By on April 27, 2017

Faraday Future FF 91

Faraday Future, which spent 2016 as the automotive poster child for bad news, continues to face a myriad of problems. In this most recent hardship, we learn Faraday couldn’t even manage to choose a company name without stirring a legal backlash.

Faraday Bicycles, which manufactures electric-assisted pedal bikes, has filed a trademark lawsuit against Faraday Future in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California. In the complaint, filed Tuesday, the e-bike company states Faraday Future has been infringing on its name — which it officially trademarked in October 2013. The legal action follows a November claim against FF over the acquisition of its domain name and nearly endless financial woes. 

Faraday Future has only been in existence since 2015. The lawsuit, shared by Jalopnik, includes information on a rejected trademark application from 2016. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office denied the request after reasoning the automaker’s name would easily be confused with the bicycle brand. Faraday Bicycles is currently seeking an injunction and unspecified damages.

Since both companies derive their names from a nineteenth century British physicist whose research paved the way for later electric discoveries, I’m not inclined to give one more credit than the other in coming up with a unique name. It isn’t as if the Faraday family is involved with either company. However, trademark law is pretty clear. You can apply it to practically any phrase or word and successfully prohibit anyone else from using it.

While Faraday Future probably could have made a case for itself by explaining how dissimilar its hypothetical product is from a bicycle, the trademark rejection from 2016 is pretty damning. So, even if FF manages to survive the onslaught of legal problems and financial trouble, it might have to continue on as Edison Motors if an injunction passes.

However, this could be a blessing in disguise. Faraday doesn’t yet produce anything with its name stamped on it, and distancing itself from a name synonymous with bad publicity could hold some advantages.

[Image: Faraday Future]

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6 Comments on “Faraday Future Facing Trademark Lawsuit Over Its Own Name...”


  • avatar
    statikboy

    If no two companies could have a single same word in their names, we would quickly run out of things to call them. This lawsuit is unreasonable.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      To me (not a lawyer), it seems unreasonable that johnny-come-lately Vehicle Company #2 would be allowed to use the primary name of Vehicle Company #1 in its name.

      It’s not like one builds bikes and the other one builds windmills (although they do tilt at them).

  • avatar

    Usually names are registered under certain categories of products and services. Surface vehicles are typically one category. If this is true, it reeks of amateurism. Still, I have often noticed this trait with engineers. Completely absorbed by the technical ins and outs of a certain project, they forget to look after the basic stuff, or at least ask an expert to look into this.

  • avatar
    phila_DLJ

    They could always rename themselves the Redskins Motor Company!

  • avatar
    whitworth

    The US needs some major reforms to copyright laws.

    “faraday” is almost like using the word “electric” in your name.

    The current legal environment is set up to benefit lawyers and shakedowns.

  • avatar

    saddest thing about this is faraday bicycles make the ugliest retro-grouch electric bikes imaginable. who’d ever mistake their sad crap for the chinese vapourware car maker’s?

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