By on November 16, 2018

Jaguar Land Rover has announced it will implement Green Light Optimal Speed Advisory (GLOSA) technology on a trial basis. The system utilizes vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2X) connectivity, allowing cars to “talk” to traffic lights while informing drivers of the speed they should travel to avoid having to stop.

GLOSA isn’t a new concept. In fact, it’s been kicked around for years as a potential way to minimize congestion and improve urban traffic flow. The theory involves creating a network of traffic signals that perpetually communicate with connected automobiles and encourage the vehicles to self-regulate their speed. The system works with timed signals, though implementing adaptive signals is believed to further improve the system’s overall benefits. 

It’s not the most revolutionary technology under consideration right now — it still relies on the city’s infrastructure keeping tabs on your vehicle to function properly (something we have moderate concerns about). But, if the industry does pivot this way, GLOSA is one of the most common-sense and least invasive automotive advancements currently on the drawing board.

First of all, it doesn’t force the car to do anything (not yet, anyway). The stop light will continue doing its job while providing the driver with some useful information, via V2X, that they’re welcome to ignore. If you want to slam on the brakes at the last minute, you still can. The goal isn’t to eliminate driver involvement; rather, developers just want to make hectic commutes a little more bearable.

“This cutting-edge technology will radically reduce the time we waste at traffic lights,” explained Oriol Quintana-Morales, JLR’s Connected Technology Research Engineer. “It has the potential to revolutionize driving by creating safe, free-flowing cities that take the stress out of commuting. Our research is motivated by the chance to make future journeys as comfortable and stress-free as possible for all our customers.”

GLOSA is being tested alongside several other advanced driver assistance systems, all aimed at improving commutes and reducing emissions. JLR uses the Jaguar F-Pace as its test platform for the tech as part of a $26 million research project based in the United Kingdom.

 

[Images: Jaguar Land Rover]

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12 Comments on “Putting a Stop to Stopping: Jaguar Land Rover Testing Green Light Speed Advisory Tech...”


  • avatar
    Blackcloud_9

    I think it’s a great idea.
    Where I used to live as a kid, there was Mountain Ave. The speed limit was 35 MPH. However, there were signs on each north-south traffic signal stating that the signals were set to 30 MPH. Whenever my then best friend’s mom drove us down that street she would always cruise right about 30 and we made just about every light. And this was back in the 70s. Why more modernized versions of this traffic planning hasn’t been deployed already has always been a mystery to me

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      One part of a whole to make autonomous driving work. Vehicles need to communicate both with the vehicles around them AND the local infrastructure to make it work smoothly.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Because the guy in the Bimmer will drive around your mom and cut her off, unless she is tailgating the guy in front….. Eventually, your mom will catch on.

      You can’t top down control components who make decisions on their own, and who are concerned solely with their own utility, no matter the cost to anyone else. That’s a somewhat long winded way of spelling humans.

  • avatar
    Fred

    The problem with this is that all the guys around you who race up to the next stop light.

  • avatar
    jfb43

    Why can’t we develop an algorithm and deploy cameras on lights? The cameras can pick up speed and number of vehicles coming from each direction and figure out the best time to turn red or stay green. Nothing is more infuriating than being in a large pack of cars, moving briskly, that has to stop because a single vehicle is sitting on the sensor at the intersection.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      You can only resource starve minorities for so long, before they catch on and join the majority. In your example, the lone guys sitting on a sensor, will alter their route to join the favored pack, making that pack ever bigger. Which will cause your algorithm to starve the remaining lone guys even further. Creating a vicious circle that won’t end until everyone is trying to pile onto the same road, since that’s the one that the algo focuses on keeping flowing.

      The proper way to manage traffic, is to aim for maximum utilization of ALL available roads. Then let people spread out, lessening the load on any one artery. Humans are extremely adept at adapting. Of course, everyone wants traffic in front of everybody else’s house but not theirs. So in unfree societies where restricting what others can do is hailed as some form of “Progress”, you always end up with idiotic over concentration of traffic, hence suboptimal utilization of available blacktop.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        “You can only resource starve minorities for so long, before they catch on and join the majority. In your example, the lone guys sitting on a sensor, will alter their route to join the favored pack, making that pack ever bigger.”
        — Hardly likely, since they’re obviously coming from a different direction and headed to a different direction. Why would they fly with the flock when the flock isn’t going where they need to go?

        “The proper way to manage traffic, is to aim for maximum utilization of ALL available roads. Then let people spread out, lessening the load on any one artery.”
        — Fully agreed.

        ” Humans are extremely adept at adapting.”
        — Fully disagreed. They’d rather force the environment to adapt to them rather than adapting themselves to the environment.

        “Of course, everyone wants traffic in front of everybody else’s house but not theirs. So in unfree societies where restricting what others can do is hailed as some form of “Progress”, you always end up with idiotic over concentration of traffic, hence suboptimal utilization of available blacktop.”
        — I can agree with this but usually it means that either more blacktop is made available in the popular direction of flow, causing what may be better routes to be ignored. I, personally, have several different ways to get to almost anywhere I want to go, so I can avoid congestion most of the time.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          “— Hardly likely, since they’re obviously coming from a different direction and headed to a different direction. Why would they fly with the flock when the flock isn’t going where they need to go?”

          Make them wait long enough, and they’ll end up rerouting to make use of faster moving roads. There’s almost no end to how far people will drive around a lake or fjord, to avoid waiting for a a daily, or weekly, ferry.

          “— Fully disagreed. They’d rather force the environment to adapt to them rather than adapting themselves to the environment.”
          Adapting the environment is generally unproblematic. What’s not so, is putting mechanisms in place, allowing them to forcefully adapt other people.

          “— I can agree with this but usually it means that either more blacktop is made available in the popular direction of flow, causing what may be better routes to be ignored. I, personally, have several different ways to get to almost anywhere I want to go, so I can avoid congestion most of the time.”
          It also means avoiding laying down blacktop creating cheap and easy connectors between developments and neighborhoods. IN the process forcing what could be a 100 foot trip, into a mile long one. A full coverage grid, without roadblocks and speed bumps and other nonsense, was the way to lay out roadnets. You can push an enormous amount of cars simultaneously through such a mesh. Now, the trend is to ruin it all on purpose, just so the special snowflakes get to force people to pile up in front of other people’s houses, instead of moving freely past their own.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “Make them wait long enough, and they’ll end up rerouting to make use of faster moving roads. There’s almost no end to how far people will drive around a lake or fjord, to avoid waiting for a a daily, or weekly, ferry.”
            — Sounds more like they’re dodging the ticket/toll price, not the wait to get across.

            ” What’s not so, is putting mechanisms in place, allowing them to forcefully adapt other people.”
            — Yet you just stated that people were highly adaptable… why would they need to be forced, if that were true?

            My point is still that if someone is taking a different route, typically to reach a different destination, they’re certainly not going to joint the rat race just to keep moving. Especially if that rat race has a tendency to slow down in places where it’s nigh-on to impossible to diverge.

            “Now, the trend is to ruin it all on purpose, just so the special snowflakes get to force people to pile up in front of other people’s houses, instead of moving freely past their own.”
            — You really believe that, don’t you?

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    I believe there is one… stating that single car can not be allowed to sit idle for more than 60 seconds. Do YOU know how long that car was sitting there?

    What’s more infuriating to me is a light cycle during rush hour that stays green a mere 10 seconds, letting only 2-5 cars through on a highway that’s backed up more than 20 deep. Have YOU ever had to effectively sit through four light cycles at one light before?

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Back to the future. In 80ies, in some Russian cities they had this tech, they called “green lane”. At every light they had an electronic speed display and they promised that if you keep that speed, you will catch green light at next intersection.

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