By on August 8, 2018

You have to wonder if Donald Frey and Lee Iacocca knew what they had when the first Ford Mustang rolled off the assembly line in 1964. Despite having a storied career of dramatic highs and lows, the model has been an overwhelming success, standing the test of time. This week, Michigan’s Flat Rock Assembly is celebrating that history after finishing production on the 10 millionth Mustang to grace this planet.

While this represents a grand achievement for a vehicle that’s undoubtedly an American icon, its sales volume is nothing compared to the mighty Toyota Corolla — which has sold 43 million units worldwide. Still, 10 million cars is incredibly good for any model and exceptional for a performance model. In fact, the Mustang is the best-selling sports car in history and has been for years. For the sake of comparison, Chevrolet has built roughly 5.5 million examples of the Camaro since its introduction in 1966. 

“Mustang is the heart and soul of this company and a favorite around the world,” said Jim Farley, vice president of Ford Motor Company. “I get the same thrill seeing a Mustang roll down a street in Detroit, London or Beijing that I felt when I bought my first car — a 1966 Mustang coupe that I drove across the country as a teenager. Mustang is a smile-maker in any language.”

Ford said the 10 millionth Mustang matches the the first model ever produced (VIN 001) as closely as possible, cosmetically speaking. But that’s not saying much. Essentially, they’re both wearing white paint, but it’s a different story everywhere else.

The vintage steed housed a 164-horsepower 4.3-liter Windsor V8 mated to a three-speed manual, whereas the 2019 model uses a 5.0-liter Coyote V8 making 460 hp with twice as many forward gears and more tech than the first-generation car’s production team could have possibly imagined.

To celebrate, Ford assembled over 60 owners from various eras to park their cars in the shape of the number 10,000,000 — commas and everything. They then hung around to exchange pleasantries while WWII-era P-51 Mustangs flew overhead before having their photo taken. It was the first time in history that this many Mustangs gathered in a single parking lot without one of them crashing into a crowd of people upon exiting the area.

[Images: Ford Motor Co.]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

39 Comments on “Mustang Milestone: Ford Has Assembled Ten Million Ponies...”


  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    I’m curious to know what JohnTaurus thinks about this and other things.

    He’s a real lover of Ford, rightfully so!

    What do you think of this latest gen Mustang, John, as well as Australia, and did you finally find a vehicle to buy after your incredibly exhaustive search and running commentary?

    Keep us posted!

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      I think you’re trolling JohnTaurus – please don’t.

      Many of us are predictable, which can be aggravating, but that’s also part of the fun of being here.

      I’d hate to lose your valuable insights due to a moderator intervention.

    • 0 avatar
      Maxb49

      Why are you calling out a poster like this?

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I couldn’t log onto this site for months without a DeadWeight diatribe on the ATS cluster. Give it a rest DW. You are rapidly approaching the status of great trolls past like [email protected], P71Silvy, and other gasbags that are no longer with us.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        FALSE EQUIVALENCE.

        My posts are approx 85%+ substantive, highly detailed, content rich, automotive-centered, commentary on specific, particular industry and vehicle matters, that rarely touch on my personal life.

        I’ve been racking up a YUGELY amazing batting average on predictions based on solid and stone cold analyses regarding the plight and future of –

        – specific auto execs (Johan-Uwe-Melody tragitriad as just one example; wait fir my Jim HACKett and Jim Farley sh!tcan prediction to ring true)…

        – specific sucka$$ vehicle models to get decimated in the marketplace or outright sh!tcanned (I could list 18 to 30 models, with the ATS being merely one rolling dumpster fire)…

        – specific auto “journalists” and “reviewers” who are lame and pathetic lapdogs that have been caged and trained by the manufacturers (it’s a truly sickening game of inside baseball collusion that takes a massive dump on actual consumers, some of whom pay money to read these corrupted POSs’ reviews)…

        – and I’ve called out, with a high degree of candor, accuracy and blunt truth, many other factual things regarding the rot of particular automakers and those who “cover” (literally) those garbage manufacturers, as leeches while feeding off of the manufacturers’ trough, like plump piglets.

        I add value, gratis. YOU ARE WELCOME.

        What I don’t do is POST 100 TIMES A DAY ABOUT MY HIGHLY PERSONAL, REAL HOUSEWIVES-STYLE DRAMATIC TRIVIA, THAT OCCUPIES A DAY IN THE LIFE, EVERY DAY BULLSH!T THAT IS FAR MORE APPROPRIATE FOR r/HobbyDrama (e.g. daily updates on a quest for a $3,000 to $5,500 used car, preferably a Ford, but maybe a Kia Amanti, that one can use as an Uber whip, or then again, a barn find vintage something that one can maybe use to go on picnics).

        You may disagree with my opinions, but you can’t challenge my accuracy in many things I’ve predicted that have rang true, and you can’t credibly accuse me of posting trivial, irrelevant and, to be direct, emotional drama about personal

  • avatar
    mikey

    I’ve loved the Mustang since I was a kid (along time ago) ..My GM roots, to say nothing of the logo on my pay cheque, always stopped me from “pulling the trigger”..My bride of 45 years shared my passion.

    Two Camaro’s and a Firebird never quite filled that void. With GM long behind me in the rear view mirror, I’m on my 3rd. I can’t count the number of rentals.

    I had my sweet 05 GT convertible manual shift out today, and drive a 15 EB Premium package as a D.D..These days I’m old enough, and been through enough ,to drive the vehicle of MY choice.

    My choice is a Mustang !!!!

  • avatar

    It never ceases to amaze me at how much mileage ford has gotten out of:
    – A rebodied Falcon
    – A rebodied Pinto
    – A rebodied Fairmont
    – ibid
    – ibid
    – a reworked Lincoln LS DEW platform

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Sort of a proto modular platform with the fox chassis. It spawned not only the Fairmont and Mustang but also Thunderbird and the derivatives there of (Cougar, Mark VII, Zephyr, Capri, LTD, Granada, Durango, Marquis, Continental) and soldiered on in the form of the SN95/New Edge Mustangs in extensively modified form.

      Ford has always done a good job at providing a sporty car as opposed to a “sports” car like the Camaro and defunct Firebird which asked the driver to sacrifice usuability in the name of performance. That usually meant the Mustang lost out in comparisons to the GM pony car except when it came to long term sales which it looks like average out to about 189k a year since its introduction.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        A shame that the independent rear suspension that was designed for the Mustang never saw the light of day. A classic beancounter move, but the beancounters would say “who cares, look at those sales numbers”…which is true, but imagine if Ford had gone forward with the IRS at launch. They could have been the company that was known for great driving cars. Eventually, they had to go IRS…decades late…funny how those cheap out moves often have to get corrected with the proper hardware – after the reputation has been set already…always in catch up mode instead of leading…

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          “but imagine if Ford had gone forward with the IRS at launch.”

          they wouldn’t have sold any more, and they’d have made less money on the ones they did sell.

          do you know how business works? It works by selling things people buy, not making things which sit in dealer lots while people argue about them on the internet.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          IRS doesn’t define a great driving car. If I sneaked a solid rear axle in to your M3 while you were sleeping, it’d take you months to notice if at all.

          An IRS sports car can be just as much a handful on bad roads. Otherwise, live rear axles have just as many advantages as disadvantages in handling or “driving”.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Yeah, not like the competition took several years to get out an answer to the mustang or anything none of which had an IRS for many generations.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Nah the Falcon platform was the proto modular platform. That platform was drawn and quartered many times for a total of 18 different track and wb combinations and over 20 different body shells, in the US alone. Don’t know how many different variations there were down under where after the early 60’s they divereged from the US and had their own varitions including stretching it out to a full size car.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      well, then it should amaze the s**t out of you what Honda has been able to do with little more than a collection of rebodied Accords and Civics.

      • 0 avatar

        :) Given that I’m driving a 10th Gen Civic LX, yep.

        Civic: CR-V, Civic sedan, Civic Coupe, Civic Sport (hatch), Insight
        Accord: Accord, Clarity (I suspect…), Odyssey, Pilot, Accord Crosstour (now defunct), _likely_ the Ridgeline.

        I’d suppose my point is: Mustang has never been its own thing, though I guess the “no cars but Mustang” Ford of the near-future means it will, de-facto, be its own item.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Lee Iacocca may be the best auto exec of the last 50 years given what he accomplished with what he was given, and there’s no sarcasm in that declaration.

  • avatar

    The misaligned headlight design on the SN-95 up front in the headline pic just makes me so upset.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      Even better was when, back in the day, I saw the stock report that my father always received from GM. It had two Cadillacs on the cover with a big “Malcom-Baldrige Quality Award Winner” printed at the top. One of the Cadillacs had a headlight that was so out of alignment that it was ridiculous. Ever a letter writer, my father wrote to GM about it. He received exactly what you would expect from a smug company – nothing.

  • avatar
    James2

    If you see a very good looking 1980 Fox Mustang blue-over-white powered by a 200-cubic-inch six… stay away. Walk in the other direction. Of course, it can’t mow you down since it’ll probably stall first.

  • avatar
    craiger

    10 million Mustangs vs. 5.5 million Camaros. I haven’t looked up the historical sales figures yet but I have to think that in the Malaise Era the Camaro had to have outsold the Mustang. I’m old enough to have experienced both of those crap wagons and in various iterations. The Camaro sucked less than the Mustang imo.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Car and Driver to the rescue:

      caranddriver.com/news/warning-graphic-content-50-years-of-camaro-vs-mustang-sales-numbers-in-living-color

      • 0 avatar
        craiger

        Thanks! As I suspected, the Camaro caught up mostly in the 80s. But still. I mean, the GT in the late 80s was considered by many to be pretty bad ass, but compared to the IROC-Z…I didn’t get it then and I don’t get it now.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    My late Dad’s 2006 ragtop GT was his second Mustang. He had to sell his first Mustang, a ’67 coupe, because he knocked my Mom up with me – something that I heard about until around 2005. We still have the car in the family but, with my Mom’s A4 6MT; my sister’s 911 Carrera S cabriolet; and my CTS-V – it doesn’t get out much. Two things about it: 1 ) I have to put the top up in any kind of convertible weather when I park it due to black leather seats. 2 ) The front doesn’t really seem connected to the rear when hooned. It feels broken, honestly, when compared to the above cars in my favorite corners. It’s a great cruiser, though. My brother has the insurance detail this year. Maybe I’ll go grab it this weekend.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      My dad had a ’65 he bought new and his old man (my grandfather) told him he was crazy to spend $2,000 on a car. It was British racing green with a white top, just imagine how much it be worth today. He too reminds me (occasionally to this very day) the reason that car left the family was my birth.

      My first car was a Mustang… but I hated it mainly because I wanted a 5 speed hatchback and this particular car was automatic coupe – no thanks. Spun it out during the rain once but didn’t hit anything thankfully. After a few months the car was stolen and was never recovered. Since it was my first car (and very used when purchased) it didn’t have theft coverage and thus a total loss. Parents were not happy but I was glad it was gone then I finally got my Civic which was a huge improvement – well minus the wrong wheel drive part.

      • 0 avatar
        Tele Vision

        @JMII

        You share the ‘Lost Mustang’ pain, too! I remember my Dad saying that the 289 was the best engine he’d ever had – this after many larger V8s, mostly GMs. Reminiscence, perhaps, but he worked on all of his cars. By the age of 10 I was helping him and heard about the vaunted 289 a lot. He was diagnosed with a brain tumor 8 years ago and wasn’t allowed to drive due to impaired vision. I took him for his last ride in his Mustang from his hospice. He was in palliative care the following week.

        • 0 avatar

          My condolences, Tele Vision. My father was a NASA engineer who drove an Alfa Romeo Guiletta in his younger days. For his “final ride” I drove him past the Saturn V and Space Shuttle static displays at the Alabama Space and Rocket Center. Then he crossed the rainbow bridge.

          He taught me how to repair cars, rebuilding one from the crankshaft up just in time to obtain my driver’s license. The man taught me how to shift gears, correctly, up, down, double clutch, even heel & toe. As a result I’ve had a lifetime love affair with sports cars.

          I’m sorry for your loss. May your memory of him be renewed every time you hear or read about that 289 motor. I always heard a 302 with the 289 heads was the “hot ticket”

          • 0 avatar
            Tele Vision

            Many thanks, Wade. My Dad and I did mostly top-end stuff but it ‘took’, if you will. Plugs and wires; alternators; belts, A/C compressors(!); O2 sensors; headers on a Chevy Van… It all added to a young boy’s infatuation with cars. As with yourself it hasn’t ended. A smooth shift is just that – up or down, heel-and-toe on the way down, obviously – it’s a thing of beauty. My Irish Da would bang on about ‘efficiency’ when he was teaching me to drive: “Wrong gear! This thing ( a sh!te Escort for the kids ) will pull the next gear at WOT!” My Dad’s first car was an MG-TD. Double de-clutching, as my Da correctly called it, was intrinsic to getting anywhere in that heap, I’m told. He was a senior oil exec but carried his love for efficiency with machinery to both his work and his home.

            He liked the full-throttle upshifts on his last ride, even though he couldn’t see anymore. He would have been pissed had I powershifted – so I didn’t.

            Your Da must have been a stickler for details, being an engineer. Brilliant. I’m sure that has passed on to you.

            Don’t ever forget your Da – he never forgot you, yeah?

  • avatar

    Mustang, I never knew ye. Yet as a car guy I’ve watched the Mustang my entire life. First car stereo I ever installed was in a buddy’s ’66. A friend had one a 5.0 convertible and a ride was impressive. Loved the Bullett chase scene; those faux c-pillar scoops made me want one. Of course I remember the POS Mustang II which a friend was condemned to drive during college. For a muscle car I always wanted something purer (GTO), for a daily driver something more upscale. I’ve sneered at the 4 and 6 cylinder Mustangs my entire life. What possible resale could a car that only LOOKED like a Mustang have.

    This last year or so I’ve actually been tempted. The Mustang’s longer hoodline reminds me of the Jaguars FORD briefly built. The amount of power available is stupendous. And the price is certainly right. The Camaro, the Challenger, they don’t look right. The Mustang does. Who knows what a test drive might do to me. I might end up a Mustang Man after all these years.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    I bought my first Mustang two weeks ago – a used 2014 with 26k miles on the clock, a 6-speed manual, the 3.7L V6, and a ruby metallic paint job. It’s an absolute joy to drive, even with the highway 2.73 gears out back.

    Yeah yeah, I could have gotten a GT but the V6 is fast enough for me plus no turbo piping/complexity of the EB. My last two cars have been turbocharged and I wanted to go back to N/A.

    Maybe next time I’ll get the GT.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Congrats!

    • 0 avatar
      Willyam

      No need, I think. I’ve rented one of those, and the 300+ horsepower rating felt quite real when floored (although it was more mild when just babied, and even got strong mileage). Honestly, I was a little surprised that you could just “rent” something that strong without any other qualifications of sanity than a credit card.

      Remember, the brutal 5.0 from the 80’s started out at 210hp, IIRC.

      • 0 avatar
        Maxb49

        Remember, the brutal 5.0 from the 80’s started out at 210hp, IIRC.

        It did, but those engines were quickly upgraded with better heads and a more aggressive cam.

  • avatar
    civicjohn

    I remember when my uncle pulled up in a brand new Mustang in my grandmother’s driveway. I was 6 at the time and have subscribed to at least one or two car magazines since.

    Congratulations Ford!

  • avatar

    With Hackett in charge the Mustang may have a future as only a SUV. Ford is a company that does not respect its own history and this imperils its future.

    Fords stock is in singles digits again today.

    What a disgrace!

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Joe K: Fram? Seriously? Fram when hey make a filter to a mfg spec for OE labeling and use ma be acceptable. Fram...
  • MRF 95 T-Bird: The vertical-loading glovebox along with its sliding door was influenced by the modern European...
  • dukeisduke: Yeah, Kia dealers have a reputation for being shady, especially doing things like putting items like...
  • Mike-NB2: Not entirely different from Honda, Toyota and Nissan, just a generation later. Some neighbours just bought...
  • Matt Posky: “Matt Posky isn’t an EV fan. Got it. Yawn.” Depends on the application. Work in the city and...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber