By on February 23, 2019

Focusing primarily on the U.S. market sometimes leads to a skewed view of what the average global consumer demands in their driveway, but not always. Broader trends don’t respect geographical boundaries; interest in light trucks doesn’t stop at the border.

As American buyers increasingly demand more additions to their high-riding vehicle buffet, the same call can be heard in other markets. And, just as Americans took home more electric vehicles (thanks, Tesla) in 2018, the segment recorded significant growth in places you’ve never visited.

However, the world still loves the Ford F-150. No change there.

Let’s take a global peek at last year’s buying decisions.

Sales data compiled by JATO Dynamics (hat tip to Seth Parks) shows a global market in a state of flux — and shrinking. Global passenger car and light commercial vehicle sales fell 0.5 percent in 2018, the first annual drop in a decade. Blame North America and China, mainly.

While new vehicle sales fell 0.2 percent in North America, a mid-year downturn in the Chinese market saw that country — buyer of 30 percent of the world’s new vehicles — fall 2.8 percent. Europe, the Middle East, and Africa took home 1.1 percent fewer vehicles, with the UK recording the sharpest drop (-6 percent) and Russia the largest gain (+13 percent).

What else happened in 2018? For the first time, India bought more vehicles than Germany, becoming the world’s fourth-largest car market. Buyers in Latin America took home more new vehicles than Japan.

Indeed, while North America and Europe appear to have peaked, growth in Latin America and Southeast Asia remains strong. Countries like Brazil and Thailand recorded double-digit increases in new vehicle sales.

Nissan announces U.S. pricing for 2018 Rogue Hybrid

In terms of vehicle segments, crossovers and SUVs are as popular as clean drinking water. Volume rose 7 percent in 2018, with that segment’s share of global sales rising from 33.8 percent to 36.4 percent. Still, JATO Dynamics notes that the rate of SUV growth slowed in 2018, compared to the double-digit volume increases of past years. All SUV segments recorded growth in 2018.

Global leader in the crossover/SUV field is Renault-Nissan (12 percent share), though Toyota, Hyundai-Kia, and Volkswagen all recorded double-digit growth.

You can probably anticipate what’s coming next. Cars. Yes, those segments dwindled as more and more buyers shacked up with new SUVs. Globally, compact car volume shrunk 8 percent last year, with sales of MPVs dropping 14 percent. Subcompacts and midsizers also shed buyers.

Hurt by losses in the U.S. and Europe, the best-selling passenger car segment, compacts, saw its market share drop to 16.8 percent — less than half that of SUVs.

While overall volume remains low, electric vehicles had a boffo year in 2018, mainly due to the ramp-up of Tesla Model 3 production in the U.S. and China’s continuing push for EV sales (zealous European lawmakers played something of a role, too). EV volume rose 74 percent to 1,261,000 vehicles, or about 1.5 percent of all new vehicle sales. Just two years earlier, the world saw only 391,000 EV sales.

Tesla Model 3, Image: Tesla

It should come as no surprise that pickup sales made up a healthier slice of the world’s new vehicle pie last year, but you might be surprised that the U.S. was not the country with the largest pickup sales growth. Sure, that country buys half the world’s pickups, but Brazil and Thailand recorded the best segment growth.

Globally, pickup volume rose 5 percent in 2018, with the segment’s share of new vehicles sales now standing at 6.4 percent. Winner among the world’s pickups — and all vehicle models — remains the Ford F-150, which sold 1,076,153 units last year. If environmentalists are taking stock of this, they can rejoice in EVs collectively outselling the single most popular vehicle model.

F-150 sales in 2018, it should be noted, were flat.

Among the top five best-selling models, no surprises exist. The F-150 leads the pack, followed by the Toyota Corolla, Honda Civic, Toyota RAV4, and the Nissan X-Trail/Rogue. Should last year’s trends continue, expect to see the RAV4 reach the number three spot.

[Images: Ford, Nissan, Tesla]

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88 Comments on “What Did the World Buy in 2018? Plenty of SUVs, and 74 Percent More Electrics...”


  • avatar
    65corvair

    The part about trends didn’t respect borders make sense. People are people. Twice I’ve talked to a Frenchman who rented Suburbans. They loved them. If gas, regulations and roads were the same in Europe as here, they would buy similar vehicles. As mpg’s get better, we buy bigger (taller). Look a pictures of any European country from the ’60’s and now. Vehicles are much bigger and nicer cars today.

    Another note in general, when you have China dropping 2.8%, it should not be a big deal. If a company sales drop 2.8% and you don’t have at least level profits, you are a poorly managed company.

    If I had been Honda or Toyota, my last redesign in the midsize and compact sedan would have been to make the cars about 4 inches taller, with about 3 inches going to seat height. I don’t see sedans going away, but the choices will be fewer.

    • 0 avatar
      Fred

      I knew a couple of Danish who bought Dodge Chargers. Compared to Denmark gas is cheap here. Big V8 roar and wide open highways, yea that’s something you can’t get in their part of the world. On the other hand they were impressed that I had a Audi A3. They said that’s a car for well paid executives. Not that I was poor but hardly rich.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      Ever notice most europeans rent an SUV with a V8 when they vacation in the US. And they absolutely love them!

      • 0 avatar
        nrd515

        I had an Australian couple move in next door to me back about 40 years ago. I had my truly awful Dodge Power Wagon then, and they did nothing but make fun of “American Trucks” when they first arrived. They bought A Nissan B210, in almost the same yellow as my truck was. They only had the one car for a while, but suddenly one day, there’s a brand new Chevy K10 4×4 pickup in the driveway. I asked him what made him buy it, and he said, “I don’t know exactly, but a guy I work with let me drive his and I just understood!” He and his wife still live in that house, and when I look at Google street view, there is a GMC Sierra Denali pickup and a Yukon parked in front. My last truck was a 2003 Ram that I had to get rid of after I was severely injured in a series of falls, and anytime it snows out, I miss it a lot. I loved that thing. Not so much the looks, but the way it sounded and drove through anything.

      • 0 avatar
        AtoB

        “Ever notice most europeans rent an SUV with a V8 when they vacation in the US. And they absolutely love them!”

        I as an American OTOH look forward to renting a VW Polo or UP! while in Europe.

      • 0 avatar
        cpthaddock

        I only know about my cousin + family, who rented a Suburban for three weeks and just felt embarrassed by the excess, poor packaging, handling and tacky GM interior. I’d recommended something on this scale to them because other family members have rented vehicles they’re more familiar with (Corolla, Rogue etc.) and felt constantly intimidated because of the diminutive size while traversing our wide open spaces.

    • 0 avatar
      James Charles

      65Corvair,
      Your analysis is correct. It could be stated that anyone in America is similar. Why not say the person on $30k a year would like to have a BMW instead of a 10 year old Kia?

      The average guy in India would dream of any car, not just a Suburban.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    “F-150 sales in 2018, it should be noted, were flat.”

    Please direct me to the Ford press release where they indicate F-150 sales.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Ford
      F-series
      2018 909.330
      2017 896.764
      2016 820.799
      2015 780.354
      2014 753.851
      2013 763.402
      2012 645.316
      2011 584.917
      2010 528.349

      Source: http://carsalesbase.com/us-car-sales-data/ford/ford-f-series/

      Ford show the same figures: http://fordauthority.com/fmc/ford-motor-company-sales-numbers/ford-sales-numbers/ford-f-series-sales-numbers/

      F-150 sales may be flat, but it’s still better then sedans

      • 0 avatar
        deanst

        You do realize that they sell the f150 in Canada? It’s actually more popular here (on a per capital basis) than in the u.s. – despite the constant bleating that Canadians only buy cheap, small cars.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        “Ford
        F-series
        2018 909.330
        2017 896.764
        2016 820.799
        2015 780.354
        2014 753.851
        2013 763.402
        2012 645.316
        2011 584.917
        2010 528.349”

        I said F-150. Not F-Series

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Ford doesn’t break-out the F-150 sales from the F-Series sales. The article is wrong

          • 0 avatar
            SD 328I

            True, but neither does anyone else.

            Neither GM nor RAM break down light vs. heavy duty sales with their full size trucks.

            Silverado is 1500, 2500, 3500 etc. Same with Sierra and RAM.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Even though OEMs don’t disclose the sales breakup, the information is out there, not hard to find, and based on registrations.

            GM is half ton ‘heavy’, with something like a quarter of their sales “HD”s. Some say it’s because there’s little love for Duramax or independent front suspension 4X4s.

            Ram is very HD ‘heavy’, thanks to Cummins obviously, while Ford is somewhere in the middle with about 60% F-150s.

            But Super Dutys and F-150s are the same platform now, despite different frames, frame gauge, etc. A “platform” has more to do with orientation, spacial location of engine/trans, fuel tanks, wiring routing, brakes from booster to calipers, etc, even if those actual parts are non-interchangeable.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            Exactly my point.

            The article is wrong. And I’m not sure how a writer that lives in the automotive world could get something so simple completely wrong.

            He’s looking at the sale of 4(+?) vehicles and saying that it’s one single model. The fact is there is no vehicle called the F-Series. It’s a fake marketing slogan that allows Ford to crow about sales of multiple vehicles in TV ads.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “True, but neither does anyone else.

            Neither GM nor RAM break down light vs. heavy duty sales with their full size trucks“

            Yes but a “Ram” or a Silverado are at least real vehicles. The “FSeries” is not. It’s completely fake.

            You cannot buy a 2019 F-Series. You cannot get parts for a 2019 FSeries. It makes sense that GM includes all Silverado sales under one title…because they’re all Silverados. But F-Series? That’s just made up marketing nonsense designed to retain a sales title that nobody cares about.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            “Ram” pickup sales are multiple classes/models also, same as GM fullsize pickup sales figures.

            Except when Ford combines F-series, it’s “fake marketing”? You have to REALLY not be paying attention to not grasp this.

            GM’s “Longest Lasting…” is actually fake marketing.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “Except when Ford combines F-series, it’s “fake marketing”? You have to REALLY not be paying attention to not grasp this.”

            Ok please show me a parts list for a 2019 Ford F-Series. Please show me the engine options for the 2019 Ford F-Series.

            Yes, it’s a made up title so Ford can retain a sales crown nobody cares about.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Chevrolet Silverado Series Trucks vs. Ford F-Series Trucks

            You’re getting hung-up on semantics it’s just a name, but the groupings are similar

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Ford could just list sales of “Ford Fullsize Pickups” and you’d have to live with that just the same. Either way, you’re not getting “F-150 Sales” specifically, alone, separately or whatever you’re looking for.

            There would be nothing to compare them to anyway, (except Tundra/Titan) since GM nor Ram gives up they’re 1/2 ton sales that way either.

            Except Ford doesn’t list “F-Series” as a specific truck, and only in the media will you find “F-Series” used extensively, and just for simplification obviously.

            So please show where Ford list’s “F-Series” as a specific truck, as opposed to simply F-series (no distinctly capital “S”), also for simplification, meaning all fullsize pickups made by Ford.

            The most you’ll find is “F-SERIES” when everything in the heading is BOLD PRINT, same as E-SERIES (van/cutoffs).

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    No surprises here, people just like the practicality of SUV/crossovers and pick-ups. Don’t see that changing much in the short term. Do you think the buying public is ever going to go back to “longer, lower and wider”?

    • 0 avatar
      vehic1

      Lie2me: Time will tell. Do you believe that 0% of the increased crossover and pickup sales is fad/trend-based? That people are suddenly “woke” to Jeep Wranglers and Gladiators, and huge pickup hoods and grilles – that it’s purely a matter of utility?

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        People buy what their friend, brother, uncle, neighbor, co-worker buy, because they got a good deal and I drove it one day and liked it. Once bought they discovered they liked the ride height, the 4WD in winter and the fact it can carry all my stuff and a couple of kids. That’s how trends start, in my opinion anyway

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        “That people are suddenly “woke” to Jeep Wranglers and Gladiators, and huge pickup hoods and grilles – that it’s purely a matter of utility?”

        People buy what makes them feel good to drive…….it’s as simple as that. Every car/truck I’ve ever bought has emotion tied into the purchase to some degree. I’m not unique.

        I used to own a CC PU. And they are the most versatile thing you can own, if you have family, need to tow things, and have a life style that requires you to carry things every weekend that don’t fit or aren’t safe inside an SUV or van. Which is why I’ll be buying another one in a few years. Miss that truck all the time.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      Yeah I think it’s probably a trend that’ll pass. Most people who buy these vehicles don’t actually need them and would be just as well served with a more fuel efficient smaller car. So at some point another trend will arise.

      Believe it or not, I don’t want them to fail. If they’re keeping Americans employed meeting the big demand, all power to them.

      I’m screwed as a car enthusiast but to be honest, it is probably a blessing in disguise for me personally. One less expensive habit I will have will ultimately be a good thing. I bought my 2015 Accord off lease last year and I’ll probably drive it another 3-4 years. I used to get a new car every 3 years. I had no desire to do that in 2018. So the change in the market saved me some money.

      But my worry is that Ford and GM threw all eggs all in one basket with the trend. So if the CUV and SUV market does tank, guess who’s going to be bailing them out? That won’t save me some money as a U.S. taxpayer who’s going to have to foot the bill for that.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Americans, at least post WWII have always purchased vehicles “by the pound” so to speak. From the Land Yachts, to the Broughams, to todays 4 door pickups and yes, crossovers. Typically any deviation from that has been the trend, not the other way around.

        • 0 avatar
          Superdessucke

          We had a brief bout with frugality after the first oil embargo where cars got smaller (downsizing) but I would say this is generally correct.

          This never made any sense to me. I think having a bigger car kind of sucks but then I live in an urban environment where size is usually a liability, and I am definitely realizing I do not represent the mainstream car buyer. Even Civics and Jettas are starting to approach the dimensions of a midsize car of the late 1970s. My newer Accord is positively a land yacht in my opinion. Not enough to make me want to get rid of it, but I do find myself wishing it was about 10% smaller.

          Oh well. Like I said, I will move on to other hobbies (plenty of things to spend money on in this world) and it will be interesting to watch what happens. If CUVs stay popular and keep the economy rolling I’m cool with it.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “This never made any sense to me.”

            True. It doesn’t make any sense until you factor in people’s WANTS versus their NEEDS.

            But actual purchases are generally driven by the financial considerations of a buyer’s disposable income.

            In short, if a person can afford what they want, why should they settle for only what they really need?

            Consider this as food for thought: I would love a Marathon Motor Home for $2.5Million, yet I drive a free and clear rebuilt 1973 Southwind.

            ’nuff said.

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            Oh yes, I agree. They buy them because they want them, not because they need them. So that’s why I think this’s a trend that’ll ultimately pass.

            Enthusiasts take comfort in that but do you know what the next trend will be? I don’t either. It might be even worse for enthusiasts than this one. In fact, were I a gambling man, I would bet it will be. It probably will be self driving and electric, and it might not be long before a nostalgic drive in a 2018 Nissan Rogue seems as exciting as a ride in a 1965 Porsche 911 does now.

            We had a good run if you think about it. The first V-8s of the 1950s, the 1960s muscle car era, the 1970s..well, ok, the 1980s muscle car resurgence, the pocket rocket era of the early 1990s, etc. Good times were had by all. But time has passed us by now. It’s now time to focus on other hobbies.

            Sounds like you’re doing that already. I like RVs. Good work Perfect way to ride off into the sunset with dignity :-)

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Superdessucke, I have been very blessed and very fortunate to have been able to make a go of it after I retired from the US military back in 1985.

            Looking back at my automotive “run”, yes “The first V-8s of the 1950s, the 1960s muscle car era, the 1970s..” it’s been great fun, especially when my four brothers got into the new-car retailing game in the 1980s (and drafted me because my services were FREE.)

            I don’t know what the next trend will be but based on the SAAR and what actually sells, I would forecast the money will be made for the next three to five model years in the light duty four-door pickup truck ring and the SUV/CUV ring of the North American automotive three-ring circus.

            But the entire US economy and future are actually hanging by a very thin thread and there are so many factors that can upend the whole ball of wax.

            To name a few:
            First and foremost, Politics.
            Second, all things Energy.
            Last but not least, all things Trade.

            Getting that balance just right is the tricky part, and so difficult to achieve for the majority of people of all age groups.

            If they don’t have their financial act together by age 55, they never will unless they win a Lottery. And that affects what they drive, what they buy, if anything at all.

            But we had to work our way through our era. And we did!

            Now the young’uns have to shape their world into the place where they have to live. If that is Socialism, that’s their choice.

            I’m happy with what I got.

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            HDC, you are a wise sounding person. And you have the proper reflection. I’m trying to gain that myself in life.

            You hit the nail right on the head with politics. Have you read the Green New Deal? Pure politics couched in energy policy. I remember being in college 25 years ago and there were a few socialists. They used to get laughed at by our contemporaries like the idiots they were. I can’t even imagine how something like this would have gone over then. Lead balloon comes to mind.

            But now? I’m not saying the Green New Deal will pass. But the very fact that it didn’t become immediate cannon fodder on late night TV and get laughed off the floor of Congress along with a pointed suggestion that AOC get referred for a psychiatric examination shows you that times have drastically changed. And it was even endorsed by many Democratic presidential candidates! I simply couldn’t believe what I was actually seeing! Yet there it was.

            This could of course be a fad. An attempt to jump on the Flavor of the Month’s coattails. Or there could be a monumental shift in how we drive very soon. Those Chevy Traverses and Ford Explorers everyone now loves could disappear into the night like mist, along with the farting cows!

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            HDR, you are a wise sounding person. And you have the proper reflection. I’m trying to gain that myself in life.

            You hit the nail right on the head with politics. Have you read the Green New Deal? I remember being in college 25 years ago and there were a few socialists. They used to get laughed at by our contemporaries like the idiots they were. I can’t even imagine how something like this would have gone over then. Lead balloon comes to mind.

            But now? I’m not saying the Green New Deal will pass (yet). But the very fact that it didn’t become immediate cannon fodder on late night TV and get laughed off the floor of Congress along with a pointed suggestion that AOC get referred for a psychiatric examination shows you that times have drastically changed. And it was even endorsed by many Democratic presidential candidates! I simply couldn’t believe what I was actually seeing.

            This could of course be a fad. An attempt to jump on the Flavor of the Month’s coattails. Or there could be a monumental shift in how we drive very soon. Those Chevy Traverses and Ford Explorers everyone now loves could disappear into the night like mist, along with the farting cows!

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            I have NOT read the Green New Deal. Not interested. Won’t apply to me. It’s something for the young’uns to decide to enact and pay for.

            But I do have three TVs going (in different rooms) all the time, tuned to different stations (Bloomberg, CNBC and Newsy), so I’m sure to hear something of interest at some point. And it was discussed by the talking heads, as well as dismissed.

            My concern is mainly with the financial markets since my wife’s CSRS/FERS annuity is directly tied to how well the markets are doing. Hey, the higher it goes, the more and larger forced payouts we’re forced to accept.

            And if the markets go down we do not have to repay anything since, like life insurance, the annuity is fully funded BEFORE forced payouts are made.

            But I do love my steaks, driving ICE vehicles, flying in jet aircraft, so the Green New Deal would not be something I have an interest in. That’s for the next gen to determine.

            They want it, they can pay for it. My generation had what worked for them, and my parents generation had what worked for them. I’m cool with that.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            I have NOT read the Green New Deal. Not interested. Won’t apply to me. It’s something for the young’uns to decide to enact and pay for.

            But I do have three TVs going (in different rooms) all the time, tuned to different stations (Bloomberg, CNBC and Newsy), so I’m sure to hear something of interest at some point. And it was discussed by the talking heads, as well as dismissed.

            My concern is mainly with the financial markets since my wife’s CSRS/FERS annuity is directly tied to how well the markets are doing. Hey, the higher it goes, the more and larger forced payouts we’re forced to accept.

            And if the markets go down we do not have to repay anything since, like life insurance, the annuity is fully funded BEFORE forced payouts are made.

            But I do love my steaks, driving ICE vehicles, flying in jet aircraft, so the Green New Deal would not be something I have an interest in. That’s for the next gen to determine.

            They want it, they can pay for it. My generation had what worked for them, and my parents generation had what worked for them. I’m cool with that.

  • avatar
    Rocket

    Careful saying that … practical or not, many are of the opinion that enthusiasts are supposed to hate crossovers.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Lol, Don’t tell anyone, but there’s no reason why a person can’t have a Jeep and a Miata in the same garage

    • 0 avatar
      nvinen

      I don’t think anyone is supposed to hate anything but personally I don’t get crossovers. They’re worse in pretty much every way than an AWD wagon. More expensive, worse handling, less legroom, generally slower and use more fuel, look worse, etc. We have two in my immediate family and about sev en if you include my parents and sister. I’ll drive one of our full size sedans over all of them any day. The AWD is good in heavy rain I guess. That’s about the only benefit for me.

      • 0 avatar
        Rocket

        Been a wagon guy for a long time, but there just isn’t much to choose from in terms of traditional wagons today. One can only conclude that the crossover is the modern wagon, but with the increased ground clearance and higher hip point most drivers prefer. Crossovers also offer greater passenger space given the same footprint. Personally, I’d like to see a resurgence in ‘real’ wagons, but that’s wishful thinking.

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          The two things a CUV gives up over a wagon(handling/fuel economy) the majority of people could car less about. They have more room, ride better, are easier to get in and out of, and you sit up higher. That’s what is important to most buyers which is reflected in sales. Gas is dirt cheap, so IMO fuel economy isn’t even a factor.

          • 0 avatar
            nvinen

            I don’t find crossovers have “more room” at all, at least where it counts. Legroom in my wife’s escape is woeful. No better than the focus on which it is based. The two have a similar footprint. And cargo space isn’t that great unless you enjoy piling stuff on top of other stuff and having it fall over when you go around corners and fall out when you open the tailgate. I also find it much more awkward to get into than a normal car since the doors are too short. I have to do this weird twisting thing to get in. And sorry but I do care about handling and fuel economy.

            I also don’t find taller vehicles ride better either. The higher centre of gravity means they’re either too wallowey or too harsh. I feel certain road bumps less in my low, race inspired sedan than my wife’s CUV and yet it doesn’t roll and pitch. Yes my car will bottom on out bad potholes when hers won’t but most of the time it gives a smoother ride which is surprising since it is fast around a track and her SUV isn’t!

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            Your wife’s Escape’s legroom issue is a Ford problem, not a crossover problem. And even within the Ford family there are good ones. My wife’s MKX is shorter than the last 2 sedans I’ve owned, but it has noticeably more legroom. Key as we both decent height and have a rear facing seat.

            Wagons don’t match on cargo space either. Our MKX is shorter than a Mondeo (Fusion) wagon… but it has nearly double the cargo capacity with the seats up. Even the midsize wagon class leader, the Euro Passat, is off by about 1/3. Volume = L x W x H…

            If you don’t like crossovers, that’s your right. I don’t either. But we have to deal with facts to have meaningful discussions and form useful opinions.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            @nvinen the same things that compromise space in a crossover are at work in modern hatchbacks and wagons, maybe with the exception of VW models (sloping roof, etc). My Fiesta can swallow a good amount of stuff, but not much more than a sedan unless I drop the seats.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            “And sorry but I do care about handling and fuel economy.”

            I’m sure you do but you need to realize your the minority. I have no desire to own a CUV either but I can understand their merits and why people choose them over a sedan or wagon.

    • 0 avatar
      nvinen

      Then why does my sister’s CRV have the same problem? It obviously isn’t just Ford. It’s the fact that a crossover is basically just a hatchback on stilts so it’s going to have similar interior room to a hatchback. They just aren’t a replacement for a full-size wagon. An SUV is but then you’re spending significantly more. Also we bought the Escape because most of its competitors were woefully underpowered at the time. Another CUV problem (unless you want to spend big money on something less reliable). None of the others we test drove had all that much more interior room.

      • 0 avatar
        Spike_in_Brisbane

        Agreed. Vehicles are designed to carry their passengers/ cargo and no more. I remember getting out of my CLK320 and into a Lincoln Navigator on display in a mall and being appalled at how little space there was for me as the driver. Space behind me is irrelevant, my wife and I seldom have any use for the back seat. Back in the sixties a friend owned a Chev Belair which took up acres of road space but inside it was no bigger than my Holden except for width. ( The front bench seat was about 15 metres across)

      • 0 avatar
        Rocket

        Nvinen, your sister’s CRV does not have a space problem. It’s the size of a Civic, but has 10% more rear legroom than a Civic hatchback, more headroom, and FAR more cargo capacity. Many people will cross-shop the CR-V against an Accord, and with a conventional trunk, the CR-V’s load carrying advantage is even greater. Plus, despite being a foot longer, the Accord’s rear leg room is identical to the CR-V’s. With a higher roof, crossover seats typically sit higher and more upright.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        “Also we bought the Escape because most of its competitors were woefully underpowered at the time.”

        Escapes are one of the few in their class and price point to offer decent engine choices

        • 0 avatar
          jatz

          Interesting that the base Escape is available only with the 2.5 NA engine.

          Sounds perfect to me, though. Po’ folks like me can’t afford to be early adopters of teensy turbo nonsense.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Yes, obviously a compact vehicle won’t have the room of a full size vehicle. Who has ever said otherwise?

    • 0 avatar
      nvinen

      Also, cargo volume is a meaningless measurement because you aren’t always carrying tall items or items that stack. Cargo area is more meaningful. A large flat tray can carry more groceries than a narrow tall box of the same volume for example.

      • 0 avatar
        Rocket

        Hardly meaningless. We don’t all haul just groceries after all. Some loads are taller. There is a benefit to being able to see over whatever you have in the cargo area. The shorter load bay can also be the difference between climbing in versus reaching in.

        • 0 avatar
          jatz

          “We don’t all haul just groceries after all.”

          Precisely, Rocket.

          In addition to groceries, big box items, snow shovels, odd-shaped Goodwill donations etc., I always haul my ass.

          Personal ass haulage, particularly for the arthritic, is tremendously eased by the one-size-fits-all utility of a tall vehicle.

          And for the VERY tall vehicles, any arthritic will tell you that climbing into it is vastly easier than scrunching into a sedan or conventional wagon.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Nope…the TTAC pickup standard should be applied to hatchbacks. If you aren’t hauling dogs or stacked floor to ceiling with groceries using 100 percent of the utility 100 percent of the time you are a poser and would be better with a moped.

  • avatar
    arthurk45

    Tesla Model 3 sales have collapsed in the U.S. and don’t look promising in either Europe or China. Tesla Model S and X base models got clobbered by Porsche Taycan and Jaguar I Pace – were immediately withdrawn from production.
    The Porsche Taycan is guaranted to outsell the Model S in its first year of production.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Sounds like everyone who wanted a Tesla 3 got their Tesla 3 and now what? I’d rather have the Porsche myself

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      The Model 3 was the best selling EV in the world in 2018. In the US it outsold every car model from BMW and Lexus, and it outsold all of Audi and Acura. There’s every reason to think Europe and China are huge growth markets for it. Tesla has always steadily increased its base-model battery size over time on the S and X; I doubt Porsche’s electric vaporware and Jaguar’s me-too rig are relevant to that, since the German competes at the high end and the Brit’s range is poor. I own neither a Tesla car nor Tesla stock, so I don’t have a dog in this fight other than it annoys me when people talk a lot of BS.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      @arthurk45: As usual, your comments about Tesla are completely incorrect.

  • avatar
    cpmanx

    The source article from JATO Dynamics correctly notes that the best selling vehicle line is the Ford F-series. This article attributes all those sales to the F-150, which is simply wrong. Would be nice if TTAC had linked to the source:

    https://www.jato.com/global-car-market-remains-stable-during-2018-as-continuous-demand-for-suvs-offsets-decline-in-sales-of-compact-cars-and-mpvs/

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      People seem to interchange “F-150” and “F-Series”. Its the entire line that accounts for those sales, not just the half ton.

      To be fair, the F-150 and Super Duty are more closely related than half-tons and 3/4 ton+ Ford trucks since 1996. They now share a cab and other bits, even though the Super Duty’s frame and such are different.

      It’s also important to note that trucks like the F-450 chassis cab are not included in total F-Series sales, so that F-750 you see at U-Haul had nothing to do with F-Series selling 1m+ units.

  • avatar
    jatz

    EVs are going to proliferate because the OEMs will make it so.

    I’m too dumb to understand their myriad reasons for doing this but, as with CAFE, Affirmative Action and bicycle helmets, larger forces than popular demand are afoot here.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      A lot of the EV momentum is driven by state law, as in CA where if an OEM sells more than 2000 vehicles in the state, that OEM MUST offer EVs for sale alongside their ICE vehicles.

      That’s why I think there is a good chance that we’ll be seeing two different classes of vehicles being sold again, like CA emissions, and emissions for other states.

      We had that before. No reason not to go back to that dual standard. It worked in the past. It will work in the future.

    • 0 avatar
      vehic1

      Except that popular demand, in the form of the popular vote that elects governors, senators, and almost all public officials, is therefore largely upheld. OEMs aren’t gambling, either, that the US will forever disregard EVs – since they have already increased their sales here.

  • avatar
    SD 328I

    “Yes but a “Ram” or a Silverado are at least real vehicles. The “FSeries” is not. It’s completely fake.

    You cannot buy a 2019 F-Series. You cannot get parts for a 2019 FSeries. It makes sense that GM includes all Silverado sales under one title…because they’re all Silverados. But F-Series? That’s just made up marketing nonsense designed to retain a sales title that nobody cares about.”

    What??? How does naming the F-Series help Ford to retain their sales title? Total sales of full-size trucks is measured the same, both light and heavy duty are taken into account for all 3 manufacturers.

    The F-Series, Silverado and RAM are a series of full-size trucks with different variants from 1500, 2500 and 3500 and larger sized trucks.

    Chevy call it the Silverado, but it isn’t just the 1500, it’s all of them.

  • avatar
    cpthaddock

    I can only imagine Ford execs nervousness about their increasing reliance on the F150 and thus vulnerability to oil prices, as electric marches forwards. I’d love to have a full size pickup, but I’ll wait until gas gets back above $3 per gallon and then grab one at a fire sale price.

    • 0 avatar
      jatz

      The older one gets, the more trifling a concern is FE, certainly as compared to comfort and safety.

    • 0 avatar
      SD 328I

      You’ll need well above $3 a gallon for an extended period of time, probably a recession and credit crunch as well.

      In fact, in California, gas has been over $3 a gallon for a while and the best selling vehicles continue to be trucks and SUVs there.

      Even in the height of high gas prices and recession in 2008-2011, the best selling vehicle was still the F-series and full size trucks.

      They also retain historically high resale value regardless of fuel prices.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        This. When gas gets expensive (rarely) people gripe while they fill up their trucks, but they keep right on filling them up. And should it croak, they buy a new one and gripe a little less because it is likely better at the pump than the ol one.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        SD 328I, What you wrote is so true, even with the gas prices in CA. The price of gas in CA had no effect on my grandson choosing to buy my 2016 Tundra 4dr 4×4 for use as his DD on his 90-mile roundtrip commute.

        Gas is currently $2.199 for RegUnl in my area and in CA it is usually at least one dollar more per gallon.

        Another intersting thing about that is that book value on my 2016 Tundra is higher today than what I paid for it back in 2016.

        • 0 avatar
          Fordson

          HDC, that info is incomplete without knowing whether or not you sold him the truck at market value, or at grandpa-to-grandson value. If someone is willing to sell you a vehicle that’s worth $35k for maybe 75% of that price, that pays for a lot of gas.

          You indicted elsewhere that you are 73 – so your grandson is what – mid 20s? Over $250/month in commuting costs (actually that is only gas cost – cost per mile is significantly higher) is certainly not where most 20-somethings want to be, I know that.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Fordson, all valid points on your part. I didn’t want to get lengthy in my comment, as I was on the throne at the time of writing.

            I paid $39K for that truck, and my grandson is paying me $500/month for it until paid for (however long that takes). Started that when I left the truck at his house in Fallbrook, CA, when we spent several month is Ensenada, BC, Old Mexico, in the Spring of last year.

            His Tacoma DD finally died and my grandson asked if he could use my parked truck for his daily commute to his job at March AFB.

            My grandson is currently age 28yo.

            My point was that some people, like myself and others, don’t care about the price of fuel because WHAT they choose to drive (for whatever reasons of their own) is more important than the cost of fuel.

            Some people attach their highest priority to booze or cigarettes. Others to drugs.

            But there are some people who value the mobility of driving themselves any time, anywhere as high as food and shelter. And they structure their income accordingly.

  • avatar
    sfredst

    The writer had all this data available and chose not to share it with us? What is that all about? Trying to use data to push the writer’s ideas? What a letdown of an article. This is not journalism it is crap!

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    “EV volume rose 74 percent to 1,261,000 vehicles, or about 1.5 percent of all new vehicle sales. Just two years earlier, the world saw only 391,000 EV sales.“. A lot of state/local governments are requiring their departments to buy EVs even if they do not want them!


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