By on January 14, 2019

1999 Ford Contour SVT in Colorado wrecking yard, LH front view - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsOver the decades since the 1960s, the Detroit car companies have tried their best to make dollars selling their Euro-market cars in North America, with varying degrees of success. Ford did tolerably well with the Capri and Fiesta over here, then raked in little American-market income with the Merkur XR4Ti and got bombed, Dresden-style, with Merkur Scorpio sales.

Dearborn optimism climbed to new heights for a high-performance version of the Americanized Mondeo, the Contour SVT, prior to its 1998-model-year debut. Here’s a fiery red ’99 in a Denver wrecking yard.

1999 Ford Contour SVT in Colorado wrecking yard, engine - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsThe Contour SVT got a 200-horse version of the Duratec V6 for 1999, which wasn’t overwhelming for a 3,100-pound sedan of that era but enabled the car to get out of its own way well enough. The Contour SVT handled exceptionally well by 1999 standards, making it ideal for transformation into the world’s quickest road-racing 1966 Mustang.

1999 Ford Contour SVT in Colorado wrecking yard, gearshift - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsA five-speed manual transmission was mandatory on the SVT, though Ford had learned by that time that American performance-sedan buyers preferred automatics (see: post-1995 Taurus SHO).

1999 Ford Contour SVT in Colorado wrecking yard, instrument panel - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsSales of the Contour SVT sucked, not to put too fine a point on it, despite the near-universal approval lavished on the car by members of the American automotive press. Yes, we love factory hot-rod European sedans with manual transmissions, and we think you should buy them instead of top-heavy faux-truck mall haulers (actually, I think you should buy Yakuza-grade 1970s JDM limousines for daily driving use, but I understand that not all of my peers share this viewpoint).

1999 Ford Contour SVT in Colorado wrecking yard, interior- ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsAmericans like roomy vehicles, and the Contour was awfully cramped for a car sporting a price tag that edged close to that of the much bigger/cushier Taurus. The cheapest Contour in 1999 started at $12,100, while the SVT was $22,940 (about $18,502 and $35,000 in 2019 dollars, respectively). Meanwhile, a loaded Taurus SE with a waterbed ride and plenty of stretch-out space (and the same Duratec engine as an option) cost $16,375, and the mighty 235 hp Taurus SHO could be had for $29,550. The ’99 Crown Victoria? $19,325.

1999 Ford Contour SVT in Colorado wrecking yard, dealer emblem - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsAt the same time, American drivers wishing for a sporty image and plenty of space could get a new Explorer Sport for $20,610. Many did. In fact, most did. The ever-shrinking pool of 1999 American car shoppers who insisted on a taut-handling sedan with manual transmission made their way to their local Saab, Volvo, Audi, and BMW dealerships. The Contour SVT — in fact, all the Contour/Mystique models — went away after the 2000 model year.


Sajeev Mehta will shed some bitter tears over the blue oval on his Sierra when he sees this post, and rightfully so.

If you like these junkyard posts, you can reach all 1600+ right here at the Junkyard Home of the Murilee Martin Lifestyle Brand!


Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

56 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1999 Ford Contour SVT...”


  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I’m kind of amazed this is in a junkyard. I’m thinking these things will be future classics. They are also incredible to drive. I have always wanted to grab one and swap the Taurus 3.0 short block under what I presume are Yamaha designed heads.

    Ultimately though, aside from that glorious V6 roar, something like a 2006+ Civic Si sedan gets you to the same end point with way less hassle and uncertainty.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Even the plebeian Contour/Mystique left me taken aback at just how good it felt on a back road.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      I’m not amazed at all, looking at the rocker panels – they’re basically missing. Notice the drywall screws that someone used in a feeble attempt to get the skirting to stay on?

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      We need to take up a collection and send Murilee on a trip to some exotic automotive locales to tour and photograph their interesting junkyard denizens. The background stories on the unusual vehicles would be fascinating.
      Say, China, Greece and South Africa. New Zealand, the Philippines and maybe Argentina would round it out nicely.
      What do you think, Murilee?

    • 0 avatar
      96redse5sp

      I’m surprised it’s in a junkyard, because it still has a lot of scarce CSVT parts.

      It’s extremely unlikely that these cars will ever be valuable or attract any interest from anyone but a hard-core group of devoted followers, though. They weren’t especially fast, even back in the day. And They were never popular to begin with and were based on the plebian and unloved base Contour that Ford couldn’t give away.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    The Duratec V6 was one of Ford’s better engines, that’s why there’s so many old Tauruses on the road, but I don’t remember the Contour being a particularly good or bad car

  • avatar
    jh26036

    A handsome & spunky 90s sport sedan that most won’t remember. God bless the 90s.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    I thought the 95 Contour was fairly good-looking. But the 99 front end (in the junkyard car) was awful, IMO.

    I actually considered a Contour/Mystique with a manual trans in 1996. I had test driven a V6 auto Contour when they came out, and I was impressed, I really liked it.

    After driving the Contour V6 5-speed, and a Probe GT V6 5-speed, I liked the Contour, but I liked the way the Probe shifted a little bit more.

    Too bad (for Ford), neither of these cars was known for their durability.

    • 0 avatar
      WallMeerkat

      I thought the same about the Euro 93 Mondeo (original 95 Contour), it looked smart and understated.

      Then they gave it that awful pointy lights and corporate round grille facelift (as per the junkyard car) and ruined it.

      At least the Mondeo after that looked a bit better, even if it did look like a cross breed between a Jetta and a Focus.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      I also pitted the Contour against the Probe GT when I was car shopping back then and pretty quickly leaned toward the Probe; a decision that was a good one. I have heard some people say the Probe was unreliable but mine had no repairs just basic maintenance. It still resides in my garage…

    • 0 avatar
      96redse5sp

      Agreed. The first generation Contour was a beautiful car. And for my money the first generation ’95 SE was a much better all around car than any Contour SVT.

  • avatar

    KLASSIC RUINED :(

  • avatar

    I had a Mercury Mystique, with the non SVT v6 and manual. I recall really annoying the salesman, as there were literally 3 cars in the NY/NJ/CT area with a manual, and I wasn’t being reasonable and taking an automatic off the lot. I was there because it was a manual six in my price range.

    The only difference between the SVT and the uprated sixes for suspension were the shocks-springs and bars were the same for the sixes. I eventually had SVT shocks installed and it made a difference, along with a set of quality tires.
    The price difference was covered well in the article. Ford’s response was to de-content the car every year, so things like heated mirrors went away. There was a problem with the dashboards…they’d shrink, and after replacing a few thousand, Ford’s Better Idea was a glorified tape kit to cover the gaps between dash and body. Luckily mine was earlier, so fixed right. The dealer was getting killed on warranty reimbursement for this job.
    Ford went from the concept of 3 series competitor to bargain basement in about four years.

    The six/manual was a decent combination, the car cruised well at speed. The downfall was that, by 120k miles, the car was clapped out. Interior bits, the seats, etc showed way more wear than, say, my 330i did at 300k plus.
    All in all, another good design, shot in the foot by marketing, and shot in the head by bean counters. A normal buyer took the Taurus because the back seat was American sized, not the euro C Class size.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      My brother’s ’96 Mystique has some of that dash shrinkage going on, but aside from that his interior is in remarkable condition, better than many more recent domestic (and asian) efforts. It’s certainly held up better than my ’01 A4’s interior.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      I forgot about the dash issue. Fixed it myself with about a dozen black zip ties. After that, the issue vanished. Probably a better fix than what Ford would have done.

  • avatar

    oh man….

    I had a 2000 base Contour, and even with base suspension and 14″ pizza cutter tires, it would stick to the road like glue in the curves. Even the Zetec 125hp four was pretty decent, even if mine was saddled to the crap-o-matic CD4E automatic.

    It did not get great mileage in town, matter of fact, I could get about 2mpg less in my 95 Explorer than I got in the Contour in town. Even on the few road trips I took the Contour on, it took 3 tanks of gas run through it before it could stomp the Explorer on highway mileage (my 2wd V6 Explorer got 23mpg routinely on the highway, the Contour got 24 for the first two tanks, and then the 3rd would be 41mpg)

    It was not a roomy car, 6’2″ me and any passenger taller than 6′ would make the back seat unusable for anyone with legs. It became a 4 door, 2 passenger car at that point. Mine also apparently skipped the sound deadning process as it was LOUD at speed inside the car. the factory radio struggled to be heard over the road noise. The plastics inside it were made of potato chips if you even so much as moved them the wrong way, they would crumble. When I sold the car a year later, the 3rd brake light was in the glove box as the plastic surround had completely disintegrated around it.

    Electrically it was pretty good, no issues there, but I had also bought it with 80,000 miles on it, and sold it with 95,000 miles on it and made a massive profit on it. I did put a timing belt on it, and that was all I had to do to it.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      “even with base suspension and 14″ pizza cutter tires, it would stick to the road like glue in the curves.”

      I echo this sentiment, except on my brother’s Mystique it seems like the car runs out of tire (General Altimax RT43 on his) way before it runs out of suspension or brakes. Utterly confidence inspiring, as the chassis communicates very well. The PO dynamat’d the entire car so it isn’t particularly loud, although certainly not as isolated as most contemporary sedans (loads better than my 2012 Civic at least). Finally, on the interior durability aspect, I’ve got a lot more crumbling stuff on my 2001 A4 at 130k miles than he does on that ’96 Mystique with 250k,+ but the Mercury had a careful first owner who garaged it.

      • 0 avatar

        mine lived its life outside in Texas, so the heat and sun didn’t do the interior any favors. surprisingly the dark blue metallic paint cleaned up well.

        • 0 avatar
          sjd

          The first car my wife and I bought together was a 1996 Contour. We bought it for the handling. Unfortunately she couldn’t drive manual so we ended up with the automatic, which failed at 180KM. Before that the car nickel and dimed us to death. It ate wheel bearings and sensors and the Zetec 4 vibrated like crazy when idling with the A/C on. We finally dumped it and have never bought a new domestic car again. My wife also learned to drive manual as they rarely fail and now that’s all we drive.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    I’m trying to think of the last time I saw a Contour/Mystique on the road… and I’m drawing a blank. A lot more likely to see an older rusty Accord/Civic/Camry/Corolla or a cockroach GM vehicle.

    Anyways – the Contour SE (with manual), when I was a fresh college graduate, was high on my want list. The SVT, given my limited income, was impossible, even used. (for those who care, I ended up with a 2WD Nissan truck).

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Once I started to notice them (since my brother adopted a high mileage orphan Mystique 2 years ago), they’re an almost daily sighting. Certainly their survival rates are lower than J-bodies and various Japanese cars (the take rate and subsequent failure rate of the C4DE saw to that), but they’re still around.

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      Cars models disappear from the roads after 20 years unless they were desirable enough to preserve or restore. It’s rare to see a pre-1997 Toyota Camry or pre-1998 Honda Accord on the road here in salt-free North Texas even though millions were sold. Eventually they become more expensive to repair than replace with a less worn car. The Contour is similarly old and starting from smaller numbers.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        I dunno, here in salted-road Central Indiana, a ’90-93 Accord doesn’t even raise an eyebrow, they’re still prowling the streets en masse, to say nothing of the ’94-’97 Accords and ’92-’96 Camries, still spring chickens mechanically. Sooner or later a neglected timing belt will let go on the Accord, or a balljoint will fold a wheel over and cause it to wreck, in the case of the Camry, on the 4cyl the oil pump seal leaking long enough without a top-up will kill the 5S sooner or later. Besides that, both models are fantastically resilient, including to rust: rear quarter panels on the Honda might go, but the subframes hold up better than anything domestic. Old Camry subframes may as well be made by Swedes (impervious to rot).

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      I see them every day, in the rust belt.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        92-96 Camry holds up better than pretty much anything out there. I’m amazed at how well they look some 25 years later. The next gen Camry was nowhere near as good from a body point of view; the reduction in the quality of materials was quite evident even when new. Still, Toyota kept the reliability of the older car in the newer model. I’d take a ’96 over a ’97 any day

  • avatar
    tonycd

    tonLU86 is right about the durability or lack of same.

    These cars were designed for Europe and had a serious lack of rear seat room, for both heads and legs, for US family car duty. I was permanently turned off them when my 74 inches of self got stuck in the back of a rental Coutour on a business trip and got out to find the toes of my best leather shoes had been gashed to bits because Ford had cheaped out on finishing the sharp metal edges of the seat tracks in the rear passengers’ toe space. Infuriating and unnecessary, and such a Ford thing to do.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    This one made it to 176,000 miles, so it should get some kind of award. I really wanted to like these cars, but one thing that killed them was the ridiculously tight backseat. You can even see it from the outside, the way the rear door windows immediately curve down. After a year or two, they tried scooping out the front seatbacks, to try to create more knee room. After we split up, my first wife bought a ’97 LX with the four-cylinder and five-speed.

    What I’m wondering is, what caused the driver’s airbag to deploy? An electrical gremlin? A pothole? I don’t see any front end damage that would explain it.

    • 0 avatar
      tomLU86

      It may have had a defective odometer that prematurely jumped from “0” to “1”.

      Considering how many of these were sold, it’s interesting that one still can see 95-2004 Gramd Ams and even Chrysler ‘cloud’ cars (Cirrus/Stratus),

      It is any surprise that, as cars have lost favor, the domestic makes have been hit harder than the Japanese?

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      I was wondering about the airbag as well. Perhaps someone simply pried the cover open to see what an un-popped airbag looks like. (It’d be completely blown out if it had actually gone off.)

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    I was very intrigued by these back in the day, and still think they are a great looking car. Since I cant afford new, by the time these were around a few years they seemed to age extremely poorly in terms of trim, interior, lamps, and rust.

  • avatar
    Zipster

    More than 60,000 people died in the bombing of Dresden, a city of little military significance. I would suggest you acquaint yourself with history before invoking an insidious comparison like this.

    • 0 avatar
      tomLU86

      Zipster is absolutely correct.

      However, history is written by the victors. So while a few people (today–but 40 years ago people knew) know of the “Nazis barbaric bombing of Britain”, most people don’t realize that massive numbers of German and Japanese civilians (even excluding the atomic bomb) that were killed by the US.

      This is a car site, some irreverence is OK, but the bombing reference was inappropriate.

      And no, I’m not a Germanophile. My parents were on the receiving end of German/Nazi aggression. But bombing Dresden in Feb 1945, when the war’s outcome was a foregone conclusion, or for that matter, even Hamburg in 1943, when my parents lived under the German occupation, really did nothing to help my parents and tens of millions of other civilians, or even the the US troops fighting in Italy and later France.

      • 0 avatar
        jhefner

        World War II was hell on civilians; and there were atrocities being committed everywhere. The Japanese thought their captures were less than human, and committed the Rape of Nanking and other atrocities against their Asian captures. Besides the Jews, Germany decimated Poland when they passed through, and again along with the Russians as they passed back through on the way back west.

        The greatest loss of life at sea was not the Titanic, but the Wilhelm Gustloff and later Steuben, both sunk by the same Russian submarine in the Baltic. 5,348 military personnel, Nazi official, and their wives and other civilians evacuating from East Prussia were lost aboard the Gustloff alone, 3,608-4,500 aboard the Steuben.

        At same time, by 1945 the Allies were dealing with opponents who refused to surrender in the face of certain defeat. Both nations were developing suicide weapons, and Hitler was sending Hitler Youth and old men into battle when there no more men to send.

        Everyone knows the death toll on both civilians and troops would have been much, much worst had the bomb not been dropped on Nagasaki and Hiroshima; the Emperor was prepared to fight to the last person standing; just like Hitler did; rather than surrender. The Emperor got the message and surrendered after two atomic bombs were dropped; many of Hitler’s officers got the message after Dresden was bombed; but Hitler did not.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    What a sad car there. Are those drum brakes on the rear?!

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    Big fan of the SVT contour. I’m biased though.My first non 4cyl was a 93 Probe GT 5spd.Purchased in ’97 with a loan from my parents when my 1st gen Probe 4cyl 5spd burned consumed oil at a rapid pace at 180k miles..A known problem apparently with the Mazda 12v 4-pot.I bought it from a younger adult who was buying a Jeep Cherokee. It had only 34k miles. 9000 dollars.
    It was bright red over dark red grippy cloth. The 16 inch 5 spoke wheels with 50 series 225 section width tires and stiff suspension was next level in grip compared to anything else I’d owned the V6 sounded glorious at 7k RPM.
    It was fairly reliable except for the need for frequent plugs and wires which were not cheap for a grad student for the Ford OEM spec.I always used Amoco 92 as it was only 10c more in the 90s.Timing belts were cheap though ,at under 300.00 at 60k iirc.
    It also went through a lot of tires. I remember ordering from the Tire Rack on the phone and the salesman recommended the Dunlop D60A2.Great tire for the money. I went through so many of those I still remember the model.

  • avatar
    LeeK

    I owned and drove a 98 SVT Contour, ordering it sight-unseen from my dealer (on just a handshake) and drove it daily for the next seven years and 100k before I replaced it with a Lancer Evolution VIII. It fit my family of four well, took us on vacations to the beach, and provided thrills on backroads when the traffic was light. It wasn’t particularly reliable though, losing a water pump at 56k, an alternator at 75k, and various sensors at inopportune times. Still, it had a light clutch action (it replace a 92 SHO, whose clutch was miserable), the sound system was fairly decent, and the 200 HP Duratec engine growled nicely at high RPMs. Handling was adequate for a FWD vehicle and the ride was stiff but not unpleasantly so. It was sold as a $10,000 less expensive alternative to the E36 BMW but I always thought it was less refined overall. It was as close to being Jererny Clarkson’s “Mondeo Man” as one could be in the US at the time.

  • avatar
    MQHokie

    I had a 1998 SVT. It was an excellent daily driver and as stated by others, the exhaust note from that V6 was fantastic. I autocrossed it successfully for years, and also ran it in several time trial events at Lime Rock Park before I put it on its roof in the infield there. I got it fixed and continued to drive it for a couple of years after the track incident, before finally selling it and buying an Infiniti G35 when I needed more rear seat space for my growing daughters.

    Never had any significant reliability issues with it – its worst problem was a tendency to either leak or boil the power steering fluid when racing it. The chassis was well-tuned and could be coaxed into oversteer without too much effort, which made for fun racing.

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    I had three platforms of this car. The first one was a Mercury Mystique-with the 4 cylinder purchased new. That motor vibrated so bad they couldn’t find out why. After buying a Taurus, I purchased two Ford Contours back to back (both ever so slightly used) with the Duratec V6-they were great motors. However-the weak point was the automatic CD4E transmission-it was not known for reliability-and that’s why cars like these with 100,000 plus miles were rare. I used them for business-I was in outside sales and drove 30,000 miles a year. And if you had to be in a car most of your day, why not drive one that handled really well.

    I ended up trading one of them in-then the other was donated to charity after the transmission failed.

  • avatar
    Garak

    I remember the base model Mondeo being a fairly unpleasant car with annoying, tiny pedals. One of the blandest, least inspiring vehicles on the road. Very durable though, 300k-400k km odometer readings were pretty typical until the cars went to the scrap heap. Cops used a lot of these back in the day.

  • avatar
    agent86

    My mother had a Contour. Because she’s cool, it had a V6 and a five-speed. No SVT badge, it only had a little “24V” badge to indicate it was faster than your Hertz rental. It was painted Anonymous Sleeper Taupe.

    It was a great car, fun, quick, decent mpg, no problems while we had it. My brother inherited it and sold it when it was about 8 years old.

  • avatar
    ColoradoFX4

    My brother had a ’99 Mystique LS V6 5-speed that I drove fairly often, and for a FWD sedan that thing was a blast to drive. Pretty durable too; he didn’t take care of that car at all (always pains me to watch any car get abused), but still managed to wring over 165k trouble-free miles out of it.

  • avatar
    Steve S.

    I test drove a Contour SVT back in the day. Fun to drive until I encountered uneven pavement, then it started torque steering furiously. I bought an SN95 Mustang GT convertible instead. From the people describing the quality and reliability issues I think I dodged a bullet there.

  • avatar

    Aside from reliability issues, I think was really hurt the Contour was Americans didn’t want to pay Taurus prices for an Escort-sized interior.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    gtem. I see the same vintage of Camry and Accords and surprising that they don’t have that much rust. I saw an 87 to 91 Camry with a Papa John’s delivery sign running strong but full of rust holes. Still see a fair number of old Pontiacs. From the number of 92 thru 96 Camry I see I would state that they are maybe the most durable Toyota ever made–just incredible how over built they are.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    I bought a 95 LX V6 5 speed in 1998 and owned it 24 hours. It developed a valve tick on the way to work the next day. The dealer was willing to fix it, but I wanted no parts of it. I bought the 95 Cougar V8 I went to this dealer to buy in the first place and had it for 3 years.

    Yes, it was a bit small inside but it was one sweet driving car. The V6/5speed made it fairly lively and I really wanted it over that Cougar. But I wasn’t taking a chance on it and it was probably for the better. I always wanted an SVT car but it never worked out.

    I drove a fair amount of these and the Mystique, “Cloud cars” and the like for Enterprise in the late 90’s. Even with the 4 cylinder, this was a solid driving and running car, but it did feel cheap inside, more so than even the Chryslers (except the Breeze, it was on par with the Fords). I saw a lot of the same switchgear and things eventually in my 2001 Focus.

    Ford was already beginning to give up on cars to pursue high-dollar trucks and SUVs by 99, no wonder these cars suffered.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    This was once my dream car. I was shocked at how poised it was on the road: no dive, squat or lean; light and precise controls; tidy size. Mind you, I drove it right after driving a friend’s ’94ish BMW 325is on a road trip, so it’s not like the bar was low! While the SVT was out of my price range, even the 4-cylinder base model handled like a dream. I nearly closed on a mid-range 5-speed manual V-6 in a dusty gray-brown. I was in love with the car, my only complaint being that it lacked the extra top-end oomph of the SVT, but ended up being so PO’d at the dealer’s high-pressure sales tactics (dude, give me back my license and keys!) that I walked out. Good thing the dealer was an a-hole, because as it turned out I was laid off the following day.

  • avatar
    Eric the Red

    I am surprised people haven’t discussed the real reason the Contour/Mystiques failed in the market place. They replaced the Tempo/Topaz cars. The Tempo/Topaz had a long run and were reasonably priced (maybe even cheap) and were slightly bigger. Customers were expecting a replacement but instead were presented with a smaller more expensive car. It may have had better handling but cost and size it did not have. It faded rather quickly in the marketplace.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    “Sales of the Contour SVT sucked, not to put too fine a point on it, despite the near-universal approval lavished on the car by members of the American automotive press. Yes, we love factory hot-rod European sedans with manual transmissions, and we think you should buy them instead of top-heavy faux-truck mall haulers (actually, I think you should buy Yakuza-grade 1970s JDM limousines for daily driving use, but I understand that not all of my peers share this viewpoint).”

    Cut, pasted and saved for my next attempt to get a Civic Type-R at invoice in March! Thanks!

  • avatar
    mcbacon

    I had its rebodied younger sister, the New Edge Mercury Cougar with the D25 and 5 speed. While I can’t compare it to Cougars of yore, I can say that, even on sandy New England winter mountain roads with mediocre tires, she was a blast to drive and always wanted to be pushed harder and just stuck to the road. She also made a great highway cruiser with half-decent economy. I legitimately miss that car!


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Secret Hi5: Premium >91 octane is required, correct? i.e. Not just a recommendation, but a requirement.
  • MoparRocker74: McDonalds and Taco Bell seated in white leather on a 1000 mile roadtrip…we have ourselves a...
  • redgolf: so it’s also a “smart” car too!
  • Corey Lewis: This is a GOOD idea. The PMC Signature Program, for select vehicles only. Have them fill out an...
  • Menar Fromarz: I personally don’t see a problem with the expansion of non ICE tech as there are distinct...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States