By on February 13, 2019

Image: Brian Williams/Spiedbilde

It’s nice to write about a vehicle with an honest-to-goodness name, especially one that replaces a vehicle with an alphanumeric name. As it slowly relegates past three-letter combinations to the dustbin of history, Lincoln Motor Company is busy putting the finishing touches on the next product in its utility vehicle offensive: the Corsair, formerly the MKC.

The smallest vehicle in Lincoln’s renewed stable, the Corsair debuts for the 2020 model year. While the model’s new name is meant to conjure up images of a small sailing boat, most will associate it with a brawny WWII American warbird. This, if it needs to be said, is not a bad thing.

A 2020 model year VIN decoder document sent from Ford to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration spells out your powertrain options. Interested in a plug-in hybrid?

You’ll be able to choose one, as the document shows what we’ve seen suggested in spy photos. In addition to two purely internal combustion offerings, Ford’s 2.5-liter four-cylinder will mate with an electric motor beneath the Corsair’s hood, generating a power figure that remains TBD. The 2.5L iVCT engine makes 175 hp and 175 lb-ft of torque in a base Fusion S. Driving range of this plug-in hybrid is again anyone’s guess, but Ford’s Fusion Energi plug-in saw an upgrade to 25 miles for 2019.

As middling range, combined with a higher sticker price, is not a strong selling point, Lincoln is no doubt under some pressure to offer a CUV that goes the distance, and for not too much of a markup. Note that the PHEV model is only offered with all-wheel drive.

Image: Brian Williams

The remainder of the engine options should look familiar, as they’re carried over from the MKC. Entry level power comes from a 2.0-liter Ecoboost four-cylinder rated at 237 net brake horsepower, with tonier buyers sure to spring for the 2.3-liter version. That one is listed at 275 net brake hp. The VIN doc lists front-and all-wheel drive models in base or Signature trim.

One thing that should disappear for 2020 is the MKC’s outdated six-speed automatic transmission.

While we haven’t seen one sans camo, it’s clear Lincoln designers want to endow the little CUV with Aviator-esque styling. Exactly when we’ll see this crossover debut is another mystery, though this fall seems likely — perhaps at the L.A. Auto Show.

[Images: Brian Williams/Spiedbilde]

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44 Comments on “Lincoln to Offer Three Flavors of Corsair...”


  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Named after an Edsel? Hmmmmm…

  • avatar
    Verbal

    There just aren’t enough luxury compact crossovers on the market. Lincoln to the rescue!

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      This is a redesign and renaming of an existing product.

      But, yeah, they should just not be in hot selling segments.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Save your money and buy a loaded Ford Escape, same vehicle

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Ford is hoping no one listens to this advice.

      • 0 avatar
        dwford

        Now that spy shots have revealed the new Escape’s interior to be identical to the new Focus’s interior (not great at all), The extra money might just be worth it.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        You can’t get the 2.3 in the Escape, so not, it’s not quite the same. A similar situation exists with the Fusion/MKZ. Want a V6? MKZ-only since 2013. In my opinion, Ford does a better job than GM in this area. Comparing the Traverse to the XT6 shows no difference in top-level drivetrains. The 3.6 is a decent motor, but Cadillac should offer something more. The MKZ with the 3.7 (and now the 3.0TT) is a decidedly up level experience compared to the Ecoboosts that are the top engine in the Fusion. This is as it should be.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Wish it were either a regular hybrid or a full BEV. Plug ins seem to combine the worst of both worlds with no benefit.

    Plus the savings aren’t even that big unless you live in a state with expensive gas AND a time of use rate. Based on average gas and residential electric prices, a normal hybrid will cost basically the same to fuel up as an equivalent BEV/plug in will to charge up. And if you don’t live somewhere with green power the emissions savings are negligible too.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      This is the part where a Volt owner lectures you on how plug ins are the Best Thing Ever, and you’re clearly stupid for not understanding the 3.114% of drivers who a) can actually take advantage of the tech, and b) actually afford the tech.

    • 0 avatar
      Rocket

      Using the plug is optional, so in a way it is still a conventional hybrid. Plug-ins seem like a good compromise for a lot of folks – especially when there is a short commute or lots of errand-running involved. A full BEV is an awfully big price jump, and is difficult to justify in such a scenario. What good is a 200-mile range if the car rarely goes more than 10 or 20 at a time?

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      Plug ins just seem like a waste of money. You pay more than for a regular hybrid, but if you use them as intended (keeping within the EV only range) you’ll never get your money back.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Can one still obtain a hybrid which runs on conventional fuel? If plugging in is required I see and others would see it more as a limitation than strength.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          Hybrids run on gasoline by definition.

        • 0 avatar
          jalop1991

          “Can one still obtain a hybrid which runs on conventional fuel?”

          The Prius, for example, is a GASOLINE car. It’s a “hybrid” which convention says means it uses batteries and electricity to make better use of that gasoline.

          But the ONLY energy put into the car to make it go is gasoline.

          Hybrids are GASOLINE cars.

  • avatar
    mikestuff

    I live in Salt Lake City, Utah and winter has its grip on us. I spent last weekend in St. George, almost the last place to go in Southern Utah. The weather was nicer than Salt Lake City and it was warmer by at least 40 degrees. I went to a funeral so it wasn’t like I was having fun. At one point, I was with my brother (he drove which is my favorite way to travel) and I saw a new Lincoln driving down I-15, probably on the way back to Las Vegas and I think it was one of these. I know almost nothing about Lincoln SUVs but I noticed that this had the name Corsair on it and I’m old enough to remember when that was an Edsel name It looked just like an MKC so maybe it will be the same except for the name. I don’t think I’ll ever understand all the SUV’s being built and especially a Lincoln SUV but I’m not the market.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      You see prototypes from time to time here in Denver as well, though they’re normally heavily camouflaged. Automakers do a lot of high-altitude durability testing in Utah and Colorado. I worked for an outfit that did the testing in the mid-’90s. Getting paid to drive around in the mountains was a pretty sweet (if low-paying) gig.

  • avatar

    Corsair is a brand of hair dryer isn’t it?

    /s

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Create a murdered out edition called the Con-Air.

  • avatar
    kushman1

    If they could design and package this as an avatior follow up a year later allowing people who can’t afford that to buy this then it’s going to be a huge 1-2 punch for Lincoln.

  • avatar
    James2

    Who owns the Messerschmitt brand name? They used to make cars after the war. Mitsubishi should name its next crossover the Zero. Ford, of course, had a F-150 Lightning, ntm Mustang. And then there’s Dodge with its Hellcat.

    You can’t have enough cars named after WWII airplanes.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      I approve of the above post. And still believe that the Triumph Spitfire has the best name in automotive history.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        It’s funny that you mention this. I was watching an Amazon special about the Supermarine Spitfire earlier today and thought about how it compared to the Triumph. The Aircraft was what we today would call an air-superiority fighter, meant to be the top dog. The Triumph was an entry-level sportscar for those of modest means. Ironically, the coupe version with the big motor (I6) ditched the Spitfire name in favor of GT6.

    • 0 avatar
      jatz

      “You can’t have enough cars named after WWII airplanes.”

      Bravo!

      Model X > Gooney Bird.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      And, of course, Zil could build a Stormovik..

  • avatar
    Rocket

    If Lincoln separates the Corsair from the Escape as they have the Aviator from the Explorer, this could actually find an audience in that gap between upper mainstream and full-on luxury. Although one could argue there are no compact luxury cars, just premium ones. Nothing in this class is truly luxurious.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      The Porsche Macan isn’t considered luxury?

      • 0 avatar
        Rocket

        The Macan is not really in the MKC’s class. It, along with the Q5 on which it’s based, GLC, X3 and others are a class above, or maybe 2/3 a class above. Now if Porsche makes something based on the Q3 (they won’t), then we’ll talk.

        • 0 avatar
          Rocket

          After further consideration, I might be willing to consider the Evoque “luxury”. At least in design and material quality. And price, of course.
          Doesn’t really drive like a luxury vehicle though, but you can make that argument about a lot of premium cars.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    Arrrgh! Tis a grand cute-ute for an old sea dog. The Mariner while blingy; has made too many trips around the horn for its captains. Oh to be piloting a Corsair during the equinox! Arrrgh. They be showing up for lease for not many doubloons.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Regarding its EV range I would expect it to be near that of what has been mentioned for the Aviator ~35mi.

    Unfortunately it seems as though they are going to make all of their Lincoln Hybrids Plug-ins. The Explorer on the other hand doesn’t get a plug-in version, at least to start, and I’m wondering if the Escape will be denied a plug too.

  • avatar
    ravenuer

    Let’s see now…..will it be the Lexux UX, or this thing…..decisions, decisions…

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    I will wait for the new Lincoln Corsair to arrive before deciding on a new car purchase. I like the look of the Aviator but it might be to big for my needs. Gas power version for me too. The Nautilus will not be redesigned until 2021 for 2022?


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