By on February 6, 2018

Image: 1985 Toyota Tercel 4WD WagonTime for the third entry into the sub-class of vehicles from the 1980s that I call Tall Import Wagons. The first was a light blue Nissan Stanza, known as “Multi” up north in Canada. Then, a similarly blue Colt Vista showed us what Dodge could do when it swapped the emblems on a Mitsubishi.

Today, a third competitor takes center stage: the Toyota Tercel 4WD wagon.

Image: 1985 Toyota Tercel 4WD WagonIntroduced as the Corolla Tercel in the United States back in 1980, Toyota’s cheapest offering on our shores morphed into its second generation for the 1983 model year. Gone was the Corolla name, as the Tercel now stood on its own with a more complete lineup of body styles. It was available as a three-door hatch, standard sedan, or five-door — in hatchback or wagon guise.

Image: 1985 Toyota Tercel 4WD Wagon

Offered in front- or four-wheel drive, all North American Tercels were powered by a 1.5-liter inline-four engine. It produced 63 horsepower, shifted through four-, five-, and even six-speed manual transmissions (on 4WD models only), and also offered a sad three-speed automatic.

Image: 1985 Toyota Tercel 4WD WagonWe got close to perfection today, but today’s Tercel has a handicap. Though it’s the desirable wagon body style and has four-wheel drive, it also has the three-speed automatic. Dry your tears, B&B.

Image: 1985 Toyota Tercel 4WD WagonThe Tercel’s four-wheel drive configuration was an assemblage of bits Toyota already had in its bin. The Corolla provided the rear axle and coil springs, and the rest was standard front-drive Tercel. Only the transfer case was new, locking the front and rear differentials in 4WD mode.

Image: 1985 Toyota Tercel 4WD WagonMuch like an AWD Tempo of the time, the Tercel’s system could only be used on slippery roads. I suspect owners ruined many of these vehicles after flipping the 4WD switch every time it started raining. If only the modern crossover had been available then!

Image: 1985 Toyota Tercel 4WD WagonOur example today lacks the optional inclinometer, as well as most power features. It does have air conditioning to cool the spotless interior, though.

Image: 1985 Toyota Tercel 4WD WagonThis Tercel lived a better life than most of its brethren, covering only 77,000 miles since 1985. The boxy wagon is presently located on the west coast, near the affordable hamlet of San Francisco.

Image: 1985 Toyota Tercel 4WD WagonCurrently it’s for sale at a Toyota dealer that wants all the money for it. And by that I mean $11,900.

Image: 1985 Toyota Tercel 4WD WagonCheck yourself, Stevens Creek. At least there are a lot of nice pictures. And would you look at the size of that cargo area?

[Images via dealer]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

113 Comments on “Rare Rides: 1985 Toyota Tercel 4WD Wagon in As-new Condition...”


  • avatar
    Sub-600

    I’m digging the background on the gauge cluster, was this car in the film ‘Tron’?

  • avatar
    ant

    so what, is this a crack pipe/nice price post?

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Supremely useful form factor, but all of these are so terribly ugly that I can’t see them as anything but the bottom of the barrel.

    Sweet ATM user panel on the tailgate, by the way.

  • avatar
    scott25

    The Stanza Wagon was the Multi up here, Prairie in Japan.

    It’s rare enough to see one of these that isn’t beige/gold, that makes it almost worth the price. Almost.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    Didn’t know you could get a 6-speed in these. In 1985 that was almost unheard of.

  • avatar
    brettc

    That thing looks like it’s brand new, even has a replacement Toyota battery. Did the previous owner drive it into a food saver bag and vacuum seal it for 33 years? Wow.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Well Corey, you’ve featured the Stanza, the Colt/Vista and now the Tercel AWD. So when do we get the Wagovan? Have a soft spot in my heart/head for this segment as their utility to price is unparalleled, as is the visibility for the driver.

    Still see a surprising number of Tercels in the local university parking lot. No wagons unfortunately.

    The Honda also had a 6 speed manual available, the 6th gear being a ‘super low’ locking in the AWD.

    • 0 avatar

      I want to do a Wagovan, and the last holdout oddball in the segment the Nissan Axxess.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        I figured the Expo LRV would be considered the last of the breed, even with sliding doors.

        Here’s my perfect version of such a vehicle, Plymouth badged, AWD, manual trans. https://seattle.craigslist.org/tac/cto/d/plymouth-colt-vista-awd/6461269783.html

        A Mitsubishi-badged version would be acceptable.

        • 0 avatar

          Off topic, but I want to find a first generation Sable in excellent condition to write up (preferably in black or brown).

          Tall order.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            I found a 1986 Taurus the other day in Texas. It needs me to love and care for it properly. I want another first gen. This time to keep.

            Here’s a reasonably priced, low mileage 1987 Sable. Silver, though. https://modesto.craigslist.org/cto/d/fast-sale-low-miles-clean/6481538497.html
            I doubt the pics are worthy of your basing an article on them, but its there.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Can’t abide by the Pep Boys wheel covers, but that interior, though. Wow.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            I would put a set of 4th gen alloys on it, no sooner than the ink was dry on the bill of sale.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            $1300, John…it seems to be calling your name.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            +$2k for a trip to go get it and bring it back.

            Nahh, if I was going to spend that on a Taurus/Sable, I’d rather drop some into the 1995 (paint, dent removal, 17″ Fusion alloys), and adding a 1986-88 Taurus to my collection. I don’t have a lightbar obsession like Corey. And, the less said about red interior, the better.

            Yes, its clean, and if I had a car buisness that specialized in unique older cars in suburb condition, it’d be a prime candidate.

            Along with such as this: https://austin.craigslist.org/cto/d/89-acura-legend-coupe-115k/6452749303.html

            And this: https://dallas.craigslist.org/ndf/cto/d/1996-toyota-camry-manual/6454154570.html

            Possibly even this: https://lafayette.craigslist.org/cto/d/1981-grand-marquis-coupe/6478018408.html

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            “preferably in black or brown”

            Heresy.

            The only first-gen Sable is the ’87 Monochrome Edition LS with all-white bumpers and side trim, and white basketweave wheels.

          • 0 avatar

            Were those also called White Knight?

            Because I’ve seen a video ad.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            I’ve seen exactly one in person, Dal.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I had those exact wheel covers on my ’87 Taurus. They were actually more attractive by the standards of the time than the stock ones, which had a misguided, way too conservative “trim ring” look.

            https://dudazps6njn84.cloudfront.net/00/s/NjAwWDgwMA==/z/KsMAAOSwUd9aWMyO/$_1.JPG

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            @ FreedMike & JohnTaurus – I don’t think those are aftermarket wheelcovers; I think they’re factory steelies with hubcaps (and, I think, beauty rings as well). It’s tough to tell in that picture. See also: https://i1.wp.com/hooniverse.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/IMAG0008.jpg?resize=700%2C467.

            Aftermarket full wheelcovers made to ape that look? Sure, ditch them. But not OEM wheels. If you want to augment things with a set of period-correct alloys, go for it. Got to keep the steelies for Pebble Beach purposes, though. :-)

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            @ Featherston,

            We were talking about the 1987 Mercury Sable in the link I posted after Corey’s mention of a possible future article based on a first-generation Sable.

            The Tercel does appear to have factory hubcaps. My 1983 SR-5’s were painted white, though.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            @ John, ah, got it.

            @ dal20402 – Ooh, those definitely violate the “things which try to look like something they’re not” rule. It’s almost always a mistake to do that. There are exceptions, of course, including:
            – MB-Tex
            – metal painted to look like wood, but only if well executed. I think I recall seeing a Packard that had a metal dash like this. It hearkens back to the 19th-century practice of painting iron mantels to look like wood. (A relative used to live in a Second Empire mansion that had this from new, and I think I also saw an example of it in the V&A.)

      • 0 avatar
        240SX_KAT

        I own a manual transmission 4wd Axxes and it’s not for sale.
        It’s also heavily rusted.
        One of these days I’ll throw a turbo on it and have two ka24 turbo vehicles.

      • 0 avatar
        KalapanaBlack7G

        Too bad I didn’t get pictures of the dual Axxess’ (Axxi?) in the junkyard a couple of years ago. A very worn brown first generation, and an incredibly clean, incredibly rare second generation. White over dark blue cloth, no damage or age issues I could see, a “For Sale-$1500 OBO” sign in the rear window, and nearly new name brand tires. IIRC it was a 92, and it had around 120k. Cruise control, A/C, power windows and locks… Very unusual, and probably the cleanest vehicle in the junkyard. The older one belonged there, but the newer one was so clean and well-kept… I’ve always wondered what its story was.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          I always feel a bit of sadness when I find a clean, well-cared-for car in the junkyard.

          It is unreasonable to feel empathy for an inanimate object, so I guess that makes me an unreasonable man, lol.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @John, Share the same feelings. When we have a vehicle that has served us particularly well or that we have grown attached to, we actually name it.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Arther, it happens to non-car people too. When I saw our former 1990 Aerostar a few months after it was traded in, I spoke to the new owner and told her how much we loved it.

            When I got home from school, I started to tell my mom about it, but she interrupted me, saying “I don’t want to talk about it!” It was like a member of the family. She also regrets selling the 1997 Sable, at one point, she wanted me to find one like it, but then recanted, saying it would never be the same.

            A year or so after I sold their 2008 Grand Marquis for them and they then got the 2012 Taurus, I had driven her to the doctor and after that, we stopped for a bite to eat. Next to us pulled a Grand Marquis, same style and color as her old one. I asked did she miss that car. “Nope!” LOL I hope who ever has it in Saudi Arabia (where it was exported by the guy I sold it to) loves it more than we did. I honestly can say I hated that car.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    I had an ’83 SR-5 4wd wagon. I absolutely hated it. It was slow, far slower than my 1990 Festiva which had similar HP figures, but weighed less. It was top heavy so it handled like a shopping cart, and it wasn’t reliable for me.

    The only way it could have been worse was to be equipped like this one, with a 3 speed auto and basic gauges.

    • 0 avatar

      I wonder what the original owner is driving now, assuming they’re still around.

      Super basic Crosstrek? A Soul? It’s interesting to me to ponder where customers go when they need a new car, and the segment they bought into before no longer exists.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I’d much rather have a first gen, even a sedan like this one:
      https://sacramento.craigslist.org/cto/d/1982-toyota-corolla-tercel-4d/6485971629.html

      • 0 avatar

        You’re right, the Expo lived longer. But having done the Colt already, I’m not sure I can get another article out of that name!

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          But it was applied to so many different cars! Lol

          • 0 avatar

            Mitsubishi’s global branding with Colt is a big mess. Hard to keep track as I was writing up that old Vista.

            I’m realizing there’s almost a case to be made to add one more tall import wagon to the list. Honda Odyssey/Isuzu Oasis. Maybe too big though.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            My favorite minivan after the Ford Aerostar, just above the Mazda MPV All Sport.

          • 0 avatar
            Sub-600

            Ford Aerostar, ironically named, at least phonetically. The a/c was a disaster in those sweat boxes, on a par with the Saturn Vue. Don’t head into the desert in those crates.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            The A/C in my 1994 Sport was adequate enough, and my parents 1990 seemed fine.

            It was pretty aerodynamic in 1986. Ten years later, not so much.

            Ford should bring the Transit Custom here as the new Aerostar. It slots in size between the Transit Connect and the Transit full-size.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      A friend of mine actually got one of these going fast enough to lose it on a curve and go off the road. That took conviction!

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        That doesn’t surprise me, they were so top-heavy, they make an Isuzu Trooper feel like a Mustang in comparison.

        I speak from experience, I had a Trooper 2 door, long wheel base, and I never felt that it was as tipsy as my Tercel. I guess the 13″ wheels played a role in that. (The Trooper had aftermarket 16″ wheels.)

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    I looked at these new when I bought my Colt Vista. They felt cheaper and tinnier than the Colt and the interior was pretty low-rent. A fairly noisy ride. Didn’t and don’t regret my decision.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    “a Toyota dealer that wants all the money for it. And by that I mean $11,900.”

    I guess they’re hoping to sell it to some crazy die hard Breaking Bad fan. For that kinda money I can get a first-gen Scion xB, same boxy styling but a far superior drivetrain.

    I did come close to buying one like this once, a 2WD variant. The 63hp figure was worrisome though on top of its non-existent safety.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      $11k for a first gen xB?! That seems pretty outrageous in and of itself.

      • 0 avatar
        Steve65

        https://sfbay.craigslist.org/pen/cto/d/2005-scion-xb/6464308645.html

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          So someone is crackheaded enough to ask that much for a ruined example. Doesn’t mean its worth it, or that you have to pay that much to get a decent one.

          You can get a low mileage second gen for that: https://m.ebay.com/itm/2014-Scion-xB-5-Door-Wagon-4-Spd-AT/112557568052?epid=182716716&hash=item1a34f43034:g:~tkAAOSwKUhZtdWj

          I do like the first gen better, but $11-$12k for one is bonkers.

          Here is one, 5 speed, one owner, clean as a pin, has 90k, but isn’t “stanced” and is only $8,000 cheaper: https://seattle.craigslist.org/tac/cto/d/2006-scion-xb-onlymiles-one/6483340658.html

          • 0 avatar
            Steve65

            Congratulations on vigorously missing the point.

            It’s about what people want and like, not what makes sense.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Oh, so your point is that he wants and likes to overspend, and you found a way for him to do just that. It doesn’t have to make sense, I am so sorry I was too stupid to get that. 1+1= 18, duh. You win.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        You took my point a bit too litterally JohnT.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Yes, I suppose I did. I did get, and do agree, that a Scion xB would make a much better alternative.

          • 0 avatar
            Ryoku75

            No problemo. I just hope the dealer deletes a digit from his price.

            I could see some whack job buying it, then justifying the price because Toyota, forgetting that the cars quite old by now. Basically a “whale”.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            100% agreed. If I saw it on craigslist, I’d be tempted to email the seller and tell them they added an extra 0 by accident. LOL

    • 0 avatar
      Detroit-Iron

      There are a million better vehicles to be had for $11.9. Miatas, older trucks, cushy late model American iron in perfect shape. Even among odd-ball near classics you can do much better than this thing.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        ya+rly. I didn’t pay that much for my Skyline.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Its not about what makes sense. Its about what someone, somewhere wants and likes.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            It’s a single used car – you only need one idiot, and the Internet makes them much easier to find.

          • 0 avatar
            Eddy Currents

            If I won a powerball this would be my first purchase on the way to a Leno-esque low budget collection.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            @krhodes1 so very true.

            @Eddy, I’m sure if you looked around a bit, you could own a decently sized fleet of these by spending $11k. But, to each his own. If I won the lottery, I’d own many cars that would garner a “WTF?” from the B&B. I wouldn’t over spend in buying them, just in turning them into what I want, what I feel they deserve (restoration, upgrades, etc). Hahaha

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I think the dealer should give it away for $1,000 if it can find someone who can outrun it on a 10-speed bike.

    On second thought, that might not be such a great idea – someone might actually be able to pull it off.

  • avatar
    St.George

    Perhaps a more modern (yet still simple) version of this type of vehicle could be a part of Fiat’s lineup? Some sort of small 4X4 urban warrior ‘lifestyle’ vehicle at a lower price point than the Crosstrek, but with more useful capacity?

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      The Fiat 500X starts about $2k below the Crosstrek.

      But, I’d rather have something more utilitarian, without the 500-aping styling. In other words, a Jeep Renegade.

  • avatar
    Menloguy

    I like how the blanking panel to the right of the speedometer blends in neatly into the chessboard gauge cluster background. I wonder if “Econo” and “AC” are separate buttons or if it is a dual-stage setup, and am also curious about what exactly “Econo” mode does.

  • avatar
    is_lander

    I actually know the best customer for this car. My MOM! She is actually in the market for a replacement for her granny Corolla, and she used to have this ride. She was a single mom in the early eighties, and this was her tool for hauling us three kids around. It was the first car she bought after moving to the US. The hatch was like a whale’s mouth. I remember putting a sofa and other large furniture in there. It started my love for hatch backs and later hot hatches. Of course she won’t buy it now, but the nostalgia is strong. The price is NOT! At that age and era when we had this Tercel, I would have preferred the AE86 or Civic over our Tercel. But it was a strong tool for a struggling single mom. That has to be worth something.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    The Seattle area was crawling with these in the late ’80s. Given that the powertrain was pretty much indestructible, I have to assume they all rusted to death.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      The manual trans was far from indestructible. Every time I went to the bone yard for parts for my 1983, there were always several examples with bad trans. Maybe it had something to do with mine randomly going into 4wd at speed, which lead to a crash.

      Rust? In the PNW? Unless they lived right on the coast, rust should not be an issue. I had cars older than this with 0 rust when I lived up there.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Interesting. Maybe bad transmissions got them first.

        Old Japanese cars seem to rust eventually, even around here. Although the rust spread very very slowly on my grandma’s beater ’79 Civic.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        I’m interested in the story about the crash.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          I’ve told it here before, but what I remember is hearing a “clunk”, then losing control, crossing the opposing lane and going down a hill and into a large rock. I was only going about 30-35 MPH at the time. When it was over, the 4wd selector was engaged. I wasn’t hurt, but the car was.

          I was going so slow because a few days before, something similar happened just outside of town, and it spun around and side-swiped a gaurd rail. Also, when it came to a rest, the selector was in 4wd. I can only surmise that it jumped into 4wd and that sudden action, at speed, caused the rear axle to engage and thus caused me to lose control. I can only guess that it locked up for an instant, I don’t know. I do know it didn’t stay locked up because there were no visible skid marks and I don’t recall hearing the tires screeching during the event. My friend’s dad was following me since I had said the car was having problems and I wasn’t sure it would make it home. He described it as “the damndest thing” he’d seen. (The first incident, I did hear tire squeel, but it was the result of the car sliding around. I can’t believe it didn’t roll, it sure felt like it was about to.)

          Just for the record, my hands were on the wheel during the second event, so I am sure I didn’t bump it into 4wd by accident. I didn’t normally rest my hand down by the 4wd selector, so I don’t think that was the case the first time, either.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            I think I do remember that story now.

            They’d surely recall any modern vehicle that could possibly do such a thing!

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Probably, and I’m sure that one would be recalled as well, if it was a common issue. I don’t know that it was a common occurrence, and a quick Google search didn’t reveal anything. I do know they had transmission issues, as I mentioned I had seen several junked because of it, I was only guessing that it could be related to the issue I had.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      At the time they were the skier’s choice of vehicle for certain. I don’t know about them having a problem with the manual transmission. I had a friend who used to destroy cars and he managed to keep it for 3 or more years and put a ton of miles on it. I did do a clutch in it, ball joints, fixed the A/D and I think that was it of any major repairs. Seems like he bought it with over 100k on it and put an easy 60K or more on it in the time he had it.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        When I traded the Realtime AWD Wagovan, (very clean, dealer serviced,low mileage and with the dealer installed A/C) the dealer grabbed it for his daughter who was a skier. Never had a quicker/easier negotiation for a trade-in.

        Traded it for a Caravan as we had just had another addition to the family.

  • avatar
    Lee Wilcox

    Neighbor had one of these when I lived in town. Seem to remember that he had a tough time keeping a transmission in it. Thought it was pretty handy but not very hardy. ymmv

  • avatar
    Jack Denver

    Three speed automatic was pretty standard for the time. Were there any automatics with more that 3 or 4 speeds in 1985 in any mainstream vehicle?

    I vote crack pipe. The car looks to be in great condition for its age and the mileage is low, but it’s not a particularly desirable or collectible vehicle. And since certain things deteriorate by time, if you want this as a daily driver you are going to be putting some money into keeping it going. For $11K you could buy a MUCH newer and better vehicle of equivalent function. So if it’s not worth it as a collectible and not worth it as a functional vehicle, it’s not worth it, period.

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      You know what’s sadder? That same sad 3 speed auto was in a Corolla till around 97 (if not 01) in base model.

      • 0 avatar
        Eddy Currents

        It was a completely different 3 speed.
        I happily put over 100,000 km on a $500.00 1996 Corolla with the 3 speed. Couldn’t kill it. A bit noisy on the highway, but it still managed decent fuel economy.
        Rust ended that party…

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          I almost responded that it was not the exact same three speed, because the FWD Corolla was a transverse engine design, but these early Tercels had a longitudinal engine, even though they were FWD. The Tercel switched to a transverse engine layout the generation after these, and I’m sure shared the Corolla’s 3 speed from then on.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I think he was saying it is sad because it takes what little performance this car had out behind the barn and murders it in a manner that belongs in a Quentin Tarantino film.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        In that era, the performance of cars with 3-speeds attached to small, peaky engines tended to be pathetic. The large gaps in the gearing meant that they couldn’t stay in their brief powerbands after a shift, and they usually didn’t have a lock-up torque converter so they were both inefficient and slushy even on the highway. My girlfriend’s Tempo at the time, for example, had an 800 rpm difference between being on and off throttle on the highway at the same speed. 800 rpm with no purpose other than to put unnecessary heat into the transmission.

        But that wasn’t even a really bad one. The 2.3L Tempo engine was reasonably torquey so it worked okay with the auto. My other, uh, girlfriend (mistress?) at the time had an ’89 Corolla wagon automatic and that thing was seriously weak. The fact that it would have been dramatically better with a manual made driving it somewhat depressing.

        As with most GM automatics in the ’80’s, I liked the 3-speed auto in my ’87 Grand Am better than most modern automatics I’ve driven. It wasn’t terribly slushy and the downshifts were instantaneous. It paired well with the torquey, low-revving Iron Duke and had a lock-up torque converter so it was quite efficient on the highway. I’d have taken a manual if I had the choice, but the auto was acceptable.

        With the Japanese compacts, it was hard to imagine why anybody would have paid more for an automatic that was so much slower, less efficient, and probably even less reliable than the manual. But now that automatics are faster than manuals on most reasonably quick vehicles, and I’d take a manual anyway, I suppose I should understand that people are willing to make some sacrifices for their preferences. There are plenty of drivers who would never even use full throttle on this Tercel wagon.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          I couldn’t agree more, especially having owned more 3 speed Tempos than would be polite to admit in public.

          I know my Tercel was slow, I couldn’t imagine putting up with it (as a teenager) with an automatic. Although hardly what anyone would consider “fast”, my 4 cylinder/auto Tempos never felt nearly as slow, the 5 speeds were down right quick in comparison to my Tercel.

      • 0 avatar
        PandaBear

        Yeah JohnTaurus, what I meant was it is just SSSSSLLLLLLOOOOOWWWWW on the highway because it revs like crazy but you can’t go fast.

        During my days of long commute in reverse traffic, an Integra with 4 speed will go about 4k rpm at 90mph. The 1.6L Corolla (100hp, 4AFE) with 3 spd auto will go about 90 if you really floor it, based on the sound I’d say it is probably about 4500rpm. It won’t stay above 50mph when I tried to climb the grapevine on I5.

        And at highway speed it only gets 26mpg.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    “Crack Pipe” 3 or 4 times over. In California they’re still all over the place (and nothing special) and more were sold there than anywhere else.

  • avatar
    PandaBear

    Rest assured they are not really trying to sell it. The ridiculous price is there to bait link from articles like this one to the dealership and the brand only.

    My former coworker in the area (San Jose) bought this exact vehicle after his car caught on fire in the company parking lot (on top of a leave pile he didn’t see). I think he paid only around $2000 for it, 10 years ago.

    $12k, I’d take an Integra Type R instead.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      @PandaBear has nailed it. This is only meant to draw traffic. Internet traffic, as exemplified by this article and possibly traffic into the dealership by those who owned one or grew up in one just to go see it and maybe even ask for the chance to take it for a drive.

      They have listed the “I don’t want to sell it price”.

    • 0 avatar

      In fairness, I’d have posted the price and a link to the sale ad, whether it was $1,200 or $120,000.

      These articles are about the cleanliness and rarity of the cars, and the price is something I always mention.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        I guess but it wouldn’t take very long to find a way more interesting car of the era, with much less miles and in better condition. But yeah probably at half the price.

        Just from the main photo, I spotted right off the front fender paint and driver’s door don’t completely match, and that was from the 4 inch screen on my phone and my bad eyesight. The hood’s alignment is off too.

        The price wasn’t the “story”, but for many readers, that’s what it quickly became. Laughable if you’re in California.

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        Corey, keep finding and listing stuff like this. I find myself inexplicably drawn to “off” vehicles like this. Heck, just found a very, very clean 1986 Toyota Celica GT in my hometown that looks like it’s only about 3 years old. If I was actually home right now instead of in another part of the world, I would have gone to look at it. Cars like that in such good condition intrigue me much more than any exotic or supercar.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Corey, Agree 100%. I could care less what the ‘asking’ price was. What interests me is seeing utilitarian, non-collectible, everyperson vehicles that have survived. Particularly when they have survived in good condition/low mileage.

        Much more interested in seeing these vehicles of our youth, or that we might have owned, than some supercar/exotic that was bought as an investment/garage queen.

  • avatar
    KennyPowers55

    Thanks to Breaking Bad, this will always remembered by me as Jesse Pinkman’s car.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    What did it cost NEW?

  • avatar
    rpn453

    I didn’t know these had a real 4WD system. Even with the automatic, it would have been a fun car in the winter. But I would never drive such a nice old car on salty roads, and since it wouldn’t be any fun to drive in summer due to the automatic it’s practically worthless to me.

    I hope it finds a good home.

  • avatar

    that was a hideous monstrosity when it was -er- contemporary. the passage of time has done it no favours. take it to the wreckers, please!

  • avatar
    brandloyalty

    The paint on the front fender doesn’t match. Rust or crashed?

  • avatar
    hifi

    Can we just please haul it to the scrapyard, and then move on?

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Yes, the Tercel has a nice, flat rear cargo floor, but so what? It won’t swallow a 4×8 sheet of plywood or drywall, so no deal.

    I’ll buy a 4×4 crew cab 3/4 ton pickup for that!

  • avatar
    TheEndlessEnigma

    This thing must be a scream at modern highway speeds.

  • avatar
    craiger

    Even my infamously all-encompassing love of all things 80s has a limit.

  • avatar
    SteveRenwick

    Just the thing for the Bay Area Coastside. It makes a Volvo 240 wagon look positively Republican.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Carrera: I loved the six years I’ve spent with my 2007 Ridgeline. Excelled in everything I threw at it. Absolute...
  • Felix Hoenikker: I was going to comment on that too! You beat me to it.
  • Carrera: I loved the six years I’ve spent with my 2007 Ridgeline. Excelled in everything I threw at it....
  • SCE to AUX: The most I’ve ever done was 3x +8 mph (83 on the straight of an otherwise very curvy 25 zone), back...
  • Proud2BUnion: As a car obsessed child, I kept all of my parents retired plates. My son was able to register my green...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber