By on January 25, 2019

Image: GM

It came without ribbons. It came without tags. It came without packages, boxes or bags.”

— Dr. Suess, The Grinch Who Stole Christmas

2019 Chevrolet Blazers are available for purchase at dealership near you. No, really, they are. Like, right this second. You could buy one. Some people already have. This is interesting because it’s pretty much impossible to find a review of one anywhere on the internet. A search for “Chevrolet Blazer Reviews” brings you to some news of the initial auto show reveal, and that’s about it.

To you, the TTAC reader and automotive enthusiast, this news probably doesn’t rock you to your core. But there’s a group of people that are wringing their hands nervously about this product launch.

The journosaurs.

 

Chevrolet decided that no media launch was required for the Blazer. No farm to table luncheon or five star resort full of journalists eager to copy and paste the press kit into WordPress, perish the thought. They just sent them to dealers. And people bought them! Turns out that for most consumers, just going to Chevrolet.com and reading the specs directly from the source works just fine. 

Well, as you might imagine, the journosaurs of the internet aren’t happy about it. They don’t have the ability to create content, you see. They can’t tell stories. They don’t even have it in their budgets to rent said Blazer from the Emerald Aisle. (You can be damned sure that I’m going to look for one at Atlanta Latoya Jackson Airport next week.) All they can do is take the free press trips and write positive reviews of whatever car is shoved in front of them.

The journosaurs in the private Facebook groups really don’t like it when I share their names, but one gentleman, whose Facebook page has 516 followers and whose website doesn’t rank on Alexa, seemed particularly perplexed that GM did not personally invite him to wax poetic about the Blazer before daring to ship it. “It’s like they don’t want us to talk about it!” No kidding, dude.

What would happen if the OEMs decided, en masse, that the journosaur should go extinct? It’s hard to believe that GM just forgot to put together an event for the Blazer — the failure to launch was intentional. While it’s likely not expected to do the volume of the Equinox, the Blazer is slotted in the larger two-row CUV segment, long the domain of the Edge and the Grand Cherokee. In other words, GM needs and expects its reboot to do well.

The Bark prediction is that the lack of journosaur reviews by websites with fewer followers than many celebrity dogs will impact the sales of the Blazer by exactly zero units. When that prediction comes to pass (and it will), then what’s to stop GM from killing off the next journo launch — and the next, and the next? What’s to prevent the other OEMs from following suit?

In a world where the journosaurs provided any intrinsic value at all, this would be a bad thing. More press is typically a good thing, not a bad thing. More opinions, more perspectives, more diversity of thought are valued in the real world. Of course, the journosaurs provide none of these things. They simply regurgitate what they are fed, and then they hop the plane to the next event.

No, this would actually be a good thing. The reviewing would be left to the publications that are financially solvent and free to be independent of the influence of OEM PR reps. The internet would no longer be swamped with vanilla, beige takes of every car on the market. You’d only get high quality reviews written by qualified drivers and talented writers.

So let me say this — good job, Chevrolet. You’re helping the signal-to-noise ratio on the web. You’re putting hacks out of a job. And I applaud you for it. I can only hope that you’ve started a trend that will ultimately end in the extinction of the journosaur.

(Editor’s note: There *is* a Blazer test drive occuring right now, in San Diego — no doubt to Bark’s chagrin. That doesn’t mean OEMs won’t read this column … and perhaps walk away with an idea.)

[Image: General Motors]

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122 Comments on “Bark’s Bites: The Blazer Might Be the Meteor That Kills the Journosaurs...”


  • avatar

    Looks like a Lexus up front, sorta.

  • avatar
    forward_look

    I looked at your headline and thought it was the Dodge Journey that was in trouble.

  • avatar
    forward_look

    I looked at your headline and thought it was the Dodge Journey that was in trouble.

  • avatar
    deanst

    So this column is about something that is NOT happening? Um, okay. Coincidentally, I just watched an episode of the Newsroom where they interviewed on air the guy behind their own celebrity tracking app in an attempt to make him look like a total fool.

    Of course the car manufacturers want any reviews to be done by those who are wined and dined, publishing positive reviews up until the day the vehicle is cancelled. (The old Colbalt, as everyone knows, was an abomination, but the new Chevy Cruze changes all that, blah, blah, blah……)

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      These have been on sale since before Christmas. Only a few salesman reviews on YouTube.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        If anyone didn’t know that, they can thank GM’s Chief of marketing – or they could, if GM had one.

        That fact is why we shouldn’t give GM too much credit for the demise of journosaurs. It has more to do with a lack of marketing strategy than a deliberate move.

        After all, when was the last time you heard a Chevrolet marketing slogan? Was it “See the USA in your Chevrolet”? Or was it “Baseball, hot dogs, apple pie and Chevrolet”?

        • 0 avatar
          jalop1991

          OK, Lorenzo, then I’ll give credit to GM for exposing the journosaurs for what they are. No free flights to Hawaii for the family? Then nobody writes about it.

          Imagine if you will, a world where people went after news to report–instead of being mommybasementbloggers who do nothing but sit there like Jabba the Hutt and expect to be spoon-fed.

          Imagine a world where a young man with some initiative used his OWN FUNDS to start up a reporting service, using his OWN FUNDS to go RENT the car to drive it. Or to find owners and ask for rides while he interviews them. And then reports the facts he finds on a web site where he sells ads to recoup his funds and make a profit.

        • 0 avatar
          NormSV650

          Lauren Fix the Car Coach is in a…you guess it…a Blazer this week! She reports on the vehicle first Monday of Feburary.

    • 0 avatar
      Guitar man

      Theres something wrong with the internet at TTAC, a single page of Google “chevrolet blazer review” gives :

      car and driver
      topspeed
      consumer reports
      the car connection
      autoblog
      cars.com
      motor trend

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    It must be difficult to come up with original copy for yet another crease-eyed, Venetian blind-grilled, AWD carbon blob motivated by yet another turbo-four.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I look at the new Blazer and think: “Were lots of customers coming to Chevy dealers and wish (out loud) that they could buy a Murano from said dealer?”

      Because that’s the only business case I can make here.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        I think the Blazer occupies a sweet spot in the crossover world. Equinox is a bit tight, Traverse is a school bus. We have a Lincoln Edge and it’s right sized. About as long as a Civic but as roomy as an Accord.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Yep, I’ve rented Ford Edges a number of times now and always come away from them thinking “okay, I get it, that was actually a nice driving vehicle” Notable step up in refinement and passenger comfort over the compact (Escape/CRV) class.

          • 0 avatar
            Spike_in_Brisbane

            Really? My experience of a rented Edge is that it rides like a Landcruiser from two decades ago.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      The Blazer actually does not have a turbo 4 available, which was surprising to me as well. 2.5L NA or V6.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Yeah Ford doesn’t offer big NA 4-cylinder in their SUVs.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          I VASTLY prefer the Ford 2.0T in my Edge rentals to the gutless and tortured sounding 2.5NA motor I’ve sampled in a rental Acadia. Too much weight for that motor, in a prior gen Malibu or Impala it is much less offensive.

          • 0 avatar
            ponchoman49

            I have the 2.5 in my 2017 LT Impala and am very happy overall with it. Averaged 36.5 MPG on a 7 hour trip to Ohio in Sept with 2 aboard plus luggage. Had no trouble at all keeping up with fast 80-85 MPH traffic. Note that the Blazer with both 2.5 and 3.6 are tied to the 9 speed which gets more power out of most engines that are tested with it so it will be interesting how it performs here.

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      @Tele Vision: it’s not that difficult. You just hire someone who breathlessly “reports” on black slabphones all the time, and have him change “slabphone” to “SUV”.

      You could probably write a bot to do it.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Blah Blah Blah Blogosaurs is more accurate.

    • 0 avatar
      iNeon

      Sprinkling salt on/into a dozen press releases a week is much preferred to actually having a job.

      Car bloggers are as lazy as the people behind the newest X-men run.

      The horsemen of salvatian. Srsly?

  • avatar
    IBx1

    The underlying problem is this:

    Presenting the [CURRENT YEAR] [BRAND NAME] crossover. It has [5] seats, a [ENGINE], [OPTIONAL] all-wheel drive, a [NUMBER]-speed automatic transmission, stylish [GAPING MAW AND FLOATING ROOF], and comes in [SPORT] and [NAME OF EXPENSIVE METAL] trim.

    How does it drive? You sit in the chair and push the forward button on the floor and sometimes you turn the unweighted circle in front of you.

    Is it practical? There are chairs for humans and a space for items behind them.

    Anything else being produced these days is similarly soulless; the new “supra” is automatic-only and even the Mazda3 got neutered with the manual only being available on one trim and powertrain. Nothing is worth buying for anyone who cares to read reviews.

    • 0 avatar
      Lightspeed

      Genius

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Really? Miata, 2 series, Corvette, GTI, 911, CTR, GT350 all soulless?

      Only online trope more tired than the journosaur is the forcibly jaded commenter who is sooooooo ooooooover everything but still takes time out every day to grace us with his presence.

      There are plenty of great, fun, SOULFUL cars. I’d argue we’re in a golden age.

      • 0 avatar
        theBrandler

        This true, there are lots of cars with plenty of character. The unfortunate reality that jades one after a while and eventually leads to bitterness is knowing that most of us will never be able to own one until it is over a decade old and has gone through 3-5 owners. Really kills the whole excitement – It’s like marrying the cheerleader that couldn’t score with any of the jocks.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          That’s an issue that has nothing to do with the cars. A new car has always been a luxury for most people, and when they werent it’s because cars fell apart after 3-5 years.

        • 0 avatar
          dukeisduke

          Or the cheerleader that the whole football team had already run through.

          • 0 avatar
            jalop1991

            “Or the cheerleader that the whole football team had already run through.”

            train, train, train
            (train, train, train)
            train, train, train
            (train, train, train)
            train, train, train
            (train, train, train)
            train of fools

      • 0 avatar
        IBx1

        @sportyaccordy, the problem is you just pointed out the entire and complete list for this year.

        2 series with a manual is dying in a year or two. New C8 Corvette will be auto-only. 911 take rate is surprisingly increasing towards manuals, thankfully. CTR doesn’t have VTEC and misses the entire point of a CTR. GT350 is awesome but the new GT500 is automatic-only. Maybe you could add the WRX to that list but it sounds like a camry, and the STI is running a 15 year old engine.

        • 0 avatar
          multicam

          I’d argue the Wrangler still has soul. I’m a few months away from buying one, probably a Rubi and certainly a 2-door with stick.

          It’s a different kind of soul, a rode-hard-and-put-away-wet kind, but still soul.

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        @sportyaccordy: yes, I do loves my GTI.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Good take – it’s a Chevy SUV, so do you really need someone’s opinion on it? You either want/need it or your don’t. 0-60 time, ground clearance or even how the stereo sounds likely doesn’t matter to those buying it.

      Want a real review of it? Film some random kids climbing all over it then you’ll get a honest take.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      Savage burn!

    • 0 avatar
      mountainman

      You are correct. Add to that the electronic nannies and self driving BS, and the future is looking very depressing indeed.

  • avatar
    TheBestPlaceEver

    I wonder how much of it has to do with the near-irrational hate of GM by the enthusiast community. If you search “Chevy” on most forums it’s just an endless stream of negativity, even when things have gotten a lot better lately. I’d take most of the Chevys I’ve driven over many Japanese cars these days – they make a good, affordable product. They’re absolutely not the best, but they’re certainly not Nissan or Mitsubishi (and have better tech than Toyota, generally).

    Honestly maybe it’s because they’re mostly driven by boring middle class people to boring middle class places at boring speeds, but not everything can be an MR2 or a Miata. The English teacher that was mean to you drives a Chevy, the cool math teacher drives a Miata.

    If you know you’re going to get bad reviews from people _only_ based on brand name, why bother? All you’re doing is hurting sales.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      It’s a triple threat of negativity – it’s a Chevy, it’s a realtor-grade crossover, and it’s not a retro squarebodied ’73-’90 knockoff. No one who reads this sort of stuff is at all excited about it, so GM might as well spend their marketing dollars on social media “influencers” instead of “journalists.” There’ll be no change in the signal-to-noise ratio, the noise will just come from somewhere else.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      I agree that they’re stuff isn’t terrible, and the tech is better than Toyota – Entune? Are freaking kidding me? I think Toyota is too cheap to spend money on stuff like Apple CarPlay, and Android Auto. They force customers to install an aftermarket radio, or buy add-ons from companies like GROM.

      Chevy just seems to be clueless, like the rest of GM, about marketing what they’re selling.

  • avatar
    John R

    The Salary-Man’s Urus.

    I don’t know if this might be a ELE (Extinction Level Event) for automotive bloggers, but I do think automakers may discover some the film industry discovered a long time ago. Some films are just critic proof.

    Most michael bay films – especially since the original Bad Boys – have been trash, but the Transformers movies effectively printed money in spite of deservedly poor reviews.

    The same may be true here. There may be some products (CUVs of the Murano variety, for example) that no matter how bland they are will still sell. So why spend the money on press cars and junkets?

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    “The reviewing would be left to the …. free to be independent of the influence of OEM PR reps. The internet would no longer be swamped with vanilla, beige takes of every car on the market. You’d only get high quality reviews written by qualified drivers and talented writers.”

    Are you telling us that your Bro is coming back? Otherwise I don’t quite understand which independents you are referring to.

  • avatar
    ptschett

    Coal miners were told to rent a U-haul and learn to code, I reckon that advice should work for journos too.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      This has been my favorite week on Twitter in some time: endless woe-is-me from the laid off Huffposters. “Those jobs aren’t coming back, move or learn to code!” as they haughtily told laid off factory workers the last few years.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        The Huffposters should learn how to extract coal. lol.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        The Huffposters should learn how to extract coal. lol.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        “endless woe-is-me from the laid off Huffposters”
        gtem,
        No one saw that comin’, least of all the laid-off Huffposters.

        They thought that their jobs were secured for their lifetimes, and the woe-is-me comments were embarrassing to read because they viewed themselves as being different from all other people who had lost their jobs throughout the US in this booming economy.

        Things change. Plenty of jobs out there (at least 7.1 million jobs unfilled).

        • 0 avatar
          jalop1991

          @highdesertcat: one can only hope that these youngsters, allowed to play “work” by their parents and society who failed them, will realize that in fact no one cares what they think or what their opinions are, and that they’re on their own in the world–and will realize what that means.

          Maybe they’ll start up their own little businesses. I would LOVE to follow them around for ten years and find those who do, and sit down with them and present their old articles to them.

          • 0 avatar
            jatz

            This much schadenfreude in an old guy is sad.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            jalop1991, it’s been said that with age comes wisdom.

            I was idealistic in my younger years. And I survived.

            What I learned along the way was exactly that no one gave a rat’s @ss about me and that it was up to me to get ahead and better my life.

            This is one reason that after I retired from the military I worked for myself.

            I could never work for anyone else again because being in the military for more than twenty years showed me that everyone else is just looking after themselves.

            And civilian life is far worse because there it is survival of the fittest.

            That’s one reason I was so hard on my kids and grand kids to get them an education.

            No such thing as a life-long career any more, unless you’re self-employed.

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        @gtem: then you probably can’t wait for the new Gawker to turn back on, and watch the old guard rant and rave.

        They’ve already started, frankly.

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      Everyone should learn to code these days.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        I have several fresh from college kids that know multilpe computer languages inside and out. They don’t know how to solve a problem and/or work through an algorithm worth a crap, but man they have the syntax down.

        Learn to solve problems. If you can do that I can teach you the language de jour. Working the other way is more difficult and frankly a waste of my time.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          Yeah..if you can’t problem-solve, just knowing “how” to program ain’t gonna cut it!

          Some of the up-and-comers have got it in spades, however. The Operations area of my IT Department took in an intern who, just out of high school, was contacting various employers out of the blue, inquiring about whether they had any work that could be done by someone going to college for a computer programming degree. Our Operations Manager took a chance, and now this kid is full-time with us, with flexibility in scheduling to work around his school obligations! Hard worker with a gift for learning! Not the average kid in his parents basement, for sure! He’s solved a few problems in a matter of minutes that others had struggled with for weeks and months. (Part of which, admittedly, was convincing the powers-that-be to try to get their input and actually OWN the processes for which they were asking; you’ll have that in a local government organization, and as we’ve all seen, it gets worse as you go higher!)

    • 0 avatar
      JoDa

      No way Journos are going to make themselves useful to civil humanity.
      That’s why they’re Journos :)

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    Could be right. Or based on that last note, maybe General Motors has decided it is better to get the press when customers can see the press and actually go right to the dealer and test drive or buy one.

    There is probably little more infuriating to the average car shopper to read some reviews of a new car they’re thinking might fit the bill and then find out “should be at your dealer in the next 3 to 6 months”

    Gee thanks.

    I can applaud this GM strategy, whatever the reason. It also kinda fits in with the death of auto shows. Just make the car. Show the car when I can actually go buy one. I’m tired of the stuff like the new Supra or the new Bronco. They’re just setting themselves up for disappointed customers.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    It seems to me that GM stopped caring about building cars a long time ago, now they don’t seem to care about promoting them either. If GM doesn’t care why should we?

  • avatar
    Peter Gazis

    Loving it!
    I’ll be sure to check out the Blazer at the Chicago Auto Show. February 9th thru the 18th if anyone is interested.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    “Chevrolet decided that no media launch was required for the Blazer.”

    I think they’ve also decided it doesn’t need an advertising campaign. I haven’t seen a single freakin’ TV commercial for it. Not even Real People Boy pulling a Ford/Honda/Toyota logo sheet off of it. It’s like Chevy thinks potential buyers will discover it by mental telepathy.

    Hell, I even saw a new Real People Boy ad the other day, with three Chevy crossovers (painted red, white, and blue) outside on a lawn, in the sun, and not a single one of them was a Blazer. It was a Trax, an Equinox, and a Traverse.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    $33k for a non-turbo, no leather, no AWD mainstream vehicle. A base Edge has a turbocharged 4 and starts at $29k.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Could this be a kind of sea-change in how automakers introduce their cars? Maybe. But we’re talking about CUV here. Do the people who buy them care what Car and Driver has to say about its “at the limit” handling? Probably not. If that’s the case, why spend the money on a press intro?

    But the people who buy Corvettes, Camaros, or any other more driver-focused vehicle might well care.

    Therefore, here’s what I guess: we’ll see fewer “press intros” for vehicles that have no enthusiast following, as Bark says, but they’ll continue for more interesting vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      I agree completely. What’s the point having an event for a crossover that every journalist will be biased against before they even see it? As the mainstream audience who don’t care about such things have moved to crossovers, online reviews will be that much more important to sell old fashioned cars and sporty vehicles. As for trucks, who knows? Everyone wants to see their capabilities tested, but also people buy their brand no matter what.

  • avatar
    arach

    I was pretty sure the Blazer isn’t having a media circus because its made in Mexico.

    And as of right now there are millions of people who hate GM for closing plants and moving to Mexico.

    How could they possibly have a media circus that doesn’t end up with 12.8 million people pointing out the fact that “This new blazer is what you get when you shut down plants in the US and Canada”.

    I really think that is the driving factor of the low-key launch.

  • avatar
    285exp

    They have all those totally unscripted and completely accurate real people ads, why do they need to spend any money on journalists?

  • avatar
    LectroByte

    We’re going to be in the market for something like a Jeep Wrangler or 4Runner sometime this year, and when I head the Blazer was coming back I was hoping for an SUV based on the Canyon/Colorado, not this.

  • avatar

    Just to clarify, the event that’s happening in San Diego is an add-on to a GMC Sierra event. It’s not a full blown event, and it’s happening well after the actual launch of the car.

  • avatar
    JLGOLDEN

    I climbed all over the two Blazers at the Houston Auto Show. These cars seem to be generating a lot of interest and surprise – after all there has been no advertising for the model. Quick takeaway from the hands-on: I hated the car on paper but find it a beauty in the flesh. A great driving position and delightfully small steering wheel make for a happy driver’s space. Now, for a test drive…

  • avatar
    JoDa

    But, But, But, Muh Junket!

  • avatar
    Null Set

    Umm, really Bark?

    https://www.autoblog.com/2018/12/27/2019-chevrolet-blazer-info-specs-pricing-review/

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Greatful Ford at least seems to not desire to destroy any brand equity left in the Bronco name in the manner GM is doing here.

    How about a Chinese built subcompact carrying Chevelle badges for your next trick.

  • avatar

    I do not know, but how TTAC is different when all they do – wait for manufacturers to invite them to exotic locales to write glowing reviews. TTAC also has no budget for rental cars?

  • avatar

    So now what, are there going to be lay-offs at major car news media outlets? There was a 7% lay-off recently at Huffington Post and BuzzMedia is laying off 15% of staff. But that was because they invented stuff and presented it like a news to unsuspecting public. Who needs “journalists” like that? I can come up with fake news myself, thank you very much. It is not that complicated. I can write car reviews even without test driving cars, by just reading press releases or copy and paste from existing reviews on the Net.

  • avatar
    nrd515

    A friend of mine is waiting on his Blazer to come in. He drove one a day after a couple showed up at the dealer he usually buys from.
    He’s replacing his wife’s 2010 Explorer with it, as the Explorer has become totally untrustworthy. Yesterday, when the cold hit, it decided to refuse to start. The battery wasn’t dead, it just wouldn’t do anything. He had it towed to the shop he uses and about an hour after they put it inside, before they even opened the hood, it started up fine. It’s about the 4th or 5th time since October it’s just gone dead. They changed the 3 year old battery, which seemed to do nothing. It’s never been a great vehicle but over the last year, it’s had a lot of stuff go wrong with it, so it’s time. Besides the problems, it has almost 165K miles on it. The Explorer will be the first vehicle he’s owned that he didn’t drive into the ground before junking it.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I am more interested in a Mexican made Chevrolet than a Chinese made Buick, at least it is made in North America. The Blazer doesn’t look half bad and I would reserve judgement until I read some further reviews.

  • avatar
    Rasputin

    Ditch the oversized wheels with low profile tires and lower it about 2.5 inches and you would have a fairly good looking wagon. One that I might purchase – and probably for $5000 less than the Blazer. Amazing, but that is what wheels from the hood and 2+ inches of ground clearance cost these days.

  • avatar
    jatz

    What’s with this emergent fat face trend? This Blazer is nearly as porcine as that QX Inspiration concept.

  • avatar
    geo

    Because smartass auto journalists would endlessly write about the 1982 to 2005 Blazer while stretching to draw comparisons with the new one. Any cheap bits or imperfections would be evidence that the same DNA is in both vehicles. Sort of like no Cadillac review can seem to do without mention of the Cimmaron or seventies land barges, Chevy small cars with the Cavalier, or Hyundai reviews with the Excel or Pony (until recently, it seems).

  • avatar

    Makes me wonder if this is a “direct to DVD” movie situation, or the experiment the writer suggests. Reviews of the XT6 are decidedly “meh” and not what GM would want writ large. Either this truck is really good and they want to see what happens, or they know you’ll end up at the Toy/onda/dai store anyway.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    Why would Chevy spend a crap ton of money on a press launch for this thing when the proles will eat it up ’cause CUV.

  • avatar
    jfk-usaf

    YAAAAwwwwnnn … Did someone say something? Another boring CUV. The more likely scenario is that Chevy realizes that this thing really excels at no particular thing and simply exists to add depth to their CUV/SUV line up.

  • avatar
    bcoul

    Passionate about cars I am and many times have had the desire to write. Somehow though, I’m always a bit concerned about the legal implications about publicly posting negative comments about a brand or a specific vehicle. Is it the same for the “journosaurs” you refer to? Other than not being invited to previews or getting the hot news, is there any risk of a lawsuit for speaking your mind about car manufacturers? Thank you for your feedback!

  • avatar
    Radio Freedom

    Um…this sort of thing (short-lead press events after the vehicle is already on sale) happens all the time. Mark would know this if he was a real “journosaur” and not a dealership hack pretending to be a real journosaur. Is TTAC so hard up for talent that they have to publish made-up controversies from wannabes with massive conflicts of interest? Don’t we get enough of this from the White House?


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