By on July 1, 2018

It finally happened. Tesla Motors reached its goal of 5,000 units per week for the Model 3. After numerous production setbacks and timeline adjustments, the automaker reset its target for the end of the second quarter and appears to have pulled it off just five hours after the deadline passed.

With Tesla having extended its assembly line beyond the confines of the Fremont facility’s interior, it’s unclear if the company can maintain this level of production over the coming months. But, with steady progress having been made and the second-quarter goal hit, we at least know it’s theoretically possible — and that should please investors and consumers alike.

According to Reuters, the vehicle that pushed Tesla over the edge finished final quality checks at the Fremont, California factory and was ready to go around 5:00 a.m. While Tesla hasn’t officially confirmed this, its employees have. There were a several social media posts celebrating the event with staff members signing a large sheet indicating the 5,000 unit goal had finally been met. Some of those posts were mysteriously taken down a short time later.

Since Tesla technically missed its self-imposed deadline, perhaps it’s trying to control the narrative. It could want to wait until production and delivery numbers for the quarter are released. Maybe it doesn’t believe the 5,000 per week pace is sustainable as things currently stand. For all we know, the employees may not even have taken it down at the behest of Tesla.

We should have a clearer picture within a few days, after the company releases the numbers. Unless employees are pulling an elaborate and cruel prank on everyone, the achievement looks genuine. But the important thing is proving that rate of production is repeatable.

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88 Comments on “Making the Mark: Tesla Reportedly Hits Model 3 Production Goal...”


  • avatar
    TwoBelugas

    if you thought a Chevy Lumina built on a Friday afternoon at 4PM can be iffy, imagine the ownership experience of the person that paid 65k for a Model 3 built at 5AM on a Sunday

    • 0 avatar
      HeeeeyJake

      And those iffy Luminas were built completely indoors too!

      You made a great point, +1 to twobelugas

    • 0 avatar
      Sub-600

      5:00 AM on a Sunday in a tent.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      “… imagine the ownership experience of the person that paid 65k for a Model 3 built at 5AM on a Sunday”

      — It wasn’t built at 5AM on a Sunday. That’s the time it passed its quality inspection, meaning it was built earlier than that.

      • 0 avatar
        racerstodeath

        A car comes off the assembly line every minute at real car company. Considering that,the vehicle could have been built around 5 am on Sunday.

      • 0 avatar
        TwoBelugas

        “It wasn’t built at 5AM on a Sunday. That’s the time it passed its quality inspection, meaning it was built earlier than that.”

        Do you think it’s even remotely possible that there was a significant time gap between the car was “built” and the QA people jump on it to stamp it “passed” with Elon personally watching?

        If so, well, you have a lot to learn about Tesla, friend.

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    This is a scene from a modern-day version of the film, “Gung-Ho”. “the workers return and continue to work toward their goal and pursue it with the level of diligence the Japanese managers had encouraged. Just before the final inspection, Hunt and the workers line up a number of incomplete cars in hopes of fooling the executives. The ruse fails when the car that Hunt had supposedly bought for himself falls apart when he attempts to drive it away. The strict CEO is nonetheless impressed by the workers’ performance and declares the goal met, calling them a “Good team,” to which Kazuhiro replies “Good men.””. I wonder how many of last week’s 5,000 were pushed out to the breakdown/rework lot…

    • 0 avatar
      jpolicke

      Yes, I’m sure we’ve all seen the movie. I was thinking of that same scene when I read the article. What we don’t know is how intensive the post-delivery dealer finishing will be.

      • 0 avatar
        TwoBelugas

        Well then it’s a good thing Tesla repair centers are known to be very quick to get parts and put drivers back in their cars as soon as possible, so I’m sure any teething issues will be dealt with quickly.

        *grab popcorn and a chair*

    • 0 avatar
      IHateCars

      “I rike you. You make me raff.”

  • avatar
    Fred

    I saw my first Tesla SUV (Model X?) on the road yesterday. Reminded me of those bulbous BMW SUV/coupe things. Probably take a year or more before I see a 3.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I’ve seen a couple Model S cars on highways when traveling for work to bigger cities like Pensacola. I’ve yet to see any other Tesla in the flesh. But, I’m sure in Kaley-forn-ya, they’re as common as a Mazda 3.

      • 0 avatar
        Fred

        I saw a few Model S in Texas, especially when in Houston. This Model X is in California. I can’t afford to live in the areas where electric cars are more common, ie have a charging station within 100 miles.

      • 0 avatar
        "scarey"

        “Look at that S-car go !”.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        Oddly enough, I have ridden in one, a friend’s father who’s a senior union tool and die maker and owns a fabrication shop splurged on a Model S 60D(?). You see them and some Model Xs with some regularity around Indy, as we have a Tesla store built into the ritzy north-side mall.

        The S is freaky-fast and looks great, but the whole car has an air of “prototype” about it. Interior materials are good quality, but something about the design and assembly just feels a bit off.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      @Fred:
      Meanwhile, in my little rural county in Maryland, we have S, X and 3s running around.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      I see a lot of Model X and S around the greater Seattle area but have yet to notice a 3.

      • 0 avatar
        redmondjp

        There are a few 3s running around the Eastside. There are two or three of them at my workplace in Des Moines. In fact, one of them came into the parking lot behind me this morning – the driver’s side LED headlamp was 50% dimmer than the RH side one. On a brand new car.

        Then last Saturday morning, I was behind an X at the Goodwill donation station. The rear power hatch wouldn’t close – it was stopping a few inches away from closing. Then the driver had to get out to manually close it. Apparently in his efforts to remotely close the rear hatch, he somehow released the front hatch, as he had to walk up the the front and close that. He had a sheepish grin on his face as he got back into the vehicle!

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      Gads. You see several anytime you drive in Vancouver. Up to 10 during a half hour drive. Almost as many X’s as S’s. Saw a white Model 3 this afternoon. They swarm around the ritzy private schools.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      Tonight at a social gathering I was told by someone from the local ev association that there is a shipment of about 600 Model 3’s ready to be delivered to buyers in Vancouver. I wasn’t aware they were shipped in large batches.

    • 0 avatar
      fIEtser

      They’re making around five times as many 3s and they cost maybe half of what a Model X does, so you should start seeing them soon. Perhaps you already have, just didn’t recognize it.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    When they can build one every 53 seconds like Ford can an F-150 (and completely indoors!), then I’ll be impressed at their “disruption” of the “legacy automakers”.

    Wonder when they’re going to get around to building the much-ballyhooed $35k model? How long as GM had reasonably priced Bolts on dealer lots now?

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      @JohnTaurus: “When they can build one every 53 seconds like Ford can an F-150”

      When is Ford going match the Model 3 production rate with MKZ & Fusion production rates? They seem to be lagging Tesla a bit. Maybe you should be impressed when that happens. MKZ & Fusion are cheaper than a 3 so that shouldn’t be hard, right?

      Hey, maybe Ford can learn from Tesla’s tent and build their chinese factories quicker and cheaper. You can bet they’re showing those Tesla tent pictures to their chinese friends.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        “When is Ford going match the Model 3 production rate with MKZ & Fusion production rates?”

        in 2014.

        might come as a bit of a shock to you, but stuff actually happened before Tesla did it.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          I’m talking about current production. Not historical. I was making the point that having production capacity isn’t as important as having a product people want to buy. That point may apply to Tesla as well in a year or two when cars like the EQC, EQA, and others hit the market to compete with it. They can build 5000 per week today, but will they have the demand in a year or two.

          • 0 avatar
            hreardon

            Apple had a massive backlog of orders for the original 1984 Macintosh. Unfortunately, once the early adopters were satisfied Apple discovered that demand was nowhere near as high as originally planned.

            Granted, the end of that story worked out pretty well for Apple. However, it took them 20+ years for that to happen.

          • 0 avatar
            jaffa68

            @MCS

            Hilarious, so if someone (many companies) did it (long) before Tesla it doesn’t count.

            BMW are making 2.6 million cars per year (profitably) and they’re selling. VW/Audi even more. Ford 6.6 million and the vast majority are sold at a profit.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            Look at those goalposts move!

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Or, for that matter, let me know when Ford can build an electric car that goes more than 100 miles on a charge…it’s all relative.

      • 0 avatar
        jaffa68

        Anyone can make an electric car, it’s not difficult, the major car companies have waited until there’s a market and some infrastructure that’s all. They’re not late to the market because it’s technically difficult, they’re late because they wanted the market to be there first, it was a business decision. But they won’t stand back and let Tesla run away with their business.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          The problem with that argument, jaffa, is that GM proved there was a market back in the early 90s and chose to not only abandon it, but destroy all the evidence (aside from two that were saved for museums and one whose owner refused to give it up… actively hiding it for 20 years.)

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            a couple hundred hand picked, carefully selected lessees over the course of a few years in one small region of the country is not evidence that there was a “market” for 70-mile EVs.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            The fact that those lessees went out of their way to at least attempt to prevent the repossession of those vehicles should tell you something. The fact that one of those lessees SUCCEEDED in preventing the repossession of their car means everything.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            there are a non-zero number of people who go out of their way to own and drive (and maintain) air-cooled Beetles; that doesn’t mean there’d be a lucrative market for new ones.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            The Audi TT was basically a stretched Beetle given a bigger engine and better handling (admittedly front engine, but that certainly didn’t hurt the “New Beetle” when it came out.) Don’t believe me? Look at an old Beetle profile, then look at the first TT profile. Compress the shape to the same length as the original Beetle and it is almost identical.

            The technology within can change–it has to change over time. The original electric cars used big lead-acid batteries. The EV-1 used a previous-generation rechargeable battery like Ni-Cad or similar. The new electrics are all using some form of Lithium Ion. BUT… GM could have surpassed Toyota by actually producing the EV-1 as a consumer model AND people would have bought it, as proven by the people buying Teslas today. Had they started back then, we’d be seeing a LOT more EVs on the roads today.

        • 0 avatar
          fIEtser

          Yet Ford hasn’t done it or indeed even announced something compelling.

    • 0 avatar
      thejohnnycanuck

      Yes, exactly. Where is this mythical $35K Model 3?

      I don’t think too many people doubted that they would eventually make their production goal. The bigger question remains will Telsa ever make money.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      “When they can build one every 53 seconds like Ford can an F-150 (and completely indoors!), then I’ll be impressed at their “disruption” of the “legacy automakers”.”

      — When a Legacy automaker won’t build what a customer wants–not can’t, won’t–then I couldn’t care less how quickly they pump out those Road Whales™.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        news flash- customers *want* those “road whales.”

        to the tune of 900,000 per year.

        so let me wordsmith your comment into what you *really* meant:

        “— When a Legacy automaker won’t build what *I pretend* I want–not can’t, won’t–then I couldn’t care less how quickly they pump out those Road Whales™.”

        • 0 avatar
          brandloyalty

          People want the road whales because the manufacturers spend $500 of the $10,000+ profit from each of them on advertising to condition consumer preferences. Why else would people buy such monstrosities? And hand over 10 grand each to the manufacturers. Then the manufacturers go about chanting the mantra that they’re just selling what people demand. Nice racket.

          • 0 avatar
            jaffa68

            I see much more Tesla advertising (dressed up as news) than Ford advertising.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Jaffa: Then you don’t watch much television, do you? During any race coverage you’re liable to see no fewer than SIX Ford truck commercials to maybe two each of the other brands. TV adventure shows aimed at the male of the species include at least one Ford truck commercial every half-hour or so. About the only channels where you DON’T see a Ford truck commercial are the old-folks channels lime MeTV or FeTV.

            I see FAR more Ford truck commercials than I see Tesla news.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @JimZ: News flash– Not ALL customers want those Road Whales™, as demonstrated by the number of ’90s-vintage and older “compact” trucks on the roads almost anywhere you go. Why do you think mid-sized and smaller “crossovers” and SUVs are so popular?

          Oh, and I’m not pretending. I’m one of those DRIVING one of those older, “compact” trucks. What I want is to replace it with a new one with more performance and an extended cab. Mine is sensitive to extreme heat and loses about 30% of its horsepower. A new truck with a turbo four the same size as my ’97 Ranger is all I need OR want. Modern mid-sizers are much too big, which is why they’re not selling as well as they could.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “@JimZ: News flash– Not ALL customers want those Road Whales™, as demonstrated by the number of ’90s-vintage and older “compact” trucks on the roads almost anywhere you go.”

            Funny, I don’t see hardly any. The Japanese ones all rusted away by 1994. I still see plenty of Rangers but I don’t know how old they are. But even then, the last gen PN150 Ranger was effectively midsize anyway.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “Funny, I don’t see hardly any. The Japanese ones all rusted away by 1994. I still see plenty of Rangers but I don’t know how old they are. But even then, the last gen PN150 Ranger was effectively midsize anyway.”

            — Most, my friend, but not all. As for the last generation of Ranger, it split the difference between its previous generation and the current one. I’m driving a ’97 and compared to the Colorado, it’s a compact, not a mid-sized truck. With their 2000-generation, the Colorado and Ranger both grew to equivalency with the Dakota, which had always been larger than the GM or Ford models.

            But that is my point; they’ve grown larger than necessary and their sales are nowhere near what they were in the 90s and 80s. Bring their size back down and a lot of these CUV owners would be buying a pickup truck instead. Do I •expect• to see that? No. At least, not in what remains of my lifetime. In 20 years or so? I certainly do, as CAFE will be obsolete and costs will demand smaller trucks for all but commercial use and even some commercial operations that are now driving Toyota Tacomas and Nissan Frontiers rather than the big GM mid-sizers.

  • avatar
    orenwolf

    Good stuff. With the AWD variant released, I went ahead and placed my order today (Yay Canada Day!).

    2-4 month delivery target. I’ll update as it gets closer. Net cost is about $100/mo more than my Mazda 6 lease was, and with any luck will be even more fun to drive. Plus nearly free ”fuel,” even with my surcharge for using Bullfrog Power.

    I saw my first model 3 ”in the wild” in Port Dover 3 weeks ago, so they’re finally showing up in southern Ontario.

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      I’ve seen one in the wild here in Michigan. The “no grill look” is very distinctive. Pretty sharp.

      Kudos to them for meeting ant production targets at all, especially with all the staffing cuts. I figured we would be into 2019 by the time they hit target production.

      As the less expensive models hit the market though eventually, we will see if non fanboy consumers can live with the reliability/quality. That’s a bigger hurdle for Tesla I think. If they want to go mainstream ever, will need to be pretty bulletproof. Most people don’t have the flexibility and patience to deal with breakdowns. In the end, they need to get to work on time.

      • 0 avatar
        orenwolf

        On the reliability front, I’ll be sure to report how it is vs. my current Mazda, which had two tiny recalls (seat wiring harness and some other minor issue right when I took delivery).

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          I don’t expect any Tesla fan to be honest.

          • 0 avatar
            orenwolf

            The mentality that ”anyone who thinks differently than me is a terrible person” seems to sum up the vitriol in the US quite succinctly.

            My post history will speak to my candor. If the car’s a lemon I bloody well want everyone to know it. I don’t think it will be, obviously.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            I’m just going on what I see/hear out of Tesla fan circles. thing’s on a flatbed for the 9th time in 6 months while the owner wails “best car I’ve ever owned!” and tweets “Please fix my car Elon!”

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @jimz: What sites outside of the Tesla fan sites? Just curious.

            Anyway, from personal experience with GM new plant startups years ago, ramp-ups/line speed-ups never went well. GM would ship the bad cars too. The repair lots would be full and they’d just start sending them out with the expectation that the dealer would take care of the problem.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    All hail Czar Musk and the Tesla minions!

    Wise observers should reserve final judgement on the success of these until they have a few months warranty exposure.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    Preston Tucker rushing his Tuckers for completion and driving them up to the courthouse as proof all of it wasn’t a scam.

  • avatar
    FalconRTV

    I’m very happy for Tesla. But what happens when Model 3s become mainstream and people want to fix them in their backyards, and discover Telsa not too happy to support such endeavors? Will they fall into a market value hole like old Mercs and BMWs with no-one willing to take them on in the pre-loved car market?

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      There are already third parties offering suspension and other upgrades for Model 3 owners that want to track their cars. I’ve they’re modifying them already, I don’t see any problems with third parties maintaining them.

      https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-model-3-professional-driver-time-attack-race/

      • 0 avatar
        racerstodeath

        Check out youtube on people who buys wrecked but not salvaged Teslas… They can’t get ANY parts for their cars and Tesla charges thousands of dollars to recertify these cars as road worthy…

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      It’s already happening.

      Read up on Jason Hughes’ Tesla hacking adventures!

  • avatar
    thejohnnycanuck

    What’s lost here is the irony of this achievement. Five thousand is also the number of Tesla articles we’ve had to endure since the Model 3 was first announced.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    Tesla is the “12 year old boy” of car companies. Believes he’s smarter than everyone else, believes he’s the first to ever think of something, and repeats everyone else’s mistakes because he’s too stupid to listen.

    oh, and spends most of his time trying to make sure his friends see him as the coolest kid around.

    • 0 avatar
      tnk479

      That would explain the gull wing doors!

      • 0 avatar
        Sub-600

        Teslas don’t have doors as much as they have escape hatches, did you see that one go up in flames a couple of weeks ago? I thought it was a Ford for a second.

    • 0 avatar
      jaffa68

      I recently read that after “months of struggling” their engineers managed to get a robot to insert a tricky screw by changing to a version with a tapered ‘lead-in’ which allows for any slight misalignment.

      MONTHS – to come up with something Fiat were doing in the 1980’s.

      The same article claimed Tesla had managed to save production time by eliminating 300 unnecessary spot weld from the model 3 body shell. If that’s true I hope the crash tests were repeated.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    I really miss PCH101 in general, and in a more specific and technical sense, at times when articles/essays such as this are posted.

    He clearly had an extensive background and education in multiple areas, one of them that must’ve included finance, and I’d love to hear his analysis on most things Tesla happening and being reported on lately.

    He also was quite perceptive and accurate in real time regarding the political, media reporting and other such things centering around the 2016 presidential campaign, and accurately called out certain internet sites that ebbed towards the fringes, that likely had an outsized influence in voting patterns and political perceptions in key swing states such as Pennsylvania, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin, as
    essentislly being propaganda outlets for foreign governments (mainly Russian-funded or heavily influenced ones), although he did not make it a habit to initiate political debate on TTAC (he made some excellent points in responding to others who did initiate such debates).

    I consider myself a clear independent politically-speaking, but am increasingly convinced with each passing day that we could use a lot more of PCH101 scientific and fact-based commentary on everything from the true nature of Tesla’s financial situation to more general topics such as the viability of EVs and autonomous driving systems, as well as the automotive industry’s impact on climate change.

    PCH101’s input would be a welcome counterweight to much of what’s being claimed/alleged on TTAC (and a certain blog by a Green Riverside started by two disaffected, Breitbart-influenced brothers that still contribute occasional written submissions (though less frequent, certainly far more intellectually hollow) to TTAC.

    Where are you, PCH101? Your absence has made TTAC worse again (MTWA).

    • 0 avatar
      brettucks

      PCH101 was one of the reasons I became a frequent reader – anything he posted was well thought out. Even when I disagreed with position (which was seldom) I always learned something from his comments.

      PCH101 is sorely missed by me.

    • 0 avatar
      Chocolatedeath

      I agree, I miss his words on this site as well. However over the last couple years I have noticed the absence of several people who are respected their opinions because they were based on facts and not conjecture. Principal Dan is another one who I respect it. Who has disappeared from these Halls.

      I miss the days that we had actual engineers and people who actually worked for the automobile industry as well as other Industries get factual information so you can sort through and better understand some of the mess that is often spoken on sites like this. If I’m not mistaken we had several Automotive guys that used to use this site in secret.

      What we have now and some of the commenters or a set of people that Google information and try to come off as being informative. However I do realize that it takes all types to make a site well-rounded. My background revolves around having a PhD in cognitive therapy, so I am far removed from engineering however I love cars always have and always will. So I pride myself on reading and knowing as much as possible however a lot of the intricate workings of a company and its products I have limited knowledge of.

      However I do know people and I laugh and facepalm myself daily reading this site and others.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        @chocolatedeath: “I miss the days that we had actual engineers and people who actually worked for the automobile industry as well as other Industries get factual information so you can sort through and better understand some of the mess that is often spoken on sites like this. If I’m not mistaken we had several Automotive guys that used to use this site in secret.”

        We did for a while. However, there were (and still are) a number “nattering nabobs” who eventually shouted down any reasonable thought and commentary with their constant trolling. It was the same issue with (identifiable) women commenting on the site, we ended up with a bunch of awful comments and they went away. If there are still women commenting on here, they’re doing a fine job of hiding, although there’s little content that addresses women’s concerns vis-a-vis the automotive industry, anyway.

        Nonetheless, this string ties in well with the post by the mods to remind folks to be civil on this forum. Had attitudes been better around here, there wouldn’t have been such a decline in commentary.

        I don’t know about anyone else, but I find the “Best and Brightest” sobriquet to be an euphemism, not a compliment.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      @DW

      I agree. Pch, Tres et al. where is yinz guys at these days?

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    If Tesla reached its goals, good.

    But the systems currently employed by Tesla might be a concern. Are they efficient and/or running at a loss? What of vehicle quality?

    My view is I have doubt regarding the sustainment of the Model 3’s manufacture.

  • avatar
    markf

    “2016 presidential campaign, and accurately called out certain internet sites that ebbed towards the fringes, that likely had an outsized influence in voting patterns and political perceptions in key swing states such as Pennsylvania, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin, as
    essentislly being propaganda outlets for foreign governments (mainly Russian-funded or heavily influenced ones)”

    The Russians made people in swing states read web sites you don’t like and then they voted for Trump. Of course those were originally Hillary votes but the Ruskies are so crafty they turned ’em.

    Trump won, get over it already

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      My entire family of Russian emigres voted Trump, as did just about the entirety of Russian-Jewish Brighton Beach. A 25 year old sleeper cell! Putin was playing the long game LOL. On a more serious note I think some here would be fascinated to see some of the people in my friend group (two women come to mind, one of them a minority) that also voted for Trump and their motivations to do so. None of them fall into the disaffected working class category btw.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        Also of interest, leading up to the election driving through NE/East Ohio and Western PA I’ve never seen so many political yard signs before in my life, 10:1 Trump. I new the pollsters were missing something big. These aren’t Breitbart readers either, this was steel and coal country, lunchbox Dem turf.

        • 0 avatar
          geozinger

          @gtem: Yup, that’s my home area. Youngstown, Ohio more specifically. I was amazed at how much they went for Trump.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            I think some people just miss the Cold War and are pining for its return.

            there’s good business in keeping people frightened, and nothing frightens people like a far off enemy who seems as powerful as you.

          • 0 avatar
            markf

            Same in Southern Colorado, 25:1 Trump (stickers, yard signs, t-shirts) All you had to do was look at Trump’s rallies to know the “hillary landslide” polls were out to lunch

    • 0 avatar
      Sub-600

      Mueller’s probe will make “Al Capone’s Vault” look like a Pulitzer winning expose. Unless Putin placed subliminal messages on Pornhub, nothing happened.

  • avatar
    Asdf

    How bloody impressive – automaker finally manages to make a whopping 5,000 cars a week! I’m sure no other automaker has ever done that before, so this is quite a man-bites-dog story!

    But Tesla really should have prioritized reaching another milestone, one that other automakers reached decades ago, and that is making cars that can be fully “recharged” in five minutes or less. There’s no reason why this shouldn’t apply to Tesla as well, and the incredible fact that this is *still* not possible with a Tesla in 2018 (!) is a complete and utter disgrace, for which Tesla deserves to go bankrupt. As it is, Tesla’s battery-driven sh*tboxes are so uncompetitive that they don’t even have a reason to exist.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      Correction, they made 7,000 cars a week. 5,000 was just the Model 3. Supposedly they are on target to boost that to 8,000. When was the last time a new start-up automaker made that many cars in a week?

      Why do you keep spouting this 5-minute recharge crap? Most of the time, I don’t have to deal with the recharge time. I just come home, park the car, and it charges while I’m home. Next time I drive it, it’s good to go at 100%. With my next car, I’ll probably get the inductive charging, so I won’t even have to bother plugging it in. With 300+ miles range, I won’t have to worry about charging away from home. So, I’ll be driving, parking it at home, then driving again without worrying about plugging in or going to a charging station. That’s a lot better than even a 5 minute recharge time.

      So, why in 2018 do they make cars that have to be taken to a fueling station to to recharged? Cars that you don’t need to worry about taking to a gas station at all are here. Next time you are getting gas, remember that’s not something I have to do – at least for my EVs.

      • 0 avatar
        vvk

        I get a blank stare when I talk to my friends about not having to find a gas station as one of the best features. When I press them, they say “well, what is the big deal.” People are just so used to having to fuel their cars that they don’t even consider how annoying it is and how much time is wasted. I cannot wait to get rid on all my ICE cars so I don’t have to ever set foot at a gas station again.

    • 0 avatar
      fIEtser

      Five minute charging doesn’t really matter except for those attempting to set speed records on long-distance trips. For average daily driving, the time to charge [a Tesla] is nearly inconsequential, even for those who can’t charge at home.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        I took my Leaf 117 miles one way this morning. Stopped a little past the halfway point to top up. I had enough to make it the entire way after 12 minutes. But, you know, I was enjoying my little rest and stayed hooked up for another 8 minutes. If I had pulled out my laptop, I would have totally forgotten about time.

        Most days, I don’t even really look at the range meter. I just go and do my thing, come back and plug-in. Repeat cycle. No oil to check or change, no gas to worry about.

  • avatar
    ByTheLake

    Production rates (or VIN registrations, or whatever distracting metric Tesla wants people to focus on) mean nothing unless the company is making a net profit – and that includes operating expenses, R&D, etc. that Tesla tends to leave out of the discussion. Musk’s main objective is to maintain hype to prop up stock prices for future borrowing.

    Investors need to continue to ask “bonehead” questions and not be distracted by meaningless metrics.

  • avatar
    Lockstops

    Tesla should change their name to Jenga.

  • avatar
    Carroll Prescott

    No evidence Tesla can sustain this – just wait until the quality problems of a huge number of products swamps its centers. Tesla has a hard enough time building their cars at a snail’s pace.

    I hear 300 welds were removed from the Model 3 in order to speed things up.

    I just can’t wait until the Teslafools who buy these and gush with excitement find out it is one thing to put ceramic coating on their not ready for it Model 3’s. Imagine driving them for three years and suddenly the fatigue of use takes its toll on the structure.

    The one good thing about Tesla is that it is like GM – kills its own customers.

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