By on April 6, 2018

The Rare Rides series has had a couple of bouts with ancient, excellent condition Toyotas in the Tercel Wagon and 4Runner. Today, we have a look at a little orange truck which pre-dates either of those.

It’s a Pickup, from way back in 1983.

First, some Hilux history. The Toyota Hilux started out as a brand new offering from Toyota back in 1968, and came to the North American market as the Hi-Lux starting in 1969. It was a replacement for the unpopular Stout truck, which we featured on Rare Rides in 2017. A second generation debuted for the 1973 model year, and brought with it additional modernization.

The second generation underwent a revamp for 1976; it grew larger, had more standard equipment, and larger engines were available. These were all characteristics requested (or perhaps demanded) by North American customers. The changes also brought a new naming convention for Toyota’s truck offering — in 1976, its name transitioned from Hi-Lux to Pickup in the North American market.

For 1979, the third-generation Pickup arrived, bringing with it the most truck-like of truck characteristics: optional four-wheel drive. Toyota was getting the hang of American desires now, and for the first time a three-speed automatic transmission was available to complement the four- and five-speed manuals. A range of inline-four engines were available, all of them between 1.6 and 2.4 liters of displacement. Toyota reserved four-wheel drive for engines of at least 1.8 liters, to the chagrin of cheapskate customers.

Today’s SR5 Pickup is from right at the end of the third generation’s life. Trucks with four-wheel drive ended production in July of 1983, as Toyota wound down the old model in preparation for the fourth-gen model (which took over in North America for 1984).

This example draws power from the 22R carbureted engine; it was the largest on offer, with a displacement of 2.4 liters. A long-lived Toyota design, the 22R was produced from 1981 through 1997, and in original guise produced a raging 97 horsepower. 0-60 time? Yes, it has one.

Information on the listing is scarce, but the Pickup is exceptionally clean, and has travelled over 160,000 miles. Everything looks original, right down to the paint and tape stripes. The clean interior has all of its trim and even wood applique. Luxury!

Currently listed on eBay, the Pickup’s owner is asking $18,500.

[Images via seller]

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84 Comments on “Rare Rides: A Toyota Pickup From 1983, Extra Clean and Rust Free...”


  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    Solid-axle manual 4×4? Oh yeah, someone’s emptying out their bank account.

  • avatar
    VW4motion

    Toyota pickup and rust-free do not go together.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    For as good looking as that truck is, either the 160K on the clock is lying, or the interior is. That carpet in particular looks far too new, especially for that kind of mileage. Even the seat covers would be significantly more worn. Sure, it may have been garaged all its life but this is much more of a restoration than a survivor, or at least a re-upholstering, I’m sure. No way would I pay $18K for it.

    However, this truck does exemplify what I’m looking for in a modern compact. Even in ’83 I believe it came with an extended cab version on a stretched wheelbase (about 15″ longer, plus or minus, IIRC.) A lot of people simply don’t need and don’t want anything larger than this; despite arguments to the contrary.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      It’s definitely been gone through and restored, no doubt about that.

      I love this thing, but it would ultimately be just about useless to me: way too clean to go offroad-romping in, and I’d even feel bad hauling gravel or whatever in the bed!

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Looks like new carpet at some point (did it originally even have carpet?) but I believe the seat upholstery is original. It looks a bit worn, and that stuff was famously long-lasing.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Exactly. It’s an all original, Near Mint “survivor”.

        The bed floor says it all. It’s like I’ve said to Vulpine repeatedly:

        These pickups, this era were rarely bought for “work” and rarely even used for moving couches and stuff.

        They were bought during “The MIni Truck Craze”, as one would buy anything “sporty” or specialty, as say a Celica, Z-car, RX7 (that would never see a race track) and such, which would do zero towing. Ever.

        This one has never even had a rear bumper, much less a receiver hitch. Point is there’s literally millions of mini-trucks, still out in California, still on the road, and pickups in this fine a condition, are a dime a dozen.

        That’s really hard to fathom if you’re in Virginia or something most your life. Most were sold/stayed in California, the epicenter of The Mini Truck Craze, and The Wild Custom Mini Truck Movement.

        The import quotas in Japanese cars helped spark the Hot trend, keeping in mind there were no limits (or dealer price gouging) on pickup imports and Japanese automaker wisely flooded the US with import pickups, cut-rate, as fast as they could load them on a boat.

        This one was probably owned by a high school librarian, dentist, CPA or something, now either dead or circling the drain.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          “Exactly. It’s an all original, Near Mint “survivor”.”
          — At that mileage, unlikely unless it was EXTREMELY well cared for. However, if you take a closer look at that interior, you’ll notice that the dashboard colors are mis-matched and the through-the-door image shows the dark brown lower portion normally protected by the door panel is unusually rough and ill-fitting. There’s at least three different shades of brown there, as the wheel column and the lower instrument housing are yet a third shade of brown… not even considering the cloth upholstery and carpeting. Nope… not original.

          “The bed floor says it all. It’s like I’ve said to Vulpine repeatedly:”
          — (and to which I’ve argued repeatedly…)
          “These pickups, this era were rarely bought for “work” and rarely even used for moving couches and stuff.”
          — There’s work and there’s “work.” Mini trucks weren’t meant for heavy-duty use and this one exemplifies this. It WAS used for some level of real work though, or the bed wouldn’t be as scarred up as it is. Especially when you consider the condition of the rest of the body.

          “They were bought during “The MIni Truck Craze”, as one would buy anything “sporty” or specialty, as say a Celica, Z-car, RX7 (that would never a race track) and such, which would do zero towing. Ever.”
          — Well, half true. But I would note that there were slide-in truck bed campers and even mini-fifth-wheel trailers designed to be towed by one of these. And don’t forget, there were even whole-hog Class C RVs made from them. People buying one of these mini trucks weren’t buying sporty cars, they were buying mini-trucks then for almost the exact same reasons they buy full-sized trucks today; some for “status” and others as actual utility vehicles. And by all means they were better at utility than most of the Road Whales™ of today.

          “This one has never even had a rear bumper, much less a receiver hitch.”
          — Didn’t need ’em back then when the trailer they towed was usually a fifth-wheel.

          “Point is there’s literally millions of mini-trucks, still out in California, still on the road, and pickups in this fine a condition, are a dime a dozen.”
          — Absolutely false. 100% false. Sure, there are a lot, more than some would expect, but not “literally millions.” Especially in California.

          “That’s really hard to fathom if you’re in Virginia or something most your life. Most were sold/stayed in California, the epicenter of The Mini Truck Craze, and The Wild Custom Mini Truck Movement.”
          — Pure bunk. Surviving min trucks are all over the country… admittedly less so in the Rust Belt due to that red cancer but can easily be found in nearly every state south of Pennsylvania in surprising numbers. Go farther south where salt isn’t in that much use (meaning mild winters) and you’ll find them by the dozens in almost any metropolitan community (not just city, but the individual communities within those cities.) And few, VERY few, are customized beyond some personalized graphics.

          “The import quotas in Japanese cars helped spark the Hot trend, keeping in mind there were no limits (or dealer price gouging) on pickup imports and Japanese automaker wisely flooded the US with import pickups, cut-rate, as fast as they could load them on a boat.”
          — Well, almost true. It seems there really was a market for them–and not just for customization. Of course, the Chicken Tax shut that down quickly enough, once all the loopholes got closed. (Something certain people insist never happened.)

          “This one was probably owned by a high school librarian, dentist, CPA or something, now either dead or circling the drain.”
          — And you know where assumptions can take you. The mileage on it alone refutes that argument.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Nobody towed a 5th wheel with a mini pickup. Most people however did spend the money for the aftermaket bumper of their choice, most commonly the Chrome Step bumper with a hole for a ball.

            You would really have to have been there to know just how much of a force the mini-truck craze was on the west coast and in So-Cal in particular. I one fell swoop they knocked out the Mustang/Camaro/Nova and vans as the cool thing to drive and customize. Plus they were something a young person could afford new or relatively new. Plain and simple most were bought simply because that was the cool thing to do and were affordable.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            I know it was nearly 40 years ago, Scout, but you should have paid more attention. They weren’t common, mind you, but they were out there. I believe they were called “mini fifth wheeler.”

            http://www.doityourselfrv.com/small-fifth-wheel-camper-quantum-5/
            —- Note the mini trucks pulling it in the lower pictures.

            https://www.scamptrailers.com/showroom/19-standard-trailers.html#!image_04

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Also there were 5 different colors in the interior from the factory, throw in several years of fading and it all looks right other than the aftermarket carpet and new upholstery on the seats.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It’s clear you’ve never been to So Cal. It’s like a rolling car show/museum with 80’s mini-trucks still everywhere.

            Yeah most don’t look as good as this one, but they sold a lot of mini-trucks, millions all together, from many brands and many years.

            And they refuse to die, or keep coming back from the dead.

            But yeah they were bought by whole segments of the car buying public that had never owned a pickup (big or small) and haven’t bought one since.

            Today, you’re either a “pickup buyer” or you’re not.

            I don’t know if you were aware of what was going on, on the west coast at the time, it sound’s like you weren’t aware of much!

            I was there every Spring Break without fail, ended up staying for years, working at a Toyota dealer, mid ’80s.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It was funny I bought a running mini-truck for $20 from a guy I knew, with a camper shell, lowered, and I’m not even sure what it was. Early Courier possibly, but I sold it an hour later to a co-worker for $200, that of course never paid me, but the reason was mini-trucks were absolutely everywhere, mid ’80s.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            https://www.tradingpost.com.au/Caravans/Caravans-/Ultima-Ecolite-27RK-5th-wheeler/Port-Macquarie/NSW/AdNumber=9HJKPJ

          • 0 avatar
            JMII

            All the mini trucks owners I knew in the 80s painted them monochromatic (chrome was uncool), added under frame neon, pastel colored graphics (stickers), then lowered them onto the ground (no 4x4s) plus had multiple subwoofers behind the seats. The vehicle of choice was the Mazda B2200s, along with a mix of Nissans, Rangers or Chevy S10s. I honestly never recall the mini truck treatment being applied to a Toyota. I think that is because the Toyota lacks the slab sides that made the wild graphics stand out so well.

            My parking lot at high school was filled with these things. Living in southern Florida was like being in Cali in terms of car culture. We had no rust so things lived forever and Japanese cars were very desirable. Case in point: my first car was a Mustang which I hated, so I was thrilled when it stolen and replaced with a Civic. The cool kids had CRXs, Celicas and RX7s. If you had a 300ZX or a Supra back then you were a god.

            At the time the cheapest vehicle on any lot was 4 cylinder mini truck, thus they were super popular as first vehicles with my friends. Many parents likely thought these were safe for teen drivers, but they were RWD, light and stick shift, so my buddies always hooned the heck out of them.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            The mileage means nothing. We don’t know if it’s highway miles, stored since the early 90’s, Sunday driven since new, a few miles a week or month, any combination, or what?

            Since then, nothing has changed as far as the “Chicken Tax” goes. 1979 is when cab-chassis loophole ended. This was a little before The Mini Truck Craze kicked off, and coinciding about exactly with the import quotas.

            I didn’t say they were only sold on the west coast, nor that most were customized.

            Take it for what it is, but I was there, front/center. Where were you? I saw who was buying/driving them, including the very young and very old, professional types men/women, and what they were trading in.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            You know, DM, if you weren’t so hard-headed set on believing there’s no demand for these small trucks, you would realize that the reason the old ones aren’t vanishing is because there aren’t any new ones to replace them. With your own words, …

            “It’s clear you’ve never been to So Cal. It’s like a rolling car show/museum with 80’s mini-trucks still everywhere. Yeah most don’t look as good as this one, but they sold a lot of mini-trucks, millions all together, from many brands and many years. And they refuse to die, or keep coming back from the dead,
            … you make that patently clear.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            True the old ones are treasured, loved and tend to avoid the boneyard. But that’s true of too many vehicles from the era, especially when “specialty”, convertible, sporty, turbo, and or 4X4. But even plain Datsuns.

            I’m not saying there isn’t “demand” for small pickups, or smaller than midsize, but that demand isn’t big enough to justify bringing them back (or bringing them in), per automaker’s studies.

            If your own “study” shows different, you should bring it to automakers.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            So you’re backtracking on five years worth of arguments because you have been conclusively proven wrong, yet you still want to believe there isn’t enough demand to tempt the OEMs. A pity.

            And what do you think _I_ have been doing on these threads and elsewhere for the last five plus years, sitting on my hands? I’ve been talking to nearly every industry person I can find AND posting on forums like these (because corporate people do read them to learn more about public response) telling them we need a return to the true SMALL truck. That’s why GM brought back the C-twins. That’s why Hyundai prototyped the Santa Cruz. And now we hear of even more smaller trucks on the horizon. The question now is to whether they will follow through quickly enough.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            How am I “backtracking”? Yes owners love their vintage mini-trucks. People love their Pintos too. So?

            Forums can lead automakers astray.

            CRXs are loved/idolized by their owners, past owners, but that doesn’t mean they’d buy “a new one” today.

            Honda saw that incredible “love” (and lust) and remade the “CRX”, and look what happened there.

            Yes Honda took it in the shorts.

            No one loved their ’85 MR2 more than I did mine (it was stolen in ’92, not recovered). I’d still own it today for sure, zero doubt, and yeah I might consider “a new one” (for a second) if it was remade today but I probably wouldn’t buy one.

            Some things are better left in the past. And you even ditched your “Loved” faithful Mitsu mini-truck, and (almost) never looked back!

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            • “How am I “backtracking”? Yes owners love their vintage mini-trucks. People love their Pintos too. So?”
            — Now you’re just trying to weasel out of what you very clearly stated.

            • “Forums can lead automakers astray.”
            — Forums can also tell them where the next big market is.

            • “CRXs are loved/idolized by their owners, past owners, but that doesn’t mean they’d buy “a new one” today.”
            — Doesn’t mean they wouldn’t, either. It’s all in how they address that market and so far the OEMs have failed to address the compact truck market effectively.

            • “Honda saw that incredible “love” (and lust) and remade the “CRX”, and look what happened there.”
            — Which only goes to show that they misunderstood what the customer wanted.

            • “No one loved their ’85 MR2 more than I did mine (it was stolen in ’92, not recovered). I’d still own it today for sure, zero doubt, and yeah I might consider “a new one” (for a second) if it was remade today but I probably wouldn’t buy one.”
            — Why?

            • “Some things are better left in the past. And you even ditched your “Loved” faithful Mitsu mini-truck, and (almost) never looked back!”
            — Ditched? No. It was legally stolen, i.e. repossessed. A bad period in my life but also one in which I learned several life lessons. For almost ten years I had to put up with what I could afford or what was given to me. I also had to think strategically as one of my employers actively tried to get me to drive MY vehicle for company business without compensation. (I ended up getting that shop padlocked by the IRS for tax evasion.) After that, need was more important than desire and I NEEDED a more wagon-like vehicle more than an open-bed truck. Now I’m finally able to operate two vehicles and the truck replaces most of the needs the wagon got used for–but not all. There are still times when the ability to carry sufficient volume under cover overrides the need for an open bed.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            That’s the problem in a nutshell.. There’s way more way to fail than succeed here. When it came down to it, the CR-z was no ’88 CRX, which truly fans/faithful wanted a repop of, not a new interpretation of the “original classic”, but that’s exactly what consumers got, and that’s as close as Honda could come.

            And of course markets change, even if they could repop the “original”. And we don’t know what other “market forces” shaped what sold good at the time. But then fwd compact pickups were never tremendous sellers.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “And of course markets change, even if they could repop the “original”. And we don’t know what other “market forces” shaped what sold good at the time. But then fwd compact pickups were never tremendous sellers.”

            That was then, this is now. FWD and AWD are extremely popular today with the people most likely to buy a truly compact truck.

            And before you go touting how the Ridgeline is unpopular, I would remind you that the Ridgeline is also barely shy of full-sized, totally bypassing the market segment we’re discussing.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        No I bet it didn’t come with carpet and if it did it didn’t look like that. A college roomate who did the Alaska oil field summer job bought a new truck very similar to this one and it had the vinyl mat.

        Next summer when he got back and took it out of storage it got 33″ tires, accompanying lift, bumpers, step bars, cam headers, intake and Weber carb.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Vulpine,
      I do believe your ideal truck will come around. Anything as small as these will be unibody.

      The closest truck to what you want in size is the Mitsubishi Triton, with a diesel of course. I know, but you guys can’t have this due to the chicken tax. Converted into USD, this is around $28 000 (recommended retail). with diesel, flat bed and all on roads (incl insurance, etc)f paid for. You could get another two or three thousand off with a bit of wheeling and dealing.

      Here’s a link to read on the single cab Triton review. btw, it FE is better than a 2.7 TT EcoThirst F-150, except this thing is towing a tandem axle caravan. Not bad eh?

      https://www.motoring.com.au/mitsubishi-triton-2017-review-105393/

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        I could go with that taking three changes;
        1) extended cab (need the extra interior space but DON’T need a full second row for passengers;
        2) gasoline engine (diesel prices as high as premium and when a 2 litre turbo engine can push 250+hp it’ll have more than enough power to cruise in a high-economy mode on the highway and get better fuel mileage at a lower cost;
        3) Standard bed. Don’t need or want a tray. Though I admit the tray does make loading and unloading easier for large, flat loads. A standard bed meets my needs while the clean sides and closed tailgate improve economy.

        Question: Isn’t the new Nissan Frontier supposed to be based on this?

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Vulpine,
          1. They do come with an extended cab, called a Club Cab.

          2. There is a gasoline engine, but I don’t think it comes as a 4×4. A 2WD version is around $16 800USD.

          3. I’m not so sure about a “standard” bed. Here in Australia for vehicles like this flatbeds are the choice because you would not buy this for anything but work.

          A flatbed on one of these offers far more area than a “standard” bed US 1/2 ton.

          4(?) The Nissan is not based on one of these. These are smaller, that’s why I presented the link to you. Sort halfway between midsize and this Hilux in this article.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            1) Expected
            2) AWD would serve me fine. Not likely to do too much muddin’ in it.
            3) That’s an Aussie thing; flatbeds are less common here because it’s too easy for the load to slide off unless tied down firmly. A standard bet lets you drop a box in the bed and not worry about it simply falling out (of course, depending on said load, a bungee net would at least keep it from flying out due to ‘enthusiastic’ driving.)
            4) Smaller is good. Still don’t need the pan, though.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Vulpine,
            Anything in the flatbed will slide around? WTF?

            Not only do you have side boards that range from 250mm-300mm, you must by law secure any load in any vehicle.

            Do you not have laws like this in the US??

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Seemingly not, Al. At least, not in personally-operated vehicles not being used for any commercial purpose. I can drive down the highway almost any time of the day and watch pieces of paper or other lightweight material circulating through the aerodynamic eddy that helps improve pickup truck mileage when the tailgate is up. Straw goes flying and even loose cardboard will fly out of an otherwise empty bed. Heavy gear tends not to move or will slide around in that bed, banging the walls and tailgate and the driver without a care in the world.

            Now, if that load has some value to the driver, then it might get tied down… but even then it somewhat depends on its size and weight.

            A stake side (flatbed with a fence-like railing around it with the uprights in bed pockets and one or two rails on each side) may be even worse, with loose gear piled up as high as the roof of the truck and only those wooden slats holding it all in.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Oh, it’s 4×4 as well. Not bad for around $25k USD.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Thank’s for that BAFO – It looks ridiculous because it is. I don’t care if it’s perfectly “legal” Down Undah, Africa, etc.

        A “midsize” pickup towing a 5th-wheel, slide-out tandem-axle RV in the USA will get you pulled over instantly.

        You can add this to the list of crazy stunts you’re allowed to do public.

        Two words: Road Trains.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Clearly you never paid attention, DM. At the time, fifth-wheel campers for those mini trucks WERE available… typically 18-25 footers compared to the 28’+ models towed by the full-sized trucks.

          I don’t think Scouty ever looked.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            They weren’t around here but then we have hills and those little 4cyls in the first wave of the mini truck fad wouldn’t have been up to 18-25′ neither getting it up the hill or safely down the other side.

            Mini trucks around here if they were actually used for outdoors/camping would were fitted with a “camper shell” and carpeted by the owner or used to tow a tent trailer or small boat.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Check the links I tossed you, Scout.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Did you check the link you posted because the period one says “the Quantum 5 was only in production for 3 years after 1978. During that time only 500 were made.” Pretty much supports that no one was buying these mini 5th wheels in the peak of the mini-truck craze.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            And you said they “never towed one”.

            Which is it? Did they or did they not tow a fifth wheeler? That specific one, the Quantum 5, was only one of several. Even Serro Scotty had some.

            http://www.nadaguides.com/RVs/1990/Serro-Scotty/Travel-Trailers-5th-Wheels (No pictures here, though.)

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8CupqxGZiI
            —- Read the comments underneath.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Winnepeg boy
            If you are interested in road fatalities here’s a great interactive map. The US appears to have a road safety standard on par with many/most middle economies from Sth America, Africa, Asia. It is in fact one of the worst for a modern nation.

            Go ‘muricin Mustang! 3 Star safety rating. Chinese LDV T60 ute 5 Star safety rating.

            http://gamapserver.who.int/gho/interactive_charts/road_safety/road_traffic_deaths2/atlas.html

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @BAFO – I see you’re side-stepping into a totally different argument, and even if your off-topic data is correct, it’s meaningless here.

            Obviously you’ve only got midsize trucks for the most part, mainstream, but fullsize jobs still need to get done.

            Since you’ve got no US DOT equivalent in OZ, Africa, etc, “official” capacity ratings are left entirely to the sense of humor of pickup truck manufacturers!

            Hey, what ever works for you guys.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            I never said that there weren’t companies trying to sell those mini-fifth wheels just that very very few of hem were actually sold and used behind a mini truck as the mini trucks of this era just weren’t up to the task. That fancy ultra light 2500lb (dry) 5th wheel in that one link would have quickly put you over the GCWR with you, your stuff and a full tank of water with the trucks available when introduced.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Might I remind you of the many Class C motorhomes on the Toyota chassis?

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Class C motor homes were on 6 wheel dually cab-chassis’. That had to end though. I think they were overloaded with passengers/gear, but they were severely underpowered.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Not arguing they were underpowered; the simple fact is that they existed and a few are still on the roads.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            A lot of questionable things “existed” (and still on the road), but most of those go away as we progress.

            Most older (obsolete) one-ton tow trucks (flatbeds and wreckers) are close to, or overloaded “empty”, but many are still on the road (making a living!).

            I know you rode in the bed of pickup trucks as a kid.

            We’re smarter now, or I’d like to think so… Lawn darts?

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    My Dad had an 81 2wd long bed when I was young. Basic truck, I remember burning my young legs on the vinyl bench. This thing looks like a Lexus comparatively. It was probably supposed to be close to this color, but was quite pink and very rusty by the time it was traded on our new 88 Ranger. Only 80k on the Toyota when it left.

    My ideal truck, for my purposes, is a Toyota or Nissan from the late 80’s early 90’s 2wd. Not for 18k

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Nice truck and remarkably well restored. The vehicle might be original, but everything from the paint job to the decals, interior seems to be redone, especially after 160k.

    White Sunraysia steel rims from the era would of gone well.

    The Toyota Stout of this era was also very similar in design and looks, but larger with a larger payload ………. and slower.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      There’s just no “money” in restoring a pickup from the ’80s, even just cosmetically, inside/out.

      If the paint was “gone” or burnt, so were the (top of the) door panels, dash pad, carpet/seats, steering wheel, column plastics, just from UV exposure.

      They all look original.

      Anything that’s not re-popped/aftermarket would be prohibitively expensive, if you can even find it (NOS).

      Too many exterior “chrome” (over/plastic) trim pieces wont be re-popped, and the sun/time eats those first.

      The custom-stripe paint job alone would be deal breaker.

      Yep this one is all original, or a crazy expensive forgery.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        No the decal job would not be a deal breaker, I’m certain there are repo sets available and there are lots of people who can custom make the. For example IH had a number of different decal sets on Scout IIs. A guy with a Scout and a sign business did measurements on his truck and later some of the NOS sets still held by the current owner of rights to officially license Scout reproduction items and bam you can order them up in the factory color or he’ll do it in pretty much any color you want.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          I’d say there’s too many makes/models/colors to re-pop/stock, and I doubt they’d age well, stilling on the shelf for very long, but yeah I’m no expert on stripe kits.

          I’d have the painter stripe the thing, so at least I know they’re gonna last as long as the paint. It’s hard to tell/trust with everything “aftermarket” made in China now.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Today there is no need to stock them. Many of the authoriszed Scout Light Line dealers do stock one or two of the Scout stripes but if you want it in a non factory color or one of the less common ones they just call up the guy who makes them and he selects the appropriate file loads the machine and pushes start. I can’t imagine there isn’t someone out there in the Toyota Fan Kingdom who doesn’t have the tools and desire to catalog the designs and cut to order.

            Yeah it is nice just to paint it which wouldn’t be that hard, If you are going that far you kind of want to bury it deep in clear so the lines are perfect but not detectable by feel. Then you aren’t restoring it and you are spending more money to make it less valuable.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Any good skin shop can duplicate original appliqués easily enough. My local one made custom stripes for my Wrangler, Renegade and Ranger.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Scoutdude,
          Even where I work we have a computerised machine that will make these decals and even advertising decals for vehicles.

          It will even cut the decals to fit panels.

          Oh, it does photos, anything you want to stick to anything.

          We use it for signage.

  • avatar
    srh

    My dream “classic car” collection has this truck sitting next to a similar condition Datsun 240. It appeals to me in the same way.

    Not sure if I’d even drive it, or just set up an easy chair in my garage and stare at it.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    That’s worth about eleventy billion dollars.

  • avatar
    TR4

    “Everything looks original, right down to the paint and tape stripes.”

    Surely, those square black door speakers are not original?

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Nice truck and assuming there isn’t something that doesn’t show up in the pictures it should sell quickly for full price. You just don’t see this era 4×4 truck in this condition. Way to many of the original owners didn’t keep them more than 5 or maybe 10 years and then they were snapped up by guys that lifted them and wheeled them to death.

    If definitely isn’t *all* original but I bet you’d be hard pressed to find one that’s much better, and certainly not one that was used for this many miles.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    The weirdest thing is that the 20R and 22R (R Family) engines were also used in the Celica, Corona, and some Cressidas. They’re low-revving truck engines, specializing in low-end torque, rather than high-end horsepower, and completely out of place in something like a Celica.

    There are articles and videos of Celicas running in the 24 Hour of LeMons, throwing rods from being over-revved.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I would say that this truck is worth the $18,500. Not too many of these exist anymore and especially in this condition.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Somewhere in the Jihadi University Dormitory, there’s a guy who has a poster of one of these hanging on the wall. He looks at it wistfully, and chants “someday…someday…”

  • avatar
    pwrwrench

    Obviously not a California truck. It does not have that ‘plate of black spaghetti’ bunch of vacuum hoses that Toyota installed as part of the emission control system.
    The basic mechanicals of these trucks are quite durable, that emission control system and the carburetor that went with it became a nightmare after about 75 to 100K miles.
    Not sure how someone would keep one of these on the road in California with the required emission tests.
    Also there were some Toyota trucks where it was necessary to remove the lower radiator hose to replace the alternator.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    barnfinds.com/preserved-sr5-1983-toyota-pickup/

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Some excellent guesses… Especially by me! It’s last been seen in Canada, original stripes, repaint on roof, bed, unknown miles (km conversion cluster at some point), USA truck originally, and mostly an “original” survivor.

  • avatar
    2000ChevyImpalaLS

    The stripe package and colors reminds me a little bit of TC’s helicopter on “Magnum, PI.”

  • avatar
    ernest

    There’s one thing you guys are forgetting. Yes, nice mini trucks are out there in California. But a nice 4X4 is the real unicorn. Most of the older ‘Yotas up here are banging through the mud and woods in anything but mint condition.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @DenverMike–I use all of my trucks for hauling. I had an 85 Mitsubishi Mighty Max with over 200k miles that I hauled gravel, mulch, 2 x 4s, pavers, furnaces, scrap metal, riding mowers, and many other things. I had the springs and shocks built up to haul a ton. I even pulled a tree stump out with it using a metal chain. I have also used my 99 S-10 as well. Do you believe that most of those who buy half ton crew cab F-150s use them for hauling or is it just those who buy smaller trucks? Maybe some of us don’t want to drive a gigantic truck all the time and like something that is actually fun to drive and gets decent mpgs. Do you believe I own a truck just for show? I might drive midsize trucks but I do use their beds. There are a lot of expensive crew cab half ton pickups that are driven around just to show off.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      The Toyota dealer I worked at, mid ’80s was mostly selling pickups to people that obviously weren’t “truck people”, including similar to what some call the “hair dresser” crowd. Or similar to Jeep Wrangler original owners that never go off-pavement but customize them to no end.

      I’m sure you’re not one of them and own trucks for all the right reasons, assuming there are “right reasons”.

      Heck yeah Mini Truck dealers “cashed in” with aftermarket “pre-runner” or off road rollbars, lighting, lift kits, big wheels/tires, nerf bar packages, and buyers snapped them up! Likely “Marty McFly’s” truck was a Toyota dealer “turnkey” setup.

      Yeah we sold plenty of those “Custom Cab” full-stretch conversions. Not an extra-cab but basically 2-door “crew cab” with full 2nd row seats.

      No doubt The Mini Truck Craze was one of the Hottest trends of the ’80s, even if most of it was on the west coast. Anyone that disagrees didn’t get out much, or on another planet.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    I know of an 85 Toyota pickup SR5 that is still being driven. It has around 500K miles. It has had some repairs, but still in decent shape. Has some rust from being parked on the streets of Hermosa Beach, Ca for most of its life.

    In the late 80s and early 90s, it was difficult to buy insurance on these. They were routinely stolen and driven into Mexico.

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    it was resprayed, probably in the original color. look at the tailgate hardware- the side latches and tailgate braces should be bare metal. not worth more than $6k, absolute maximum.
    funfact- to get around the chicken tax, the beds were made in long beach at TABC, toyotas first plant in the USA, and likely installed at the port of long beach/LA

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Good catch, Mikester.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Per the other listing Mike Posted it does say that it has had some paint work. Much of it is original though as are those decals.

      Actually the reason the successor was named Tacoma was because that was their long standing main port. When I used to travel to CA and back in the 80’s I’d always see truck loads of the beds heading north to meet their trucks. Often times it would be entire truck loads of just that highly popular blue color.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    This truck is a survivor and for that reason it is worth more more than just a used vehicle. Old trucks have become collectors items as have old farm tractors. Not too many trucks like this have survived in this condition especially 4 wheel drive. Many of these Toyotas either rusted out or were heavily modified for off roading. Each generation has the vehicle that they lusted after when growing up and either never owned one or let it go and wishes they still had it. There are more mini trucks on the West Coast but with each decade even they will become less and less as they are salvaged. I might not be willing to pay close to 20k for a truck like this but I understand why someone who really wants an old Toyota that is cherry would pay this much. Try to find one this old in this condition at any price.

    My 99 S-10 is not nearly as old or as rare as this and I have had several people who have wanted it because it is mostly original with original paint and very little done to it to change it. In a few years I will be giving it to my older nephew who is retired from the Coast Guard and will be building a large steel building with a concrete floor and a lift. My nephew wants to keep it all original and keep it as a keep sake. My nephew currently has a 2014 2500 series Ram Laramie with a Cummins diesel that he and his wife use to tow a trailer and to haul things around the farm. I guess if he keeps my old S-10 up it could be worth something just as a survivor for those who are Chevy collectors. I doubt it will ever be worth what this Toyota is worth but there are a number of collectors and people who want an old truck that are all original. Mine is a 5 speed manual and we all know that manual transmissions are going the way of dinosaurs. That is one main reason my nephew wants it along with it being an S-10 which he has always liked and wanted.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      I don’t think this is a survivor in the way your S-10 is a survivor; there are too many hints that this is a restoration… an amateur one perhaps, but still a resto. Things painted that shouldn’t be; mismatched colors in certain areas; visually poor fit in at least one place and all told, far too clean for a 35-year-old truck with that many miles on it. My 21-year-old Ranger with an eighth that many miles doesn’t look that clean and it spent 19 of those years in a garage. I will admit I’ve made three modifications to it, two of the three should be reversible. I added a tach (did not come with one, though tachs were common) and put in a manual cutoff switch for the AC compressor to reduce the load on the engine when power is needed without constantly flipping the big AC knob. You do NOT need AC running full time when in heater modes, either. I also installed an aftermarket radio head with bluetooth so I can play my tunes and accept phone calls while I’m driving.

      So, mostly survivor in much more original condition and truly functional mods for the modern driver which can (I still have the old, still functional, AM/FM Cassette Ford radio) be reversed.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        It is not a “resto” it is a vehicle that has been well taken care of, repairs done as needed, like the upholstery and carpet addition, and then recently had some paint work and extreme detailing done by someone who bought it purely with the intention of selling it for a profit.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @Scout: We don’t have absolute proof either way. “Some paint” could easily include a complete teardown and rebuild; though I agree that’s unlikely.

          However, the $18K price tag says there’s a lot more here than we know. Only a true collector planning to put one of these into a museum is likely to pay that kind of cash for it. After all, that’s nearly 3x its original MSRP. What I’m asking for my Ranger ‘survivor’ with barely over 25K on the clock is just over half its original MSRP. The value is in the eye of the beholder and to be quite blunt I don’t see anyone paying $18K for an ’83 Toyota pickup, no matter what kind of condition it’s in. It probably wouldn’t even garner $10K at a Mecum auction.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            There are previous links as people have payed much more than $10k for this exact truck already, thinking it was a steal and that they could sell it for more.

            What it sold for new is irrelevant. What matters is that in the late 80’s there were lots and lots of late teen early 20 somethings that would have given their left nut to have a truck like this, but never got it. Then you have the people who did get one which fall into 2 camps. The largest of which trashed most of them to death and the smaller group that laments the fact that they sold the truck for one reason or another possibly to see it trashed to death. All of those people are now of an age where a lot of them have a good chunk of disposable income to buy what ever they want. Lots of beholders and very few survivors.

            Your Ranger on the other hand will never bee worth more than a couple thousand dollars. It is past peak mini truck craze and the Ranger 2wd 4cyl wasn’t the wet dream truck of that generation.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Vulpine–Good point but it would be difficult to find this particular truck in this kind of condition. I doubt that this truck took a lot of work to get it in this condition. Painting panels is much easier and cheaper than replacing panels and fixing rust. My truck is more of a survivor and yours is as well. It is true that there are a lot of smaller trucks around but not too many in really good or great shape. Body and upholstery work can make a restoration prohibitive. Better to pay more for a really good vehicle than to pour a ton of money in it unless you have the tools, time, and the means to do the work.

  • avatar

    “For 1979, the third-generation Pickup arrived, bringing with it the most truck-like of truck characteristics: optional four-wheel drive. Toyota was getting the hang of American desires now, and for the first time a three-speed automatic transmission was available”

    My 1978 Toyota p/u with the 20R engine had an automatic tranny. A rugged dependable device that made the beast rev excessively at highway speed.

    It was the only early Toyota p/u I ever saw with an automatic. Moving to the mid-west from California exposed the beast to salted roads. In a short period of time the rust began and spread quickly. In three years a once-pristine truck was sold as a beater for $350.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    The tin worm does its magic in the Rust Belt. Same thing happened to my wife’s 77 Accord. I kept the body up but the undercarriage rusted so badly that my mechanic told me that the next big pot hole I hit might break the car in 2. Great running car but the tin worm did it in.

  • avatar
    road_pizza

    Wrong site :) but I’ll have to vote CP because my 6’3″ frame just doesn’t fit in these little toy trucks. Give me a full size regular cab truck any time and leave these undersized toys to the kiddies.

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