By on January 30, 2017

Homeless Toyota Van Home

Homelessness is an issue in all major cities across the U.S., but it’s particularly acute in large ones fortunate enough to have a pleasant climate year-round. Los Angeles has both of these attributes, and that means there’s quite a large homeless population. A recent article from the LA Times caught my eye.

With over 6,000 homeless people sleeping in their cars every night, the city is enacting a new ordinance to give them somewhere to (legally) park.

The ordinance takes effect next Monday, February 6th. For the first time, it will be legal to park in the street and sleep overnight in a car. The ordinance was pitched as beneficial to the homeless population; legalizing something they’ve already been doing illegally. Certain streets will now be designated by the city as being okay for overnight parking, providing legal spaces for those living in their cars.

But when the map for the ordinance was published, it reflected only 10 percent of city streets being designated for car lodging. The map appears to have built-in inaccuracies as well.

From the Times:

Officials had said homeless people could park in commercial and industrial zones. But some commercial streets labeled available on the map have restrictions on oversized vehicles, tow-away signs or red curbs.

All other existing signage restrictions on parking will still be enforced, though these restrictions are not indicated on the map. The city has a $4,400,000-plus project underway to digitize all parking signage, but that won’t be ready for two years. In the meantime, the suggestion to the homeless seems to be, “Figure it out.”

The city’s balancing act will be a difficult one. Attempting to facilitate thousands of overnight parking spaces for the homeless within crowded city boundaries, and considering the very real safety, property, and sanitation concerns of private homeowners and businesses doesn’t leave much wiggle room. Incidents like the one cited below are inevitable:

Cassandra Weinman, a social media and marketing freelancer who lives near a big Venice encampment, said a homeless man punched her in the face and took her phone when she tried to report him urinating behind her apartment.

For homeless citizens of Los Angeles fortunate enough to have working cars, using them as mobile apartments is a practical and reasonable solution. But in a large city with a considerable homeless population, that solution creates big capacity problems. And those problems are already here, right now.

With slightly less than 10 percent of streets available for homeless parking, it seems more drastic long-term measures will be necessary.

[Image: Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0)]

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104 Comments on “Los Angeles is Attempting to Fix Its Homeless Car Parking Problem...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    ” it reflected only 10 percent of city streets being designated for car lodging”

    Uh, how much *should* be designated for this purpose?

    I know what they’re trying to accomplish, but the unintended consequences will include more complaints by citizens and businesses, and lower property values. Who will want to purchase property in one of the ‘safe zones’?

    • 0 avatar
      Corey Lewis

      Yep, there will be concentrated encampments of homeless vehicles.

      Encampment > property value decreases > trash > crime > slum.

      • 0 avatar
        GeneralMalaise

        You have to feel for these folks. Given the price of real estate in most of the L.A. area, it will be difficult to find suitable locations and difficult not to impinge on the rights of the citizenry to reasonably safe and tidy streets in their neighborhoods.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Does East LA, Leimert Park, Manchester Square, Baldwin Hills/Crenshaw, and Ladera Heights make up 10% of LA?

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        If you’re a home owner in LA or most places, it’s already legal for anyone to park in front of your house. And in a big city, it’s likely a neighbor’s crappy beater or their kid’s. It just can’t be an RV, tractor/trailer, boat, etc.

        Now with the new law, the homeless can only park on “designated” residential streets, and only overnight. I’d put up motion lights all over, so at least they’ll go to a neighbor’s to p!ss, etc.

        In parts of LA county, like at my sister’s house in Claremont (thanks to the city ordinance), no one can park overnight in front of a home, not even if you happen to own/rent it.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          “If you’re a home owner in LA or most places, it’s already legal for anyone to park in front of your house.”

          That’s true! Been that way forever, but it has gotten much worse over the past eight years.

          My #2 son lives on Waco in the Clairemont ‘burb of San Diego, CA, right across from the Clairemont Community Center Park. Every night cars pull up to the park side curb and spend the night there.

      • 0 avatar
        ect

        LA is a big place – 502 square miles, with 6,500 miles of “improved roads” (according to the City). So, 10% of that means that 6,000 homeless people have about 650 miles of roads available for sleeping in cars. That’s about 9.2 per mile, or one car every 570 feet or so.

        I’m not qualified to say whether or not this is sufficient for this type of program, but the data adds a bit of context

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      SCE, there is little thought given to ‘unintended consequences’ at most levels of government. It’s not on their radar until it’s on their radar.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Can you spend your Section 8 housing subsidy voucher at a BHPH lot?

    It certainly was a plus for the fast food biz when they were allowed to accept food stamp EBT cards for payment.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    I am so psyched that TTAC is providing an opportunity for alt right posters to voice their thoughtful solutions to homelessness. I am here to listen.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      You are also here to troll and bait people into an argument.

      Don’t play like someone offends you when you are looking for it.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        Trying to turn a new leaf, Adam.

        WhiskeyRiver’s departure really got to me. I mean, who do we think we are forcing a veteran who gave $90 to a Marine to look at a reader reviews of a Jetta?

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Pro-choicers often suggest the pro-lifers should adopt all the unwanted babies.

      Perhaps all the homeless cars can park in front of your business or home.

      Both are ridiculous solutions, but only one of them has been made into law.

      • 0 avatar
        Jean-Pierre Sarti

        Hmmm, you have made me curious SCE to AUX, I am genuinely asking, why is asking the Pro-Life movement as a whole to adopt all unwanted babies ridiculous ? if all life at whatever stage is precious to you, like the Pro-Life people seem to say, it seems like a no-brainer to me that you should make sure there are no unwanted babies and gives a Pro-Choice person one less reason to terminate an unwanted baby…

        • 0 avatar
          OldManPants

          SCE is stuck. He’s highly intelligent but also religious (o_O).

          Sometimes that becomes awkward.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            I’m not in support of abortions as a form of birth control but that is a valid question.

            2013 stats show 664,435 legal induced abortions.

            The average cost of abortions is roughly $500 each (USA). The USA therefore spends 332,217,500/year.

            If that money was put into birth control campaigns and education, we might not have to abort as many.

            One could just make it illegal but just like that ban on Muslims, reality tends to be more problematic than ideology.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Hey now. I’m religious and I’d like to think that I’m at least somewhat intelligent.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            This is not a debate I’d like to wade into, but I will say this: both sides want fewer abortions. And now, there are some solutions that significantly reduce unwanted pregnancies, leveraging new technologies in data mining and birth control.

            Warren Buffet’s wife funded a pilot in Denver that reduced unwanted pregnancies and abortions by 40%. Maybe if we stopped screaming at each other and worked together, we could take programs like this national?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            VoGo – agreed.
            We spend too much time saying the other side is wrong and don’t spend enough time coming up with an answer that works for everyone.

          • 0 avatar
            OldManPants

            “Maybe if we stopped screaming at each other and worked together..”

            No “we” involved. The cause of unwanted children is always the male doing the squirting.

            Neutering at birth, reversed only after proof of responsible adulthood and financial security.

            And then I want a unicorn.

          • 0 avatar

            Thomas Aquinas, St. Augustine, Gautama Buddha, Isaac Newton, and Maimonides were all highly intelligent and very religious and the world is better off for it.

          • 0 avatar
            OldManPants

            Didja know Isaac Newton lost a bundle investing in the African slave trade?

            intmath.com/blog/mathematics/isaac-newton-loses-his-fortune-688

        • 0 avatar
          SCE to AUX

          @Jean-Pierre Sarti, OMP:

          The answer to your question is this: Because such solutions are illogical. It makes no sense (and is unfair) to place the burdens of one person’s lifestyle onto another.

          Metaphors abound… should society be made to pay for:
          Gambling losses?
          Drug & alcohol rehab?
          GM’s bankruptcy?
          Student loan default?
          Homeless shelters and parking spots?
          and yes – unwanted children? (my apologies for picking this hot-button topic first)

          There are corners of our society which care deeply for each of these issues, yet rarely do we collectively shoulder the burden of their costs. The GM bankruptcy is a good example, and these pages are filled with debate over whether this episode should have been publicly funded.

          Likewise, I’m questioning whether the City of Los Angeles is unfairly burdening selected citizens/businesses with the collateral cost of homeless cars parking on their streets every night.

          I think it is exceptionally unfair, and you can bet the map carefully avoids the nicer parts of town.

          These are great solutions until the government decides you’ll be a part of it.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @SCE to AUX – well said.

          • 0 avatar

            SCE-AuX That was my first thought…whose streets are zoned for residential vehicles ? Does this mean that other areas can now be legally “cleared out” ? I can already see the Town Government meeting with the street association where they’ve been zoned “homeless”.

            As to the hot button issue, I’ve never understood why the pro life side isn’t doing all they can to provide free birth control…you don’t abort a non event. I personally think this is the woman’s choice, and should not be influenced by a bunch of old men in government. The worst part is that if you have some money, you can always access full health services. The poor woman in some backward flyover state, however, suffers for others’ ideology.

          • 0 avatar
            ect

            speedlaw, your comment “I’ve never understood why the pro life side isn’t doing all they can to provide free birth control” is entirely logical.

            The problem is that the pro-life movement is dominated by religious zealots who believe that sex outside of marriage is a sin, and should be punished – the risk/reality of pregnancy being one such punishment. These are the same people who oppose providing the HPV vaccine to early-teen girls (I think it generally gets administered around age 12, but I could be wrong), for the same reason.

            More extreme members of the movement actually believe that birth control should be made illegal, because “only God should decide when to create a child”.

          • 0 avatar
            markf

            ” both sides want fewer abortions.”

            False, just ask Lefty/SJW hero Lena Dunham who said she “wished she had an abortion”

            If they wanted less abortions then why does the pro choice movement flip out every time legislation is proposed for counseling, waiting periods,etc.

            Planned Parent probably has to meet it baby parts sales quotas…..

          • 0 avatar
            Willyam

            markf,
            Here’s another example of where we can all work together! What the Sam Hill is wrong with Lena? That girl can REALLY write, but jeez the idiocy of some of her public statements???

            I think we all really do sort of want the same things (religious fever on the left is just as strong as on the right, which leads to the Lena “I wish I’d had one…” statements…it’s the “my log cabin was just as small as yours” argument).

            I have a couple of gf’s who have had one, and the facts, unpleasant as they are, are relevant. They both stated there were a few women in there very upset/sedated, and a whole bunch who seemed like they meet there monthly for brunch and procedures (example location: Dallas). I believe it a woman’s right to her body, but the majority of procedures IMO (from actually TALKING to real women) seem to be rural and inner-city girls (under-25) who aren’t using bc, for whatever reason.

            I would suggest that progressives may have a couple of good ideas…like free birth control. Of course, someone would have to administer it, but imagine the cost of 600,000+ mostly teen births (using the number above without fact-checks, admittedly) and increasing homeless without insurance or hope. Believe me, take away Planned Parenthood or not and they DO NOT stop getting busy. Hormones, you know.

            It’s a matter of cost: either subsidize implants or thousands more kids on assistance per year. Either way abortions are tragedies, as none of the women I know ever really got over it.

            Freakanomics stated that its a high probability that less unwanted births may have led to a large part of the overall crime reduction in this country (it’s true – in pure numbers there’s actually less crime going on).

            Help me actuaries…what’s reality?

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          Are you anti-death penalty? Perhaps you should volunteer to be the next psycho’s murder victim, if you can’t man-up and have a hole punched in your skull and your brain vacuumed out…

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        No civilized government has any more business peeking into car windows to see who is sleeping, together or alone, there, than they have peeking into bedroom windows to see who may be sleeping together or alone there.

        This drivel is just more progressive pretend-to-help-someone by getting government to pass them off on someone else.

        In an even semi free society, if there is space to park your car, you should be able to park it there, without a gaggle of nimbys and other expendable trash cheering on the goon brigade to harass you.

        If you urinate on someone’s doorstep and then punch them in the face for pointing that out, then it matters not one iota whether you are homeless or not, nor exactly where your car happens to be parked. Just ramp up penalties for urinating and punching, until urinators and punchers change their behavior. But first, for effs sake, build more public restrooms. Such that a reasonable person displaying reasonable concern, has somewhere else to go but on peoples doorsteps.

        • 0 avatar
          markf

          “The problem is that the pro-life movement is dominated by religious zealots who believe that sex outside of marriage is a sin, and should be punished – the risk/reality of pregnancy being one such punishment.”

          That is a typical lefty stereotype. Go to a rally or talk to some folks, that is total nonsense.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Pro-lifer here: No, it’s totally true. Maybe not that extreme, but yes, the pro-life movement (at least in my area) is largely driven by religious conservatism. Please don’t hurl insults; it solves nothing.

      • 0 avatar
        GeneralMalaise

        I’ve read that the number of abortions has decreased dramatically, which is great news. The use of sonograms has been a very useful tool for educating our young people.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          GeneralMalaise – when I was looking for stats I did notice a downward trend which is good.

          • 0 avatar
            GeneralMalaise

            “The problem is that the pro-life movement is dominated by religious zealots who believe that sex outside of marriage is a sin, and should be punished – the risk/reality of pregnancy being one such punishment.”

            That is an incredibly moronic and bigoted comment, ect.

            Agreed, the downward trend is good news, indeed, Lou!

          • 0 avatar
            ect

            A simple Google search will show that I was right.

            As usual, you choose to ignore substance and engage solely in personal insult. Considering the source, I’m not at all bothered.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            What’s “moronic and bigoted” about it? The pro-life movement (at least from what I’ve seen) is largely led by religious conservatives.

    • 0 avatar
      John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

      Youre psyched to troll, that’s it.

      You really should find a more constructive use for your time. Figuring out ways to provoke a troll war is getting SO tiring.

    • 0 avatar
      CaddyDaddy

      Having moved from LA over two decades ago, but visiting frequently, I can tell you that derelict Pace Arrows and Bounders abound all over the City of LA.

      Now a denizen of the Front Range, I’m delighted to see this proposal presented in front of L.A. City council. The “build it and they will come” mantra is a truism in the homeless lifestyle. This will assist the marijuana transplants from The east coast to keep moving west from Colorado to So. CA.

      My sister who lives in a progressive subsection of the City of L.A. and her lefty leaning neighbors will soon get a dose of reality when a black water leaking Travco pulls up curbside to their $1m shoebox and they get a new neighbor.

      I wonder what VOGO would do if this happened to him? I know, he would blame the alt-right.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    That van! It’s so spacey!

    If it didn’t reek of BO I’d want it. It’s glorious.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    While this program isn’t a complete solution for homelessness, it’s a good start (okay, once they find more than 10% of the streets.) Before this change, the “no sleeping in your car”, law (like vargrancy laws) essentially makes homelessness itself a crime, which doesn’t solve anything besides force homeless people out of town. (Just shoving the problem elsewhere isn’t a solution at all, and judges tend to frown on it.)

    Yes, it’s not a complete solution. Yes, it doesn’t answer fundamental questions like “where are they supposed to go to the bathroom?” How are they supposed to keep cool on hot days? Showers? How do you keep loitering at nearby locations under control?

    But all those problems are something an individual homeless person can make an attempt at solving (for themselves anyway), once you’ve removed the illegality of the homelessness itself.

    Homelessness is one of those problems with no easy answers. I don’t believe that anybody has a god-given right to live within the city limits of their choice. That said, living in your car ain’t exactly easy-street; few people do it unless they truly have no other choice.

    • 0 avatar
      OldManPants

      “Just shoving the problem elsewhere isn’t a solution at all..”

      The hell it ain’t. If it’s shoved far enough. Southward.

    • 0 avatar
      Nick_515

      solution ahahahah… this is one of those laws billed as beneficial while in fact it sounds like yet another measure to control – read move away from gentrified areas – the homeless created by the overall destruction of the welfare state.

      well, it’s better than the time city council discussed putting the homeless in a ship on the sea. the Jewish analogy with Zanzibar was not even lost on anyone, because they likely didn’t know about it.

      VoGo, don’t hold your breath, not exactly a crowd that read Mike Davis’ Fortress LA.

      • 0 avatar
        OldManPants

        “solution ahahahah”

        When you’re in your sixties and have lived a life of childfree probity, solutions don’t need to be all that sustainable :-)

        • 0 avatar
          ellomdian

          True. Of course, the other side of that argument is that you’ve already lived good and long enough already, and as you have no family that need you to hang around, you could do us all a favor and shuffle off quickly and quietly.

          Don’t bring pointless pragmatism into the fight unless you are willing to accept both sides :)

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        All, as in every.single.one of the so called “solutions” proposed by progressives for the past 150 years, are solely about control, and about creating as rigorous a divide as possible between those in power (themselves and their social circle), and those they so desperately want to pull the ladder up in front of.

        You solve homelessness very easy by getting rid of all zoning and land use laws, and dump activity taxes (income, sales) for land taxes. Then, sit back and watch as housing quality and quantity expands on a trajectory similar to every other product the progressives haven’t gotten around to meddle with yet. Like cars. And cellphones.

        In the meantime, if there is room for your car, park it. Then do whatever you want in it, as long as you don’t pose a direct threat of physical harm to anyone around you.

        But here I go being all rational again, despite knowing full and well that 150 years of pervasive, publicly funded progressive indoctrination, have rendered the very idea of rationality itself, nothing more than a distant memory of men long dead.

  • avatar
    nels0300

    Southern California living is now within my reach, just need to trade the Camry in on a Golf Sportwagen.

  • avatar
    ant

    “In its majestic equality, the law forbids rich and poor alike to sleep under bridges, beg in the streets and steal loaves of bread.”

    I’d just like to throw out that quote.

    Like VoGo, I’m also here to listen.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    The homeless will quickly find out where to park. I don’t see this an issue.

    As for the homeless problem in the US, find a more successful model in another country to best suit your needs.

    I suppose the easiest way to start is to mandate a minimum liveable wage. This would remove much of the food stamps given to people and families.

    Be serious in tackling drug abuse. The illegal and legal (oxycodone, etc) is a multi billion dollar industry. Like all multi billion dallar industries billionaires are in control.

    • 0 avatar
      markf

      They are not homeless because of a lack of a “living wage” They are junkies, alcoholics and the mentally ill who need to be in a facility, not on the streets. You are assuming people paid a”livable wage” would use it to actually do things like pay rent and be responsible. You could give most of these folks a million dollars and they would be back on the streets in a matter of months

      • 0 avatar
        John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

        “You could give most of these folks a million dollars and they would be back on the streets in a matter of months”

        Or dead with a needle hanging from their arm.

        Having been homeless myself in the recent past, I must agree that while not all homeless people fit your description, the majority do.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    You can thank de-institutionalization.

    Taking the mentally ill off the streets is a government function I actually support.
    .
    .

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Good point. But is there an alternative that doesn’t bankrupt TTAC?

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      The institutional grade mentally ill, tend not to drive cars.

      But so what, I guess. Any excuse to have send a bunch of armed, tax feeding goons out to “take” someone against their will, is reason for cheering in some, probably most, quarters in this day and age…

      • 0 avatar
        Willyam

        I can agree with this generality, as I did a few years of bike shop work in the early nineties. Many of the customers at our college-campus location were older adults prohibited from driving by arrests for alcohol, or surviving on subsistence as ex-residents of facilities and a car was unnecessary or out of reach.

        Mostly they were nice, if a little odd, and could only afford minimal repairs to their Wal-Mart bicycles.

        Two of them got in a fight over cigarettes in a rental room, and a head was left in a dumpster behind the Kinko’s on campus. This actually happened.

  • avatar
    Whittaker

    Los Angeles City, County and School District employ over 150,000, most of them working the day shift.
    I would think their parking places would accommodate 6,000 cars overnight.

  • avatar
    mikey

    Well Big Al….I would be from another country. I suspect we will go well below freezing tonight. The cops, and the social workers will try and round up the homeless, and place them in shelters . A lot of them won’t go. The shelters are bed bug infested, and there is a real fear that some of their fellow guests will rip off what few possessions they have.

    For the most part they will spend the night sleeping on a hot air vent. The less fortunate may find an unlocked vehicle.

    As an earlier poster mentioned. “there is no simple solutions”

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @mikey – in my town the Drug and Alcohol Rehab Centre tends to fill up when it gets cold out. Another way some of the street people deal with the homelessness problem is to deliberately smash a window and wait for the police. They spend the winter in the crowbar hotel, get 3 square meals a day, medical and dental and come summer are good to go.

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        Lou_BC….Necessity is the mother of invention : )

      • 0 avatar

        You don’t get much medical or dental in jail…at least in the US. You are more likely to end up in a hospital for an abcess and sepsis than get a filling done. You are also very unlikely to see your follow up meds, especially if any are painkillers. The “street” knows well that you get your teeth fixed before you start your “bid”.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    This new Garcetti administration is looking better all the time, being pro active on problems like nasty bums needing places to sleep .
    .
    I see where San fransisco now has curbside urinals (?!) ~ I’d hate that in my ‘hood but folks gotta ‘go’ .
    .
    There are plenty of Industrial areas that have wide streets with lots of well lit safe parking, I was thinking of photographing the many dozens of old Dodge Moto Homes there now that folks live in and only move on street sweeping days .
    .
    -Nate

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    You’re always going to have SOME homelessness. Mental illness and drug addiction almost guarantee it. That being said, I’m all for bringing back the county poor farm, where the able bodied can work and produce something to offset the cost of their upkeep.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    This seems like a post designed to create a political flame war.

    With that in mind…

    Homelessness is a full-fledged crisis in all the big West Coast cities right now. The heroin/opioid epidemic is creating more people who aren’t capable of observing norms of traditional living arrangements. At the same time, the conbination of a boom economy and heavy NIMBY restrictions on housing development is sending housing prices into the stratosphere and replacing many of the alternative living arrangements that used to exist with more expensive conventional housing. So a lot of people, both addicted and not, who used to be able to find rooms in flophouses or borrow basement rooms are now in their cars or on the street. Drive around here and you’ll see RVs parked all over the place and impromptu encampments in pretty much every patch of freeway-interchange grass.

    The real solution is for the NIMBYs to realize the city is growing and allow more housing to be built, so the bottom end of the housing market comes back. Until that happens, changes in the rules like this are just shifting people around and not really addressing the problem one way or another.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “The heroin/opioid epidemic is creating more people who aren’t capable of observing norms of traditional living arrangements.”

      Ban Narcan and the problem becomes self limiting.

  • avatar
    BuzzBNY

    How far is California City from LA? They could form their own community there like the C.W.McCall song Crispy Critters.

  • avatar

    When I was in LA a year ago, and this is no joke, I don’t know if I saw more Teslas or more homeless folks pushing grocery carts. One road near my cousin’s place in the Valley was lined with vintage Winnebagos and the like.

    I see fewer obviously homeless people in and around Detroit, maybe because cold will kill you, but there are some beggars stationed at some freeway entrances.

    I’ve wondered, since they’re already sitting there, if it would be exploitative to start an advertising company that pays homeless beggars to hold signs and wear sandwich boards. Begging at the side of the road can’t be more dignified than dressing up in a foam Statue of Liberty costume around April 15th.

    Speaking of homeless folks, a singer I know, Tosha Owens, a woman with a soul as beautiful as her voice, is collecting blankets for Detroit’s homeless:

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      “When I was in LA a year ago, and this is no joke, I don’t know if I saw more Teslas or more homeless folks pushing grocery carts”

      Two of my sons were in Pasadena last year for the Rose Bowl parade, and they noticed the same thing. Gold-plated Bentleys at one end of the block, and beggars at the other end. The juxtaposition really struck them.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    I hope Cassandra Weinman learned to get far away from people physically capable of doing whatever they want to her before threatening them.

    I blame private schools. Surely someone who went through the public system would understand that some people have opted out of the system.

    http://thelastpsychiatrist.com/2012/10/whos_afraid_of_lil_wayne.html

  • avatar
    markf

    Well it only took a week and half after a Republican took office to bring back the issue of the “Homeless” 8 years of obama, nary a peep, 8 days or Trump, HOMELESS…….

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Please provide factual data as to how the sitting President has had any effect on this legislation.

      • 0 avatar
        markf

        Sure, as soon as you provide “factual data”for this:

        “The problem is that the pro-life movement is dominated by religious zealots who believe that sex outside of marriage is a sin, and should be punished – the risk/reality of pregnancy being one such punishment.””

        • 0 avatar
          John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

          A-men, Mark.

          Wait. Does that make me a religious zealot?

          Well, I’m still gay, so probably not.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          1. Burden of proof is on you.

          2. Don’t move the goalposts. Ect’s the one to ask.

          3. As I said, “in my area,” and not necessarily to that extreme. It might be true in other areas that the pro-life movement isn’t dominated by religious conservatism.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    This is a huge problem in Seattle. They live in derelict campers and move them around from block to block.

  • avatar
    pwrwrench

    In Los Angeles many residential streets are “permit parking only”, sometimes with 2 hour parking allowed Mon-Fri 8-5. Permits are about $20 a year and require proof of residence by vehicle registration. Vehicles without permits are ticketed and towed.
    That may further reduce the places that people can park and sleep.
    The main problem is that the ‘economy’ for working people in the USA has been going down for 40 years.
    Try coming up with $4-5 thousand for deposit and rent on an apartment when you are getting $11.25 an hour and working 32 hours a week.
    Many people that live in a car, or motorhome, have a job. It does not pay enough to get an apartment.
    See the TTAC article about the Uber drivers that sleep in their cars.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    What are California’s requirements for safety inspections and insurance on vehicles, and what are the chances the homeless vehicles are in compliance?

    I’m asking because I can envision a situation where you can no longer afford your LA mortgage, but you can keep your car functional. What a terrible plight.

    • 0 avatar
      yankinwaoz

      We haven’t had safety inspections in Cal for decades. That was dropped when we brought in annual smog checks. And when you get smogged, they don’t check your lights, tires, and such.

      You are required to have auto insurance. And you need it when you renew your registration. However there are heaps of company that sell one day policies (called SR22’s) that allow scumbags to avoid register their car and not have insurance.

      In practice, I suspect that about half of the cars driving in San Diego do not have insurance. Hell, I suspect that a quarter don’t even have a valid drivers license (usually suspended or never had one).

      We let illegal aliens get drivers licenses from our DMV. They make them jump through some hoops, but they allow it. I have no idea what percentage of them actually have taken the DMV up on the offer.

      A good friend was hit on his motorcycle in LA by an woman driving with no insurance. So he got no help, and nothing happened to her. He tried to sue her, and it went nowhere because had nothing in her name. We suspect that she was illegal and didn’t care.

    • 0 avatar
      yankinwaoz

      Keep on mind that in Cal, our stupid idiots up in Sac passed a money grab law that requires that most of the money from traffic fines goes to the State. Not to the local county or city.

      The effect is that local police and sheriff’s departments have zero incentive to enforce traffic and vehicle laws. The state’s police, the CHP, have jurisdiction on the state highways, not county and city roads.

      Homeless don’t tend to camp on highways. So the chances of them encountering a CHP officer who cares to inspect them are pretty damn low. Most often they encounter local po-po who don’t care unless they are doing something criminal.

      Personally, I feel that this is why we have such terrible drivers down here. The blatant running of red lights, passing on shoulders and sidewalks, running stop signs, failing to yield, etc. etc. are because none of the laws are enforced off the highways.

      Drive one day in San Diego and you will witness enough blatant infringements that it would cover the city budget for a year if they bothered to enforce the traffic laws.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    O.K. here’s how L.A.P.D.’s NE Division handles it :

    The homeless gather in the North Hollywood area in the Spring when the Desert gets too hot, mostly they move whenever told to by routine patrol after complaints or on street sweeping days if the area had regular parking enforcement (it’s a different Dept.) .
    .
    Come Winter the L.A.P.D. makes sweeps chasing them all out over the hill to Lancaster, Palmdale etc. where it’s not really all that warmer but that’s how it goes .
    .
    -Nate

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