeable amount more throttle to get moving. My recently departed A4 was super easy once you got used to where the clutch’s up-take point was. A lot of newer cars also suffer from throttle-overun due to emissions-related tuning of the “drive by wire” throttle bodies.

          • 0 avatar
            vvk

            Easiest manual to drive smoothly I have ever tried was the 1988 Volvo 240 Wagon I drove to Alaska. That car was impossible to stall. My 1986 SAAB 900 was also very easy to drive smoothly. And so was my E46 325i. The hardest by far was a Mitsubishi Galant VR4 I almost bought and had for a few days. That car had nothing below 2500 rpm. Terrible driveability.

  • avatar
    saturnotaku

    I had my manual transmission phase back in the day, then I got a job where the commute was an hour each way on a good day. The love affair ended quickly thereafter.

    • 0 avatar
      Robotdawn

      Yes, commutes have a way of dampening the enthusiasm. My last stick was a Verano, which I loved until my commute changed from 10-15 minutes taking it easy to 45 minutes if I timed things just right.

      That I honestly I always thought half the fun of a stick was wringing maximum performance out of whatever anemic 4 cylinder we were cursed with for much of the 90s and 2000s. It’s not much fun when you can get to freeway speed about the time you shift to 3rd.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Doesn’t the 2020 Corolla and Corolla hatch come with a “rev matching” manual?

    Corolla SE with manual trans and 2.0 seems like a decent combo.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    It’s really hard to hear that a small, dedicated sports car like the 86 leans so heavily towards automatics. Underpowered cars like that are absolutely where you need to control your own shifting.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryan

      I’m glad I read the comment section before posting. You and I would have had an identical post, had I not. I’ve had the pleasure of driving a coworkers Subaru BRZ. I walked away so impressed. Toyota only selling 1/3 of this wonderful platform with the manual? At this rate, I won’t have a manual option with my next commuter vehicle. Sadly…

    • 0 avatar
      Richard Chen

      Only a 33% manual take rate? IIRC that’s getting close to Corvette territory.

      • 0 avatar
        Mathias

        I didn’t even know the 86/BRZ was available with an automatic. What’s the point of that?
        Reminds me of a friend of mine giving me a ride in her sister’s CRX in the late 80s… fuming about the transmission.. “she castrated the car” is how she phrased it.

        • 0 avatar
          Pete Zaitcev

          The 6sp in the 86 is tuned quite well, as good as MX-5’s actually. And it’s not all that heavy: you’re only losing a shade under 20 kg. I might have gone for it (if their headroom didn’t suck so much), because in most cars I cannot heel-toe anyway.

          The biggest remaining advantage of the manual transmission, in my view, is that the car is easier to modify. In my previous car, the main computer controlled both engine and transmission. People putting superchargers on it reported a heap of trouble with programming: rough shifts, flaring, all kinds of odd behaviors.

  • avatar
    deanst

    I remember the good old days when half of Honda Accords sold came with a stick. Wonder what the ratio is today….

  • avatar
    65corvair

    I bought my manual ’14 Accord with a stick. It’s great. I wonder how many of those are out there. I’m thinking in about five years when it’s time to trade Honda will have discontinued them. It should have 25 more good years in it! Hope I do.

  • avatar

    On the Toyota Corolla, both old and new model, the manual transmission is only offered on the SE trim. This means it difficult to find a manual on the dealer lot as most are automatic.

  • avatar
    Mike-NB2

    I’ll hit 53 soon and drive a manual-equipped car. If it’s at all possible, I’ll drive one until I die of old age. That’s unlikely though.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      If you’re willing to drive something sporty, I suspect you will be able to get a Mustang or Camaro with a manual transmission for quite a while to come. If you’re looking for a sedan or crossover/SUV, things may get tough.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    I wonder what percentage of drivers under age 30 can drive manuals?
    I know that (and drug testing) is a big issue in recruiting truck drivers.

  • avatar
    wayneoh

    As traffic congestion has increased since the Mouse arrived in sunny, Central Florida, the fun of driving a stick shift has diminished greatly.
    I haven’t had a stick in over 20 years and my left knee thanks me.

    • 0 avatar
      Carrera

      I agree. I live in Central Florida as well but most of my commute is on the B-line and work is right off the B-line. If I had to be stuck every day in Orlando crappy traffic no way I would drive a manual.I have gotten stuck in slow moving traffic on the 528 for 20-25 miles and I didn’t like it.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      When you hope to shift it as little as possible, you may be a bigger fan of automatics.

      A manual trans makes heavy traffic/congestion “lively”. Yeah it’s not a mountain road you’ve got all to yourself to carve out, but there’s no need to make excuses. No one’s gonna revoke your Man Card.

  • avatar
    ABC-2000

    I just don’t get it, a Corolla with a stick? what’s the point?
    I had 2 Mazda 3’s, both with the 6 speed A/T, the transmission was so good in both that I wondered why so many people get the 3 with a manual.
    I drove a Kia Ceed manual in Iceland, it made a lot of sense, first it was a diesel (gas is very expensive in Iceland) and second, I did not encounter any traffic for 10 days there.
    My current car is an Accord 2.0T with the 10 speed auto, 5 month in and it’s hard to decide how much I like it, there are some rough shifts in lower gears, slowing down the car with the paddle shifter is not super efficient since you need to get to 5th gear for it to be effective and if you travel at 60mph, that require hitting the pedal 4 or 5 times (assuming your at 10th gear) and….in sport mode, it will upshift on it’s own at 6500 RPM.
    Time will tell, many people say the rough shifts go away at about 6 or 7k miles.

  • avatar
    Carrera

    It was impossible trying to find a new Corolla S with a manual transmissions. Most dealers weren’t even interested in trying to find one for me unless I put a deposit down. So I started my search for a used one within 150 miles from my house. After about 5 months I found one and bought it. Slightly used with only 9,000 miles. Three years and 100,000 miles later and I still enjoy the manual. It makes driving the Corolla slightly more tolerable. I couldn’t take the droning of the CVT.

  • avatar
    Bill Wade

    I bought a Sportwagen with a stick. Quite enjoyable to drive and I’m 67.

  • avatar
    sooperedd

    It sucks to get stuck in bumper to bumper traffic driving a stick..really sucks.
    The automatics in these small cars have improved a lot over the last 30 years.
    Clutches used to be much cheaper to replace than an auto trans, not so much anymore.
    7 and 8 year auto loans allow you to get vehicles with much more content.
    Plus with a stick I can’t fiddle with the touchscreen or my phone as much!!

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    Almost 30 years of driving and only two of them have been with a car with an automatic. Call me a die hard, but through knee and shoulder surgeries, the stick shift remained. I just like being able to control the feel of a car a lot better through a manual and clutch, regardless of long commutes and aches and pains.
    I’ll still be that one guy scoping out the car lots for the one straggler (or the performance model) of the one remaining model with a stick shift. Resale value be damned, I’ll drive it until the wheels fall off with a smile on my face.

  • avatar
    CammerLens

    Diehard stick-shift guy here. I bought a 2018 Accord 2.0T 6MT specifically because it’s one of the last powerful manual-transmission sedans available.

    My commute is in hellacious L.A. traffic, and I still prefer the manual. Something about the mechanical engagement with the machine satisfies me the way no automatic can, and I think it helps make me a more attentive driver.

    I recognize that I’m an oddity, and that in a few more years the manual will cease to exist except in rare niche market cars.

    • 0 avatar
      iNeon

      What mechanical engagement/connection exists in today’s hydraulically-dampened clutch systems?

      They’re automatic turntable arms now— not wholly controlled by the pedal.

      That’s why everyone questions how to drive them effectively or smoothly. They REQUIRE throttle blipping by the lean fuel mix and the dampening in the clutch system.

      When I had the: air-cooled VWs, Volvo 245 or neon DOHC, I could walk away from a stop without throttling the things— idle was rich/high enough to not stall. My PT Cruiser, Dart Turbo and Compass 4×4 have all had dampened clutches and they’ve required douchebag revving to leave a stop.

      Its kind of gross.

  • avatar
    ajla

    2pedals4ever.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    There has been at least one manual in my driveway since my first vehicle. This will never change

  • avatar
    stuki

    15% take rate for the Corolla hatch, is pretty darned good. I’m surprised the Taco isn’t higher than 5%. Wonder how much of that, is due to how thin they are on the ground.

    The idiotic ban on Amazon selling cars online, or anyone else selling them nationwide, is partly to blame for the demise of manuals. Smaller dealers will rarely bother keeping a low volume variant on the lot. While for Amazon, even a small share of volume, means lots of cars in absolute numbers.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    I like the two pedals in my F-150. I also like the three pedals in my CTS-V. Spread the love, man. I think that one reason that SUVs are taking over ( without mentioning the Baby Boomers ) is that many people – young families and the like – are getting one expensive car for the price of two, cheaper cars that satisfy different needs and desires. I get calls monthly from friends needing a truck for an afternoon – and they all want to take my Caddy for a burn. They, to a family, have one or two SUVs and no trucks or ‘fun’ cars. Obviously, my answer is a hard ‘No’ to borrowing my truck. Rent one or buy one, boys, and a harder ‘No’ to hooning my Caddy because you miss your M3. My truck and car cost less than a new MDX by a long shot. Insurance included.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    Time to find me one of those 97 manual Yaris and put it in a climate controlled garage for the next 30 years to fund my retirement. It is rarer than a Duesenberg or first year Corvette, so I can only imagine how many hundred thousand it will be worth in only a few years.

  • avatar
    W210Driver

    I doubt that the typical manual-in-an-economy-car buyer cares about rowing their own gears. More likely it‘s a cost issue; purchasing the car with the standard transmission is cheaper than ordering it with the automatic.

  • avatar
    namesakeone

    It’s probably true, Toyota does sell more cars with a manual than most. Still, I wonder how many manuals are sold by Honda, Mazda and Volkswagen.

  • avatar
    John R

    “The 86, which you might expect to have a more even split, as it is quite literally an enthusiast car, only saw a third of its brethren shipped with a stick in 2018.”

    I think I see what might be happening here. An auto 86 actually might not be a bad idea for a commuter car; 24/36 mpg, automatic for the morning and afternoon slog, but then a manual mode for the few moments you aren’t stuck behind some baby-buggy.

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    The shift of the USDM away from manuals toward automatic transmissions began long ago and progressed much as slowly boiling a lobster. Automatics were seen as upscale in comparison to old-timey manuals and added to manufacturer profit margins. This led to the dearth of manual-equipped cars on the new car lots with less and less being stocked each year as the old lobster boiled away converting the proles to automatic users. Along came computerized electronic control for powertrains and the ability to control fuel usage with algorithms – manufacturers gained control of the CAFE and emissions by controlling the powertrains utilizing automatics after sale but this is somewhat difficult and costly to do with manuals. The percentage of those pesky manuals needed to be lowered to reduce the negative mathematical effect of lesser control over the economy/emissions and cost issues on the fleet. After time, the majority of lobsters have boiled to the point where manuals are not considered or even a memory for the buying public.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    That’s actually a very good take rate in this climate. Automakers would be wise to note this.

  • avatar
    don1967

    I stopped virtue-signalling about the loss of manual tranmissions when I realized that it’s been over 20 years since I actually owned one. Even my motorcycle has a quickshifter.

    It’s not just about laziness or convenience. It’s also about performance. Modern computers are just plain quicker at shifting gears than the meat in my left leg. More consistent, too.

    For every 100 keyboard warriors who extoll the virtues of manual control and/or performance, I’ll wager that fewer than 5 of them actually possess the skills to out-perform a modern automatic under a variety of conditions.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      It’s not that manuals are faster. It’s that they’re more fun.

      It’s been said a lot, yet still people don’t get it.

      Enjoy the speed of your auto and I’ll have the fun of the manual.

      This aggression cannot stand, man.

    • 0 avatar
      vvk

      If you want speed, yes. If you want driving enjoyment, manuals are in a different galaxy. I cannot drive automatics. They drive me insane. I cannot find any good manuals for sale, either. I have switched to EVs, which give you enjoyment of manuals in spades. No transmission — no problem.

    • 0 avatar
      don1967

      Who said anything about speed?

      I referred to performance and control, ie: lightning-quick gear shifts, bracing your feet against the floor while you focus on the right line for a corner, and other fun stuff that automatics do better.

      The problem here is motorcycles. Once you’ve tasted a two-wheeled rocket there is little joy to be found sitting in boxes with your left foot hovering above the mat, pretending to be fast. You want stability, control, lateral g-forces, braking… all the things cars do well.

      • 0 avatar
        vvk

        I am not disputing that. I am just saying that whether I am driving slow or fast, automatic transmission drives me insane because it does not respond to my inputs the way I expect.

        Also, regarding motorcycles. A Hayabusa does 0-60 in 2.59 seconds and 1/4 mile run in about 10 seconds. A Tesla Model S P100D does 0-60 in 2.29 seconds and 1/4 mile in about 10 seconds. Pretty comparable numbers.

  • avatar
    arach

    Last I checked, Traditional autos were declining at a MUCH MUCH faster rate than traditional manuals.

    secondly, I personally believe DCTs are an evolution of a Manual moreso than an evolution of the auto. In other words, I’m excited to see modern manuals growing in use and the stupid torque converter autos starting to die out.

    In other words, I completely disagree with the assessment that manuals are dying.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      1) “Manual” in this context – consumer preference – does not mean “an input shaft and one or more output shafts instead of planetary gears”, it means “manually controlling shifts, and with a clutch pedal”.

      I am a “no manuals, thanks” guy, but have no problems with a DSG (in principle), because my objection is “manually controlling the gearing separately from throttle is a waste of my time”, not “I really love planetary gears!!!”.

      Likewise a notional computer-shifted “manual” with no clutch pedal, “fine”, as long as it can be smooth and handle low-input conditions well like “a real automatic” (see below).

      2) It’s 2019. Every TC you can get is locking, to the best of my knowledge, and has been for … decades?

      What’s “stupid” about being locked at speed and unlocked at idle, letting the car seamlessly creep in an effective low gear derived from the TC being unlocked, while also being efficient in every other circumstance? And *unable* to kill the engine from stalling it while creeping forward or back?

      3) If anything kills the planetary-gear automatic it’ll be the CVT, which will also kill the DSG and traditional-manual, if perfected that well.

      (I also can’t total find numbers on actual CVT vs. Auto vs. Manual vs. DSG shipping.)

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “I’m excited to see modern manuals growing in use and the stupid torque converter autos starting to die out.”

      I think you play in a higher price-level of vehicle compared to me, but I’ve yet to find a transmission alternative that I like as much as a traditional torque-converter automatic.

  • avatar
    brettc

    I haven’t driven a manual transmission car since 2012 when I bought my Jetta wagon with a DSG. I spent the extra $1100 on the DSG because my then-wife said she’d be driving it. She drove it maybe 3 times in 6 years…

    Then I bought a C-Max for its replacement, which is only available as a CVT. The CVT in it isn’t bad, but I’m still on the lookout for a second summer-only car with a manual. Sure stop and go sucks with a manual, but they’re a lot more fun to drive to me.

  • avatar
    ThomasSchiffer

    Operating a manual transmission is not fun anymore in today‘s congested driving conditions. During my childhood the only vehicles with automatic transmissions were high priced luxury cars. I would bet that most European drivers actually wanted an automatic transmission in their regular car, but A) it was not offered and B) it would be an expensive option if it had been offered.

    Two of my three cars have automated transmissions. My third car is a beat-up Renault Twingo from 1992 which I exclusively use for driving within the Munich city. It‘s zippy and still good on gas in urban driving conditions and it will easily fit in most parking spaces. That aside, when I drive it I derive zero fun or ‘driving pleasure’ from selecting and engaging individual gears on its rubbery 5-speed manual. I shift and select gears without thinking, it’s simply an automated response.

    At the same time, traffic in my city has gotten so bad that stop-and-go traffic with this car is actually more of a hassle. If I were to replace the Twingo, a poverty-spec Volkswagen Up! (or its Seat/Skoda derivatives) with an automated transmission would be an excellent one-to-one replacement. But since the Twingo with over 300,000 km (I’m the fourth owner) keeps going and going and is cheap to insure, maintain and service, I see no need to replace it.

    I will not miss the manual transmission when it disappears.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    I was a “manual for life” guy until the first time I drove a rental Corolla with a CVT. I later bought a Prius (CVT, obviously) because I liked the Corolla.

    My problems with a geared automatic are that I always feel like it’s in the wrong gear or shifting at improper times. With a CVT I don’t feel that, so it can’t annoy me.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      There are a lot of people here who don’t like CVTs, but I think the two motor electric CVTs in Ford and Toyota hybrids are excellent transmissions, their smoothness can’t be beat. That, plus I really like it when the engine shuts off at 80 mph while I’m going down a hill on the highway.

  • avatar
    VW4motion

    How is this a surprise? What toyota driver actually cares about driving?

  • avatar
    R Henry

    Not long ago, many automatics were lousy. Now, most are much improved therefore narrowing interest in manuals.

    • 0 avatar
      vvk

      Still nothing happens when you press the gas pedal. Sorry, automatics are not good for driving enjoyment.

      • 0 avatar
        R Henry

        I recently rented a Dodge Charger R/T with the excellent 8-speed auto which is built by FCA under license by ZF. I found it to be very engaging, and would certainly purchase any car so equipped. The ZF 8-speeds have found their way into many, many cars–including many BMWs. It is a GREAT gearbox!

  • avatar
    Freddie

    If you want to see sticks survive, then put your money where your left foot is and buy a stick shift vehicle. I just did – new Civic Si.
    Manuals are out there. This new thing called the “internet” lets you search dealer inventories near and far.

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      Freddie – This. I purchased one of the last Outbacks with a 6MT in 2014. Lot of internet searching, dealer interfacing but I found mine at the price I wanted.

  • avatar
    teddyc73

    I consider myself an auto enthusiast and I have never had any desire to own a manual transmission and nor do I want a hatchback. So the tired old argument that real auto enthusiasts want manuals is simply ridiculous.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      You might consider yourself to be an enthusiast, but that is equivalent to believing yourself to be good looking, intelligent, honest and a wonderful lover. Unless others say that about you, then you are just making it up.

      And if you haven’t owned or driven a manual, then how can you judge it?? That is like asking a Catholic Priest about marriage.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    “Once again, hatchback owners prove themselves to be the real automotive enthusiast — or perhaps this author’s disgusting bias is showing”

    Disgusting bias FTW.

    (I kid.

    But I am definitely in the “why would I ever want a stick?” camp, just like “why would I want to adjust the choke myself?” or “I had an adjustable idle control and I hated having to use it.”)

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    I currently have 2 ‘identical’ Korean sedans in my driveway. Only one is a MT and the other is an auto. I prefer driving the MT, except in ‘rush hour’ or downtown traffic. And despite all claims to the contrary, I am currently getting between 8% and 12% better gas mileage in the MT (depending on the type of trips). The MT now on its all-seasons and the auto on its all-weathers.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    It is probably cheaper to make a CVT than a manual. My problem is not so much with how the CVT equipped vehicle drives as with the long term reliability and the cost to replace a CVT. I prefer manuals and understand that their days are limited but my concern is most vehicles are going to CVTs and how will these hold up in the long run. Hopefully the CVTs will become more reliable. Nissan has the worst of the CVTs.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      ‘Had’ the worst. They were also the first to implement them throughout their line-up. Being the first generally results in headaches/a learning curve.

      As they now have the most experience with CVT’s perhaps they are now ‘ahead’ of the other manufacturers?

  • avatar
    everyonesgrudge63

    I love my manual Tacoma! I also love that its so rare.


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