By on September 29, 2017

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The United Auto Workers has accused Nissan Motor Company of tracking and rating employees based on their union sentiments at the same Mississippi assembly plant where workers recently voted down union representation.

In early August, factory employees voted against joining by an almost 2-to-1 margin. At the time, the UAW claimed intimidation tactics and censorship crippled its attempt to reach workers. Now it’s saying Nissan also surveilled its entire staff and employed a comprehensive ratings system that documented each individual’s behavior regarding potential unionization.

The formal complaint, filed with the National Labor Relations Board, alleges Nissan “has maintained and continues to maintain an employee surveillance, data collection and rating system that records employee union activity and rates workers according to their perceived support for or opposition to the UAW.”

After obtaining it through a Freedom of Information Act request, Bloomberg said the UAW’s filing calls for the NLRB to subpoena the automaker and investigate the claims.

The UAW submitted a partially redacted document to the Labor Relations Board that it said is proof of Nissan’s rating system. The union claims the document lists employee names and identification numbers, saddled with notes like “has talked with solicitors at the gate before a shift” or “has been seen hanging with pro-union technicians.”

Nissan has not yet been reached for comment, but we assume the automaker will chalk this up to union shenanigans and downplay the list itself. That, of course, wouldn’t make the UAW’s allegations untrue, but the group has been pressing aggressively into the Southern United States without a victory for years. It’ll be interesting to see what comes of this.

[Image: Nissan]

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15 Comments on “UAW Accuses Nissan of Tracking Workers’ Union Sentiments...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    The UAW is becoming hysterical, and not in the comedic sense.

    It’s really hard to believe Nissan – or any modern company – would be stupid enough to permit such systematic tracking.

    Besides, a 2:1 voting margin is a crushing defeat, not the kind that intimidating a few workers will provide.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      “It’s really hard to believe Nissan – or any modern company – would be stupid enough to permit such systematic tracking.”

      **cough**Uber**cough**

  • avatar
    ATLOffroad

    If the Nissan workers were unionized but disscussing to vote out the UAW, I could see the UAW doing the same thing and tracking their members then rating them based on their loyalty to the union.

  • avatar
    ash78

    Does the union ever just look around a happy workplace and think “Yeah, our work here is already done through laying decades of a foundation for fair and equitable worker treatment as a competitive necessity for the employer — rather than through blackmail or heavyhanded dealings and corruption.”?

    Bahahahahaha, just kidding.

  • avatar
    whitworth

    So management is engaging in the same sort of tactics the UAW does.

    All of these new plants opening up in right to work states, I’m sure workers in those areas are really regretting their decision to keep the UAW back in Detroit and let it rot.

    • 0 avatar
      mason

      I’d wager the company hasn’t come anywhere near engaging in the same activities.

      Can you imagine your supervisor showing up at your door unannounced, to tell you how big of a mistake your about to make by voting the union in, that they are out for themselves, that they don’t care about the individual. And show up again and again when you’ve already asked him not to come back.

      Or standing in the parking lot at the local UAW handing out anti union flyers and stickers.

      Or throwing catered parties with an open bar to try and “win” you over.

  • avatar
    honda1

    Time for unions to go, they have served their purpose. Just a scam now, eff’em. Union boys, go ahead and flame me, you and everyone else know i’m right.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    During the recession of 2008, the UAW and other unions showed their true colors. The senior members sold out younger members and future members to save themselves. New hires would get a fraction of the pay, everyone gets a haircut except them. “Solidarity unless it’s my paycheck at stake”.

    It’s not right what happened during the bankruptcies. Everyone sacraficed just to appease them. Even us, they effectively took money right out of our pockets via buying sway with our elected officials.

    They might do a lot of things right, well paying jobs in manufacturing are worth saving…..but not at the expense of everyone else. I’m sorry but nobody deserves guaranteed lifetime employment, wages well above market, cradle to the grave benefits while making people who don’t enjoy those same things foot the bill.

    That won’t be the last time the UAW reaches in your pocket. Guaranteed.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    Unless the UAW has proof that Nissan fired pro-union employees or otherwise applied heavy pressure to “coerce” them to vote NO on the union representation, I don’t see how keeping track of the employee union sentiments is any different than poll taking during political elections.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    There’s a really annoying ad running here now from either “chocolategroupie” or “better by the minute.” not only is it an auto-playing video/sound ad, but if it loads at the bottom of the page it automatically drags the page down there and prevents me from scrolling back up.

  • avatar
    I_like_stuff

    I have made it a mission of mine to never purchase a U Aint Workin’ vehicle again.

  • avatar
    mikey

    @I_like_stuff….”U Aint Workin” how profound !..Personally I don’t buy vehicle new, or used , without a UAW/CAW/UNIFOR label…Up to and including any vehicle domestic, or transplant assembled in Mexico .


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