By on February 25, 2019

1987 Volkswagen Golf in Colorado wrecking yard, LH front view - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsIf you’re a European car manufacturer in the middle 1980s, what do you do when Tercels and Excels and Justys make your value-priced econobox seem too expensive in North America? If you’re Volkswagen, you call up your Brazilian operation and start building Americanized versions of the VW Gol, successor to the Type 1 Beetle in the South American market.

Here’s a very early example of the first-year Fox, found in a Denver-area self-service wrecking yard.

1987 Volkswagen Golf in Colorado wrecking yard, build tag - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsThe Fox (not to be confused with the Audi-badged version of the early-1970s VW Dasher aka Audi 80 aka Passat, also called the Fox in North America) was sold here for the 1987 through 1993 model years. This one was built in September of 1986 and its production-sequence number (blanked out in this photo) is in the low three digits, so we’re looking at one of the very first Foxes sold.

1987 Volkswagen Golf in Colorado wrecking yard, instrument cluster - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsThe odometer reading is low and the interior isn’t too fried by the Colorado sun, so I think this car spent most of its life in a garage. Perhaps it broke a decade or two ago, or maybe its owner had a very short and/or occasional commute. The big analog clock is the kind of luxury feature you’d have never seen on a Toyota Tercel, and it still keeps good time at age 32; naturally, I have added it to my car clock collection.

1987 Volkswagen Golf in Colorado wrecking yard, engine - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsPower came from the same 1.8-liter four-cylinder engine that went into the base versions of the Golf, Jetta, and Scirocco; the Fox version made 81 horsepower in 1987. Note the fuel distributor for the dreaded CIS fuel-injection system, next to the intake manifold.

1987 Volkswagen Golf in Colorado wrecking yard, seat fabric - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsDespite the nice clock, this car was one of the cheapest versions of the Fox: a two-door sedan with four-speed manual transmission, scratchy industro-cloth upholstery, and no air conditioning. The MSRP came to just $5,690 in 1987, a steal compared to the $8,190 Golf that year. Meanwhile, the wretched 1987 Hyundai Excel sold for $5,995 and the well-built-but-boring 1987 Toyota Tercel had a $6,548 price tag. The tinny and underpowered Subaru Justy cost $5,725. You could get the early-1970s-technology Chevette for a mere $4,995 that year (yes, GM was still selling Chevettes in 1987), and the best Yugoslavian car in North America could be had for just $4,185 that year.

The Fox was more reliable than the Excel and Yugo, more comfortable than the Chevette, slightly less rust-prone than the Justy, and a lot more fun to drive than the Tercel, so it wasn’t a bad deal for its time (though I’d still have bought the Tercel, or a five-year-old Civic).

1987 Volkswagen Golf in Colorado wrecking yard, RH rear view - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsAn interesting bit of Volkswagen history, but even the most diehard North American VW fanatics seem indifferent to Foxes; even after a couple of months in this junkyard’s inventory, few of its parts have been sold.


German engineering everyone can afford… again.


The Brazilian-market ads were a lot more fun.


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66 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1987 Volkswagen Fox...”


  • avatar
    gtem

    This thing hits all the right notes for me: basic no frills sedan with unpainted bumpers, silver-finished steel wheels, high ground clearance, large greenhouse, stick shift.

    • 0 avatar
      jatz

      “high ground clearance”

      Well, now… yeah.

      But I don’t remember pre-junkyard ones being any noticeable degree higher than the rest of the 13″- and 14″-wheeled econoboxes.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        Notably more usable clearance than most modern sedans IMO, and I agree, the rest of the economy cars of this era were likewise more practical and durable to parking lot abuse in this sense as well.

        • 0 avatar
          jatz

          “Notably more usable clearance than most modern sedans IMO”

          No argument there.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            2 winters ago I ran a ’96 ES300 that I outfitted with 15″ steelies off a Camry, with fatter-than-OEM 205/70R15 Firestone Winterforce snow tires. That was the ultimate bad road bomber. Immensely strong suspension components (tight even with 209k miles), fat sidewall and soft compound rubber, and added clearance from the taller tires.

          • 0 avatar
            jatz

            Cool. I would go out looking for trouble in a rig like that. (Always having a real shovel onboard)

  • avatar
    CaptainObvious

    Way back when – a younger guy at my office bought the wagon version as his first new car.
    I was in it once and noticed he drove with his head against the headliner.
    That would have driven me crazy – didn’t seem to bother him though.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I have to argue on the Chevette…at least those were rear drive and some could had in them in the local War-Mart parking lot after hours after a minor snow storm.

    Back to the Fox: from outward appearances this one looks like it had a good life all the way to then end. Probably a one or two owner max as it shows no signs of BHPH in its lifetime.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      Yeah, I’d take the Chevette. Ours was reliable and a lot of fun on a set of studded winter tires. Plus it’s a hatch. I couldn’t see anything to complain about at the time, after putting a decent stereo in it.

      But of the other choices, I’ve only driven the Tercel. Maybe if I drove them all I’d see things differently.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Car guys want a RWD, brown, diesel wagon.

      Oh, you mean a Chevette (OK a 3-door or 5-door hatch but close enough).

      Oh no, that’s based on 70s technology.

      But I thought you wanted a RWD, brown, diesel, wagon…

  • avatar
    TR4

    Commenters here love to rag on the Chevette. Do they not realize that since it was based on the Opel Kadett it is an example of fine German engineering?

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      The Pontiac LeMans was more recognizable as an Opel Kadett E. Was that fine German engineering? It seems more like the regular German engineering popular with people who lease.

      • 0 avatar

        I drove both a Kadett and a LeMans as rental cars in the same year. I will say they looked the same at 50 feet, but the driving experience was nowhere the same. The Open had a better interior and way better seats, even though both cars were aimed at “cheap”.

        Friend had a Fox. Lasted darn near forever. It went away after being hit in NYC traffic.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    “Dreaded” CIS fuel injection is right. The system in my ’78 Fox was less than reliable. Probably the worst thing was the cast iron fuel distributor, which was sensitive to any water in the fuel, which could cause the plunger (like a spool valve) to stick in its bore. In my case, it caused the plunger to stick in the wide open throttle position, causing an insanely rich mixture which made the car stall at idle.

    • 0 avatar
      bufguy

      I found the Bosch K-jetronic to be a great fuel delivery system especially in context with contemporary carburetors which were really struggling with emission standards… I owned a 1980 Scirocco,a 1986 GTI and I currently own a 1981 Scirocco S all of which were pretty reliable with no drivability problems…I also owned a 1993 Fox but that had the digifant system.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    Two things I think are notable about the Fox: It has a longitudinally mounted engine, and it was available as a two door station wagon. I think it was the last two door wagon sold in the US market.

  • avatar
    syncro87

    I had an ’87 Fox just like this one.

    It had a spot on the passenger door where the paint had chipped or been scratched and the prior owner never fixed it. That spot, due to the propensity of Foxes to rust, turned into a surface rust circle about the size of a softball.

    My wife therefore christened the car “Ringworm”.

    I always wanted a Fox wagon, but never could find a decent one for sale. Ended up with Ringworm and a couple years later a slightly newer one with the more aero headlights. I worked at a VW dealership at the time, and a hobby of mine was collecting misfit Volkswagens. Had a Rabbit Pickup, a Quantum syncro wagon, a couple of Vanagons, Ringworm the Fox, etc.

    The thing I remember most about the Fox was that they definitely had a third world build quality vibe to them, and that they had the stupid seat belts attached to the door with a separate lap belt.

    As cheap as they were new (and used), you could hardly complain much, though. They were easy to work on, and circa 15 years ago, junkyards were chock full of donor Foxes to supply parts for next to nothing.

    The pop out rear side windows were an awesome feature. You could ride with the front door windows down and far less turbulence than the average car. The air conditioning on Foxes sucked. The fan didn’t blow very fast, and only the two center vents supplied much cooling.

    • 0 avatar
      bufguy

      My brother bought a 93 Fox and three years later sold it to my sister when he moved to Manhattan. She drove it for a number of years until one day while driving to work on the expressway the hood flew up. Luckily she got to the side of the road and passerby stopped, helped her remove the hood and place it up against the wall of the expressway. The base for the latch had rotted from the Buffalo salt allowing the hood to fly up. She had it repaired but was afraid to drive the car any longer. The hood sat on the side of the road for two months in the sight of thousands of commuters everyday. I bought the car from her to use as a winter car in 2001 and kept it for 3 more years. I ended up selling it to my sister in law in 2004 who finally junked it 2 years later.

      • 0 avatar
        syncro87

        I grew up about an hour south of Erie, PA, so I have some sort of idea what Buffalo salt is. We didn’t have it quite as bad, but fairly close. Cars rusted out with surprising speed in NW PA 25 years ago.

        A Fox lasting until the mid 2000s is pretty impressive in your area. They rusted easily here in Kansas City, and we don’t get nearly the corrosive chemicals on winter roads that you do up in NY.

  • avatar
    geo

    The re-introduction of the Fox seemed exciting at the time. I remember reading an ad in the newspaper exclaiming “The future looks Beetle-bright with the Fox”. Some people thought this could be the next Beetle, but it seemed to come and go with few sales.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Unless this has an automatic transmission (and even then…), I would really prefer a tachometer in place of that dorky clock.

    • 0 avatar
      bufguy

      Interestingly an automatic was never available for the Fox…Introduced with a 4 speed and offered with a 5 speed later. My 93 Wolfsburg edition had a 5 speed with a clock…My brother had an 87 GL with the 4 speed that did come with a tachometer

      • 0 avatar
        Philippe Pietro

        The tachometer was standart in GL’s, even with four-speed. I’m working in an arcticle about the Fox. It’s going to be written in portuguese, but if someone got interested I can translate it.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      My first car was an 88 Fox GL that had the tachometer. That was also the only thing I could find that was any kind of option.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      I agree, what a puzzling decision. Can’t say I’ve ever seen a manual transmission car without a tach.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Weren’t there stripped versions of American cars that had a “shift light” instead of a tach?

        The light would flash at a factory set RPM kind of like a “SHIFT IDIOT” light.

        One that springs to mind is Chevette Scooter or Escort Pony.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Yes! The Ford Escort and the Ford Tempo come right to mind of being available with a manual, sans tach, and an upshift light.

        • 0 avatar
          FormerFF

          Starting in the early 80’s lots of cars were equipped with a shift light, even those that had tachs. It was supposed to come on at a combination of engine vacuum and speed that would indicate the driver was wasting fuel by not shifting.

          I did have a little fun with those once. Riding with a friend, the first time the shift like came on, I started yelling “SHIFT UP!”. He grabbed second gear and asked me what that was all about. I calmly told him that the shift light was on.

          Fortunately, he didn’t throw me out of the car.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        The German method used to be to put little dots on the speedometer indicating the various maximum speeds in each gear. I could swear I also had at least one German car that had one set of white dots for suggested shift speeds and one set of red dots for maximum shift speeds.

        • 0 avatar

          Could be.

          The real benefit of the shift light was that manufacturers were able to convince the powers that be that the shift light would meaningfully affect driver behavior, in which case they could use those shift points during the fuel economy tests for manual cars, and thus get better economy ratings.

          • 0 avatar

            My first SAAB had a fuse you could pull. My second required black electrical tape. The story I read was they did a study and found X percent of drivers heeded the lights, so they got that fudge factor included.

            The prior scam was to make shift points in the manual unrealistic, so the test would have to use those points…that no real driver would use.

            My Jetta S has a display with your Gear, and an arrow suggesting up or down if the car disagrees with you.

      • 0 avatar
        David Mc Lean

        Air cooled Beetles had no tachs. Heck, for years they didn’t even have gas gauges. When the engine stuttered as it ran out of fuel, the driver had to lean way forward and turn a lever at the front of the floor board to engage the ‘reserve’ fuel supply of about one gallon. Fun times.

      • 0 avatar
        FormerFF

        Up until as least the mid 80’s most cars didn’t come with a tach, regardless of transmissions. Tachs were mostly found in sporting cars and big trucks.

      • 0 avatar
        EGSE

        Had a ’96 Civic DX 5MT w/o a tach. Bought it from my sister who also favors manuals over A/T.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        My ’97 Ranger XLT (4cyl 5spd) had the updated dash that included a tach, the following spring I bought a ’94 XLT (same power/drivetrain) with the old-style angular dash and it didn’t have a tach. It’s a useful bit of information I suppose, but it never prevented me from driving the truck safely or competently.

      • 0 avatar
        bufguy

        Many economy cars from the 70’s and 80’s with manual transmissions such as the Chevette, Corolla, B210, etc. didn’t have a tach. I owned a 1977 Corolla with a 5 spped with no tachometer. I bought a small VDO tachometer and was able to install it in the opening where the clock would have been on more expensive models…Actually looked factory

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      It was common to have no tach on cheaper cars back then – typically, you had to buy a higher-level model to get one, and I’m pretty sure that’s the case with the Fox as well. This continued well into the ’90s.

      VW typically gave the base customer a clock instead – this was the case on my ’81 Rabbit as well. Some manufacturers just put a weird starburst pattern where the tach should have been. Here’s one from an early ’90s Protege:

      https://d3nevzfk7ii3be.cloudfront.net/igi/cBUPxJJlgjs6KOI2.medium

      A standard tach is another thing we’ve all become accustomed to.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Must be a generational thing. As others have posted in the past century there were a great many vehicles that came with a standard transmission and no tach.

        I have owned/driven cars like that from the D3, Japan and Germany.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        You guys set me straight, thanks for the examples.

        I have driven/owned a few cheap vehicles with MT from the early-mid 90s (4 cyl Ranger, a couple Saturns, and an Escort wagon) and they all had tachs. Guess that’s what I get for assuming…

        As for the shift lights, they are annoyingly still present on some vehicles, even surprising ones (Shelby GT500???)

        • 0 avatar
          JuniperBug

          Count my 2015 Mazda 3 among those with shift lights. Actually, it takes it a step further, with a fairly prominent display inside the tach which tells you what gear you’re currently in and what gear the car feels you should shift to.

          The algorithm doesn’t seem much different from what cars from the 80s used. It’ll basically tell you to shift up at any time when the gas pedal isn’t floored or at idle. 1,800 RPM slightly uphill in fifth gear? Car figures I should go ahead and grab sixth. The engine has to be lugging pretty damn hard before it suggests a downshift.

    • 0 avatar
      RS

      Given the performance of these, using a clock for shift times may be best.

  • avatar
    saturnotaku

    I always loved the way this car looked.

  • avatar
    pwrwrench

    CIS? I was going to mention the contaminated gasoline problem, (water usually), but someone already did.
    This was in the time before ethanol in the gasoline everywhere in the USA. Sometimes water would get in the gasoline somewhere between the refinery and the gas pump at the local filling station. Water in the gasoline is bad for anything that uses gas. Changes were made when ethanol was added to gasoline. Most filling stations have raised areas where the fill pipes are for the underground tanks. You might see some putting rubber mats over the fill pipe covers. That’s to try to keep rainwater out. The old steel tanks could leak both ways. Gasoline out or groundwater in. Almost all of those are long gone. Replaced with fiberglass tanks with double walls.
    Water can get in the vehicle tank if the cap is not on correctly or missing. Wash the car or rainy day and there’s water in the fuel.
    A bottle of gasoline “drier” once every few months usually takes care of this unless there is a lot of water. Then the tank must be drained and cleaned.
    What I saw on the CIS cars was that if water got in the gas tank the car would run poorly or not at all. Sometimes it would get parked for a time. Then the metal parts in the fuel system would corrode. There is no easy or cheap fix for this as no amount of cleaning will remove all the corrosion. Much of it will be downstream of the fuel filter and any attempt to run the car will have junk coming loose and clogging important things like injectors.
    Keep the water out of the system and the CIS usually worked as well as any FI system of the day.
    The other problem I saw a lot of was inexperienced repair people making a mess of things.

    • 0 avatar
      millmech

      +1 Still WAAAAAAAAY better than D-Jetronic. For a while in 1975, every new SAAB made in Belgium had water in gas. Belgian SAABs also had contaminated paint.

    • 0 avatar
      SoCalMikester

      rubber mats only partially help keep water out of the spill buckets. any water that enters has to be bailed out with a hand pump and/or wringing rags out. if theres fuel in there from the delivery, theres a valve that can be opened to drain the fuel into the tank.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Like many of their vehicles after the heyday of the Beetle, this VW looked good ‘on paper’ but was less than the sum of its parts as an ownership experience.

    Poor build quality, wonky electronics, self-destructing exhaust systems, finicky fuel systems and even rust problems, and of course the dreaded VW dealership/service counter experience.

    Type IV’s, Dashers, Foxes, etc helped to turn the American market off VW’s. However for some reason, not so much the Canadian market, where VW’s are still largely perceived as slightly more ‘upmarket’ than many/most of their Japanese and Korean competition.

    • 0 avatar
      pwrwrench

      Arthur is correct. VW, in slightly over a decade from the mid 1970s, went from being the highest selling import to nearly dropping out of the USA market.
      To add to Arthur’s list; The first few model years of the Rabbit, Scirocco, and Dasher had carburetors and horrible warranty problems, VW was too eager to open a North American assembly plant and the Golfs that came from there fell apart while being driven, and VW had the bad luck to introduce the Fox when the “Savings and Loan Crisis” (fraud) hit.
      None of the base model VWs of that time had a tachometer. As others have mentioned the GL, GLI, Wolfsburg, etc models had them.
      IIRC in the late 1980s Hondas were being marked up 10-30% at the dealers. While VW was struggling with poor quality control and not having the fashionable items of the day; 4wd and Turbocharging. VW did have some 4wd, the Vanagon Syncro and the Quantum Syncro, but those were considered too expensive and were low production. VW also had some turbo-diesel cars, but at that time diesel engines were viewed as trouble by many potential buyers. The earlier VW diesels, along with some other brands like GM, were quite awful. At my shop we converted a few of the VW diesels to gasoline.

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    “The MSRP came to just $5,690 in 1987, a steal compared to the $8,190 Golf that year. Meanwhile, the wretched 1987 Hyundai Excel sold for $5,995 and the well-built-but-boring 1987 Toyota Tercel had a $6,548 price tag. The tinny and underpowered Subaru Justy cost $5,725. You could get the early-1970s-technology Chevette for a mere $4,995 that year (yes, GM was still selling Chevettes in 1987), and the best Yugoslavian car in North America could be had for just $4,185 that year.”

    You just listed every car available that everyone lost their minds over when they missed the Whammy and won on Press Your Luck!

    My first car also had the clock instead of the tach – had to go up to the GXE model of the Nissan Stanza to get the tach. Made manual shifting by ear critical without that tach!

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    These were good handling cars (for an econobox) and offered a lot of vehicle for the money.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      Not really. The US market engine was bigger and heavier than what was meant for this car when it was laid out as a third world utility model. Said engine was placed ahead of the front axle, leading to understeer unlike any other econobox. The packaging of the entire car was terrible, leading to 2+2 style accommodations inside its boxy body. Throw in third world build quality, a restrictor in the exhaust intended to make it slower than VWs more expensive models, and that the most common production variant was the significantly more expensive but no roomier 4 door GL, and buyers would have been better off brow beating Toyota and Honda dealers into selling them the advertised loss-leaders.

      I tried buying a 1987 Civic DX after trying to fit in a Fox, and the dealer wouldn’t have anything to do with selling me one. They told me the 4-speed manual DX wasn’t up to highway travel, which was odd considering the national 55 mph speed limit of the day. I wound up with a Festiva, which was better than a Fox, but I should never have taken no as an answer from the Honda dealer. When I say the Festiva was better than a Fox, I’m saying it because three of my friends got new 4-door GL Foxes within a year. The Festiva was no Corolla, and the Ford dealer was better suited to selling real Fords, but it held up like an anvil compared to the Foxes while running rings around them on mountain roads.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Fun fact: this car looks tall and boxy, but the roofline was actually quite low. I bonked my head getting into one, and I’m only 5’10”. There wasn’t a whole lot of headroom once inside.

  • avatar
    pwrwrench

    I almost forgot a major customer confidence/goodwill killer for VW.
    When the CIS system was put on the cars there was a problem with the electrical supply to the fuel pump. The fuel pump relay plugged into a “fuse/relay panel” under the dash, but the connections inside that panel were inadequate for the amp draw. This led to heating of the circuit in the panel, melting of solder and a break in the connection to the fuel pump. Then the motor would not run. Sometimes the engine could be restarted later only to stall again at some point. VW came out with a fix for the problem by relocating the relay and switching a few wires onto a new small harness.
    Most owners were fed up by that point having the car quit on them many times with tow bills and not getting to where they were going.
    All this took place over a period of years, to figure out the problem, create a fix and get the parts to the dealers. There were many unhappy owners. A lot of them bought Hondas or Toyotas.
    Later there was the dual fuel pump failure which had the same symptom for the driver. Stalling and possible restart, but eventually needing both pumps replaced. About $1,500 USD in today’s money.

    • 0 avatar
      SoCalMikester

      on rabbits, the windshield rubber would deteriorate letting rainwater drip right onto the fuse boxes.

      • 0 avatar
        syncro87

        SoCal, it was actually the radio antenna seal. The antenna was mounted on the fender. Water leaked under the antenna base and ran down the antenna cable. The cable didn’t have a drip loop in it, and ran right by the fuse box. Water enters fuse panel, as you mention.

        They did it from brand new, before that windshield seal even had a chance to deteriorate.

        My folks bought a brand new 1978 Champagne Edition Rabbit. Soon thereafter, had the water in fuse box problem. I remember my mother being stranded in her year old Rabbit on more than one occasion.

        • 0 avatar
          pwrwrench

          Yup. One of the many engineering failures on the liquid cooled VWs.
          There was also the bolt that attached the window mechanism to the door. It was too long and eventually blocked the window from going all the way down. Why they bought bolts that went 10mm through the nut I will never know.
          And the first model years had carburetors that seldom worked properly.
          The list goes on….

  • avatar
    WildcatMatt

    My aunt had an ’85 Golf and if I recall, that “up arrow” on the dash was supposed to light up when you were supposed to upshift.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      I had an ’87 GTI that had the same thing.

      I only drove it for four and a half years, but it was the most satisfying of all the cars I’ve owned. It really did everything well and was reliable.

  • avatar
    Victor

    The Fox was an Americanized Voyage. The Gol is a liftback of sorts.

  • avatar
    macmcmacmac

    I always thought these would have been fun with the G60 or VR6 in them. My friend had the 2 door wagon. Brakes, electrical suspension, everything was prone to problems. I still liked them, like I still like Neons. As far as Chevette, no, just no. My brother had a 4 door brown (!) and tan two tone 84 Acadian and it was the most gutless, piece of crap, brake-seizing, seats-breaking, couldn’t pull the skin off a custard, hopeless turd you could ever imagine. He replace it with an 86 Golf diesel, which sadly he didn’t have a whole lot of time to spend with since we both pulled up stakes and moved west soon after. I can still remember the dash and steering wheel on that car vibrating wildly at idle. 53 storming horses worth of noise and stink!

  • avatar
    Lynchenstein

    I bought one of these out of highschool – base model w/ 4-speed. I liked how I could get some cheap performance parts intended for the Jetta/Golf. With some Neuspeed springs and better wheels/rubber it was pretty fun at the local autocross events. Never really fast, but fun. The super cheap vinyl seats were great for cleaning up too.

  • avatar
    s_a_p

    I don’t understand why the production number was blanked out here???? If it’s to anonymize it why not blank out the other part of the vin??? Am I missing something?

  • avatar
    -Nate

    This Fox has the same up shift light that Rabbit’s had ~ it worked solely on vacuum signal .

    A buddy of mine bought a new Fox station wagon in 1987 and hated it, very unreliable , after about one year he junked it, I couldn’t imagine junking a new car but…..

    The Chevette was indeed a cheap and tinny little car but, they ran and ran, many fleets had them and they were just fine as basic transportation .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    furiouschads

    Bernie owned a VW Fox.

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