By on March 8, 2019

Let’s say you manage one of the soon-to-be-closed Tesla factory-owned stores and, for whatever reason, you have dozens of brand new Model 3 EVs sitting unsold on your lot. What are you going to do if one of them has a discharged battery? As car dealers learned a long time ago in the gasoline era, batteries won’t keep a charge forever and cars sitting for a long time sometimes need a boost to their batteries.

That’s true whether it’s a conventional 12 volt lead-acid battery for an ICE-powered vehicle’s electrical system or it’s the lithium-ion battery pack that powers a EV. That’s why car dealerships for conventional vehicles have battery tenders, heavy duty chargers that can be wheeled around the lot to whichever car might have a dead starter battery.

Of course, to recharge an EV’s battery, you’re gonna need a bigger charger.

After Tesla recently announced that it’ll will be moving all sales online and stop selling cars at their factory owned showrooms, PlainSite.org, a website that bills itself as “the law in plain sight, and news too,” checked out a couple of factory stores in the San Francisco area. Both the San Francisco and Burlingame locations were open, for both sales and service, and PlainSite tweeted out photos of both stores.

At the Burlingame, CA Tesla showroom and service center, though, PlainSite noticed dozens of unsold Model 3s filling their lot. Considering hundreds of thousands of customers gave Tesla deposits on Model 3s and considering those people waited years for mass production of the Model 3 to begin, it’s surprising a factory store has that much inventory. Sure, traditional car dealers often have hundreds of unsold vehicles in stock, but those dealers aren’t selling what is probably the most anticipated new sedan in decades.

Even more embarrassing to Tesla would be it’s oh-so-green public image getting besmirched by the use of fossil fuels, and that’s exactly what happened. PlainSite’s reporter also noticed a Tesla store employee trying to charge some unsold Model 3s whose batteries apparently discharged while waiting for their forever home, only he wasn’t wheeling around a commercial 12V battery charger. He was jockeying cars to a couple of Tesla charging stations, still mounted on wooden pallets, each of them hooked up to its own dedicated 300 kVA diesel-powered generator sitting on its own flatbed trailer.

It’s not easy being green.

[Images: Aaron Greenspan/PlainSite, via Twitter]

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98 Comments on “Tesla Factory Store Uses Diesel Generators to Recharge Slow-moving Model 3 Inventory...”


  • avatar
    Land Ark

    We’re getting requests for Tesla (and EV Go, Electrify America, etc) charging stations on a weekly basis. I obviously don’t know what’s going on in San Fran, but I’d be willing to bet they’ve been trying to get power to their site to install permanent chargers but have been struggling with the local power company to get that done. That, or it wound up being cost prohibitive. But, certainly now, it wouldn’t make sense to go through with the installation if they are just going to shut the locations down.

  • avatar

    Is it safe to assume these Model 3s are not the $35K models that the deposits were originally intended for?

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    Back about 10 years ago when the Nissan Leaf was released, I went to a Nissan-sponsored test drive event. ZERO EMISSIONS plastered everywhere. Guess what? The cars were being charged by large portable diesel generators.

    I realize the optics are less than ideal, but what’s the CO2 per mile impact of using a diesel generator to charge an EV? How does it compare to the average CO2 per kWh from the standard grid or a typical ICE?

    • 0 avatar
      Detroit-X

      LeMansteve, Shhh! The whole electric powered, zero emissions, lithium batteries (headed toward in you local dump and drinking water) con-job depends on you not mentioning that!

      • 0 avatar
        LeMansteve

        If these batteries are as expensive to source and manufacture as we are led to believe, then there should be a booming disposal market to go along with it, which would greatly reduce the risk of tossing old batteries in the landfill.

        • 0 avatar
          gass-man

          “If these batteries are as expensive to source and manufacture as we are led to believe, then there should be a booming disposal market to go along with it,”

          Yes, we’ll ship them off to Africa or India or China, where they will be burned by the destitute to extract the valuable materials. Just like most e-waste other is today. It’s The Green Way™

      • 0 avatar
        Carrera

        Yeah, that’s precious. “Dirty” diesel coming to the rescue. I bet that won’t make the news.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      LeMansteve,

      OK here’s my thing:

      Let’s take the Leaf that you mention for example. How much energy does it take to keep a Leaf moving at, say 38 MPH, level ground, 70 degrees F ambient (say LA metro area)? Now pick an ICE midsize sedan – same question. Aren’t there *any* lessons that can be applied from the rolling chassis of the one to the other?

      Apparently unrelated side comment: Some of those large portable generators (particularly the ones that get rented for movie productions) are A-MAZ-ING – as in amazingly quiet. You can ‘literally’ stand right next to it and not be sure if it’s running. (How do they do that? It would come in handy at the campsite.)

      Based on the rough math I did back when I drove EV’s on a regular basis, it would not surprise me if the portable generator plus Model 3 combination pictured above gets pretty decent fuel economy.

      • 0 avatar
        gass-man

        Toolguy,

        Your math is wrong. You are conflating quietness with efficiency.

        Small portable generators are not very efficient, no matter how quiet they are.

        As for very quiet campground generators, where have you been for the last 30 years? Surely you’ve heard of (see what I did there?) the Honda EU series of generators? Very expensive, but extremely quiet. Harbor Fright [sic] just came out with a knock-off line for half the price that are getting good reviews from independent reviewers.

        • 0 avatar
          ToolGuy

          gass-man,

          I haven’t done the math – and no conflation.

          The last Honda portable generator I slept 30 feet away from at the campground was annoying all night – no idea if it was the latest model.

          Past 30 years – hmmmmm – around 20 years ago I was somewhat involved with a joint venture to introduce NiMH batteries for the EV1 – does that count?

          Help me out here (completely open to correction): Honda EU1000i would generate ~4800W on a gallon of gasoline (if it held that much). A Generac MDG100DF4 (chosen pretty much at random) would generate ~12,800W from that same gallon.

          A Model 3 Standard can hold 50kWh. So less than 4 gallons of gas to ‘fill’ the vehicle – but charging losses, so call it 5.

          Now range, blah blah yadda yadda. But stated range is 220 miles. So I could drive over 40 miles on that gallon of fuel? Not terrible…

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            Oops, the Generac burns diesel not gas.

            ToolGuy… what a disgrace!!!

          • 0 avatar
            gass-man

            ToolGuy, it sounded like you were unaware that ultra-quiet campsite generators exist. They have, for at least the last 30 years. That’s all.

            Honda makes other generators besides the EU series. The EU’s generate 59 dBA SPL at full load. A face-to-face conversation is 60 dBA. At 30 feet, the EU generator would be quieter than a whisper.

            Kudos on helping the EV-1, it was a true vision. If you could have convinced GM to shelve it for ten years and introduce it with LiIo batteries in 2006, EVs would dominate now and Tesla wouldn’t even exist. C’est la vie.

            Generator math is still off, I think. The Generac is a diesel. You can’t measure energy in a gallon of fuel with Watts, has to be Watt-hours (or Joules if you want to go all SI units). Honda fuel consumption at full load (900 W) is hard to find, but appears to be 0.33 gal/hour. Generac is 6.64 gal/hour (80 KW).

            One gallon of fuel will generate 2700 WH in the Honda (in 3 hours) and 12000 WH in the Generac (in just 9 minutes). It will take 18.5 gallons for the Honda to “fill” the 3, filling the 0.95 gal tank 20 times over 56 HOURS!

            Generac would only need 4 gallons, IF the 3 could take 80KWH rate. It can’t. The standard range Model 3 can charge at 7700 W maximum rate. Extrapolating from the consumption table, Generac likely consumes ~1 gal/hr at that rate. Blindly discounting losses, that’s 6.5 gallons, 6.5 hours to charge the 3. Call it 7 gallons.

            So better wild-ass guess would be about 30 MPG, which is not terrible, but not really great. And emissions will be worse than a 30 MPG+ gasoline ICE.

            If you use the Honda generator, the Model 3 will get 11.8 MPG… D’OH!

            Now for the zinger: My ICE Insight will go 60+ miles with that one gallon of fuel, driving like a normal human being, and have way less emissions. And I can carry 10 gallons for a 600+ mile range!

            (Yes, I had nothing better to do. At least nothing that I wanted to do!)

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            gass-man,

            No way would I charge the Model 3 from the Honda – that generator is just too loud… KIDDING! No, clearly the larger generator is considerably more efficient – I went with that one.

            The setup pictured seems to allow for charging 2 vehicles at once from one generator, so I bypassed all the charge-time considerations – I think this explains most of the gap between your 7 gallons of diesel and my 5 gallons. Either way it’s not as crazy as one might think at first blush.

            Practically speaking, the ‘dealer’ is likely more concerned with the rental fees on that generator than on the diesel fuel it is consuming – and clearly they deemed it to be a rational decision. (Plus, you wouldn’t necessarily need a full charge from the generator – charge enough to get to a dedicated charger for example.)

            Referencing my original point, the massive efficiency advantage of your Insight vs. most ICE vehicles is driven to a large extent by the basic architecture of the vehicle (thinking of the previous version with dedicated aero/etc). It seems like some lessons there could be applied to ‘traditional’ straight-up ICE vehicles.

            Thanks.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    Most Teslas are powered by fossil fuels, it’s just coming out of a different exhaust pipe.

    • 0 avatar

      While true, not all exhaust pipes are equal. A massive stationary power plant will have better efficiency than a small personal one that can fit in the engine bay. And improving the efficiency is the real economics that should be focused on, but “zero emissions” is what sells.

      • 0 avatar
        stingray65

        Fratz – don’t you know that the Democrats are going to shut down all those massive stationary power plants to save the planet (aka Green New Deal). We will then have lots of windmills and solar panels to power everything, except when the wind isn’t blowing or at night, when everyone will fire up their diesel generator so they can watch TV, microwave some popcorn, or overnight charge their Tesla. It will be just like India is today.

        • 0 avatar
          vehic1

          stingray65: Nah, Mexico’s gonna pay for it all. A stable genius promised!

          • 0 avatar
            56BelAire

            vehic1 said, “Nah, Mexico’s gonna pay for it all. A stable genius promised!”

            How’s your TDS today? Have you taken all your prescribed meds……or did you miss a dose?

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          Diesel generator? I’d never use one. Mine is a Chinese 2-stroke. Yeah, after trump gets fired by the voters for screwing them on their tax returns and the Global Warming National Emergency is declared, I’ll get solar along with a big-azzzed storage battery to run things when it’s dark.

          Plenty, if not most, Tesla and other EV buyers think ICE vehicles are antiquated pieces of crap and much prefer the smoothness and quiet we get with EVs. We also have the advantage of being able to fuel at home and not have to deal with gas stations.

          So go ahead and whine all day about environmentalists. Keep wasting your time. It’s not changing a thing. EVs are going to take over and it isn’t all about greenness. I’ve got a bigger stake in ICE technology than most here since most of my income comes from Permian Basin oil. I’m going to be screwed at some point. Instead of complaining, I’m embracing the new technology and trying to move my investments elsewhere. Even Shell just bought a US charging network. It’s time to move on.

          • 0 avatar
            markf

            “Yeah, after trump gets fired by the voters for screwing them on their tax returns”

            Fired by the Blue state voters who didn’t vote for him in 2016? They are ones moaning about tax returns now that they have to pay their fair share of Federal taxes…….

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Fired by the Blue state voters who didn’t vote for him in 2016? They are ones moaning about tax returns now that they have to pay their fair share of Federal taxes…….”

            nope. I know plenty of people at work who voted for Trump and got an unpleasant surprise when they did their taxes this year.

            I can tell you that in my case, my taxes as % of my income stayed about the same as last year, but had I not had another change in benefits last year I’d have been facing writing the IRS a big check instead of owing only a little as I usually do.

            but go ahead, keep telling me about this “Tax cut” I’m supposed to have received.

          • 0 avatar
            markf

            “nope. I know plenty of people at work who voted for Trump and got an unpleasant surprise when they did their taxes this year.”

            So what state is this in? Plenty of Trump voters in Blue states where their votes don’t count for anything unfortunately…..

            I never understood folks who think a tax refund is income, it just means you overpaid your taxes and loaned money, interest free to the Feds. Instead of being happy getting more each paycheck they are moaning about their refund.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “So what state is this in?”

            one that flipped red in 2016.

            save the rest of your WHARRGARBL.

        • 0 avatar
          zamoti

          What a load of hot nonsense. It’s not like the coal-fired plants will go away, they’ll just be superseded by solar/wind with coal as the backstop. In the end, we burn a lot less nasty coal and risk fewer lives by sending people deep into the earth to go dig it out. The balance of jobs will be maintained by the shift of labor from horribly dangerous coal mining work to less dangerous work of setting up and maintaining solar/wind infrastructure. In fact, there’s better career prospects in place for those that learn these skillsets; they can potentially set up new markets for home solar/wind–the skills used in coal mining begin and end in coal mining. Also, don’t forget that coal doesn’t ride the magic fairy express to get where it’s going. Go for a drive through central Kentucky and see the diesel tractors belching out black clouds up and down the hills on the way to wherever they are going. Also stay the F out of their way, they tend to be in a hurry.

          If you like coal so much, why don’t you set up a coal-fired furnace in your house. Enjoy the air quality!

          • 0 avatar
            gass-man

            Zamoti, most coal mining is done by machines, most of them remote-controlled and some even semi-autonomous. Not many coal miners left because they’ve been replaced by machines.

            Maintaining sprawling, national-grid-scale wind and solar farms will require large amounts of labor for construction, regular maintenance, and regular replacement. There will be many more workers driving their cars longer distances to do that than are currently working in coal mines. And every last one of those panels and windmills are also transported by “diesel tractors belching out black clouds”, and will be for the foreseeable future.

            In colder parts of the country, home coal furnaces are a real thing. They work great, are easier to run than pellet stoves, cheaper than propane or electric, and the air quality is excellent because of this modern invention called a “chimney”. Look into it.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            Zamoti,

            I burn a very limited amount of coal in my portable forge – it really is nasty stuff (without pollution controls).

          • 0 avatar
            stingray65

            zamoti – guess when the wind doesn’t tend to blow? Answer: when it is very cold or very hot, or in other words exactly when you need lots of juice to run heating systems and A/C. Guess when solar panels don’t work? Answer: when they are covered by a foot of snow or during the night, or in other words exactly when it is coldest and electricity needs are highest.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Maintaining sprawling, national-grid-scale wind and solar farms will require large amounts of labor for construction, regular maintenance, and regular replacement.”

            ok? so, why do you hate job creation?

          • 0 avatar
            markf

            “but go ahead, keep telling me about this “Tax cut” I’m supposed to have received.”

            You got one but the scam of SALT deductions for high state taxes has ended. You are now paying your “fair share”

            The Left has been crying about “fair share” for years, now you got it……

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            …Guess when solar panels don’t work? Answer: when they are covered by a foot of snow or during the night, or in other words exactly when it is coldest and electricity needs are highest….

            Who told you that? Hannity? Electricity needs are typically the highest from noon to the end of the business day. That is why we get some nice rebates for our office buildings for curtailing electrical use during that period. I’ll give you the foot of snow though…

            …You got one but the scam of SALT deductions for high state taxes has ended. You are now paying your “fair share”. The Left has been crying about “fair share” for years, now you got it……

            When the top 1% pay the same percentage of income tax that I do, I promise to never again mention my loss of SALT. To think that the “Tax Cut for Fatcats and Hose the Middle Class Tax Act” did anything to level the playing field is so laughably inaccurate that even Fox News dosen’t say so.

          • 0 avatar
            markf

            When the top 1% pay the same percentage of income tax that I do, I promise to never again mention my loss of SALT”

            They pay way more than you and pay way more in Federal taxes in both dollar amount and percentage of overall tax receipts. Now be quiet and start paying your fair share…….

          • 0 avatar
            markf

            When the top 1% pay the same percentage of income tax that I do, I promise to never again mention my loss of SALT”

            They pay way more than and pay way in Federal taxes in both dollar amount and percentage of overall tax receipts. Now be quiet and start paying your fair share…….

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Not a big surprise. Tesla had to know that the need for so many locations would be fleeting at best so why invest in upgrading the power to a building they are going to walk away from in the short term. The thing I find ironic is that those generators are sitting next to the power line tower. The other thing these generators are seemingly used for is to provide lighting for the lot as that looks like a rental lighting rig behind the one generator.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Musk is such a fraud. The inventory is slow moving so let’s finally announce the $36k model and see if that helps.

    I wouldn’t be surprised is this scum bag brings those slow moving, diesel powered model 3s back into the tent to have them decontented to $36k models.

  • avatar
    Mike Beranek

    The ironing is delicious.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Were the diesel generators using VW’s TDI engines?

    • 0 avatar
      EquipmentJunkie

      While I can’t tell for sure, these MQ gen sets are likely using a 9L Deere or Cummins for power.

      Wouldn’t a VW TDI have been such crazy irony?

  • avatar
    R Henry

    I always get a kick out seeing new Tesla’s being carted around behind F250s.

    Near me recently: http://funkyimg.com/i/2S9Jp.jpg

    Sure, I will grant you that Teslas are great toys for the eco-minded rich guy. At the end of the day though, it appears that a good ole dead-dinosaur powered F250 must be called upon, in all its CO2 belching glory, to get the Green Goddess back home.

    –Isn’t it ironic that Tesla isn’t using some sort of alt-fuel vehicles for its own fleet? Is it possible, just maybe, that Elon Musk is a “green believer” only insofar as the Government provides rebates for buyers of his expensive cars?

    • 0 avatar
      gass-man

      Looks like Tesla may not know how to load trailers either. If my eyeball math is correct, the tongue weight on that trailer will be much too high.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “Isn’t it ironic that Tesla isn’t using some sort of alt-fuel vehicles for its own fleet?”

      who says they aren’t? That truck doesn’t have a Powerstroke badge, so it’s probably got the 6.2. Which is flex-fuel so it can run on E85. Or CNG with a prep kit.

  • avatar
    watersketch

    Oh that is a bad look. I bet that in California they also need to remove the diesel generators regularly so they can call them temporary and don’t need to apply for an air permit.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    A couple weeks ago CR dropped the 3 from recommended list

    not so reliable

    I believe they dropped the S and X last year

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    This is so…delicious. Schadenfreude defined.

    I’m sure our resident Tesla can do evil fans will have a quite logical explanation for this. It’s clean diesel after all…

  • avatar
    stingray65

    Do Tesla batteries still brick if they are regularly on a charger? I remember reading about the Tesla Roadster that a lot of owners used as a weekend toy, and if they neglected to plug the car in between the infrequent runs they would end up with a $30,000 paper weight otherwise known as a terminally dead Tesla battery.

    • 0 avatar
      MartyToo

      Stingray 65. First off how dare you use gas in your Chevvy. Secondly, if you want to know about the Tesla battery thingy, you need to call one of their “outlets” and ask one of the priests, deacons or perhaps even a sexton how they prevent the battery from reaching the hereafter. We heathens on TTAC don’t tend to keep up with their tenets.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    SMALL NUCLEAR REACTOR!

    Yeah, that’s the ticket!

  • avatar
    RS

    EV’s (Displaced emissions vehicles) sure are flexible. They can run on many fuels including diesel, coal, nuclear, solar, wind, or cow farts.

    • 0 avatar
      gass-man

      No, sorry, cow farts are now banned by order of the junior congresscritter from new york.

      Unicorn farts, however, are not banned.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Sadly, neither is lying, deceit, or outright cons. Wow! Elon Musk and Trump share some commonalities. I would have added stupidity but being fair, Elon is not stupid.

  • avatar
    happycamper

    Meanwhile, here is all of the flights taken in Elon Musk’s personal jet in 2018:
    http://www.wimp.com/elon-musks-jet-flights-in-2018-with-pinball-sound-effects/

  • avatar
    Ol Shel

    The demand for sedans is shrinking rapidly.

    Why are so many of the electric offerings, current and proposed, sedans?

    • 0 avatar
      jatz

      “Why are so many of the electric offerings, current and proposed, sedans?”

      Exactly my question, too.

      I’d guess it’s because battery weight and inefficiency cause any taller and capacious a form factor to be sacrificed for max attainable range.

      • 0 avatar
        gass-man

        All the current crop of EVs sure look like CUV’s (SUX’s?) to me. They do not fit my definition of “sedan”, even if they are not jacked-up and clad with ugly plastic.

        Note Tesla’s next two models are an SUV (model 3 based) and a pickup truck.

        • 0 avatar
          jatz

          //They do not fit my definition of “sedan”

          I think you’re still operating with the morphological concept of “sedan” derived from it’s previous 3-box shape including a middle box tall enough to comfortably accommodate seated adult humans privileged in their youths with First World nutrition.

          • 0 avatar
            gass-man

            Jatz, you are exactly correct.

          • 0 avatar
            jatz

            I’d adore a ’77 Impala with modern innards.

            This one right here, in fact:

            momentcar.com/images/chevrolet-impala-1977-2.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            gass-man

            Nope. 1989 is the sweet-spot. First year of TBI fuel injection (5.7 liter four-bolt truck engine in the 9C1 cop car), last year without the stupid seat belts bolted to the doors. The 86-90 body style was the best looking of the B-bodies, be they Box or Bubble.

            Combine the cop engine with the cop gears (3.42) and the great short first-gear in the 700R4 and surprise the hell out of some wannabees at the stop light.

            Or just LSX/T5 it and scare the sh!t out of many a poseur in their pretend sports cars.

          • 0 avatar
            jatz

            Yabbut I don’t care about go-fast enginey stuff and I was an adult when the first Project 77 downsizers appeared so it’s a nostalgia thing for me.

          • 0 avatar
            gass-man

            Fair-enough. All B-bodies are welcome in my house.
            Which is actually a large garage with a bedroom on the side. Because priorities.

  • avatar
    Brett Woods

    Plainsite.org? It’s a one-man website and kid-in-the-basement amateur “company.” His physician dad is listed as the VP and Treasurer. His mother is also on the papers. I suppose it saves his dad income tax. Its tweets come from one person. The rest are retweets that are likewise derogatory. Many complaints that he posts substantially inaccurate information.

    All I am saying is that we don’t know what we are looking at in the pictures. The captions cannot be trusted. It might just be where the factory puts cars before the trucks come to take them.

    • 0 avatar
      gass-man

      “All I am saying is that we don’t know what we are looking at in the pictures. ”

      We know those are Tesla Model 3s. We know those are diesel generators. We know the generators are plugged into a 3 and have three more plugs.

      The rest of your post is an Ad Hominem personal attack.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    This tells me that Tesla’s vampire losses are not a thing of the past.

    My former Leaf, and now my Ioniq EV, do not lose charge while sitting. Tesla wouldn’t have to recharge its cars if they didn’t have vampire losses.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      I think they just arrogantly assumed the cars would be plugged in almost all the time while idle. The Model S- at least in the past- did some really pants-on-head dumb things to its 12V storage battery.

      https://syonyk.blogspot.com/2016/10/tesla-model-s-12v-battery-analysis.html

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      SCE, all vehicles have vampire losses. Some more than others. The first “Bangle” 7 Series had an “airport” switch to remove some of them or the car would not start after sitting for a long period of time. Imagine if Tesla or GM had to resort to such things…they would be excoriated in these posts. But even a stone age car will end up with a dead battery if left unused for long enough.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        You’re quite correct, but these are the kind of vampire losses that require *diesel generators* to overcome – not just a portable 12V battery jumper.

  • avatar
    vvk

    Was it at least “clean diesel?”

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Anybody know what the miles per gallon of diesel is on the Tesla 3 when charged this way?

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    [Sorry duplicate post here]

    gass-man,

    I haven’t done the math – and no conflation.

    The last Honda portable generator I slept 30 feet away from at the campground was annoying all night – no idea if it was the latest model.

    Past 30 years – hmmmmm – around 20 years ago I was somewhat involved with a joint venture to introduce NiMH batteries for the EV1 – does that count?

    Help me out here (completely open to correction): Honda EU1000i would generate ~4800W on a gallon of gasoline (if it held that much). A Generac MDG100DF4 (chosen pretty much at random) would generate ~12,800W from that same gallon.

    A Model 3 Standard can hold 50kWh. So less than 4 gallons of gas to ‘fill’ the vehicle – but charging losses, so call it 5.

    Now range, blah blah yadda yadda. But stated range is 220 miles. So I could drive over 40 miles on that gallon of fuel? Not terrible…

  • avatar
    jatz

    Send lawyers, rigs and diesel

    Dad, get me out of this

  • avatar
    BobinPgh

    Why doesn’t Tesla have a 110 volt slow charging option that could be taken care of with an extension cord? Even a 220 volt dryer or range outlet can be used on a building with conventional wiring. Don’t these cars just have to be “topped off” to keep the charge?

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      They do, but charging at 110 V only adds about 4 miles per hour.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        But that would keep the battery alive if parked for a few months…I keep my C7 on a battery tender during the winter or the battery would be dead after a few months. I would think that such an arrangement would be available for a Tesla if a lowly Chevrolet has it…

  • avatar
    markf

    This perfectly illustrates the folly of electric vehicles. Just moving emissions from the tailpipe to the power plant.

    Wake me up when we start generating electricity from nuclear power, the only “clean” energy available on demand.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      It’s not an equivalent tradeoff.

      Incidentally, I just visited Chernobyl this week. It’s a 1000 square mile wasteland.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Kewl. I really want to go to Prypiat (sp) and see what a post-human world would look like in 30 years. The photos are amazing. Same thing for Famagusta in Cypress. Uninhabited since the early 1970s…I’d love to go touring through there.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        To be fair, the RBMK reactor design was pretty much a textbook example of “what the hell were you people thinking?”

        • 0 avatar
          SCE to AUX

          @JimZ: Yes, no doubt about the RBMK design.

          I – and most people – are a fan of nuclear power when everything is good. But when it goes bad, it’s really bad.

      • 0 avatar
        markf

        Yeah it’s a real wasteland

        https://www.livescience.com/52458-wildlife-populations-chernobyl-disaster.html

        • 0 avatar
          SCE to AUX

          That’s clever. The animals moved in when the people moved out.

          But the on-site workers aren’t allowed to work more than 2 weeks at the facility before they are required to go away for 2 weeks to cool off.

          Nuclear is great until it isn’t. I’m amused that some greenies now embrace it since coal is the new devil.

  • avatar
    arthurk45

    No problem! Elon Musk bragged about how practically every American is within 150 miles of a Supercharger station.

  • avatar
    George B

    If only someone would invent a device for delivering electrical power from a fixed electrical outlet to device a few hundred feet away. Unlike a diesel generator, this electrical cord to extend the electric power to where it’s needed would be silent and there’d be no need to resupply the diesel fuel. This would be an extremely useful invention.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Now that you mention it…

      I’d much prefer to have a Lot Boy running around with a few hundred feet of extension cord. Back in the dark ages my Dad used an electric weed wacker that way around our fairly large property. It was plugged into the outlets he had installed on the outside of the house.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Next, we’ll find out that they’re using coal-powered steam shovels to excavate the foundation for their new factory in China. Lol.

  • avatar
    TeslaFanBoy

    wow even if this was true so what, Tesla makes cars in batches, like all white with a set interior and they may not have buyers for all of them at point of manufacture but and this is were the main stream and fringe media go wrong. Most legacy car makers have 10s of thousands of cars sitting around doing nothing, they can show they are sold because of the dealer network but we all know there not lol Tesla has at the most a few thousand cars not earmarked for buyers at any given time and most of them are demonstrators and show room cars. you got to love articles like this it shows the Legacy car makers are very scared.

  • avatar
    elizabethagreene

    Looking at the photograph it isn’t clear if the generator is connected to the EV charger. Am I looking at that wrong? Each charger has two connectors for vehicles, and there should be a third similarly sized connection from the generator for three-phase power.

  • avatar
    ThosEM

    If you aren’t careful you’ll become t”he fake news about cars.” Those slow selling Model 3s are outselling every other comparable car by a wide margin.

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    Fake news? Tesla cars in general are not selling well! Why would dealers in California have rows of unsold 3s on their lot if Tesla where selling well? It would be interesting to find out the days on the lot! My guess is it maybe an over 200 day average!


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