By on December 27, 2018

 

After consuming far too much turkey over the last couple of days, your humble author is suddenly a proponent of removing a few things from one’s plate. Sure, that third hot roast turkey smothered in hot gravy sounded like a good idea while ladling it onto my plate, but proved to be a fatal error just a couple of hours later as I slipped into yet another tryptophan-induced Christmas coma.

Such is the case with the 2019 Chevy Tahoe. By selecting a certain series of options, one can spec a body-on-frame SUV that actually bears a Monroney less than its base starting price. Does this make it a super Ace of Base? Do we still have turkey in the fridge?

The answer to both of these questions is a resounding “yes” … especially for the turkey.

One’s path to Tahoe enlightenment starts with a two-wheel drive LS spec, with a 5.3-liter V8 under the hood and three rows of seats. From here, one can select the Custom Edition package, a choice for which GM will put $4,200 back into your pocket. For that negative sum, GM fits a unique set of 18-inch wheels, ladles some chrome on the grille, and bins the third-row seat.

Bending the Ace of Base rules just ever so slightly, one can spec the Custom Midnight Edition instead. This choice credits $3,200 into your proverbial account, a cool grand less than the non-murdered out Custom, but bestows the Tahoe with 18-inch black painted aluminium wheels wrapped in knobby bro-level Duratracs while also fitting a set of black tubular running boards. The gold Chevy bowties turn dark, as do a pair of front recovery hooks. The third-row seat vanishes as well.

 

GM will pay me $3,200 for a better-looking Tahoe? A Christmas miracle, indeed! Or at least a contender for Super Ace of Base status.

For savvy Tahoe shoppers, the financial credits don’t end there. While deleting the marginally-habitable third row gives up a couple of family chairs, a seat can be re-added by way of choosing to spec one’s Tahoe with a front bench seat. Yes, Virginia, there really is a Santa Claus and there really is a full-size V8-powered SUV with a bench seat and column shifter available for 2019. The General will even take $250 off the sticker price. A flip-down centre console remains for those occasions you don’t want to sit three abreast.

Even base LS Tahoe trucks are equipped with tri-zone climate control, meaning rear-seat kidlets are free to swelter or freeze to their hearts content while on-board wifi allows them to Snapchat pictures of their rise from Default Guy on Fortnite. GM includes the good infotainment system at this price, plus remote start and backup camera/beepers so avoid flattening Junior’s bicycle while reversing out of the garage.

Let’s calculate the final tally, then. From its base price of $48,000 for a rear-drive Tahoe LS, reductions of $3,200 and $250 bring the sticker down to $44,550. Remove another $1,000 if you’re not a knob like me who wants their Tahoe in blacked-out trim with beefy tires. Bargain hard and you’ll likely shave a few more dollars off that figure.

Tossing out some wild speculation, options such as these may not be in the cards for the Tahoe much longer. Spy shots show the next Cadillac Escalade running around with an independent rear suspension, a development that would surely add to the livability of its (and its Chevy/GMC cousins) third row. Get yer cut-price Tahoe while you can!

Not every base model has aced it. The ones which have? They help make the automotive landscape a lot better. Any others you can think of, B&B? Let us know in the comments. Naturally, feel free to eviscerate our selection.

The model above is shown in American dollars with American options and trim, absent of destination charges and available rebates. As always, your dealer may sell for less.

[Images: GM]

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47 Comments on “Ace of Base: 2019 Chevrolet Tahoe LS Custom...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    4×4 or no sale.

    Which transmission is standard? 6-speed?

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Agreed. 2wd SUV? Might as well just get a van. (I’m not being sarcastic, I honestly dont see the value in a 2wd SUV.)

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Towing and the V8.

        I guess you can get that on the Express too, but I’d expect the Tahoe would be a nicer drive.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          I was about to add that I can fathom buying a GM-BOF-anything without tow package. That gets you the excellent Eaton differential, external transmission cooler, and higher capacity alternator.

          But then I’m probably back at $50K

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            With destination and not counting the current cash allowance, a 2019 Tahoe LS 4WD “Custom” with the tow package and a front bench is $48,625.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            And then I’m better off with a crew cab 1/2 ton cause dealers will actually deal on them.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          As Dan touched on, a half ton truck will do as much or more for less. No covered cargo area, but there are options for that.

          I dont know that I’d buy a 2wd pickup either. I get that some people dont need 4wd, it still just makes sense to make the vehicle as capable as possible while boosting resale value. Yes, it’s an option, and it comes with marginally worse fuel economy, but it’s worth it IMO.

          And, yeah, an Express wouldn’t be my choice unless I was planning an undercover incognito sting operation lol.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I’m a big 2WD advocate, and I’m fairly comfortable in that position, but I think people should definitely go with whatever options they’ll be happiest with.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Just for comparison a base 2019 Chevy Silverado crew cab 2WD is $33K with no discounts. Definitely the better deal

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Base crew cabs are “stripped out” much more. Without checking I’d say there’s no power-windows/locks, cruise, cloth seats, infotainment, rear AC, alloy wheels, running boards, carpet or V8.

            Still you raise a good point. At similar trim, SUVs should be cheaper or no more than the pickups they’re based on. I mean since they’re simpler builds, with far less variations, packages. It’s simply nuts what I see people paying for big SUVs, mid-trim and up. Plus never mind their BMW/Merc type resale dump.

            But if nothing else will do, I guess you gotta bite the bullet.

        • 0 avatar
          cdotson

          On the Express if you go with the 3500 you can get more towing and payload than the Tahoe/Suburban and get the HD 6.0 V8.

          Ergonomics in the vans suck. You can’t get rear head restraints in the vans (not OEM, and not aftermarket without ditching benches for buckets).

          The SUVs get better gas mileage than the vans, but a 12 passenger 1-ton van is cheaper than a Custom Edition Tahoe. Not that you’ll find either on any given dealer’s lot.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          The NV wagon is nicer than either. Only downside is it gets convertibilized in quite a few parking structures the GM SUVs can limbo into.

      • 0 avatar
        R Henry

        Where I live in coastal Southern California, I honestly don’t see the value in a 4wd SUV–just added weight, complexity, more fuel consumption, and higher insurance rates.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        JohnTaurus, there is a huge area of the continental United States where there isn’t enough snow to require 4 wheel drive, but where the gravel roads are rough enough to justify body on frame. The line is somewhere between I-40 and I-70 +/- elevation. At roughly the I-20 latitude and further south, the overwhelming majority of SUVs are 2 wheel drive. In addition, even the base Tahoe is too expensive to use off-road.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          I don’t live in the snow belt, either, but 4wd will increase resale value no matter where it is. I’m fine with people buying 2wd, just for me, I’m not interested in a 2wd SUV. It just doesnt make sense. I don’t mean that an Express is a good alternative, just that it’s similar in that it’s good at hauling people or cargo, but not much “sports” in a sports utility without at least the option of not getting stuck on a muddy road.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        Of course you don’t Johnny boy.

        We all know that if you wouldn’t do it than it must be wrong and stupid.

        Never mind the fact that you can probably get farther with 2wd vehicle and a locking diff than these fake 4wd/awd systems on the market today.

      • 0 avatar
        ChevyIIfan

        Towing and the cargo capacity. 2WD will give you about 300 lbs more payload capacity, not to mention 1-2 mpg over the life of the vehicle. Since payload is almost ALWAYS the limiting factor in RV towing, that can make a huge difference. In fact, I would almost NEVER own an SUV or truck WITH 4WD.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          +1

          For heavy bumper towing, what little is left of weight at the front, may as well be reserved for steering.

          But very few do buy these things as dedicated tow trucks.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Solid Ace of Base. That is a ton of vehicle for the money.

  • avatar
    deanst

    GM wins the award for world’s biggest C pillar. And I wish someone would teach them how to make an interior which looks both clean/simple and not cheap.

  • avatar
    thejohnnycanuck

    And the best part is everybody on the road will think you’re a cop.

    They should throw in a pair of mirrored sunglasses.

    • 0 avatar
      civicjohn

      +1, and grab a couple of those blue LED rectangular lamps that every vaporware EV has, stick them in the grille, and all of the sudden your commute home becomes a lot quicker!

  • avatar
    56BelAire

    Matt, you just had Turkey on Thanksgiving, Christmas is for Ham, Standing Rib Roast, Lasagna or a Seafood feast.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    There was a time when the entire point of the Suburban was to bring 6 guys (yes, guys) plus tools and equipment to the job site. At least until the demise of the R/V body “box” Suburban in the early 90s, you could order a Suburban that way, if your salesman allowed you to look at the fleet-spec options.

    This is as close as you’re gonna get to that spec these days.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    God I love the Tahoe. And, yeah, this looks fantastic with those wheels and tires.

    Still expensive at MSRP. And I’m with others…. must be 4WD.

    Anyone fill us in on what the real-world sales price might be on something like this right now? Are we talking 10k off MSRP kinda thing?

    Are they still long-lived tanks like the older ones as well? Transmission issues or anything like some recent GM vehicles?

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I dont know if they’ve solved the Active Fuel Management issues, but that, a flattery sounding engine, and a failed A/C system has plagued my cousin’s 2014 Silverado 5.3L (bought new). The wheels dont seem to be able to be balanced (always a vibration no matter what is done to solve it), and its had more recalls than I can remember.

      Unfortunately, I don’t think GM fullsize trucks/SUVs are of the same long-term quality that they were in the 1990s/00s. I’ve known others with later model examples, multiple issues and recalls abound.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Probably the last vehicle I’d ever consider buying, but Exxon Valdez-class SUVs are nice for loading up with people and stuff and heading up to the mountains. Rented a Nissan Armada for just that purpose this summer, and it was great.

    After I gave it back to Enterprise, I was glad as hell to get back into my car.

    • 0 avatar
      R Henry

      I am with you, brother. The appeal of fullsize BOF family trucks is lost on me. That said, I don’t own a boat, a camper, or a third, forth, or fifth child….so perhaps that is the reason.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Except for the optional AWD and higher towing capacity, a minivan actually has more utility than this vehicle.

    I’m always thinking about the 4×8 sheet of drywall.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Well as has been mentioned, the crew cab Silverado in similar spec is your huckleberry.

      IMHO, when hauling drywall you want it flat. Propping it up and what not typically breaks it. I learned this in an Astro if I remember, but I could be wrong…was a long time ago. I’ve sworn off drywall but I do a lot of 4×8 plywood projects and the fullsized trucks are just “fire and forget” in this respect.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Whenever I’m in a vehicle this size, I wonder how they make a vehicle so big and the outside and yet so small on the inside. Does the third row seat have any more room than a mazda5?

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “plus remote start and backup camera/beepers so avoid flattening Junior’s bicycle while reversing out of the garage.”

      Which are a complete PITA anytime I’m backing up a trailer in my ’07 ‘Hoe. Maybe they’ve fixed that on the current model.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    I tow on winter roads so a ‘Hoe without 4WD is pretty much useless for me. My ‘Hoe has a 2SP transfer case which is nice when pulling my big boat(4 tons) out at a steep landing. 4LO also comes in handy when pulling it up on the ramps for an oil change.

  • avatar
    dantes_inferno

    If you see a Tahoe exactly as pictured above, chances are it’s an unmarked law enforcement vehicle.

  • avatar
    settsu

    Is the GM SUV’s inexplicably misaligned steering wheel and driver’s seat still a thing?

    Had a Maven rental for a couple hours awhile back and it drove me nuts the entire time.

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    So here we are fighting to keep the price of a Tahoe down to $44,000, yet people complain about the price of the top-of-the-line Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid Limited at $47,000 but with a tax credit bringing it down to $39,500. That’s for a van with everything that will cost 1/3 what the Tahoe costs to keep fed. Still, the Tahoe will sell at least 5 times as many units.

  • avatar
    ARVFlier

    I know this story was posted awhile ago, but I randomly came across nearly the exact vehicle that was spec’d in the article. The only difference appears to be that the dealer didn’t delete the center console. There’s a bunch of pics on the site so you get a pretty good idea of how it looks in the wild.

    Here’s a link to it:

    https://www.koons.com/new/Chevrolet/2019-Chevrolet-Tahoe-for-sale-baltimore-washington-dc-f1c6b7a70a0e0ae9553eaaa68aed8385.htm

    Enjoy!


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