By on May 16, 2018

peugeot

Since acquiring Opel and Vauxhall from General Motors, France’s PSA Group has dropped not-so-subtle hints that it wants back into the American market. Chief executive Carlos Tavares said the group is already engineering upcoming models to meet U.S. regulations. “That means that from three years down the road we’ll be able to push the button, if we decide to do so, in terms of product compliance vis-a-vis the U.S. regulations,” he explained during the Frankfurt Auto Show.

That means Citroën and Peugeot should have a few vehicles ready for export after 2020. However, selling them won’t be a piece of cake. PSA doesn’t have an established dealer network in the United States, nor does it have a corporate friend in the industry that might allow the company to borrow one.

Still, the European auto group doesn’t seem all that worried. Rather than worry about asking its automotive neighbors to loan it a cup of sweet dealership sugar, it noticed a lot of people prefer aspartame and acesulfame potassium. PSA plans to take a modern, tech-focused, affordable approach to the problem.

“We see the high cost of doing this business; we see the challenges that exist in profitability for dealers and OEMs,” PSA North America chief Larry Dominique told Automotive News last week. “We believe with the new tools, the new technology, the new customer expectations, there are leaner, more agile ways to do this.”

Establishing a dealer network of one’s own is ludicrously expensive. PSA doesn’t want to gamble on it, in the event America buyers aren’t responsive to what it’s offering. Tesla Motors faced a similar problem when it started selling cars — a problem it resolved through online sales and delivery centers. Chinese manufacturers are toying with similar concepts, pitching app-based sales as a way to circumvent dealerships entirely.

Dominique stressed that no official decision has been made at PSA. In fact, we don’t even know which brands it intends to send in America or what kind of timetable it’s working with. But he did say that, if the group decided to go with physical dealerships, the company would take great strides in implementing tech that would keep them profitable. “The world is changing around us from a standpoint of the way the people buy and engage in purchases,” said Dominique.

As a former TrueCar executive, it’s understandable that the CEO would stress the importance of a digital solution. TrueCar initially positioned itself as a way to ensure customers were getting the best deal on a vehicle. However, that model didn’t turn out to be entirely profitable and the company gradually shifted its emphasis toward dealerships (which started to really take off around the time of Dominique’s departure).

Engaging consumers while keeping dealerships happy is an utterly brutal balancing act. But TrueCar provides a valuable lesson — digital car sales have continued growing despite the hardships. A majority of industry analysts are comfortable suggesting roughly 10 percent of all U.S. vehicle transactions could occur online by 2019.

Meanwhile, dealership expenses (as a percentage of total sales) rose to 98.7 percent last year, according to National Automobile Dealers Association data. Average losses on new vehicles ballooned to $421 per car, against $22 per car in 2015. This isn’t abnormal; stores sometimes lose money when the market sucks, only to come back with record-setting profits a few years later. But dealerships losing money helps fan the flames that tech will come in and flip the table — ushering in an entirely new era for the auto industry.

“We need to find a way to reduce our fixed costs,” Dominique said. “We want people to make a profit selling a new car.”

We would urge everyone to remain cautious around the presumption that a digital solution is the only answer to the changing market. Whether you love or hate them, dealerships aren’t going to vanish overnight. But there could be an opportunity here worth taking advantage of here. Digital sales could be a stepping stone until PSA feels safe in setting up brick-and-mortar storefronts in America.

“One of the things we are studying right now is, how can we best balance this — make a better customer experience, more seamless, more online, but also provide the right access to the services and the physical elements when you need them?” Dominique added.

Likewise, it would be foolish for any automaker to ignore tech-based solutions. Not just because it could make them money, but because practically everyone else is already trying their hand. In addition to the proposed digital sales, PSA has already launched an all-in-one transportation application called Free2Move. The app allows customers to hail a ride, pay for mass transit, book a car, and more via a single platform. It’s clever and just the sort of thing other big automakers are trying to create to keep customers engaged with their platforms (and from straying to the competition). PSA intends to launch a similar app for the American market eventually.

As for the cars, PSA hasn’t said much. We know it wants to minimize set-up costs wherever possible, swapping to digital solutions without alienating customers. However, we haven’t really heard anything about tangible product. That should change by winter.

“At the end of this year, we are going to make things a lot clearer relative to [product] timelines,” Dominique said. “By early [2019], we are going to be working more toward the next phase of selling retail, not just planning.”

[Image: Groupe PSA]

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68 Comments on “France Thinks It Can Return to U.S. Auto Market On a Shoestring Budget...”


  • avatar
    Hummer

    What products do they have that America doesn’t already have? They no longer make cars that are quirky and timeless, now they just make cheap throwaway compacts. We already have Fiat and Nissan, we have no use for more vehicles in dying segments. If you want to come to America in 2018 you better bring your A game, and from the looks of it PSA has a D stable of cars filled with more of the same ancient 2.0L > engines that VW, Audi and BMW already try to litter our streets with.

  • avatar
    Dilrod

    Ooooohh, maybe they can build a mid size pickup! Call it the Ragin’ Cajun!

  • avatar
    tylanner

    Put me down for a Alpine A110

  • avatar
    Robbie

    PSA should certainly wait for the end of Trump before investing in America. The business climate is terrible now, with a trade war and an economic slowdown looming.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Not to mention the unpredictability.

      We might wake up tomorrow and have yet another trade agreement or peace treaty thrown out the window, either of which can destroy a business right-quick.

      The saving grace of this administration is that, at least for the first year or so, they were too clueless to actually implement most of the anti-trade (pro-recession price-raising anti-business) ideas they talked about on the campaign trail. I fear that they may be finding the levers of power soon, and that the economic havoc they promised will be unleashed shortly.

      I sure wish Republican voters would have taken more economics classes. If they had, they’d have been able to how ridiculous and self-contradictory Trump’s economic platform was and is… SMH

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        You two are quite the duo, unfortunately the liberal comedy groups aren’t really doing well these days.

        You keep ignoring the facts and believing fantasies and the rest of us can continue to enjoy a strong economy that is setting new low unemployment records, and creating a job market with a surplus of good available positions rather than a surplus of workers.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          @hummer:

          Laugh all you like, but what you don’t know if you never get out of the right-wing media bubble is that we’ve seen 9 years of steady economic growth. Trump doesn’t get the credit, because we’re close to the end of the growth part of the cycle.

          I sold my index funds when Trump announced the trade war with China. The reason is that foreign trade is a very important part of the economic activity in this country. Anything which stops that is likely to create a recession. The growth in the S&P500 essentially stopped after that announcement.

          *You* may *feel* optimistic if your guy is in office, and because the commentators on Fox News are happy. But the economic uncertainty is real, and it’s a drag on the econony.

          If anecdotes are your thing, I recently talked with a manufacturer of specialized aviation equipment (glider winches), and his business has dried up because his biggest customer is in Canada. They don’t want to be hit with a 35% import tax if NAFTA falls apart, so they told him to stop making winches — and so he’s not making winches snymoee. He’s been spending the past few months trying to develop a lower-end product for the (much smaller) US market for his product.

          You guys really need to view the economic data directly. Partisan news sources like Fox News cherry pick the economic data to suit their narrative.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        If only your Bernie was not the victim of his own party’s capitulation to the murderous war criminals Bill and Hill (now with bonus rape!). I wonder if rigging primaries is even a crime in the so-called blue states?

        ““Wait,” I said. “That victory fund was supposed to be for whoever was the nominee, and the state party races. You’re telling me that Hillary has been controlling it since before she got the nomination?”

        Gary said the campaign had to do it or the party would collapse.

        “That was the deal that Robby struck with Debbie,” he explained, referring to campaign manager Robby Mook. “It was to sustain the DNC. We sent the party nearly $20 million from September until the convention, and more to prepare for the election.””

        politico.com/magazine/story/2017/11/02/clinton-brazile-hacks-2016-215774

        • 0 avatar
          Sub-600

          War criminals? These people aren’t criminals, they’re philanthropists. Have you seen the hospital the Clinton Foundation built in Haiti? Neither have the Haitians. Chelsea’s working for peanuts and is virtually indefatigable in her efforts to warn people about the little known scourge of opium addiction. She says, lt’s like, a really bad thing, y’know?

          • 0 avatar
            ra_pro

            According to the most up-to-date reporting they haven’t yet asked for bribes like the Russian orange troll. Perhaps you also heard about the curious case of ZTE the Chinese company which just received a personal pardon from the orange troll after admitting to subverting US laws apparently as a reward to the Chinese government for giving his property in Asia a break. And all that amid the call for commercial war against China?

        • 0 avatar
          ra_pro

          Republicans have a better solution than rigging primaries, they just rig the voting districts, pass laws that discriminate against voters and top it all of by putting the orange Russian droid of first generation of ancient German origin called Drumpf in charge of the mess. That really takes a lot of hate towards your fatherland to go that far.

        • 0 avatar
          scarey

          @ 28 Cars Later-“If only your Bernie was not the victim of his own party’s copulation at the hands of Hillary and Bill Clinton.”
          -fixed that for ya
          @ra-pro- like letting in tens of millions of illegals to vote fraudulently ?

      • 0 avatar
        bking12762

        Luke42-Please, please, please post more…..You make me laugh!

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          Really those 2 were the best choices that the American political system could come up with????????

          One was despised by about 40% of the population, the other by about 45% of the population.
          One is accused of deceit, avarice, and covering-up sexual misconduct.
          The other is accused of deceit, avarice and sexual misconduct.

          The economy is continuing the trend started in late 2016. Economies tend to do that, particularly large ones.

          However the manufacturing and mining jobs have not returned, in any great number. And based on current trade negotiations and flip-flops do not look like they will be.

          The Mid-East is still in turmoil and the Russian supported government in Syria appears to have ‘won’ its civil war against an American supported insurrection. Providing Russia with its first foothold in the region since they were evicted from Egypt.

          Meanwhile China is expanding its military presence in the Indian Ocean, has launched its first purpose built large aircraft carrier, is buying up access to minerals/resources in Africa, is flexing its muscles over Taiwan and playing a game of ‘cat and mouse’ in Korea.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            “Really those 2 were the best choices that the American political system could come up with????????”

            We don’t have a system anymore, Arthur. We have a rigged game controlled by a bunch of folks with money who only care about one thing: keeping it that way. And they could care less about liberalism, conservatism, or any other “ism,” aside from the fact that they’ve managed to convince us that those “isms” are sufficient to make us literally hate each other. A cursory glance at the comments on this site alone tells you all you need to know.

            Intelligent people want nothing to do with this. The natural result is that the remaining engaged participants are idiots. Thus, we get a whole choice of idiotic candidates.

            The system would work just fine without all the money. But it’s been rigged so that money is all that matters.

            Eventually people are going to wake up, and remove the ability to buy elections. Until then, stupidity like a Trump/Clinton race will be the norm.

          • 0 avatar
            bking12762

            Arthur Dailey-The obvious answer to your rhetorical question is no, they were not the best candidates. MY response was to Luke42 who stated, “I sure wish Republican voters would have taken more economics classes. If they had, they’d have been able to how ridiculous and self-contradictory Trump’s economic platform was and is… SMH” Please, this is a ridiculous and uniformed statement. Barb throwers don’t add anything of value to the discussion.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    A low budget crossover might work, they could call it Le CUV.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Strange, statistics show that Nissan is the 5th largest seller of cars in the USA, yet someone still manages to slag them for catering to a ‘dying market’ segment. -;)

    PSA is probably far ahead of me, but I would recommend that they enter the market first through the establishment of their own car sharing company. Centred in the north-eastern urban areas, where they might find a market. Allows the ‘trendsetters/outliers’ to sample their product. Eliminates the need for dealerships. Allows them to build a (hopefully positive) reputation/presence. Also allows for the development of a cadre of technicians with experience servicing their vehicles. And allows PSA to determine if indeed their is a viable market for their vehicles. And if there is, it will be in those larger northern urban centres. Don’t see them selling many, if at all, in the south or most of the western USA, except perhaps the cities on the west coast.

    From there either follow the Tesla model, or find another lower volume manufacturer willing to share dealerships.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      Better yet, brand their cars “Amazon” and sell them with free two-day delivery.
      The star ratings from the first two hundred buyers will tell the rest of us if the cars are any good.

      Or buy the rights to the defunct Oldsmobile and Pontiac brands. Or maybe use Pontiac and Holden. That would get some attention, especially if there’s some sort of Vauxhall ute design gathering dust somewhere.

      But no ads with ballet dancers in bird$#it yellow suits, all right? That look just doesn’t translate well.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        I was also going to say, get Amazon some cars to sell. They built the tech side, and for some reason, they built brick-and-mortar stores as well.

        Aside from the suit, the car ain’t that hot either. You had better offer something more compelling than a 4-door 500!

      • 0 avatar
        Garrett

        This is actually brilliant.

        “Amazon Basics” automobiles.

        All Amazon needs to do is set up a “dealership” in each state.

        For service needs, partner with some auto care chain, with Amazon handling parts fulfillment and inventory.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    I can buy soft drinks with more displacement than most of their engines. They need to either buy or develop some decent size powerplants.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Why don’t they just integrate them into Nissans & Infinitys? Seems like the easy way in and then out.

  • avatar
    analogman

    They could sell their cars through Ford dealerships.

    Ford recently made the monumentally stupid decision to stop selling cars. Seems to me that Ford dealers are going to have some extra capacity and floor space available (since it would be equally monumentally stupid for Ford to think that every former Fusion, Focus, and Fiesta buyer is now magically going to buy a F150 or Explorer). They could make a deal to sell PSA’s cars.

    Sign me up for a DS3 and a RCZ (both with manual transmissions please).

    • 0 avatar
      TwoBelugas

      “since it would be equally monumentally stupid for Ford to think that every former Fusion, Focus, and Fiesta buyer is now magically going to buy a F150 or Explorer”

      Who said that?

      Taurus->Explorer
      Fusion->Edge
      Focus->Escape
      Fiesta->Ecosport

      It is literally a 1:1 mapping of platforms shared between Ford cars and crossovers.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        “It is literally a 1:1 mapping of platforms shared between Ford cars and crossovers.”

        And I wouldn’t own a single one of the eight mentioned.

        • 0 avatar
          TwoBelugas

          “And I wouldn’t own a single one of the eight mentioned.”

          meh, no one cares. Europeans and the rest of the world seem to like the Fiesta, Focus, and Fusion(mondeo) just fine.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Then why is Ford dropping them?

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            “Then why is Ford dropping them?”

            Ford is still making all three just in other countries.

            You know, there is a world outside the US.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Yes, there is a world outside of the US… and it seems the US keeps doing its damndest to keep the world out. First compact pickup trucks and now nearly every sedan the American brands ever made.

            And now, with American gas prices on the rise, there will be no fuel-sipping compact trucks or sedans to help us save money at the gas pumps… which may be exactly WHY these sedans are being dropped.

            The higher these gas prices rise, the more I want my next vehicle to be battery-electric.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Lol @ Vulpine. Are you confused? They’re dropping them in this market, where they don’t sell all that well retail wise, and don’t make money when they do. You think that they just released an all new Fiesta last year and a new Focus this year, both of which sell extremely well in places like Europe, only to discontinue them worldwide DURING the launch of one? I mean, Sergio wasn’t even stupid enough to discontinue cars in markets where they do sell.

            And what a tremendous bombshell that you don’t like current Ford products. That is so unlike you, since you constantly defend them and make excuses about them and tell people they have outdated opinions about them and talk about how you have to buy a new one every few years because they’re just so damned wonderful, each and every one. Oh wait, that was FCA products. No, it was Ford that you’re always putting down with fake facts and your very own outdated opinions.

            Next revelation: I wouldn’t buy a new Corolla. Wow! Feels so good to get that secret off my chest. I know everyone is shocked, just take a minute to digest it and try to calm down. Drink some water. Smoke ’em if ya got ’em. That was big, I know, guys. Whew.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Clearly, 2B, you don’t know me. I’ve been anti-Ford for as long as I’ve had an email address; despite the fact that I have owned Fords and currently own a Ford. I just finished having another small modification made to my current Ford to try and improve its performance in hot weather… and no, I’ve not had one thing touched in the engine or transmission.

            But then, you knew that, didn’t you? Just like you know GM lost my trust just about ten years ago when they shut down three marques, two of which had very loyal followings but all three of which had already been destroyed by upper management meddling. I’ve only got one “American” brand left and that one isn’t really American any more. But at least their products seem good for now and I haven’t had any notable issues with any of their current products (though Daimler did a good job of sabotaging the brand.)

            I’m actually looking forward to the French brands making a comeback. They sure as heck can’t be any worse than GM or Ford!

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            “Then why is Ford dropping them?”

            Because Ford thinks you’ll take out an 84-month loan to buy an Ecosport that costs $8,000 more than a Fiesta.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Thank you, TMA. That’s the best laugh I’ve had so far today.

        • 0 avatar
          Steve Biro

          +1. There isn’t a single vehicle in Ford’s lineup that I find attractive in any way. And the SUVs-CUVs are worse than the cars. Others may like them and that’s fine. But, after being a Ford guy for 40 years, I have written them off the way I once wrote off GM.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          @Vulpine you want Lincoln to stop making SUVs and torpedo out of business with large sedans that not even you would buy though.

          I agree that Ford is going to lose sales over this, but when they are sales that come at a cost rather than a profit that’s a good thing. And as I’ve said a million times, if sedan demand picks back up Ford can just federalize and import the sedans they aren’t going to stop building and selling abroad.

      • 0 avatar
        analogman

        Who said it’s a monumentally stupid idea to exit the car business? I did, but I’m no expert, just a gear head. Probably more interestingly, so have some (non financial type) industry observers who are much smarter than I am about the car industry.

        The platforms may map 1:1, but the end result products are quite different. My sister was considering a Focus but never an Escape. A friend of mine who recently bought a Fiesta would not consider an Ecosport, and another friend looking for a Fusion for his wife isn’t interested in the Edge.

        Those buyers won’t disappear. While I’m sure a few might be tempted by a ‘CUV’, I suspect that those who want a ‘car’ will simply buy other brands. Ford is handing some of its market share to its competition. Maybe Honda, Toyota, GM, will send them a nice fruit basket to thank them for the extra customers.

        Few companies seem to slash and cut their way to greatness.

        • 0 avatar
          TwoBelugas

          “Maybe Honda, Toyota, GM, will send them a nice fruit basket to thank them for the extra customers.”

          Ruh-roh

          https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2018/05/morgan-stanley-pretty-sure-gms-cars-will-soon-go-way-fords/

          Then the gearheads can truly swim in car paradise with the sporty Camry, the road hugging Corolla, the nimble Civic, and the ever exciting Accord, because we know they sure the heck are not buying those numb and ponderous 86s and BRZs.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          “Maybe Honda, Toyota, GM, will send them a nice fruit basket to thank them for the extra customers.”

          Yep, Toyota sure will be thankful that the rental car companies will buy even more of their overstyled snoreboxes. GM is likely to follow Ford’s lead, and Honda is probably the only one that makes decent money selling cars, however, I’m sure more of their profits come from those evil crossovers. But, all three would just be seen as being bitter over not having a cash-cow like F-150. GM could be the only one to defend its stance on that charge, since its full-size trucks also sell extremely well.

          So, you know a few people who bought Ford cars, or supposedly considered them. Well, I do too, but I know a lot more people who bought Ford trucks or utilities, sales that actually made the company money. What difference does it make if a customer doesn’t buy your car, or if he buys it and you lose money on it by selling it?

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      It is enormously stupid to discontinue products that lose money and that the market as a whole is turning against.

      What would be really smart is for them to discontinue products that do make money so they can focus (pun unintended) on building a better Corolla, so they can dump it in rental fleets like Toyota does with the real Corolla. That will fix everything. Forget millions of profitable truck and SUV sales, lets sell 200k sedans and we will lose money on each and every one!

      • 0 avatar
        ra_pro

        It may not be “enormously stupid” but it may well be “short-sided”. And perhaps it will turn out to be “enormously stupid” few years down the road when looking back to this moment.

        Japanese, Europeans, Koreans figured out how to make better cars than Americans. Are you going to bet that this will not happen to the truck business eventually?

  • avatar
    KalapanaBlack7G

    Why not partner with one of the nationwide vehicle service chains? Car gets bought online, warranty repairs, service and parts available at Pep Boys or Monro or Firestone.

    Seems to make complete sense to me. All appointments and service booked online. Loaner cars available at locations. A chain of shops and service bays already set up country wide. Just need to retrain the workforce of the service partner, which I’m sure would shoulder some of that burden for the guaranteed income.

    And for those that will talk about why this wouldn’t work because of the low-end nature of the employees and quality at the big service chains – mass market brand dealers are identical, but with nicer waiting areas and cleaner front-of-house people. The back of the house is identical.

    • 0 avatar
      KalapanaBlack7G

      And loaner car inventory could double as car-sharing inventory ton get product exposure to non-brand customers whose vehicle is in for service. And of course the whole fleet is available for purchase through the online sales portal for those that opt not to fix their current vehicle. Captive customers left and right, service network already in place, no need to partner with a competitor, and probably minimal involvement with NADA and state dealer franchise rules.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Really like these ideas. Partner with an existing chain. Firestone, Midas, Speedy, Kal Tire or if they really wanted to shake up the market in Canada, Canadian Tire.

        Have designated parking areas for their cars, which would then double as loaners for those who ‘own’ a PSA vehicle and as a car sharing program for those who belong to the program but have not purchased a vehicle.

        Provides access, warranty work, loaner cars, and multiple ‘free’ locations for their car sharing. Without having to create a dealer network.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      “Why not partner with one of the nationwide vehicle service chains? Car gets bought online, warranty repairs, service and parts available at Pep Boys or Monro or Firestone.”

      NADA wouldn’t allow that to happen. They want their cut… no matter what.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      Just Google search “Pep Boys Nightmare” or “Firestone Nightmare”. The incompetence at Sears/Walmart/Midas et cetera Auto Centers is all too frequent. They are not “factory-trained” mechanics.
      Heck, I once had to explain to a Sears Auto Center “mechanic” what it meant to turn a brake drum. You’re always best off doing your own work if you can, but I digress.
      The market will decide if PSA offers competitive vehicles in a way that works for 21st century consumers. Best of luck to ’em, it just means more choices for us.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        ^this, so much this.

        They couldn’t possibly do any worse for their reputation than to turn their customers over to those horrible places for service.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          Not sure about American rules. but in Ontario auto technicians/mechanics are a ‘Red Seal’ trade/profession. Meaning that they must attend college for training, serve an apprenticeship and then become licensed.

          Only a licensed mechanic can perform certain tasks such as signing off on a safety inspection, or completing a brake job.

          Whether or not the license mechanic at a dealership, franchise, chain of auto shops, or independent shop is ‘better’ depends on a great many of factors. But they have all completed the same licensing requirements.

          So ‘tarring them all with the same brush’ is ‘discriminatory’ and probably based more on personal experience/anecdote than statistics. After all many people equate getting their vehicle serviced at a dealership as ‘flushing their money down a toilet’.

          Some of the very best mechanics that I have known have worked for independent garages, or for franchises (Midas in particular).

  • avatar
    ;scarey

    Arthur Dailey has it almost right. But they must include Southern California and the West Coast in general. (He DID mention the West Coast, though.) The Northeast, Northwest, and SoCal are where the “adventurous”, “quirky”, people live. The people in the Northwest were the first to willingly pay $4 for a cup of coffee. The first to buy hybrids. Are they called “hipsters” ? I’m not sure. But they go for the oddball ideas, at least for a while, then it either takes off, or fades away.
    The French COULD do it, IF they buckled down and applied themselves to the job, and took it seriously, tackled the job like they did acquiring the atomic bomb project. But it is unlikely because they tend to look down on all other people with such appalling arrogance.

  • avatar
    TDIandThen....

    I really like some of the ideas posted so far, if only because it’s exciting to think that maybe maybe PSA is willing and able to actually experiment and approach the market here differently. If they joined Tesla in online sales, had a single test-drive specialist dealer per city, set up a car-share fleet, all of these moves are probably very disruptive – good – for the market. Certainly here in Quebec the majority of dealers need to face an real shake of the oligopoly.

    And, I’ll take an Alpine as well thank you.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I like the disruptive ideas shared here, but – as dubious as I am about PSA’s return to the US market – I’d like to see a more specific plan with real commitment.

    The hedging by PSA doesn’t sound like a company who is in it to win it (unlike Exhibit A = Tesla). A half-hearted effort will fail, regardless of the execution details.

  • avatar
    CombiCoupe99

    If you want to break into the US car market – give us a small pickup truck with a 6′ bed -you’ll have folks lining up to buy it.

    Manhindra – PLEASE COME SOON!

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      The Chicken Tax, a protectionist holdover from a trade war decades ago, keeps foreign trucks out.

      Also, current administration in Washington likes to tear up trade deals and start trade wars.

      Don’t hold your breath.

  • avatar
    rcx141

    Ha ha. Egg box plastic and bent wire French junk !

  • avatar

    With Trump in TWH European car makers ought to take in consideration a substantial hike on import duties. Which may be the only good move this administration will be making. It will ‘stimulate’ foreign car brands to move over (even more) production to the U.S. (jobs!), plus it yields extra cash for the federal government to be invested in the infrastructure. Having said that, I do thing that some French cars make perfect sense in a state like California. Compact cars like the Renault Megane and Scenic, the Peugeot 3008 and Citroen C3 and C4.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Because small quirky European car sales are on fire right now! You can’t throw a penny without hitting a brand new Fiat or a Mini (ya know, if you’re on their sales lot, because that’s where those cars are glued/welded/stapled/nailed/screwed to).

  • avatar
    dantes_inferno

    Just longing for the return of the days when the Renault Le-Box was sold on these shores….

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    The only French brand that should return is Renault. They have nicer cars than PSA and the dealership gateway through Nissan. Give us some US appropriate engines and I think they would do REALLY well. Save the awful Nissans for fleets and pit Renault up against Mazda and Volkswagen for profitable retail. Their lineup is gorgeous and dripping with the style the US market desperately needs.

  • avatar
    cheezman88

    With a picture like that? Lol. Oh boy, I can only imagine what the average American would have to say about that one.

  • avatar
    ra_pro

    When I was in France a decade or so ago the guy who was my business host said that even French don’t like French cars. And sure enough he went out and bought a VW.


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