By on May 31, 2017

Donald Trump, public domain

President Donald Trump has said he’ll be providing his thoughts on the Paris climate deal in the coming days, but media outlets are already suggesting his take on the issue will be to leave it. Sources are claiming the president’s mind is made up and, to the surprise of no one, odds are good he will withdraw the U.S. from the deal.

Trump has already made it his mission to overturn as many Obama-related policies as possible and seems unconcerned with environmental issues that might stand in the way of potential manufacturing opportunities. Since taking office, Trump has been pushing regulators to rethink the United States’ auto emission guidelines, undoing one of the previous administration’s final acts in office.

Pulling out of the Paris accord would fulfill a campaign promise and negate the need for the U.S. to adhere to rigid emission standards — at the expense of further alienating the president from Europe’s leadership.  

However, countries are not bound by an outside panel. The accord allows the 195 participating nations — 147 who have ratified — to set their own limits, under the assumption they will all make continued efforts to limit the amount of greenhouse gases emitted by human activities to a level nature can manage between 2050 and 2100.

It also places a strong emphasis on helping developing nations achieve their goals, something a protectionist politician may not care for. Trump has also been very clear on how he does not want regulatory interference handicapping manufacturing, especially as it relates to the automotive industry.

Unnamed senior officials familiar with his plan told CNNAxios, and several other media outlets that the president’s mind is essentially settled on the matter. That assumption was further bolstered when he updated his favorite social media platform.

“I will be announcing my decision on the Paris Accord over the next few days. MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!” Trump tweeted on Wednesday. The slogan has become the president’s biggest tell, synonymous with undoing currently existing policies. If he says he’s about to make America great again, then you can rest assured he’s seriously considering rolling something back.

Then again, this came hours after his infamous and perplexing “Despite the constant negative press covfefe” tweet, something I have yet to decrypt. Considering the mystique deposited by those six words, perhaps Twitter is not the best dais for unraveling the president’s intentions.

If he does decide to pull out of the accord, he’ll have a few options on how to do it. The agreement stipulates a three-year waiting period before a country can give notice of leaving, which results in a June 2021 exit. Trump could abandon the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, which would only take one year (but at the risk of massive political fallout). Alternatively, he could claim the agreement is a treaty requiring approval by the Senate and allow the Republican majority to do the work for him.

On Tuesday, Trump convened with Environmental Protection Agency administrator Scott Pruitt, who opposes the Paris deal. Today, he is scheduled to meet with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson — who strongly supports it. While the majority of auto industry leaders have not publicly expressed their opinions, Tesla CEO Elon Musk has made it clear he is attempting to convince the president to keep the U.S. in the Paris accord. Musk also said he will withdraw from President Trump’s CEO council if the U.S. withdraws from the climate agreement.

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101 Comments on “President Trump Planning to Abandon Paris Climate Accord: Reports...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I support withdrawal from the Paris accord.

    As for Mr Musk, he ought not (and need not) link Tesla’s appeal with the climate change issue. Withdrawing from the President’s CEO council over this issue would be foolish.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      It will be nice to have money to spend on the US. If someone wants to spend money on the environment let’s put it into our national parks.

      I’m not going to get excited we’re out just yet, his extremely liberal daughter among others are right by his side. I might be doing some fireworks once official word comes through however.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Hummer,
        I see it this way. Most everything Trump is doing will make it less attractive for others to do business in the US.

        As I wrote further down, what impact will this have on US emissions?

        The US has very slowly been moving in the direction of harmonising its vehicle regs in the direction of the rest of the world.

        The structure of US controls, regs, subsidies, promote the manufacture and protection of large vehicle. Vehicles which have little scope for a large export market. Even then US (mainly big 3) vehicle quality is not near good enough for developing an export market.

        US small vehicles are more expensive and of a lower quality than many global competitors.

        You Trump people must realise the constant push by the US to continue its main thrust of producing “cheap” vehicles has lead to its current position on the global stage combuned with poorer quality overall.

        US vehicle quality has improved over the past 25-30 years, but the competition has kept one or two steps in front.

        Foreign manufacturers in the US like BMW & MB do produce good quality large vehicles, but the global market for these is limited.

        I think rather than saying “We are America and fnck everyone else” you need to learn to play ball.

        Its not rocket science to export. Just produce what the customer wants and it ain’t F Serirs pickups.

        • 0 avatar
          88c900t

          Yeah, you’re completely ignorant and wrong about the US auto market, just like another Australian member on a *different* forum (seems to be a theme…).

          Large vehicles aren’t ideal to export from the US due to high fuel taxation and displacement based taxes that other countries have (and import taxes). That, and large vehicles=high end vehicles in other markets which are relatively low volume. You’re stuck in the old days with your imported Dodge Jouneys, Chrysler Sebrings and Jeep libertys, those turds aren’t representative of US autos today.

          But to my main point, GM and Ford in the last few years are absolutely up to the quality of the Korean twins, Honda, Toyota, Mazda and certainly above Nissan. FCA… well that’s another story but Ford and GM shouldn’t be lumped in with them. The Cruze (even the previous gen) and the Focus are world class cars, as is the Fusion (mondeo).

          Here in the states the 7th gen Civics and 8th gen Accords are not regarded as great cars, 8th gen Civics even have block cracking issues and Mazdas have severe rust issues right up until 08 or so, as did Nissans. 4 cyl Toyotas drank oil like crazy, and until about 2006 Honda/Acuras with the V6 had automatic transmissions made of glass.

          Luxury brands?

          Cadillacs, particularly the new Alpha-based CTS and the CT6 are superb, and they as well as the small ATS match or exceed the BMWs in dynamics. Honestly Audi and Benz is doing great at the moment, but BMW isn’t-lousy reliability and mushy dynamics compared from what they had several years ago.

          Lowest quality? What about Fiats? and the rest of the brands under that umbrella like Alfa and Lancia? What about Peugeot and Citroen? VW? Also many Benzes 15-20 years ago were piles of junk (w202, w210 and ML) Again I think you are stuck in 2003 if you think every US car is like the Dodge Avenger.

          Of course, the world’s demand for small cars is already met, what would Detroit have to gain by venturing into those markets? And Ford is selling every F series they are able to manufacture easily, don’t you worry ;)

          As far as world politics go, the fact is that the EU is not comfortable right now as they have became comfortable with the status quo. Content with US taxpayers subsidizing defense in other NATO countries that don’t pay their fair share. They are worried about Brexit and Trump becuase they -whatever you think of them, represent reform, and the EU is afraid of reform.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “They are worried about Brexit and Trump becuase they -whatever you think of them, represent reform, and the EU is afraid of reform.”

            They don’t represent reform, they represent regression. Brexit sold to people longing for the days of the British Empire when Britain controlled everything and wasn’t just a member state. Trump sold to old white Boomers who are convinced the 1950s were utopia defined because they just can’t bring themselves to take off the rose tinted specs.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            88,
            If what you state is true, where are your export vehicles?

            Let’s not forget I do spend a significant amount of time in the US and the vehicles you mention are from the Japanese, not big 3 and they are expensive compared to many other countries.

            My mother (my family live in NJ & NY) has a new Michigan made Focus. Its quality is lower than the Thai Focuses we recieve.

            Again, you are one of the many blaming the world for your woes.

            If it wasn’t for foreign imports entering the US the big 3 would still be producing sh!t.

            The US is only competitive in producing large vehicles (via protection). Blaming other countries for the level of taxation on their fuel is a cop out. Because if their fuel was taxed the same as the US, the US would have NO or not much of an auto industry.

            The reason I say this is twofold. Large vehicle promotion in the US and uncompetitive small vehicle production in the US. So be thankful other countries have higher fuel taxes.

        • 0 avatar
          ttacgreg

          Assuming you live in OZ, here is a clue for you. “We are America and fnck everyone else” is simply the foreign policy manifestation of internal domestic cultural norms, which add up to “I have mine f**k you and I will get f**k you to get mine. Social Darwinism is alive and viscously well here in the USA. Poor people? It’s their fault they are poor and society owes them nothing. Let then die in the gutter.

          • 0 avatar
            shaker

            “Let then die in the gutter.”

            No, they will join the Armed Forces or flock to religious charities, both of which will feed them, clothe them, and teach them their proper roles as Christian Citizens.

            If they choose “none of the above”, then yes, your scenario will apply.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            ttacgreg,
            Social Darwinism?

            Trump will axe the Paris Accord.

            Disparity within the US got Trump elected.

            Trump’s approach to Allies?

            Yup, Social Darwinism. How cohesive is US society at the moment.

            The only good Trump can offer the US will be at the next election when the Trump ideals are rejected the US and moves towards real social change.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Todd, over the past several years I’ve spent half my time working across the globe.

            I only got back to Oz a little over a month ago and I was sent off again till Christmas.

            By the way I totally enjoyed Seattle, great people, but way too much rain.

    • 0 avatar

      He’s doing what he believes in. Based on the majority of Tesla sales occuring in blue States combined with about half the country believing in man made climate change and another 20 that believe in climate change but unsure the cause, it seems like a safe bet.

    • 0 avatar
      jpolicke

      Musk sells electric cars and solar panels, so of course he would be in favor of the Paris accords. He was probably hoping to get electric car tax credits extended or expanded; without them Tesla would have gone broke already and I don’t see how Tesla can break even selling $35k model 3s without the subsidy.

      • 0 avatar
        SkiD666

        jpolicke, who gets the rebates from government (federal, state), the buyer or the manufacturer? How would this “subsidy” affect profitability?

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          The subsidy effects the relationship between cost to supply and price of demand at any given supplied quantity whether it goes to buyers or sellers. In this case it goes to buyers, meaning that people with upper incomes get up to $11.5K in electric car more than they’re willing to pay for. It effects profitability because electric car sellers take in up to that much beyond what anyone is willing to pay for their cars. They still aren’t actually making money, but resources are being wasted on junk nobody willingly pays full cost for. It’s all the people picking up the slack by paying too much in taxes and not taking the subsidies on electric cars who are stolen from to pay the price. And slow you’re roll about oil subsidies. I’ve debunked that here enough times that only the shamelessly stupid can pretend they think business expense deductions should apply to every industry but the most important one, or that farmers’ fuel subsidy is somehow more egregious than their ethanol mandate, or that the old and poor should be left to freeze in their New England oil-heated homes.

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      AGREED

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      It was a horrible deal for the US, would have cost US $trillions$ and would have had little effect on global warming.

      The fact is BO could have submitted the treaty to the Senate but BO knew the Senate would never ratify it because it could not withstand scrutiny.

  • avatar
    quaquaqua

    Hmm, let’s see, NATO, Germany, Paris… China must be very happy with Trump lately. Sigh.

  • avatar
    TW5

    If you want to make sure no progress is made, sign international agreements monitored by bureaucratic committees.

    We can do our own thing.

  • avatar
    carlisimo

    I see GOP environmental policies as another form of the deficit spending they’re so fond of. Pay now or pay later – the choice for self-interested old people is obvious.

    • 0 avatar
      TW5

      Old people are bankrupting the nation, not polluting the planet. They aren’t the people addicted to personal electronics who can’t leave a wall socket behind. Old people don’t drive, either.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Shhh, you’re harshing his buzz.

      • 0 avatar
        carlisimo

        Work vehicles aside, the gas guzzlers are generally designed for the middle aged and older, and they’re just as obsessed with their iPhones and phablets as the rest of us.

        Climate change is ultimately going to be… not the end of civilization, but expensive to deal with. Even if they’re in states that disallow it (e.g. Florida), my colleagues in civil engineering are designing infrastructure for sea level rise. Agriculture will go through some upheaval; it’s proven to be adaptable, but at a cost (a literal, monetary cost). China has more environmental problems than us, but their government’s way of distracting the masses could very well mean war against someone we’ve promised to protect – we’ll either get dragged in or give up on our global pre-eminence for good. The geopolitical situation will be even worse for the regions from which we buy petroleum. Again, we have the ability to deal with that domestically, but not without a lot of economic volatility.

      • 0 avatar

        Old people own large houses or multiple houses, they live in 24/7 climate control. They buy the majority of cars motorhomes and boats my guess would be baby boomers account for a disproportionate amount of pollution.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          “…baby boomers account for a disproportionate amount of pollution.”

          Once their kids have reached adulthood, Boomers are no longer responsible for them.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “Boomers are no longer responsible for them.”

            Burn…..

            no wait, that might add to green house gases.

      • 0 avatar
        John R

        Ah. So its the young people owning multiple homes using fossil fuels to heat and power them then.

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      YOU are not correst sir.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Electricity is now a luxury good in Germany thanks to climate change hysteria. Scott Pruitt is correct in urging pull out.
    .
    .

  • avatar
    gpolak

    Most of the comments here make me wonder if it’s possible to love cars and driving, while simultaneously not having your head stuck in the sand. This “drill, baby drill” attitude is just as much of a dangerous extreme as the hippie bureaucrat that wants legislate everyone into a self-driving transportation appliance.

  • avatar
    Ion

    Crap I must have loaded the wrong website, I was looking for Automotive content not political speculation. Or is this like how the NY daily news let’s Lupica pretend he’s more than a sports commentator.

  • avatar
    Kendahl

    gpolak’s hippie bureaucrat wants to regulate most of the population into walking, bicycles or mass transit that runs at the transit authority’s convenience. He would also move them from detached houses in the suburbs to cramped apartments in high rise buildings. Of course, the governmental, business and social elite would still ride in limousines to and from their country estates.

  • avatar
    tmport

    Syria, Nicaragua … the United States? Great company to be in.

  • avatar
    zip89123

    Good for the Donald. No doubt this will save U.S. taxpayers billions.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      which he will promptly channel to the 0.001%

    • 0 avatar
      tmport

      Actually, it will prevent us from being at the forefront of the green energy technology boom, which will cost us billions of dollars, plus an incalculable amount of moral authority. And while Trump’s loyal minions might be gullible enough to believe his excuses for pulling out, the rest of the world is a bit smarter.

      • 0 avatar
        brewster12333

        tmport – I call Bullshit. But what do I know being from communist Kanada.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        tmport, you are 100% correct. This pull out is both a financial and moral failure. I’m embarrassed to be an American. At least the next presidential candidate will have an easy time setting an agenda. Simply run on the platform of undoing every single one of the moron’s Executive Orders. Not one is worth a damn. Should make getting 70% of the vote easy.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    Obama thought he could saddle this country with the obligations of a treaty-like agreement on his say-so without having to go through all that tedious constitutional Senate ratification stuff. On that basis alone the Paris deal should be kicked to the curb. And, since the Senate never ratified it, we were never officially bound by it, and can walk away tomorrow, “waiting period” be damned.

    If the planet’s hopes depend on this scheme we’d better start building sea walls in Arizona. Because even if every goal of Paris was met, the planet’s temperature will only be reduced by .17 degrees C. This much of an economic burden for such little gain is like amputating ones foot to take care of an ingrown toenail.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Obama never realized his pen and phone could be reversed. Only the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) was done properly, and look how hard it is for Republican majorities in both houses to repeal it. Just about everything else Obama did will be swept away with barely a memory of its existence. For his supporters that’s going to be a bitter pill to swallow.

      Unfortunately, neither the repudiation of the Paris Accord, nor a rollback of regulations will mean much to the auto industry. It’s a global business now, and the economics dictate that our desires for certain types of vehicles will have to be compromised by the desires and needs of markets elsewhere. The chrome-laden, big-finned, belchfire V8 is not coming back. We can only hope to carve out some small concession to American culture: a cup holder that will fit a Big Gulp.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        Obamacare is enough to turn us into Venezuela by itself, and thereby make Obama’s reign a success.

        • 0 avatar
          ttacgreg

          Venezuela is a great socialist boogey man. It is a disaster.
          I tend to look towards Northern Europe for my model of “socialism” in quotes because there is difference between socialism, by dictionary definition of the state owing the economic means of production, vs a democracy establishing taxpayer/voters funded public institutions that serve the public in ways no for-profit organization would or could.

          • 0 avatar
            stroker49

            I’m living in Sweden and I can tell you it doesn’t work. If I add up the taxes including the payroll tax (+30%) and sales tax (25%) I pay 60% in tax. Despite that my employer pays a health care insurance for me because the public healthcare doesn’t work very well.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        A cup holder that fits a Big Gulp, >48 inches between the pickup truck wheel wells so a sheet of plywood can lie flat, and enough interior length so that a rear-facing child safety seat will fit and still leave room for mom and dad. Cylinder count and exterior styling are negotiable, but “world cars” that violate these 3 non-negotiable dimensions don’t sell well in the US.

      • 0 avatar
        ttacgreg

        Too much executive power has been an ongoing unconstitutional problem for decades.
        Of course having an effective legislative branch helps. I truly love that the GOP is in full control of both branches and they are such no compromise, extreme idealogical purists that they are paralyzed within their own party and can’t get anything done. For this I an relieved and grateful. I hope it continues.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          They may not have intended it, but the Republicans are following the wishes of the Founders. They actually intended for Congress to do nothing, unless moved by a real crisis. The government which governs least, governs best. As for Presidents, Obama did us all a favor by concerning himself so much with vacations and golf. I hope Trump does the same.

          • 0 avatar
            hreardon

            Amen, Lorenzo. For all of the ridiculous hand wringing in the press, government is operating exactly as it should right now:

            Congress is so self absorbed that it cannot make any knee jerk reactions, and while Trump nibbles on the periphery, the media that he damned is coming back to bite him in the you-know-what and is succeeding in sapping his presidency of any and all momentum with the ridiculousness that is the “Russia” probe.

  • avatar
    Jeff Waingrow

    Everybody else too chickenshit to say anything in opposition to these mostly moronic comments?

    • 0 avatar
      Chocolatedeath

      Honestly they don’t deserve a response. Some folks are who they are.

    • 0 avatar
      Boff

      I’ve never found morons to be easily persuaded by facts.

      • 0 avatar
        Boff

        But perhaps this will at least get them thinking. ROnald Brownstein, writing in The Atlantic: “It’s difficult to overstate how directly the president’s plans clash with the marketplace and policy at all other levels of government.”. And further: “Predictability is a necessity for the key industries that fit into America’s energy puzzle, especially electric utilities, oil and gas producers, and automobile manufacturers. All of these businesses make huge capital investments with very long lifespans. Utilities build power plants that provide electricity for decades. Oil companies drill wells that take years to complete. Auto companies plan car models five or more years in advance. None of these industries turn on a dime. That’s why President Trump’s efforts to systematically reverse Barack Obama’s energy and environmental policies represent such a gamble for them. Before Trump took office, technological advances, consumer preferences, cost trends, and government policies at the state, federal, and international level were all jointly pushing toward a lower-carbon future that stressed greater efficiency and cleaner power sources. Now Trump, working through Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt and Energy Secretary Rick Perry, has steered federal policy in direct opposition to those other forces—a redirection capped by reports he is likely to withdraw from the global Paris Agreement, in which virtually every nation agreed to reduce its carbon emissions. While the other key private- and public-sector dynamics are still driving toward a cleaner energy future, Trump is seeking to resist that transition and restore the primacy of fossil fuels.”

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      I like to egg them on.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    Mien Covfefe – Autobiography of a Failed Potus.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    Can’t have nuclear because it might melt down. Can’t have coal, gas, or oil because they are dirty. Can’t have windmills because they kill birds and ruin the view. Can’t have solar because they kill birds and upset desert habitat. Can’t burn wood because it uses trees. But the first people to scream when the power goes out and their Leaf or Tesla grinds to a halt will be the eco-weanies who protest every form of energy.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      Don’t forget that you can’t have hydroelectric because the misanthropes use the underlying acts of the EPA to make every shade of microorganism an endangered and protected species. It is time to start cutting off the misanthropes from utilities and the civilization they detest so much.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Again, Trump is talking sh!t.

    He whines the “world” is screwing the US in auto trade. He now wants to make changes which further distance the US in the auto world with EPA changes.

    Trump and his Trumpette followers will soon realise that the rest of the world will not follow the Luddites Trumps.

    I’m finding it hard to see how Trump will make America great with his views.

    If Trump wants the US to export more vehicles, then the US better start producing many more vehicles worthy of export.

    Just because the US has its position on emissions, safety, etc doesn’t mean its what the other 80% of the global vehicle market is chasing.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      There are over 300 million reasons why it doesn’t matter what the rest of the world thinks about emissions or safety. If the US gets away from the EU suicide cult’s ideas about ‘moving past’ private transportation, our biggest problem will be European refugees.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Todd,
        Australia had a similar view in the 70s. The world is shrinking.

        To remain competitive fewer models will need to be produced in the US.

        How many major aircraft manufacturers were there 60 years ago? The auto industry is heading the same way.

        In the longer term the US will either pay too much for cars (as they already do for pickups) or the US will integrate further into the global community.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          Al, you’re starting to sound like Sergio Marchionne: “The auto industry needs consolidation! Somebody buy us out so my bosses the Agnelli family can finally dump the Fiat albatross, and I can get that fat bonus and retire rich!”

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Consolidation doesn’t scare me anyway. What are the best sellers in the US? Three pickups that aren’t reliant on any other markets and two big sedans that aren’t reliant on any other market. We’ll continue to get better cars than the rest of the world because of less government meddling in energy markets.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Todd,
            They are reliant on a 25% import tax.

            That is not healthy or competitive.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Lorenzo,
            I have yet to state the auto industry needs to rationalise vs (my observation) the industry will rationalise.

            The reality is those that do rationalise will outperform the more isolated manufacturers.

            As for, how business people decide to operate is not my call in this argument.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Are you suggesting that Trump is moving towards opening up our massive market by stripping the F150, Silverado and Ram of their protected status? Make up your mind. How is keeping Thailand out of the US market going to hurt US producers? I don’t even care about US brands. Our market is big enough that anyone serious about it will build cars to our needs. How many 3.5 liter V6 gasoline sedans did the rest of the world consume in the last fifteen years? If we ditch the fascism of Obama and Juncker and return to market forces guiding our economy, we’ll see a return to the dependable, powerful, and affordable cars that have allowed our fleet to age. It doesn’t matter what the rest of the world does, and it never has. We drove seven liter family cars when Europe was over thirty years from figuring out how to take showers. Fifty cc mopeds were playing the same role in Europe that the VW Beetle was here in the ’60s. Providing Europe’s defense has allowed them some pretty nifty domestic spending in the years since, but that is coming to an end. By the time they run out of excuses for their domestic security issues, it will be too late to do anything about it. External threats soon won’t mean a thing to countries that are headed down the other side of the arc of civilization.

  • avatar

    Marcus Aurelius Trump: Tell me again, Maximus, why are we here?
    Maximus Bannon: It’s gonna be America First! America First!
    Marcus Aurelius: Ah yes, I remember. Do you see that map, Maximus? That is the world which I created.

  • avatar
    shaker

    Trump is a mean, vindictive, narrow-minded and thoughtless person.

    The perfect president for those who share his characteristics.

    Enjoy wallowing in your “victories”.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    What some fail to see is Trump will only be President for 4 to 8 years then someone else will be President. More than likely the Democrats will regain the Presidency and undo much of what Trump has done. Businesses for the most part like stability and as what was mentioned in previous comments product plan is done years in advance and businesses cannot turn on a dime. Most vehicle manufacturers were already adapting to the 2025 efficiency mandates and most have been continually improving the efficiency, safety, and pollution controls. The best thing would be to freeze the current standards to give industry and regulators enough time to re-evaluate the 2025 standards. Extending the 2025 deadline would go a long ways toward giving the manufacturers the time they need to fully implement the standards and possibly renegotiate those parts that are not feasible.

    Adopting Global safety, efficiency, and pollution standards would actually save vehicle manufacturers money in that it they would not have to comply with different standards in different countries and they could plan in advance on how to comply with these standards. Industry does not like uncertainty–much harder to plan and budget in an unsteady environment.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Jeff,
      There are two standards.

      The US and most of the rest of the world.

      All OECD economies more or less have harmonised standards and lesser developed economies are gradually moving in the direction of OECD standards.

      The US is on its own here. If Trump’s policy becomes reality you will see a greater divergence from the direction 80% of the global auto market is heading in.

      This doesn’t bode well for the US in exports. If the US doesn’t build vehicles to suit what is needed by the 80% global market the US will struggle to further develop export markets.

      The US is only competitive in producing lower quality “consumer” large vehicles, ie pickups due to protection and promotion.

      If there was a greater large vehicle global market the US would be uncompetitive with large vehicle production like it is uncompetitive in small vehicle production.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        @Big Al–Either you misunderstood me or missed the point I was making. If the USA and the rest of the developed countries adopted Global Standards for safety, efficiency, and pollution control it would save vehicle manufacturers money. I am well aware that the USA has different standards and will most likely have much different standards under President Trump. It is better to have uniform standards and to share global platforms, but I do understand why that is not the case for full size US pickups. Eventually there might be Global sized pickups in the US if Global pickups increase slightly in size and if US full size pickups decrease slightly in size which could happen due to the fact that manufacturers are going to smaller engines which require less size under the hood. If that happens then the midsize trucks become less relevant, but there could be room for a smaller sized pickup based on an existing crossover or car platform.

        My point is that it is harder to adjust for standards that could change on a President’s whim. It takes time for manufacturers to adjust for change whether it be reducing or increasing these standards.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Sorry Jeff.

          I agree with you, except I believe the damage Trump will do, will lead to a more permanent loss of US business as trade moves to new suppliers other than the US.

          For every day Trump sits in the Oval Office will take 5 days to rectify the damage he creates.

          In other words Trump will set the US back over a decade if he lasts a couple of years.

          As much as many comments on this site degrade competition external to the US, the comments highlight how insecure many are regarding the US’es global position.

          Many, like Trump attempt to paint a picture of a down trodden US versus the world mentality.

          The reality is the US has done quite well as a nation. But as a country for its people is where it is failing.

          The US needs to look within to solve its woes, not blame other countries.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Dismantle WTO.

            or

            Coordinated nuclear strike with Russia/China on most of the third world.

            I’m cool with either.

  • avatar
    George B

    I predict that the Trump Administration will withdraw from the Paris Climate Accord, but that the US will continue to outperform Europe in actual reductions in carbon dioxide emissions. Credit needs to go to George P Mitchell and his team of engineers who spent decades figuring out how to economically extract natural gas from shale formations.
    http://www.theenergyfix.com/2013/08/05/george-p-mitchell-founder-of-shale-gas-heres-how-he-and-his-team-did-it/

    I also predict that the Trump Administration rolls back and/or delays the 2022 through 2025 EPA fuel economy standards. These “pen and phone” regulations don’t have any underlying legislation from congress that would prevent any administration from changing them and neither consumers nor the auto industry show much interest in the gas-electric hybrids necessary to meet the 2022 through 2025 fuel economy requirements. The US auto market will pause at the turbo 4 cylinder level until fuel prices rise significantly.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Big Al–It depends on how long Trump is in office as to if and when business can get back on track. I think that it might take a while to undo the damage but that it is reversible. I don’t entirely disagree with everything Trump is doing but the US does not need to alienate its own allies. Most of the US based corporations are multinational and desire to keep international trade uninterrupted–anything that would harm production and trade in overseas markets would be detrimental. Even Rex Tillerson is against most of Trump’s trade policies and is against abandoning the Paris Climate Accord. Of course Tillerson was chairman of Exxon-Mobil which is definitely a multinational corporation and Tillerson has many years of international experience.

    As for bringing back jobs and keeping jobs in America those corporations like Carrier will use more automation and reduce the labor force anyway. The remaining jobs will require a higher skill and many of the existing workers do not have the training or experience for those jobs. Sure some of those workers might get retrained but in many cases those workers will lose their jobs and not find a comparable job with comparable pay. Much easier to promise something in a campaign than it is to deliver on the promise which is true regardless of political affiliation. The promise to deliver on keeping the coal miner jobs is another promise that will be hard to keep especially with cheaper cleaner natural gas from fracking. Industries become obsolete and no amount of promises or government intervention can prevent their eventual demise.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Jeff,
      Trump is causing instability, business and countries will drift away from instability.

      Unfortunately the Chinese are working hard to fill in this unstable void Trump is creating.

      The setbacks created by Trump will reduce the US’es glibal position…..more permanently than you think.

      I don’t want to see this occur. But the majority in the IS voted for this schmuck and the US will have to live with this and the associated reduction in standard of living as trade and US influence moves elsewhere.

      • 0 avatar
        hreardon

        Just because you work hard doesn’t mean that you succeed.

        While I do not disagree with your premise, Big Al, keep in mind that a *lot* of manufacturing is skipping China these days and going to Mexico, Vietnam, etc.

        All things staying constant, China has something, but externalities and black swans are a real biyatch and while American trade policy may be rocky at the moment (remember: words are not actions), Chinese financial obscurity and corruption are a *substantial* concern for those making multi-billion dollar decisions.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    It’s all one big, tempest in a teapot, to coin a phrase.

    We’re all in a global computer simulation. Remember the Mayan calendar ending in December 2012? That was it – the end of the real world. All that was left was a computer running simulations of all possible outcomes.

    Look what’s happened since then: the Pope resigned, American oil production doubled bringing OPEC to its knees, in the latest Superman movie he finally put his underwear on under his tights, Bruce Jenner became a woman, the Cubs won the World Series, scientists concluded that salt and fat are good for you, and Donald Trump became President.

    The marvel of it is that the simulation is so sophisticated, it allows us to contemplate being in the simulation! That’s like Mickey Mouse suddenly realizing he’s a two-dimensional drawing – and that Goofy and Pluto are both dogs!

    The computer is running through all possible outcomes, and who knows – it may well be that adding CO2 has prevented the return of the ice age, that Freon is harmless, asteroid capture will give us an inexhaustible supply of materials, that V8 engines can be made more fuel-efficient than electric motors, and that single automobiles with lone drivers are the most efficient form of people-moving.

    I can’t wait to see what happens next!

    • 0 avatar
      shaker

      “The marvel of it is that the simulation is so sophisticated, it allows us to contemplate being in the simulation! That’s like Mickey Mouse suddenly realizing he’s a two-dimensional drawing – and that Goofy and Pluto are both dogs!

      The computer is running through all possible outcomes, and who knows – it may well be that adding CO2 has prevented the return of the ice age, that Freon is harmless, asteroid capture will give us an inexhaustible supply of materials, that V8 engines can be made more fuel-efficient than electric motors, and that single automobiles with lone drivers are the most efficient form of people-moving.

      I can’t wait to see what happens next!”

      Trump will publish his memoirs, which will cite these ideas as proven facts.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Trump doesn’t believe my alcohol-induced humor any more than I do. Instead, he’s craftily using such non-sequiturs to replace off-with-their-heads by making opponents’ heads explode. The trick is making people actually believe it.

        It’s easy to see what he’s doing – fulfilling his campaign promises. You know the old joke – after an election, the electorate is divided into two camps: those who are afraid the winners won’t live up to their campaign promises, and those who are afraid they will.

        The period of danger begins when all the promises are fulfilled. That’s when presidents start ad-libbing policy. Like a box of chocolates, it is.

  • avatar
    Dan

    Paris, wherein Obama agreed to gut US industry in exchange for the five billion people in the developing world agreeing to keep developing exactly as they already were. It’s hard to say whether climate believers or climate deniers should have been more disgusted with the result.

    I’m delighted to see this in the trash where it belongs.

  • avatar
    Jacob

    Wow. A Trump-related politics discussion is surprisingly civilized. This speaks volumes of TTAC readers, in a good way.

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