By on March 19, 2018

Image: 1976 Mercury Grand Monarch GhiaOur own Sajeev Mehta pointed out this grey brougham box the other day. He always keeps his ear to the pulse of the Internets for any old Ford, Ghia, or Ford Ghia vehicles which come up for sale.

It’s luxury and elegance on a Grand level! Come have a look.

Image: 1976 Mercury Grand Monarch GhiaMercury was no stranger to using the Monarch name on cars; it first appeared in Canada in the 1940s. Ford rebadged higher-end Mercury vehicles and sold them over the border as Monarchs. Lower-level Mercury cars became Meteors (once Monarch disappeared; Ford provided the bodies earlier on). Canadians must hate the word “mercury.” But why?

Image: 1976 Mercury Grand Monarch GhiaIn the United States, the Monarch nameplate was a short-lived one. On offer at Mercury dealerships between 1975 and 1980, the good people at Ford used the Granada as a starting place for an upmarket Mercury version. Mercury customers received a different grille and light arrangements front and rear, as well as luxurious trim. Trim is an important consideration for our Rare Ride today, as it’s the least common Monarch.

Image: 1976 Mercury Grand Monarch GhiaFor the 1975 and ’76 model years, the Monarch was offered in the luxuriously equipped Grand Monarch Ghia trim. Intended to slot in right under the full-size Grand Marquis, the Grand Monarch Ghia was the only one to get four-wheel disc brakes. Additionally, a central hydraulic system supplemented the standard electrical system.

Image: 1976 Mercury Grand Monarch GhiaLeather was standard on all Grand Monarch Ghias. Your author would be remiss in failing to point out the luxury and exclusivity provided by the Ghia badge on the dashboard (and embedded in the richly landau-ed c-pillar).

Image: 1976 Mercury Grand Monarch GhiaOther standard features on the Grand Monarch Ghia included a leather steering wheel, special 14-inch multi-spoke wheels, whitewalls, a solid state ignition, and higher-quality carpeting and soundproofing.

Image: 1976 Mercury Grand Monarch GhiaThis one’s equipped with the 302 V8, which was not the largest on offer. That honor goes to the 351 V8 of the same Windsor family.

Image: 1976 Mercury Grand Monarch GhiaThe Grand Monarch Ghia was perhaps too luxurious for the Mercury M badge it wore on the front. While the regular Monarch’s official replacement was the Fox body Cougar for 1981, the Grand Monarch Ghia was replaced in 1977 by the Lincoln Versailles.

Image: 1976 Mercury Grand Monarch GhiaA brougham lesson on the dangers of being too aspirational, perhaps? The Lincoln Versailles was not available in Ghia trim, and that’s a step down no matter which way you look at it. Today’s Rare Ride is on eBay presently, and is yours for just $4,600. If it were brown, Sajeev would’ve clicked that Buy It Now button days ago.

[Images via seller]

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72 Comments on “Rare Rides: This 1976 Mercury Monarch Is Both Grand and a Ghia...”


  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    “Canadians must hate the word “mercury.” But why?”

    In Canada, Mercury was a parallel brand and dealer network to Ford.
    http://www.brewtowncruisers.com/CanadianMercurys.htm

    “Additionally, a central hydraulic system replaced the standard electrical system.”

    Do what now?

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Correct.
      We had Ford dealers and Mercury-Lincoln dealers and never the twain was to meet.

      • 0 avatar
        Wunsch

        Is that not how it worked outside Canada? I had no idea. What role did Mercury serve, then?

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          Mercury allowed Lincoln dealers to sell more ‘mass market’ types of vehicles?

          Eventually Canadian Mercury dealers had rebranded Fords in nearly every category. Bobcats (Pintos), Comets (Mavericks), etc.

          • 0 avatar
            NOSLucasWiringSmoke

            (Aaargh…I typed this response and it disappeared, so I had to do it again)

            The reason for the Monarch in Canada was the Meteor, and the reason for the Meteor was that dealers had a harder time making a living in Canada’s smaller, less urbanized, less affluent market on mid- and high-priced cars alone.

            Meteor was a Ford retrimmed and rebadged for Lincoln-Mercury dealers to sell. At first it was a Ford with Mercury trimmings (grille, chrome, etc., from 1946-48 it was called the “Mercury 114” for the Ford wheelbase it used, to distinguish it from the bigger Mercury 118, the US model which was also sold in Canada), then it diverged from following US Mercury design language for awhile and charted its own course.

            Since L-M dealers got the Meteor, Ford dealers got a Mercury with different trim badged as a Monarch, tit-for-tat.

            The original Meteor marque disappeared after 1961, the name was then used for a Mercury clone of the midsize 1962 Fairlane which flopped in the market and disappeared quickly. Then Meteor returned to Canada in the mid-1960s as the lower trim levels of full-size Mercury and stayed through the 1970s. The Monarch was killed off after about 1960 and never returned, by then Fords and Mercurys were so similar that there was no space in the lineup for it.

            Meteors and Monarchs used Canadian-derived trim level names like Niagara, Rideau, Montcalm, and Lucerne in place of US trim level names like Custom, Fairlane, Galaxie, and Monterey.

            All the big three did this in Canada; there were Chevy-based Canadian Pontiacs and Plymouth-based Canadian Dodges, too. In Canada, a Pontiac Laurentian was roughly equivalent to a Chevrolet Bel Air, a Parisienne was trimmed to Impala standards. The GM and Chrysler versions predated WWII, Ford’s were only afterward but were more notable because they created whole marques (albeit thinly-disguised versions of other cars) that wouldn’t be seen anyplace else.

            Prior to the auto pact of 1965, automakers needed to build cars in Canada to sell them there competitively, but the small market wouldn’t necessarily allow them to offer everything they did in the US. There were all sorts of funky, petty differences. For instance:

            -Ford in the US offered a six-cylinder companion to the flathead V-8 starting in 1941. Canada didn’t get that until 1956.

            -The OHV Y-block Ford V-8 that debuted in US 1954 Fords wasn’t seen in Canada, which kept the flathead for another year.

            -Chrysler made all its flathead six-cylinder engines for Canadian production from the 25-inch-long block used only in the larger Chrysler and DeSoto models in the US, so displacements and dimensions of Dodge/Plymouth versions were all just a little off compared to the US models.

            -Canadian Pontiacs put a Pontiac flathead six into a car that was otherwise a Chevy with Pontiac trim, until the US Pontiac abandoned sixes in 1955; thereafter Canadian Pontiac sixes were Chevy “Blue Flame Six” engines, but slightly larger-displacement versions (261 cid vs. 235.5 for the Chevy) that were only used in trucks in the US.

            -For several years after WWII, GM didn’t even try to make or sell Buicks in Canada, despite the McLaughlin-Buick (badged as such) being the genesis and a mainstay of General Motors of Canada up through 1942.

            I could go on and on about this…

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @NOSLucasWiringSmoke: please do. Or even better compose an entire column/article and have it posted on TTAC.

          • 0 avatar
            86er

            I believe Canadian Ponchos also lacked the “wide track”.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      ““Additionally, a central hydraulic system replaced the standard electrical system.”

      Do what now?”

      They did not have a central hydraulic system to replace the electrical system. What they did have is a hydraboost brake booster which uses the power steering pump to provide assist instead of the more common vacuum powered brake booster.

      It is capable of producing greater total line pressure and a greater amount of boost to input pressure than vacuum boosters. Presumably it was done because of the 4 wheel disc brakes. Other early Fords with 4WDB had them too.

      • 0 avatar
        NOSLucasWiringSmoke

        @86er – You are correct, being based entirely on the Chevy chassis Canadian Pontiacs were not “Wide Track” although they had US Pontiac styling, this led to some people thinking they didn’t look quite right.

  • avatar
    pale ghost

    On my first business trip to Chicago fresh out of college Hertz upgraded me to one of these. Compared to my clapped out, rusted out and barely running 65 Impala, my thought was I finally arrived.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Drove many Granada Ghias and even a Gatsby Edition but never one of these.
    Brings back a lot of great memories.

    No opera windows and I could not determine if it has coach lights. Also a toggle to operate the driver side mirror. Couldn’t see one for the passenger side so it might be a manual.

    Notice how the front turn signals/cornering lights replicate those on the Lincoln Marks of the period.

    Add the bigger engine, some pop up headlights and Continental kit on the back and you could be styling 70’s style.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Gatsby Edition?

      Wow.

      • 0 avatar

        Is this one?

        https://barnfinds.com/last-gasp-1982-ford-granada-gl-manual/

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          No, the Gatsby Edition took Brougham to its highlest level on the Granada.
          If my memory is correct and remember I am having to flashback to the ’70s and a vehicle that I drove a few times, but did not own. Two-tone paint scheme in colours that would have made it irresistible to Sajeev. I believe that it may also have had matching interior colours, extra exterior medallions/badging and possibly the required coach lights, and Continental kit.

          It was a special edition and possibly most expensive of all Granadas.

          Unfortunately it seems quite difficult to get any information regarding them, so assistance would be appreciated.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Rumor has it the Gatsby edition has special dent-proof front fenders, perfect for running pedestrians over with.

            (Literary rimshot)

            Arthur, I’d have to guess that was some kind of Canadian-only or dealer-added trim. I looked it up and couldn’t find anything.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            “Rumor has it the Gatsby edition has special dent-proof front fenders, perfect for running pedestrians over with.”

            They’re perfectly safe as long as you don’t meet another bad driver.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          The manual…the bucket seats…the sporty horizontal trim on the door panels…the rotary knobs for the vent windows…so, so, so very European…

          • 0 avatar

            I can’t even find a single picture of a Great Gatsby.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            “I can’t even find a single picture of a Great Gatsby.”

            You could get your eyes checked by Dr. T.J. Eckleburg, Oculist. That might help you see better.

            (I’ll be here all week!)

          • 0 avatar

            We’re really on a roll today, Old Sport.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            The Gatsby might have been a Canadian or even a GTA only offering?

            At the time was dating a girl whose father drove a Sedan de Ville. She was/is very fashion conscious. Perhaps too much for us to be long-term compatible.

            I was driving a Gran Torino Elite (Ford dark brown with a brown interior and the biggest optional engine).

            Her older sister drove the Granada Gatsby. My girlfriend preferred the Granada to the Sedan de Ville or my Torino. So a few times I would swap cars with her sister.

            Of course her favourite vehicles were the Lincoln Marks (IV and V).

            In retrospect of all the PLC’s that I owned/leased the Gran Torino Elite may have been the best. Great cubic inch to size/weight ratio and very Brougham, perhaps even more so than the Cordoba.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      The dashboard picture has a “mirror” something down next to the ash tray. Usually, “sport” mirrors like these were dial-remote, from all Big-3.

      Not enough room for a mirror control like on the door, perhaps? My aunt’s ‘77 LTD had a normal mirror control for the passenger mirror on the dash. (Dark red, landau top, brocade upholstery. Was not the top-line Landau trim with the covered headlights and fender skirts, either.) Her son had a ‘75 or ‘76 Granada Ghia 2-door, with the chrome outside mirrors, but no passenger remote, IIRC.

  • avatar
    highdesertcat

    Wasn’t this car supposed to compete with the Cadillac Seville?

    Kinda like a Suburban all dressed up to be pimped as an Escalade.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Close, but not quite. That honor would fall to the Lincoln Versailles, which was a gussied-up version of this car.

      However, I give Lincoln full props for somehow getting one into the Windows on the World restaurant (yes, the one that was in the World Trade Center) for an advertising photo shoot.

      https://www.flickr.com/photos/randar/33944540285

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Thanks, Mike. I was stationed in Germany when all this vintage took place, and I missed a lot of what was going on in the states for the eight years I was overseas.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Sevilles were fairly legit vehicles – they were based on Novas, but you’d never know that, as they had unique styling, upgraded engines and suspensions, and a completely different interior. Heck, I’d rock one today.

          The Versailles was a silly creature – it looked like every Granada ever made. It did have nice paint, though.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            In 1976 or 1977 when I was visiting my BFF at the US Air Base on Soesterberg, he took me to a GM dealership in Utrecht, NL, to look at a baby-blue metallic Seville in the show room that he was thinking of buying (tax-free).

            For various reasons that deal never happened but we did get a close-up and personal with that Seville, and it was very nice.

          • 0 avatar

            Seville saved that brand. A most important offering at the time – the Cadillac for young(ish) people.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Young(ish) is right. My BFF and I were both 29 yo at the time.

            And the Seville actually appealed to both of us.

            But I went with the Toronado.

          • 0 avatar
            NOSLucasWiringSmoke

            The Seville may have started with the rear-drive X-body platform, but by the time GM engineering had finished with it, it shared virtually nothing with the Nova and its humble brethren. They created another designation for the Seville (I think “K”), as so many chassis components had to be changed to end up with a product that would satisfy at the stratospheric price GM asked.

            The original Seville was not innovative, since it was following the European luxury cars, but it was definitely “thinking outside the box” for GM. It was wildly successful, and it previewed the direction GM would take with downsizing a couple of years later. I wouldn’t kick a clean ’75-79 out of my garage.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    “the Grand Monarch Ghia was the only one to get four-wheel disc brakes”

    Sounds typical for the era (and of nowadays). The most uppity trim packages usually had goodies like that and some under-the-skin goodies that weren’t always so obvious. In general this is a good thing.

    My Valiant “Brougham”* had factory undercoating, three speed windshield wipers, two speed rear window defogger fan (noisy and really noisy settings, the embedded wires in rear windows was just coming to market in other models), and a few other things I’ve forgotten.

    * there’s a contradiction- the luxury model of the low cost division’s (Plymouth) entry-level car.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    That car’s in great shape for a ‘76, that front seat is relaxing me just looking at it. I remember a friend of mine who was a ‘Starsky & Hutch’ fan, his dad had a ‘76 Granada. He decided to do one of those Starsky things where he slides across the hood, his bell bottoms got hooked on the hood ornament and he face-planted into the quarter panel, lol. He might have made it if his dad had a Torino.

  • avatar
    Matt Foley

    The first owner must have been Hugh Jass. Look how the center armrest is perma-bent toward the passenger side of the car.

    • 0 avatar
      Roberto Esponja

      Happened frequently with center armrest equipped Fords of that vintage. It had to do more with the way drivers slid into the seat than with the girth of the drivers.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      You overestimate the structural soundness of any interior piece on a mid-’70s car, sir. He could have bent that puppy on his third day with the car.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    What a bleak time the 1970s must have been. 4.9L. 120-something horsepower. Steering wheel from a ship and handling to match.

    I generally feel nothing for Malaise Era iron except a profound gratitude that I don’t have to drive anything like this today, but there’s something remotely charming and dignified about this Mercury. The details, more modest size, and general proportions help it avoid some of the worst caricatures of the decade.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      My grandma had a Granada, even as a kid in the mid 70s I knew its was a major POS. It didn’t so much “drive” as it just floated along, slowly, while squeaking constantly. Sorry but there is nothing charming or dignified about this. The Malaise Era was clearly the darkest days for automotive design and engineering.

    • 0 avatar
      Sub-600

      “What a bleak time the 1970s must have been.” Pre-oil embargo ‘70s were fine. The 440 in my ‘70 GTX made 325 hp, quite a bit for the time. The only modification I made was the purple shaft kit. Yes, the handling sucked and it had Mickey Mouse brakes, but that was almost 50 years ago. There were a few Malaise Era cars that weren’t too bad, the 1977 Dodge (Warlock) Lil Red Express pickup had the Hi Output 360 that made something like 275 hp.

    • 0 avatar
      Blackcloud_9

      I agree. The first few moments I look at these pictures, I think “Wow, not bad”. Then the rest of my memories catch up with me and remind me what general pieces of crap these malaise era cars were.
      I took driving lessons – that was when it still offered as a course in High School – in a 1976 Granada. It, of course, was probably a half-step up from the base model. It had a straight-six and it was slooooooow.
      My teacher, Mr. Trautwein retired that year right after I took lessons from him – I decided that there was no correlation between the two.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Same here. The appeal of these tanks is completely and utterly lost on me. Hideous to look at and worse to drive.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I’d rather have the Granada Sports Sedan.

    lov2xlr8.no/brochures/ford/76gran/bilder/7.jpg

    Black with black roof, 351 V8, track-lok, fanciest 8-track AM/FM strereo.

    • 0 avatar
      bking12762

      And here is one with a hand mixer….https://phoenix.craigslist.org/wvl/cto/d/1978-ford-granada/6511965771.html

    • 0 avatar
      MRF 95 T-Bird

      In the mid-80’s I came close to buying one from a neighbor just like this one but in Cocoa brown with the 302-2v C4 auto and the rally wheels. It was just starting to rot in the rear quarters so I refrained.

      I know they have gotten much derision over the years but as a Ford fan I’ll defend them. Size wise as they were just above a Maverick/Comet in luxury but not as Brougham like as an Elite or a 75 Cougar XR-7 which I owned. if it had the 302 or 351, some options, the rally wheels and a good suspension it was all right by me.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    If I ever start my Musee d’Malaise, this very car will be a permanent exhibit.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    I just had to look up the HP ratings for a 1976 Granada with the 351:

    petrol (gasoline) engine with displacement: 5766 cm3 / 351.9 cui, advertised power: 106.5 kW / 143 hp / 145 PS ( SAE net ), torque: 386 Nm / 285 lb-ft

    143hp / 285lb-ft would be a lazy driver, though some half-decent oomph off the line probably made this thing “feel” faster than reality.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Ah, good old Dove Gray. My first boss owned a loaded ’77 Thunderbird (400 2-barrel, gray velour interior) in that color.

    I guess this could really have 50,000 miles on it, but the keys look suspiciously worn for only 50k. This car also has one of the infamous “the transmission might slip out of Park and roll away” stickers on the dash.

    Take it away, Murilee!

    http://autoweek.com/article/wait-theres-more/little-warning-label-saved-ford-23-million-vehicle-recall

    • 0 avatar
      MRF 95 T-Bird

      In the late 70’s I owned a 70 Mustang coupe, Ford sent me the “transmission might slip out of Park and roll away” sticker. I had known about the issue from reading the papers and car mags at the time so I stuck it up on the visor. Plus I always used the e-brake on my folks hilly driveway and most other places.
      Other Mustang owners stuck it mid dash above or below the optional AC vent.

  • avatar
    427Cobra

    brings back memories… took my driving test in my aunt’s ’76 Granada Ghia coupe… my BFF’s dad had a ’76 Buick Electra Park Avenue Limited… truly a “land yacht”… oh, those crushed velour seats… fabulous… and the speed minder/buzzer… always good for a laugh.

  • avatar
    Roberto Esponja

    My father had the Ford equivalent of this, a Granada Ghia, as a company car. A loaded 1977, emerald green with white vinyl top, white-and-chrome bodyside moldings, and white-and-chrome hubcaps. It was a pretty car, for its day.

    However, he had a lot of trouble with it, electronics-wise. Most infamously the hot summer day when we were driving back from the beach and BOTH the car’s A/C and power windows decided to die mid-trip. With five people in the car. It’s amazing that nobody passed out…

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    I once saw a one of these that was badged a Mercury Monarch on one fender and Ford Granada on the other. These were pretty popular, and I test drove a couple. But, when I first saw the 1978 Chev Malibu coupe, that car seemed light years ahead of the Ford.

  • avatar
    DavidB

    My family had a ’75 Mercury Ghia 2D with the 351. My dad drove it for business a few years, then passed it down to my oldest brother in ~1979, then to my next older brother whose girlfriend poured sugar into the gas tank ~’82. New drivers license in hand, I took possession in ’86 (with its new engine!) and promptly stepped through the rusted rear floor board when vacuuming the fairly deep shag carpeting. My dad’s new business ride was a new ’79 Lincoln Versailles with white leather interior and Cartier clock. Both had Landau tops. What pieces of sh!t both of these cars were, but such fun memories in them…

  • avatar
    sgeffe

    Someone in this car’s past was safety-minded!

    Note the FoMoCo recall sticker for the transmission on the top-left corner of the IP!

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    Nope.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    The center armrest is a neat summary of ’70s Detroit build quality. (Although it wouldn’t have been like that on a contemporary Lincoln Mark IV or V.)

  • avatar
    JREwing

    I love the optimistic 120 MPH speedometer. This is basically the same 302 as in my ’84 Crown Vic, but with carburetors instead of throttle-body fuel injection, and one less cog in the transmission.

    This thing would’ve been lucky to break 100, and then you’re scared s***less by the marshmallow suspension. The stupid-tall 4th gear in my Crown Vic allowed it to lug itself into the mid-115 range before it ran out of breath.

    Then again, in 1976, anything approaching 100 would’ve been a felony speeding ticket.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      The carb wouldn’t prevent 120 MPH (or more) nor would the 3-speed auto. 3rd gear is “1:1” direct-drive, same as 3rd in your “overdrive” trans equipped car.

      But its dreadful 2.50:1 “final drive” couldn’t push the shoebox aero much past 100 MPH, and even that took a whole minute. My only question is “WHY?”?

      I drove a Monarch 302 like this one for a short time, (late ’80s, extremely low miles, long story) and the absolute last thing this car inspired me to do is drive fast.

      • 0 avatar
        JREwing

        Exactly! I’m pretty sure the number of original owners that ever explored the far reaches of the speedometer could be counted on one hand.

        That thing is geared like a diesel – out of necessity. That 302 would run out of breath at incredibly low revs – HP peak came at 3200 in my Crown Vic. Even with 2.50:1 gearing, the engine was winded long before the speedometer was pegged.

  • avatar
    threeer

    My mom and dad saw one of these being rolled into the showroom when we were stationed up at Tobyhanna, PA. We owned a Montego at the time. Though my mother seemed to really like the Monarch, it was just too far beyond the pay scale of an E-7. The Montego (in the basest of base forms, down to the vinyl interior) soldiered on for over 10 years before being retired.

  • avatar
    MartyToo

    My Dad bought a Grand Monarch from an executive at the Ford radiator plant in Green Island, NY. It eventually was handed down to my younger brother who thankfully didn’t hand it off to anyone else in the immediate family.

    When my Mom drove it, it always seemed to me like a Granada with a boatload of crap glued on the interior in an attempt to make you think it was better than it was. How making a car heavier with crap would make it better escaped me.

    I do remember phone support for my brother when the accelerator pump on the carburetor caused the thing to stall when turning corners. I also think it suffered from a dead choke pull-off, too.

    I have no idea if it was a Ghia. I’ll have to ask my brother.

    The best feature of this car was that when my brother inherited it, I inherited the ’75 Malibu station wagon that he had been driving.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    “That honor goes to the 351 V8 of the same Windsor family.”

    Are you sure about that? I seem to recall that by 1976 Ford/Mercury had moved on to the 351 M.

  • avatar
    Mike-NB

    I’m a Ford fan and a closet fan of Malaise-era cars like the Granada and Monarch. I grew up with those. But I have never heard of the “Grand Monarch.” It is entirely possible that this trim wasn’t available in Canada since we don’t like to be seen to be “putting on airs.” For what may be different reasons, that seems to hold true today – Canada doesn’t get the Lincoln “Black Label” trim you get in the US of A.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I remember the ads for the Granada and Monarch compared them to a Mercedes except at a lower price. I remember seeing a lot of Granadas and Monarchs and I saw a number of Grand Monarchs. I don’t know if these were any better or worse than many of the cars of this era. I don’t think the cars of this era were that bad but I prefer the safety features, economy, and long term reliability of today’s vehicles. I do miss having the option of having a different color interior besides black, gray, and tan and having more exterior colors besides different shades of black, white, and gray. Most of today’s vehicles are not very exciting with front ends which resemble Billy Bass. Each Era has its pros and cons and in the future 40 years from now there will be those who will deride the boxy large trucks, suvs, and crossovers and the coupe like sedans that all look alike.

  • avatar
    MartyToo

    What about that beauty called Beaumont? My college friend had one and I asked the question that had long bothered me. Was it a Chevy or a Pontiac? He looked perplexed, said he had never thought about it and then took the owners manual out of the glove box.

    The answer was no closer but it began a quest by my friend Dave which to my knowledge has never been answered. The closest we got too as answer was that it was neither.

    This reminds me of a 60’s Mad magazine creation, The Cheviac, designed to slip into the GM lineup for those who wanted more than a Chevrolet but less than Pontiac. Mad’s creation looked like…a Beaumont!

  • avatar
    road_pizza

    Funny how time changes one’s views… when I was a young’en in the Seventies I despised the new-for-’75 Granada and Monarch even tho I was a true-blue Ford kid, but now I’d have no issue cruising one. Especially if it was one of these Grand Monarchs. Give me one in this particular shade of grey but make mine a 351W, thanks.


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