By on September 21, 2016

2017 Toyota 86

Toyota has long been accused of being a purveyor of somnambulant transportation, but amid rumors of a renewed Supra and Lexus finding its Nipponese NASCAR in the RC F GT concept, it appears Japan’s biggest automaker has finally input directions to the racetrack into its corporate navigation system.

Which, of course, neatly brings us to the Scion FR-S Toyota 86.

“Give us an affordable, rear-wheel drive coupe!” the internet masses shouted, before quickly retreating to their stale basements and online forums. Toyota listened, shacking up with Subaru, and working mightily to create it.

A sub-$30,000 rear-drive coupe with a stupid North American name was the first-born of that shotgun marriage, as we all know. They did it! Affordable rear-drive fun! And how did the enthusiast community repay their generosity? Sales last year were roughly half of their 2013 peak amid cries for moar powerrrrr. Ungrateful whelps.

Those who did sign the note on an FR-S (and managed to find a knowledgeable dealer) were rewarded with the rare combination of driving fun and low payments. Even Clarkson liked the thing. For 2017, Toyota ditched their Scion experiment, applied some LED mascara, slapped some 86 badges on the sides, and rummaged through the engine compartment to find an extra five horsepower … so long as buyers choose the manual transmission.

And you should. For a starting MSRP of $26,255, buyers will find a 2.0-liter boxer four-cylinder engine with 205 hp rolling on natty 17” rolling stock. Six airbags satisfy the Naderites while a seven-inch touchscreen provides decent (if not deafening) tuneage. Sadly, Party Mode is not available on this particular Toyota.

Buyers selecting the white ‘Halo’ paint will be dinged for an extra $395 but all other colors, including extrovert-friendly ‘Hot Lava’ and ‘Ablaze,’ are $0 choices. Curiously, slathering your 86 with the blue/purple ‘Oceanic’ hue alerts potential buyers that choosing this color removes the all-season tires. Assuming Toyota stores are not in the practice of delivering cars to customers on bare rims, it’s a safe assumption that — for whatever reason — different and potentially stickier rubber is included with this particular hue. If so, that’s a $0 no-brainer. Ask your dealer.

So, the 2017 Toyota 86, then. Modest increase in power, measured increase in price, cautious changes in styling. Hmm. Modest, measured, and cautious. Those are words used to describe Toyota during the years it forgot about driving fun.

At least they fixed the name.

Not every car at the Mr. Noodles end of the price spectrum has aced it. The ones which have? They help make our automotive landscape a lot better. Naturally, feel free to eviscerate our selections and let us know if there are other models you’d like included in this series.

The model above is shown with American options and is priced in Freedom Dollars. As always, your dealer will probably sell for less.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

99 Comments on “Ace of Base: 2017 Toyota 86...”


  • avatar
    kosmo

    I’ll just bang my usual drum of “5-door HB version, and it would be in my garage”.

    Other than that — and I’ve actually driven it extensively — it’s a perfect fun machine for public roads!

  • avatar

    This is what happens when you actually engineer and build a car for Jalopnik’s internet dollars…

    …it gets outsold by the tC.

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      Discontinue the tC. Problem solved. ;)

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      The tC wasn’t bad, actually…and it was quite a bit cheaper, and had that full length sunroof, and a big back seat. Didn’t surprise me that more buyers would pick one.

      • 0 avatar
        kvndoom

        I test drove a tC, 2014 or 2015 can’t remember. I absolutely loved it. For the lower price, better fuel economy, TORQUE, hatch, and proven engine, I would have bought it over the 86 as well.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Never underestimate the power of torque…

          I’ve seen NM Toyota dealers advertise tCs that have been treated to quite a bit of the TRD catalog (cat back exhaust, lowering springs, thicker swaybars, and wheels) that stickered for less than an FR-S.

          I know which one I would pick.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      That sounds bleak, but the FR-S alone outsold the Miata by at least 2:1 every year except 2015 when the margin was smaller. Add the BRZ and you’re looking at 3:1. I don’t know their corporate calculus but outselling your primary competitor by those marginsseems like a success to me.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      They didn’t though. They managed to leave out a good amount of the fun.

      The car is just not enough fun. Great chassis, great steering, looks great, good enough inside but that engine is a soulless lump that really just wants to be under the hood of some beige sedan. They either should have made it peakier and want to rev, rev, rev, or they should have made it smaller and a turbo so that it would have some decent torque. It is the worst of both worlds, relatively torqueless yet unwilling to rev. Ugh.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        A balanced summary. Does anyone know why Toyota didn’t just re-use the engine in the Elise for the 86?

        • 0 avatar
          bumpy ii

          The 86 is a cut-down Impreza chassis, so it was easier and quicker to leave the Subaru engine in there. An inline-4 would have to lean over a lot to clear the front of the hood, which complicates designing the car to accomodate both RHD and LHD.

          • 0 avatar
            Willyam

            Great post, I’m glad I came back to this thread. I’ve always wondered the same thing…for a company that essentially specializes in small fours, why buy this motor?

            …the more you know.

  • avatar
    legacygt

    The low sales numbers are not the result of lack of power or any other flaw with the car. It’s all about the market. For years, the small, inexpensive, RWD, great-handling sports car segment had exactly one player. The Miata. That was pretty much it. Then, instantly, with the FR-S and BRZ, the number of players tripled and the market probably didn’t get much larger. Scion (while dying) and Subaru (while growing) were both relatively small brands and not in a position to help grow a market. Now, when those cars were released, I believed there should have been a Toyota version. Why? Because they sell a ridiculous number of cars through a huge number of dealers. Their brand and network are in a position to educate the public about a new model that would help grow the segment. Now they might be on the right track…although I would have called it a Celica.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      The problem this car faces is the same as any other non-premium rear-drive sports car: it’s more money for less space, which you can’t get away with unless you’re a premium badge, or at least charging premium prices. Even the Miata struggles, and the Detroit offerings don’t sell hugely well, are more expensive and tread on nostalgia.

      Everyone likes the idea of cars like this, but they’re too downmarket to compete with leased BMWs, and too impractical to compete with the front-drive compacts. This pretty much eliminates deep-pocket Boomers and well-off urbanites.

      Once you walk past leased BMWs and lightly-used Civics, you have to contend with the brutal insurance rates, which disqualify just about anyone under 30. That leaves “middle-aged people who, for some reason, turn down a bunch of other more rational choices and who probably already have a second car” and “die-hard JDM-yo guys with money”. That isn’t a huge audience.

      Great car, but the market for it dried up twenty-plus years ago.

      • 0 avatar
        Nedmundo

        I think the “too impractical to compete with the front-drive compacts” is a real problem for the 86/BRZ. Back in 2013, I tested an FR-S and Focus ST just for grins, and while the FR-S was definitely more fun to drive, the Ford was still a blast, and far superior as a daily driver. I’d love to have an 86/BRZ or Miata, but can’t consider one until the kids are out of the house.

      • 0 avatar
        Quentin

        “That leaves “middle-aged people who, for some reason, turn down a bunch of other more rational choices and who probably already have a second car” ”

        Spot on, psar. I have an SUV that I drive on days where I need more space or more traction.

        • 0 avatar
          duffman13

          I have an S2000 as a second car. I would have bought a FR-86Z, but the top doesn’t go down on it, which was a bigger priority for my wife. Plus, more power and VTEC yo.

          • 0 avatar
            Quentin

            The soft top is why I didn’t get a Miata or S2000. They are miserable with the top up (which is 10 months of the year in WV) and the 2 seater configuration is less kid friendly.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            Hard top was the first part I bought for my S2000. It was also the only mod I got 100% of my money back for when I sold it.

      • 0 avatar
        Steve Biro

        Anyone who considers this car and worries about more money for less space… or the fact that it has “only” 205 hp clearly doesn’it understand the product. The 86 and its Subaru sibling are just fine the way they are… and outsell the Miata, BTW.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          Then evidently very few “get it” as low as it sells. But, no, nobody at all cares about high HP RWD coupes, no need to make a version for them.

          The Miata is a two seat roadster. The 86 isn’t. Do you also brag that the Transit Connect outsells the Focus ST and therefore is the better car?

          I do get it. I like the idea of a naturally aspirated 4 cylinder RWD coupe. But, I can see the market for a factory go-fast version. It doesn’t need to attack the Mustang GT or the 370Z to offer customers the choice of a higher powered version.

          I loved Kia’s GT4 Stinger, only I want a non-turbo I-4, of course with the rather simple, basic interior in keeping with that part of the concept, and the stunning exterior. I also loved the Nissan IDx concept, but both are off the table unfortunately.

      • 0 avatar
        kc1980

        I think you hit the nail on the head. I would love to Have a BRZ even minus the power, if i could have it as a second car. Toyota and Subaru think they can charge a near premium price for a car that’s impractical, has an average interior at best, and is purely for fun.

        There’s not a large amount of Americans who can pay near 30 grand for a second “fun car”. I look at what the new civic hatch is offering for 20 grand starting, and ask myself how anyone could choose a BRZ for like 7 grand more, with no space, and barely enough power. The BRZ and FRS should start at 20 grand nicely equiped.

        I might not be able to power oversteer my gti, but its still tons of fun on the street, and fits people and cargo in it while still being a sporty small car. The BRZ does none of that. I could see me buying a first gen BRZ in like 5 years for around 8 grand as a weekend toy/project car. Its insane to buy one new.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      That, and if you want to spend around $27,000 on a 2+2, you have the base V-6 Mustang, which would walk a FR in a straight line.

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        Yeah, there’s no real way to make this car make sense without taking a huge bath on it. Toyota would have to sell it for mid-range Civic money, and even then it would be a tough sell against said mid-range Civic.

      • 0 avatar
        Quentin

        Now that they’ve dropped the track pack on the V6, you have terrible gearing that is tall enough to get to a theoretical 210mph. It also weighs 600~700lbs more than the twins. In a straight line, I’m sure the extra 1.7L makes the Mustang faster, but that is about the only place that it is more sporting.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Horsepower sells.

        • 0 avatar
          raph

          I sure hope Ford changes their minds about the sixxer one of these days. Once the V8 cars have passed squarely into the realm of unaffordability I’d take a well optioned V6 over the EgoBoost any day of the week.

          Ford has some seriously deranged product planners from the gun in your side take an EcoBoost or GT if you want anything other than a rental car trim Mustang to the weird optioning of the 2016 GT350 where you had to pick between a cruiser or a track car (prior to MY2017 you had the base GT350 with no coolers and Recaros to the Track Pack which included the trans and diff coolers as well as MR dampers but excluded the big touch screen and premium radio to the Tech pack which excluded the coolers but replaced the Recaros with the 6 way power seats and included the MR dampers). They rectified the situation in 2017 with the GT350 but still force buyers into the EcoBoost or GT if they want a Mustang with sporting pretentions.

          Too bad I say since it would be nice to have a sixxer with a decent suspension, brakes and rubber.

          • 0 avatar
            psarhjinian

            I’d certainly opt for the turbo-four Mustang if it was appreciably lighter than the V6, sounded better and/or was a more lively drive.

            The problem is, it isn’t. Not at all.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        @Freedmike

        Which is completely missing the point of this car.

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      “Celica” = good.

      “86” = ????? (bad)

  • avatar
    Roberto Esponja

    “Toyota 86” I’ve seen some dumb model names in my lifetime, but this…

  • avatar
    ajla

    I’d rather they make a Toyota version of the GS-F for $50K.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    I stopped reading after “somnambulant”

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    The Party Mode button cracks me up. I picture this suburban dad in his 4Runner at some humid Saturday morning soccer game.

    Arriving early and jumping out in his Dockers khakis, he depresses the Party Mode button and blasts some Get This Party Started by Pink across the field- because that’s what the kids these days like! A cooler full of Capri Sun is also presented.

    His wife brought the kids in the Sienna, she had to go pick up a couple more.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      My first 4Runner had party mode. It was useful for car camping and at the drive-in. I was actually a little disappointed that my 2016 4Runner didn’t have party mode. I’d always thought it would be hilarious to rig up a disco ball to drop from the ceiling when you hit the button.

  • avatar
    DevilsRotary86

    This is the car I really wanted to buy. My wife absolutely hated it. Wound up buying a Mustang EB instead. It’s not exactly what I wanted, but I think that I will live :)

  • avatar
    heliotropic

    Seems weird that this has less standard features than the BRZ, but now a higher MSRP. At least the FR-S was a little bit cheaper.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      It’s been trending that way for years. The Subaru version is a little bit unique in that it has two trim levels, but even the more limited Premium version (as opposed to the more premium Limited version) is better equipped than the Scion.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    So will dealers be willing to deal now that this isn’t a Scion?

  • avatar
    JD321

    It looks like it was designed by a 12 year old boy.
    12 year old boys don’t have $30K.

  • avatar
    LS1Fan

    What Toyota should do; cut the power by 30 HP and call it the Corolla ST.

    Pitching this ride to the enthusiast crowd is a nonstarter -had they released it in 2002 and featured it in “2Fast 2Furious” they’d have had a smash hit. But that demographic has aged out of “Race Wars” and into mortgages and minivans.

    The niche for this thing ; teenage drivers looking for their first car.

    Newbie Drivers get a compact car that’s not a total snooze to drive, and Ma and Pa can buy a car for the kid(s) that they’re reasonably sure can’t be wrapped around a tree. Back in the day a V6 pony car could fill the bill, but modern examples push 300 HP in the base trims.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      You can wrap anything around a tree. I had a friend in high school who drove his Geo Metro like a go-kart (with predictably disastrous results; he was lucky to have been uninjured when he crashed).

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        I resemble this remark – I almost wrapped a 96 Altima around a tree as a 16 year old – it managed to stop when I hit the curb backwards. More power, neutral handling, and RWD is not something I would want my hypothetical teenager to have.

        At least the Altima was a stick though.

    • 0 avatar
      whynot

      If Ma and Pa are buying the car 9 out of 10 times kid is not getting a 2+2 sports car, no matter how safe and slow it actually is.

      Ma and Pa are usually not concerned about how boring the kid thinks the car is to drive.

      If kid is buying the car 9 out of 10 times kid will not be able to afford the price Toyota must sell this at in order to make money.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Yeah, I wouldn’t buy my child a sports coupe, either. My point is just that kids can behave recklessly in any car. These are hormone-soaked individuals who, up until recently, were probably relegated to foot-powered modes of transportation. To them, anything with a motor is ripe for hoonage.

        So—although you don’t need to exacerbate the risk by getting Junior a sports car when he turns 16—your focus as a parent should be in making sure you trust your child enough to drive reasonably in *whatever* car he / she owns…not in artificially neutering the experience by buying him / her a slug. Otherwise, your child doesn’t need to be driving.

        This reminds me of a story in which a high-school acquaintance of mine was given a brand-new Lexus IS350 to drive to school on a learner’s permit, *before* he officially held his license. I think his father had money in oil and had already been wealthy when he came over from Japan. According to my acquaintance, he was able to drive the car without a license because he convinced his parents that you could drive to / from school and work unaccompanied if you held a learner’s permit (this is and was untrue in Oklahoma). Well, he destroys the car in short order…and what do his parents do? They buy him a new M3. I was floored.

        • 0 avatar
          raph

          Hah reminds me of that story about the mother who bought her kid an early S-197 GT500 who promptly wrecked it only to have his mother buy him another.

          Even better when that story broke I used to hang out at CamaroZ28.com and one of the guys there related a story about a high school buddy who promptly wrecked his M3 only to have his dad replace it with a Viper.

          I’m convinced to this day in the latter story that the M3 wrecking kid’s father must have hated the boy so much he bought the Viper so the kid could kill himself and the father would make a good show of scolding himself until behind close door cackling about how he hated his son and duped insurance companies in the process for a death benefit.

        • 0 avatar
          ttacgreg

          The last thing I would ever facilitate a young adult (especially male one) getting into is anything resembling high performance. Perhaps a used Prius would be about right.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          I went to school with a kid who managed to write-off *4* brand new Saab 900s in three years. Parents just kept buying them for him. Plus the lawyers so he kept his license.

          “The rich are not like you and me.”

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            You know Josiah? He kept having problems with blown head gaskets and dropped valves, so the dealer told him not to lug the engines. His interpretation was to keep his foot in it right up until it was time to stand on the brakes. Even with totaling the cars every quarter, he still had at least one long enough for the headliner to fall. Man, Saab 900 Turbos were dreadful.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Evidently not. That’s just lacking in common sense.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            What evidence is that? The company failing and having to be bailed out by GM? Every car after the 900 being a Fiat or an Opel? Having an engine based on the same one in the TR7?

        • 0 avatar
          Willyam

          Oklahoma is a silly place (queue Monty Python).

          I grew up there, and many of my friends were given 125cc Dirt Bikes to ride to school at age 14 or 15 (memory fail). It was a way to get off the busses before age 16 and not bug Pa for a ride. No protection, barely able to keep up on the main arteries, and off-road tires putting much less rubber in contact with the pavement. One kid slid his under a slow moving school bus (fortunately he bailed before it was crushed thanks to teen reaction times).

          It did not occur to me that this was not normal till I moved away at 18.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “What Toyota should do; cut the power by 30 HP and call it the Corolla ST.”

      It would probably be more effective to just make a turbo Corolla All-Trac for ~$26K instead of trying to sell a unique, crampy 170hp RWD sport coupe under the Corolla umbrella.

  • avatar
    Click REPLY to reload page

    Q: What did Toyota do with the Scion brand name?

    A: They 86ed it!

  • avatar
    StarAZ

    Now I really can’t decide between the 86 and the Nissan 370Z.
    They are at the same price. The 370Z has 2 more cylinders, over 100 more horsepower and (IMO) better exterior styling, but the 86 is a newer car (interior) and has enough power for street driving.
    They also both have hydraulic steering…

    • 0 avatar

      Actually, the FRS/86 has electric power steering, but you can’t tell. I recently purchased a used FRS…

      I drove my friend’s Z before buying the FR-S. The Z definitely has more power, but on the street, whats’s the point? Any windy road in the FR-S is a BLAST, and then you look down realize you’re not even going that fast.

      I will say the FR-S is a much better buy used than new. My car’s MRSP was $27,000 (Series 10) new and I got mine for $16,000 (with 60K on odo). It’s a great $16,000 car, I don’t think it’s a $25K+ car…

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        I’ve driven one BRZ with 50K miles. It was aging far closer to a Subaru than a Toyota, with floppy doors and a rattle. Was that an anomaly? How tight is your 60K FRS? I’m curious, since it is one of the few new cars that I would take for free.

        • 0 avatar

          The doors are a little floppy, but it doesn’t seem any worse than the lower mileage examples I drove.

          As far as rattles there are a couple of “known” rattles that exist in the rear parcel shelf, front speaker and shifter. They are all fairly easy and cheap to fix.

          The most annoying issue is the “cricket” sound from the high pressure fuel pump at idle and low RPM. There’s a TSB but even people with the updated part still get the noise. When I fill up with Ethanol-Free the noise goes away…

          I realize on paper these things all sound pretty bad, but I don’t think there’s another RWD car I’d own for the same $.

  • avatar
    Brock_Landers

    Lack of torque…biggest concern the critics have. 2.0 turbo would be too expensive. BUT. Subaru’s 2.5 boxer four shares the same block with 2.0.
    2.5 displacement with 86 heads would give enough toruque, hp and smooth power delivery. Strange that Toyota hasn’t facelifted the 86 with 2.5 displacement.

    PS! DC2 Integra Type R has the same power/torque to weight ratio that 86. And it is FWD. All autojournos still think DC2 R was God’s greatest gift to mankind. Even in 2016 no one says its slow.

  • avatar
    Trucky McTruckface

    The base price is up to $26,255 now? Yikes. That’s $1300 more than an MX-5, which has the added appeal of a convertible top. It’s also $1500 more than a V6 Mustang, which greatly offsets its larger size with much better performance. Even the laughably overpriced Camaro is still a few hundred less.

    I wanted to like the FRS/BRZ/86, and I still love the concept, but the execution is sorely lacking. Even with the lowered expectations of a “fun” car it still fails relative to any other entry you could think of.

    Do you know what else fails? The premise of this column. It has yet to cover a car that’s “ace” of anything.

    • 0 avatar
      Ltd1983

      This is my biggest problem with the car, the price.

      Power and features wise, it competes with $16-18k compact sedans and coupes, but because it’s RWD people are supposed to pay an extra $10k?

      Drop the price to closer to 20k and they might move a few more to some 20-somethings, but as it sits, it’s way too compromised of a package.

      • 0 avatar
        kc1980

        100% correct!

      • 0 avatar
        tjh8402

        Couldn’t disagree more. The car’s performance and power falls smack in the middle of what’s common at this price point and is way beyond what you’ll find in the $16-18k range. There are no cars in that range with 200 hp and 0-60 at 6.5-7.0 seconds. The BRZ’s C/D Lightning Lap time is ahead of or competitive with similarly priced cars like the Miata, Fiesta ST, 500 Abarth, Focus ST, and GTi, as well as more expensive cars like the Mini JCW. You can’t get a performance package equipped V-6 Mustang, meaning you have to get an ecoboost. Add that and you’re up to $29k. Although that the Mustang is the outright performance bargain should surprise no one. It’s feel is totally different than the 86. The Toyota offers near (although still not equivalent to) Miata equalling levels of driver engagement with far more practicality thanks to the rear seat (which can baby in a pinch never mind its usefulness for cargo) and slightly larger trunk.

        I do think Toyobaru has hurt themselves but not offering a 4 door or the above mentioned hatchback model. That would’ve given them a clearer niche for the car. The segment of the market who wants a Miata, but needs more space, only not as much as a Mustang, Fiesta ST, or GTi is pretty small.

        • 0 avatar
          Ltd1983

          Civic SI starts at about $4k less than the BRZ/86, with more HP, seating, features, etc.

          The Abarth 500 is about $5k less, and is more practical, and a more raw driving experience.

          Bring the BRZ/86’s price down $5k, or bring the interior and power up a few levels. The abysmal sales numbers agree with me…

          • 0 avatar
            tjh8402

            I’ll give you the Abarth. I didn’t realize Fiat cut the price that dramatically. It’s still not a match for the 86. I’ve also driven both. I have an Abarth and a friend has an 86. The 86 feels quicker and drives far better. The Civic Si is no more and has been out of production 2 years. When it was made, the MSRP was right around $23k. The next generation Si was speculated by C/D to come in around $25k. The BRZ has been a lot quicker when you go beyond 0-60 and 1/4 (where it is equivalent to those two). It’s C/D Lightning Lap time was about 8.5 seconds quicker than the Abarth and was 3.5 seconds quicker than a Civic Si. The lap time gap from the Civic Si to the BRZ is more than the gap from the BRZ to the ecoboost Mustang.

            Nobody complained that the Miata was overpriced when it was turning in less performance with less power for a similar price. As I said earlier, I think the 86 sales suck because they are competing for too small of a niche. It’s always been considered second to the Miata in driving pleasure, so people who want to maximize that will always go for the Mazda. The 86’s advantages over the Miata was always slightly better performance and being slightly more practical. That being said, while being way more involving to drive, it offers way less space, practicality, and straight line speed than the hot hatches and Mustang. People who needed more space than a Miata and were willing to forgo driver involvement to get it and/or wanted more straight line speed than a Miata also probably wanted more than the Toyobaru. That a bit quicker and a bit more practical than a Miata, but slower and a good deal less practical than a Mustang or hot hatch niche is a small one. I go back to a hatchback or an extra set of doors would’ve done wonders for the car. In my personal case, space was the only reason I went for the Abarth over the 86. I liked the 86 way more otherwise because yes, RWD makes a huge difference.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    All the published heights for the 86 I can find are under 53″. One lists 50.6″.

    No month will break four figures. Low threes. But excitement!

  • avatar
    Russycle

    heh, Toyota jettisons Scion and renames this the “86”. The perfect marriage of Toyota heritage and American slang.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • SoCalMikester: not everyone likes the honda boy-racer look
  • SoCalMikester: and start all your payments over again, of course.
  • RHD: I’m on board with this… If the Cougar has a manual transmission, it might be a decent drive. (I know...
  • dal20402: Nope. I’d rather have the ones in the compact class rather than these. All of the mass-market entries...
  • How_Embarrassing_4You: Crazy, know at least 5 people who have owned(and then bought newer years) first year Ecoboost...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States