By on January 8, 2018

2018 Toyota Camry XSE white - Image: Toyota

On Friday, I penned a minor rant about the state of the four-door sedan. Many of you read and commented, for which I offer my profuse thanks. It’s the readers who make this place, after all.

Many good reasons and theories were bandied about in the comments, leading me to believe the B&B has a bit more opinion than most on the future of this once-burgeoning segment. Still, we know four-door family sedans are slowly going the way of PalmPilots and Polaroids.

My question for today is this: what’s the next sedan, on sale today, you think will asked to leave stage right?

We’ve already seen more than a few sedans pack up their belongings and head out of town. FCA put the brakes on both the Dart and 200 not that long ago, the latter of which once commanded Super Bowl air time.

At General Motors, the Buick Verano is gone, along with the marvellously brutish but annoyingly titled Chevy SS. Noises were also being made in 2017 of GM sharpening the executioner’s axe for large sedans like the Buick LaCrosse, Caddy XTS, and Chevrolet Impala.

The Hyundai Azera sedan — the big Hyundai most people forget about — is also disappearing but that one is easily explained away by the emergence of the Genesis brand. It’s worth noting that the cupboards of this particular new effort by the Koreans are currently quite bare in terms of popular SUVs and crossovers.

Ford has been quick to refute claims that the Fusion won’t live to see another iteration but all signs, from a potential production shift to the reported cancellation of its redesign, point in that direction. The Taurus? Who knows?

What’s your bet on the next sedan to fall on the chopping block? Whatever it is, I’ll be sure to pour one out; fewer bodystyles in the market means slimmer choice for the consumer … and that’s always a crying shame.

[Image: Toyota]

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88 Comments on “QOTD: What’s Next on the Four-door Firing Line?...”


  • avatar
    arach

    I don’t think the Genesis killed the Azera… the Sonata did.

    When the 2015 sonata came out, it was bigger with more options and more features than the Azera. What was left to offer that wasn’t true “luxu-elite”? Nothing.

    • 0 avatar
      sgtjmack

      To an extent, yes. But the Genesis was head and shoulders above anything Hyundai had in their line up.

      • 0 avatar
        rpol35

        I don’t think the SS was a competitor for the Impala at all; completely different pricing, production numbers and target markets. The SS was a true performance sedan, the Impala was a generic four-door family car or rental option.

        The Holden Commodore, on which the Impala was based, could have stood in for an Impala with a V6, turbo four, and less sporting options but that would have required producing the car in the U.S., Canada or Mexico to get away from the real strong Australian dollar.

        • 0 avatar
          Nightporter

          Any idea why they couldn’t have just built Zeta Commodore in the States and sold it there as the current-gen Impala? ‘Not Invented Here’ syndrome perhaps?

          It seems far more logical to me than making a slightly enlarged Malibu clone. The VF Commodore even has outwardly Chevrolet design language.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      The Azera lives on in Korea as an all new model for this year. So I wouldn’t say the Sonata killed it. The thing is, few people really want a Hyundai sedan when there’s an Accord/Camry available at nearly the same price. That’s what makes it hard for Hyundai to sell cars in this market.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Arach hit it right on the head.

      Problem was (unlike for the Avalon in comparison to the Camry), the Azera really didn’t offer any more rear passenger room than the Sonata.

      In addition, the Hyundai didn’t do as good of a job on the Azera as Kia did with the Cadenza (more on that later).

      The new Grandeur (which didn’t make it across) is a much better vehicle than the Azera and was the best-selling car in Korea for 2017.

      Cadenza sales have been around the 1k mark the past 3 months (thus far, the addition of the Stinger doesn’t seem to have impacted sales of the Cadenza).

      Think Kia would be happy if the Cadenza can continue at that pace along with increased Stinger sales (as supply increases on the Stinger).

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        Azera and Grandeur are the same thing, just named differently in different markets. I’m sure the new Grandeur is better than the previous one. There’s not a huge difference in space, but the Grandeur fills in more of a Buick LaCrosse role for the company. And it came with a V6. It’s just a sturdier car than the Sonata, even if doesn’t offer much more utility. See, for example, Maxima vs Altima.

        The current Cadenza is also better, because it’s also new. It just really, really looks like the old one. Much like the Optima, which was new in 2015, people don’t even realize Kia is putting out new sedans.

  • avatar
    sgtjmack

    The SS was doomed when it arrived as it was direct competition with the Impala. They never sold enough to justify continued sales in the U.S. Plus it didn’t have any striking good looks to drag peopke away from other cars on the market.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      No leasing on the SS either.

    • 0 avatar
      sirwired

      It died most likely because the underlying platform, the Holden Commodore, no longer exists.

      • 0 avatar
        JDG1980

        I never understood why, if they were going to have one Australian car in the Chevy lineup, they brought over the boring-looking Holden Commodore sedan rather than the ute version. At least that would have been visually distinct, and stood out from everything else on the road – the SS just looks like a vanilla sedan if you aren’t a car buff. A Holden-based El Camino couldn’t possibly have sold any *worse* than the SS did, and it might have turned out to be a surprise hit.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      SS and Impala are in different leagues. Impala is for old dudes, SS is for well-salaried people who whats to have fun.

      The reason SS is out is because GM manufacturing business in Australia folded. SS was re-branded Holden design, and there is no more Holden manufacturing. SS was re-branded Commodore model which is Australia-native. Since there is no more production in Australia, we don’t get any SS here.

      In no way Impala and SS cross each other. Never someone looking for performance RWD sedan will say, “ah you have nice sale on Impala. Let me get one of these instead.”

  • avatar
    tnk479

    Subaru needs to either turn the Legacy into a real sports sedan and stop trying to out Camry the Camry or else that model is doomed. There is no use case for a soft, floaty, family sedan anymore. All of those buyers are getting into a Forester.

    • 0 avatar
      gottacook

      Kindly note that the Legacy sedan, even with this year’s steep decline, is selling much better than it did at the peak of its sporting offerings, 2008-09 (when the GT spec. B and the ordinary turbocharged GT, as well as the 5-speed-automatic six-cylinder 3.0, were available in the U.S. market):

      (data from http://carsalesbase.com/us-car-sales-data/subaru/subaru-legacy/)

      2017 49,837
      2016 65,306
      2015 60,447
      2014 52,270
      2013 42,291
      2012 47,127
      2011 42,401
      2010 38,725
      2009 30,974
      2008 22,614

      The Legacy was much the same size for 20 years, through 2009. Subaru started selling a lot more of them when the larger size was introduced. And I can’t imagine a “real sports sedan” based on a car with those proportions.

    • 0 avatar
      I_like_stuff

      But it has so much LOVE!

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    The 200 that FCA killed off isn’t the 200 in the Super Bowl ad. The older one in the ad was arguably better.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      I haven’t spent much time in the newer 200, but the first one was literally lipstick on a pig. Cheap to buy, and I’m sure miserable as they were they’ll languish around forever, but the Pentastar was only redeeming feature those things had. I find it unlikely the redesigned 200 is that bad.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    I’d have to say any sedan that has seen a dramatic sales drop is in question. Too bad, but to me, the main culprit after the growth in SUVs/CUVs is coupe styling, which makes a supposedly roomy car by nature more and more impractical.

    If I ever get another car, it may well be either a pickup or CUV of some sort – or a Buick Cascada!

  • avatar
    tnk479

    I would say that every automaker should ask the following question: what is special about our four door sedan? Is it more sporty/fun than the competition? Is it much safer than the competition? Is it rated much higher in quality and reliability than the competition? Has the styling caught fire with the public? Is it environmentally trendy (Prius)?

    Ford Fusion, Subaru Legacy, Kia Optima, Buick Regal, Chevrolet Malibu, Nissan Altima, Nissan Maxima, Hyundai Sonata, Volkswagen Passat are a “no” to all of those questions. Without a redesign to make them distinctive or special in some way, these models are all question marks.

    Toyota and Honda have reliability, depreciation, and to an extent the Honda has driving fun. Mazda 6 has driving fun and they are bringing a turbo motor finally so they might be okay (but maybe not). VW is hoping their new four door coupe sells on its styling. Kia brought the Stinger to sell on sport/driving fun, though it is perhaps too expensive to succeed.

    • 0 avatar
      der_Alte

      Is the new Buick Regal actually a sedan*? It has five* doors, it’s a liftback, not a hatchback.

      * As I understand a sedan is a four door car with a separated trunk and a hardtop is a sedan without the B pillar.

      ** In Europe hatchbacks, liftbacks and wagons/caravans are classified as five door vehicles.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Looks like a sedan, functions like a hatchback. We’ll have to see if that configuration is able to generate any boost in sales for Buick.

        Local Buick dealer has put a new Regal on the corner of their lot in the brick paver-ed landscaped spot reserved for new models. Looks pretty sharp.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Toyota and Honda are thr most expensive in their economy sedan and CUV segments. The $4,000-$11,000 discounts on Koreans and Domestics just kill any perceived advantage in bank, propped up residuals is moot. Most cars in their respective segments all cost within a couple thousand or less in 3, 5, or 10 years.

    • 0 avatar
      dougjp

      This is really interesting and is partly what I’ve been thinking.

      For the life of me I can’t understand how manufacturers just “roll over and play dead” when it comes to marketing in the face of the sales trend towards buying “boxes”. Cars (sedans) with the same equipment as boxes, because of the lower center of gravity and weight and wind resistance are faster, better handling, have better fuel economy, look better, and are quieter. And have lots of space for all but major carrying needs which are sometimes so occasional. Its like people in Florida wanting AWD when they never go off road. Boggles the mind.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        Look better? To 50%+ of the driving population (i.e., women), sedans don’t look better, they just look poor. I don’t know a single woman who prefers a sedan to a CUV. Those who drive sedans are doing so because they had to settle. But they still aspire to a CUV with their next vehicle. A CUV is a status symbol, in the same way the Explorer was 20 years ago. She may be driving a crummy Rogue, but it’s better than being caught in a mainstream sedan by her friends.

        None of that other stuff you mentioned (center of gravity, weight, wind resistance, faster, better handling, better fuel economy) matter. And notably, you left out the factors that heavily favor CUVs: ride height, versatility, and safety (perceived or otherwise).

        • 0 avatar
          frankev

          I know four women, three of whom made purchases in the recent past, who prefer sedans over a CUV: my wife, my mother, my mother-in-law, and our neighbor. The youngest of these four will be 46 this year, so maybe their views reflect those of a past generation, but I wanted to point out that women with such views do exist.

          My wife has picked out Fusions during the last two buying cycles (the 2012 SEL was totaled, replaced with a 2014 SE). She could’ve chosen any type of vehicle, but specifically wanted four-door sedan, an automatic transmission, a reasonable level of comfort items (sunroof for Chicago summers, heated seats for Chicago winters, etc.), and a lockable trunk compartment.

          My mother is driving a 2000 Chevy Malibu that she bought new before retiring from the Tier I GM supplier for which she worked. Now in her early 80s, she continues to drive and has in the last year or two spoken of replacing the Malibu with another Chevy sedan (she liked the last generation Cruze). She emphasized the need to have four doors with a lockable trunk compartment. My mother would be a cash buyer, and could readily pick a CUV over a sedan without feeling financially stressed, so she’s not “settling”.

          My mother-in-law drives a 2013 Kia Rio, which replaced a 2010 Kia Optima that was totaled. When she shopped for it, her requirements included the following: four-door sedan, A/C, auto trans, lockable trunk compartment. She also wanted it to be brand new, despite the best efforts of our family to convince her to get a larger, gently used car–I said it shouldn’t matter if someone else had farted in the driver’s seat. She later came to regret the purchase (lack of interior space, no power windows/locks [!]), but she’s sort of stuck with it for now. However, when she speaks of replacing it, the four-door sedan requirement holds.

          My neighbor has had two Nissan sedans recently: the current example is a ~2016 Maxima, which had replaced a ~2014 Altima (guessing on the years). She said she got a deal on trading in the Altima for the Maxima, but I don’t know the details–both cars were brought brand new from the same dealer. (I wonder if she responded to a mailing?) The Maxima is a top-trim (SR or Platinum) in black (very sharp looking). My neighbor certainly could have picked up a CUV for the price of that Maxima.

          So my point is that there are women who, for whatever reason, decide a sedan best fits their automotive needs. What I found interesting is that, in my small sample size, three of the women specifically mentioned four doors and a “lockable trunk compartment” as must-have features. In three instances, the women are single and have just the one car for their household at the time of purchase, the exception being my wife who has access to our minivan for hauling larger items, and now my mother-in-law who recently moved to the southern US and lives with my sister-in-law and her husband who are empty-nesters (three or four vehicles total in that household).

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        They don’t want to sell sedans when they can sell the jacked up box version of the sedan for $5K+ more money.

        And people buy them because on average people are stupid.

        What I think gets missed around here though is that since the sedan and the CUV share platforms, the added cost of still offering the sedan is pretty minimal. So I doubt very many of them are going to go away even as the volume shrinks.

        • 0 avatar
          JDG1980

          People buy CUVs because the form factor is superior overall to that of a sedan – especially a modern “sedan” that is really a four-door fastback coupe with minimal rear-seat headroom.

          • 0 avatar
            Dave M.

            Exactly. I don’t get why people get so defensive and insulting about crossovers overtaking sedans in sales. I sit more upright and comfortably in a CUV, meaning superb interior packaging. It’s not rocket science.

      • 0 avatar
        zamoti

        I agree about the absolute lack of care taken for sedans built by US manufacturers, specifically GM. Ford has done relatively well with the Fusion, but they haven’t TOUCHED the Taurus in years (secretly I lust for a SHO). Dodge has been warming over the same corpse for many years in the 300 and Charger, also Challenger. GM has had various Impalas over the years which I’ve driven as rentals, but cannot for the life of me remember anything special about them at all and I’m not sure I could tell a Malibu from an Impala.
        Given that SUVs/CUVs and trucks have been the moneymakers it comes as no surprise the sedans got left in the shadows to rot. One might blame the automakers for not creating a compelling case for the sedan form factor, but one could just as well point the finger at the buying public who wanted to drive around in something that sits a few inches higher so they could see over other cars (of course made pointless by the ubiquitous adoption of tall boxes).
        This nothing but an evolution of the species; early on there were a wide variety of bodystyles and choices; utility thereof, safety standards, price concerns and various other factors have whittled down the pile to the “best” iteration of the model. As with any type of evolution, variety will shrink down to the essential set of features, anything else will be discarded. Soon the vast majority of cars will be tallish AWD CUV things all with a 2.5 L turbo 4 cyl or electric drivetrain. Some vans may remain, trucks will go nowhere, but sedans, station wagons, coupes will all be made obsolete. There will be some small fraction of the market that still does the occasional “sporty” thing, but since the vast majority of the buying public has no use for them, they will be made in limited quantities. Most people don’t care about driving dynamics, horsepower (beyond having enough to beat the other guy at the merge) or driving enjoyment.

        • 0 avatar
          JDG1980

          The current-gen Impala is very well reviewed (Consumer Reports loves it). Unfortunately, GM diluted its brand value by continuing to manufacture the (mediocre at best) previous-gen Impala alongside it as a “Limited” fleet model. Thus, people got a lackluster car at the rental counter and scratched the Impala off their list, not knowing that what they drove had nothing in common with the real retail vehicles. GM finally scrapped the Impala Limited in 2016.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The Fusion Hybrid and Energi are environmentally trendy and their buyers often go for the top trim.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Except the Fusion has been widely praised for its driving dynamics and its looks. Its getting long-in-the-tooth now, granted, but it isn’t ugly nor boring.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Well, aside from maybe the Fusion, the others are new or will be soon getting the next gen models.

      The new Regal is just starting to hit the lots in #s, so we’ll see how sales fare (GM should be satisfied if it sells about 75%-80% of what the TLX does in sales).

      However, no matter how the Regal fares on the sales front, after this generation, it may very well see the knife as GM no longer has Opel to provide the platform and develop it.

      The Maxima has been doing more than fine for Nissan.

      With its recent redesign, the Maxima has been outpacing the Avalon in sales (did 67.7k last year – which is more than double the Avalon in sales).

      The vast majority of family sedan buyers don’t care about driving “fun” – which is why the 6 dropped 26.6% in sales last year (selling only 33.4k – way below that of the other sedans you listed).

      If anything, there’s a greater chance of the 6 disappearing than something like the Optima.

      We already know that the XTS is on its last legs; will the LaCrosse and Impala survive?

      Can see the LaCrosse surviving (need it for the China market and Buick, here still needs a larger sedan), but can see the next gen Malibu grow some to take over both its spot and the Impala’s.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Nissan Maxima – has very little reason to exist over the V6 high optioned Altima.

    I’ll say it again. “Maxima” should be a performance trim of the Altima – turbo 3.6 V6, AWD, and for the love of god optional manual trans.

    You’re welcome, Nissan.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Naw, the Maxima is a much nicer car overall. It benefits from the different design. Nobody would buy that Altima; that is why they stopped making the R.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Yes the Maxima is a nice package, is Nissan even making back development costs at this point?

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          I thought Maxima was one of those sedans which kept up strong sales.

          2015 40,359
          2016 62,670
          2017 67,627

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Less than 100K isn’t exactly strong, but I’d take one over an Altima any day that ends in “y”.

        • 0 avatar
          thegamper

          Probably not, they are discounted pretty heavily. I like the Maxima as well, and think it is probably one of the best bargains on sale today as transaction prices put you pretty firmly in volume midsize range. Expect 5-6k off sticker without much haggle. Its a great deal for the price as even the base models are pretty well equipped, the top trims that sticker for about 40k have TON of content, strong V6, good fuel economy, road manners, etc. etc. But FWD and CVT will always kneecap what it could be in the marketplace. A Maxima Platinum is probably already nicer than lower level Q50’s. Probably another reason it doesn’t need to exist though unfortunately.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          What development? All the major components in it are 10-20 years old. And it’s up in sales. It’s a keeper

  • avatar
    jh26036

    Nissan ins’t interested in a car that’ll lose even more money than the Maxima is now.

    Nissan Corp already has a car like that, it’s called the Q50.

  • avatar
    frank908

    This will probably be the last Maxima. But if Nissan were cool, they’d kill the Altima name and go forward with the Maxima as their stand-alone mid-size sedan like the did in the past. The Maxima name is pretty damn solid with a good history you can’t manufacture today.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Chevrolet Sonic is being discontinued. Replaced by a value edition price leader of the Cruze.
    Spark is continuing. Possibly due only to it’s recent update.

  • avatar
    legacygt

    Charger/300. There is a team at FCA that does a fantastic job of keeping old cars with good bones relevant far longer than they have any right to do. The Charger and 300 are good. But they are ancient and there seems to be no interest in replacing them.

    • 0 avatar
      frank908

      FCA: beating dead horses since their last bankruptcy. Let’s see if they can K-car their way out of the next one.

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      But they just keep selling consistently. The demand isn’t like your typical small sedan, but it’s fairly constant (90k+/year for last 5 years)and I understand they do make money on them. Where as smaller sedans often had no margin.

      They’ve been talking for 3 or 4 years of a new Charger/Challenger based on the Alfa platform but it seems part of their consistent sales are based on the size.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      My WAG on the Charger/300 is that they get a quickie cosmetic refresh for 2020 and then live on in full Panther mode until 2025 at which point either their respective brands won’t exist any more or they’ll go to an updated RWD platform.

      I do wonder if the Challenger will go to the Giulia platform for 2020 though.

    • 0 avatar
      JDG1980

      I think FCA will keep making the LX cars until and unless safety regulations become prohibitive. They’re fully amortized and fill a unique market niche, so they represent a source of relatively trouble-free profits for the company.

    • 0 avatar
      Jerome10

      I freaking love the Charger. Haven’t driven the 300 in probably a decade. V8 only however.

      I know these things are ancient.

      But my God when I put my foot into the gas at a stop light and that HEMI roars and burbles and spits, I rarely get as giddy behind the wheel in anything else. BMW were magnificent. Porsches are amazing. Mazda Miata is brilliantly a hoot. But the Charger V8 makes me feel just the same for some very odd reason I can’t put my finger on.

      Something about RWD, a big American pushrod V8, balanced weight distribution, the noise, the feeling maybe that you AREN’T driving a car so good all the charming stuff has been engineered out? I don’t know, but they’re just great, even if maybe they should get the axe.

      • 0 avatar

        @Jerome – I agree. I’d be driving a Charger now if I had the money. As is, my 98 Stratus is my DD. Way back when I owned a ’72 Charger I thought I would try to “only” drive a Charger from that point on. Failed to follow through on that. Did go to an 84, but after that finances dictated where I went next – Escort wagon and now the Stratus which was my wife’s car until she had 5 fractures in her right leg and an eventual amputation above the knee for that same leg. Such is life.

  • avatar
    Lichtronamo

    – Any Acura sedan
    – Both the Buick Lacrosse/Regal
    – Cadillac XTS
    – One of the Chevrolet Malibu/Impala
    – Lexus GS
    – Mazda6
    – VW Passat

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      2009 to 2012 mazda was selling about what they sold in 2017 and they didn’t pull out.

      • 0 avatar
        Lichtronamo

        They shared development costs with Ford then. They are stand alone now and don’t have the same economy of scale. Unless they partner with Toyota on the next Mazda6.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          But now they just ship these from Japan. They sell this same car everywhere in the world. And in Australia Mazda is #2 brand by volume. This is not like if they made US-specific model.

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      The turbo 2.5 is probably the last chance for the Mazda6 in the US market. It is currently selling at approximately the same volume in the US as in the European market. This will probably be its last model cycle in the US unless something miraculous occurs.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Already know that the XTS is on its last legs.

      W/o Opel, the Regal may very well go after this generation, but can definitely see the LaCrosse staying.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    It’s hard to choose. Do we cut the Altima, which lost 50K/20% between 2016 and 2017? How about the brand new Sonata, which is down 60K/33%? What about the Passat, which is only down 16% from last year, but is down by 1/2 from its big cost cutting redo in 2012, with drops every year since?

    Compared to compacts, midsizers are needlessly huge and dull to drive, even if incentives give them price parity (another reason for manufacturers to get out while the getting is good). Compared to midsize 2 row crossovers, they’re less practical, not much more fun to drive, and much lower profit for manufacturers.

    If it were up to me, I’d cancel all the losers and do the following:

    Compacts- make a little bigger (pretty much the size midsizers used to be) and offer a wider range of engines

    Crossovers- replace the midsizers with “Outback” style 2 row crossovers.

    Give the people what they want! Fusion, Passat, Sonata/Optima are not that.

    • 0 avatar
      Lichtronamo

      Agreed. It’s getting to the point that unless you’re Toyota or Honda, you only need one C/D sized sedan in your brand lineup.

      • 0 avatar
        thegamper

        I think that’s what will end up happening. You will have one offering. Any full sized cars from volume makes are history. C segment cars that don’t sell in massive numbers are on the chopping block.

        Or…..not being an automotive engineer, how hard is it to parts bin out a focus based on the Escape. A fusion based on the Edge. Change as little as possible from one to the next. Sheetmetal, ride height, roof line….and done. I assume that’s done to an extent now, but literally, just take the next Fusion, add height, change roofline and you have two vehicles for not much more than price of one. Almost like making a tall wagon version of the sedan. High riding wagons like the TourX, Volvo XC, Outback are nearly crossovers already. All they need is more ground clearance, higher roof and would be pretty nice CUV.

        That being said. Mazda6, XTS, Impala, Maxima, Cadenza, Taurus, Avalon, 300, Charger, ATS, CTS. Lacross, Legacy, Sonata/Optima, Passat all on endangered species list I would think.

        One question I have wondered is if the death or marginalization of so many storied name plates will have an effect on the future market. For instance, everyone knows a Camry or C-Class. Not everyone knows a Toyota CH-R, or a GLA. Do manufacturers at the top of heap during sedan days stand to lose out from the crossover craze just because people aren’t familiar with products?

        Such a massive product shift is really a ton of goodwill lost in established nameplates.

  • avatar
    slap

    Wasn’t the real reason GM imported the SS was to “use” it in NASCAR, so they had to sell it to the public?

    I really hope that the Regal and Stinger catch on, with their hatchbacks that look like regular sedans.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      No, GM was nice to people and gave them real performance sedan with MT. Now, if they would remove most of the electronic features, leather, sunroof, etc and sold it for $33K, there would be different uptake on it. But it would still die as Holden manufacturing died anyway.

  • avatar
    grrr

    Nissan will do away with it’s large cars soon enough – it’ll start by dropping down to just one of the Altima/Maxima/Fuga, and eventually offer none – all it’s standard cars will be cheap and cheerful; or sold as Infiniti).

    To this point; in the Australian and New Zealand markets, Nissan has not sold a standard sedan for the last two years – the lineup consists of 370z, GTR, Juke, Qashqai, X-Trail, Pathfinder, Patrol and Navara – the first two are a sporty coupe and perfomance 2-door; and all the rest are CUVs/SUVs and a ute/pickup.

    Standard sedans are on death-watch, with a move towards more performace, luxury and styling leading over price competitiveness. A good example of this is that I expect that the next Mazda6 and RX9 may well be the same car based on the Vision Coupe.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    Any Ford sedan.
    Ford Fusion.
    Ford 500/Taurus/Freestar/whatever they call it now
    Ford Focus
    Ford Fiesta (Oops that one is already cancelled)

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Are you just hoping? The Fusion is the 4th best selling midsize, there’s a lot of underperforming nameplates underneath its position that are more likely to bite the dust before it does.

      The next generation Focus has already been spied, I have no doubt we will see it here.

      The Taurus is likely to go soon, but that should surprise no one. Its as old as the hills, and its segment is one of the steepest declining in the industry. That said, it isn’t the worst selling, and I wouldn’t be totally surprised if the 7th gen doesn’t show up at some point to at least fill the Interceptor Sedan role, if nothing else.

      • 0 avatar
        pmirp1

        First step ,

        Make Fords in Mexico.

        Second step,

        Perhaps China.

        Last, get as smart as Fiat-CHrysler and put a nail in coffin of Fords with recall ready transmissions.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        The Fusion has lost 100K in sales over the last 2 years if my memory serves me. It’s DOA and as the Sonata shows a redesign won’t help. They’d do better to bring it back as a faux crossover wagon like the Outback.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        I wonder if Ford’s decision to move Focus production to China will have a big effect on sales?

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        The Taurus passes on, even in police interceptor trim. Chicago will re-tool for the next gen Explorer and Lincoln SUV and the police upfit down the street will switch to upfitting the Fusion as the “sedan” model.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    Didn’t we already have this as QOTD recently?

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Buick LaCrosse: See you later.
    Chevy Impala and Malibu: I don’t know which one will be left standing, but only one will.
    VW MuricaPassat: Watch for the Jetta to grow a little bit and this homely thing to be axed.
    Toyota Avalon: (Edit, never mind, there’s a new one coming).

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      The Buick will live and the Impala will die. It’s been quite obvious that GM has no plans for the Impala as the Malibu has been already gone through a complete overhaul and due for a MCE soon.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    Chevy Malibu will be next to go. The answer is convert all sedans into station wagons. Offer two models one that is raised 3-inches and has “tough” gray/black cladding around the wheel openings, and another that sits 1-inch lower than normal height and has the requisite front splitter, rear “diffuser.” Everybody is happy.

    • 0 avatar
      JDG1980

      It will be interesting to see how the new Buick Regal TourX wagon performs. If it does well, we might see more experiments along these lines.

      The Chevy Impala is very well reviewed – CR says it does even better than most luxury cars at providing a smooth ride and low NVH. But its sedan form factor limits its usefulness. Imagine if they used the same platform to make a modern Roadmaster wagon. All the fuel economy of a modern car with carrying capacity to rival a Suburban (the old Roadmaster could swallow 4×8 sheet goods).

      The Subaru Outback falls somewhere between a conventional station wagon and a crossover, and it has a strong market niche. Those extra few inches of ground clearance matter a lot to many buyers, especially with the poor condition of all too many American roads today.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    Y’all forgot well-educated women and fancy European sedans. RWD lexi’s too. Ex-GF’s education and rides: 2 Masters and 1 PhD from an Ivy League school, Audi S6; Masters from George Washington,Cayman & ancient Wrangler; Masters from UVA, her dad’s old truck, she’s a flight attendant living in Charlottesville; current GF, Masters, Mercedes SL, Red. Would any of them trade their high-priced sdan for a high-end SUV? Not a chance.

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