By on August 17, 2016

2016 Chevrolet Camaro UK red

Anticipating virtually nonexistent demand, General Motors will ship 15 copies of the 2016 Chevrolet Camaro coupe to the United Kingdom for deliveries in September. Another three Camaro convertibles are expected to find homes one month later.

Chevrolet, which concluded a decade-long full-line foray into Europe last year, will sell the Camaro through only one UK dealer, Ian Allan Motors in Virginia Water, Surrey. You may recall hearing that Virginia Water was the first UK locale outside London in which the average price of a new home crested £1,000,000.

British buyers heading to Virginia Water in search of a new Camaro will certainly need to have access to more funds than buyers who are keen on a new Ford Mustang. Given the blame we cast for poor U.S. Camaro sales on a pricing scheme that presents the Camaro as a premium pony car, it’s not surprising to see that Camaro pricing in the UK would be similarly lofty.

But there’s one key difference.

Pricing for the Camaro with the 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder — the V6 is unavailable — begins at £31,755, £760 higher than for the Mustang EcoBoost. A jump to the far more desirable V8-engined Camaro, however, requires a big leap to £37,020, a £2,025 increase compared with the Ford Mustang GT. £2,025 equals roughly $2,600 USD.

2015 Ford Mustang right hand drive

The U.S. price spread between the pair is actually greater, but money isn’t the only factor: Ford decided to make the sixth-generation Mustang a global force, catering to the right-hand-drive needs of a few right-hand-drive nations. As a result of a global effort, Ford claims that the Mustang is the planet’s top-selling sports car, with help from more than 3,500 sales in the UK in 2015.

General Motors, on the other hand, didn’t make the same commitment. Chevrolet UK is attempting to sell left-hand-drive Camaros at a price premium.

Pay more, the company seems to be saying, to drive a car out of which you can’t see, and on the wrong side of the road to boot.

[Images: Chevrolet UK & Ford]

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42 Comments on “Chevrolet Camaro Deliveries Begin In United Kingdom In September, All 15 Of Them...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “Pay more, the company seems to be saying, to drive a car out of which you can’t see, and on the wrong side of the road to boot.”

    You’re looking at it incorrectly.

    “Pay more to show your individuality with a rare Camaro which few people will ever see, ask you about all the time, and assume you’re wealthy and interesting because you’ve got a limited availability, American LHD vehicle.”

    • 0 avatar
      TonyJZX

      I cant fathom how wrong GM has gone here.

      So let me get this right… they want to sell what is an inferior car, for more money and they cant be bothered to make it RHD?

      LOL?

      Thing is Ford did everything correct. By making a global Mustang that tries to appeal to European tastes they actually increased the appeal to American tastes as well.

      The English arent that stupid. They dont see an LHD car as a novelty like the Japanese.

      The way I see it, GM doesnt respect the RHD market to actually make an RHD car.

      Ford does. So Ford takes the cheddar.

      Be advised, GM sponsored Manchester United to a multi hundreds of million dollar advertising contract and then decided that maybe they should pull out of Europe.

      Who’s in charge here? BTSR?

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        What you’re missing here, is brand. Chevrolet is -not- in the UK any longer. This is a thing GM is doing to make some extra bucks on a few cars, because -they can-. It’s not market conquering or anything like that, that’s not the goal. It’s a single dealer, did you notice that part? The Camaro was not designed the same way as the Mustang to be international.

        As well, GM has other brands already in the UK, like Vauxhall and Opel.

        Not every car is a globe conquering star. They don’t have to be. And yeah they have wasted a lot of money on bothering with the UK market – you’d propose they spend a bunch more making a very limited appeal car RHD.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Ford needed to broaden the appeal of the Mustang because it sits on a unique platform. The alternative is to cancel the car — there are no longer enough American sales to justify keeping it just for the US.

        The Camaro uses the Alpha platform, which will be used in many cars and crossovers in the GM lineup, including in China. The Camaro doesn’t need to pay all of the bills for that architecture. Different circumstances.

        Fifty years ago, the Mustang began as a way to sell more family sedan platforms by making them prettier — it was a cost amortization exercise. That is no longer the case. Most of Ford’s car and crossover lineup is FWD, which makes it a greater challenge to sell Mustangs profitably.

        What GM is doing in the UK with the Camaro is essentially a personal import program. Not a big deal.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          100k/year is more than enough to justify keeping it.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            US Mustang deliveries –

            2011 – 70,438
            2012 – 82,995
            2013 – 77,186
            2014 – 82,635

            Those are the kinds of numbers that get cars cancelled.

            Ford is not in the same place as is GM vis-a-vis pony cars, and we should not be surprised that Ford would push to internationalize its car while GM would not be inclined to bother.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            yes but the S197 was pretty long in the tooth, despite the MCA in 2013. Once the S550 launched they were at 133k/yr in the US.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            For cars like this, sales can be expected to fall or remain flat after the first couple of years — the people who really wanted one have already bought theirs by then and they aren’t going to buy another one anytime soon.

            Ford can’t count on maintaining high numbers based upon the US alone, which is the point of internationalizing it. It needs to use the Mustang to squeeze more of that platform because it doesn’t have any other opportunity to do so.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          No one forced Ford to give it a dedicated platform, now wait Mulally did. Fact is there was a plan for a new global RWD architecture that was supposed to give the Aussies a new Falcon and those of us in the US a true Panther replacement and maybe a Mark for Lincoln. Giving that program the ax and renaming the 500 were some of the first things he did when he took the reins.

          At the time I can understand why he felt that way, with limited development funding and a shrinking market for large RWD sedans, but on the other hand it would be nice to spread some of the development and tooling amortization across a wider base.

          On the other hand I can still dream about them giving the Mustang platform a stretch so the back seat is useable by someone with legs and giving the resulting car a Lincoln Badge.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Ford does not see itself being a player in the RWD sedan market, nor does have it any intentions of using Lincoln to seriously take on the Germans. So that ain’t gonna happen.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Like I said I can still dream, implying that I don’t think it will happen and I’m certainly not going to hold my breath until I can buy a new Mark or TC.

            On the other hand look at the upcoming Explorer and the fact that there will be a Lincoln stablemate. It will follow the traditional longitudinal RWD layout and I bet they will offer a 2wd version. That too could be a basis for a large RWD sedan to carry the Lincoln badge. They have implied that the new Conti is a short term solution.

            Yeah I know it is far fetched but a guy can dream can’t he. And I’m not talking Vulpine or BAFO levels of dreaming that it would not only be a segment leader it will seriously cannibalize other segments to the point that they will disappear.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            I’m not sure that the RWD Explorer story is accurate. That was a TTAC story from two years ago that, as far as I can tell, was never confirmed by anyone else and that certainly didn’t prove to be true when the Explorer was updated for MY 2016.

            I would presume that the One Ford plan would call for having as few platforms as possible. It would be easier to make AWD Explorers from a FWD platform than to go back to a RWD format.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            Mustang has been on its own platform since about 1994, when it became the last of the Fox cars in existence.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            And since 1994, Ford had a near-death experience and a CEO/savior who did not care for the fragmented, decentralized product development strategies that preceded him. Hence, One Ford and the attempt to consolidate parts and platforms as much as possible.

            If the Mustang was an ordinary car, then it probably would have already gone the way of the Panther. But the car is tied into Ford heritage so deeply that extraordinary efforts will be made to keep it. Hence, the push to internationalize it.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          The Camaro/Firebird was cancelled at around 35K combined units a year. The Mustang is a matter of pride for Ford so I don’t see it being killed off until 20K units or less, plus drastic rebates.

          Maybe a fwd would have to carry its name for a while, but the Corvette hung on at just 12K yearly sales.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Ford killed the four-seat Thunderbird when it was hovering around 80,000 annual sales ten years before GM did the same with the Monte Carlo. Both were brand identity products which were competing in NASCAR, and both had platforms shared with other cars. Has developing a car become less expensive in the past decade or two?

        • 0 avatar
          dash riprock

          Great concise explanation. Thank you

        • 0 avatar
          raph

          I’m glad I’m not the only one out there to recognize this.

          While I have my doubts about a reply elsewhere when I mentioned this in less flattering way a person claiming to work for Ford responded that they didn’t need to go global just that they wanted to.

          My retort was about the same citing alpha production numbers and mentioning how the Mustang rides on a bespoke platform and needed the added volume where GM doesn’t with Camaro on alpha.

          Speaking of which I suppose given the Camaro’s sales numbers that’s a good thing. If the Camaro had its own platform like Mustang I suppose it would be headed for the “hiatus” home again.

          Although on the plus side you get some decent hardware for the money if the 62k base price for the upcoming ZL1 has any validity.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnAZ

          @PCH101: You need to add in 5000-7000/yr Mustangs in Canada plus some for Mexico before talking about International numbers.
          Just in case you couldn’t find the numbers for 2015, that was 122,349 for the US and 6,933 for Canada.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Selling a few Mustangs in Canada will not prevent the car from being cancelled.

            The 2015 numbers were not forgotten nor were they relevant to the point being made, namely that there was a real risk of the Mustang being cancelled had it not been internationalized. You cannot presume that the sales numbers from the first year or two of a new model can be sustained into perpetuity.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @TonyJZX
        Still the sales are microscopic, for both the Mustang and the Camaro. 3,500 Globally For the Mustang?Have actually seen two samples, they looks lot like the current Ford Falcon, except smaller. Camaro is even more of a joke. GM and Ford have lost the plot.

        • 0 avatar
          raph

          “GM and Ford have lost the plot.”

          huh?

          The Mustang is pretty well received, especially by non car guys. Ford made the right choice by going in the direction they did.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            3,500 cars Globally? What impact at all could they have? Mustang will be quickly forgotten.Ford needs a much more substantial entry than the Mustang to start breaking into new markets.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnAZ

          The number 3500 referred to sales in the UK in 2015. Not Globally, and certainly not in the rest of North America. As I recall there was a significant delay in producing the first RHD cars for the UK and elsewhere, so you might want to wait to see what the true global numbers are like for 2016. Apparently the Mustang is outselling all other sports cars combined in Germany.

    • 0 avatar
      LS1Fan

      Precisely.

      It’s the “Skyline GTR” effect.

      As an aside, can someone send a cease and desist letter to Infiniti G35/37 owners making it VERY clear that they do not own nor shall their car ever be a “Skyline” .

      It’s an Infiniti. That’s plenty good enough.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    And as an added bonus wait until the exchange rate is at its worst in years. I was waiting to read whether they had actually made a RHD version; I should have known better. Cue GM whining about foreign trade barriers.

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      I would think that, if pricing was established recently, the higher price is a direct result of the exchange rate. And I would also expect to see the price of Mustangs going up as a result.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    I don’t know; I’ve driven RHD cars here in the US, but thankfully for only a day or weekend at a time. I can’t imagine it being anything but a pain in the arse to drive a “wrong-hand-drive” car on a daily basis.

  • avatar
    ...m...

    …sporty? – yes, sporting, even; performance, undoubtedly; but the mustang and camaro are not sports cars…ford’s claim, best as a i can read beneath the din of my screaming cats, is of the best-selling sports coupé, not sports car, to be semantically specific…

    • 0 avatar
      carguy67

      IMO, it’s not a ‘sports car’ if it’s not a roadster or convertible. Yeah, that leaves out Lambos, lots of Ferraris, etc. But that’s just me. I have a Mustang GT, and I don’t consider it a sports car, but my Austin-Healeys are (although the BJ8 with its 2+2 seating is debateable).

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @m
      Sporting Sedan Yes, not a Sportscar

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Sadly “sports car” has become completely bastardized. I think if anybody bothers to look up the definition it simply says;

      Sports car – anything the marketing folks slap some aluminum wheels and stickers on.

      Sadly its one of those instances where a living language can be a bad thing.

  • avatar
    NoID

    Having driven the RHD version of a vehicle primarily designed to be LHD, I can tell you that I’d probably prefer the LHD Camaro over the RHD Mustang in the UK. Take note in your car of the footwell size on the driver and passenger side, especially the width. Now imagine cramming two or three pedals (or four, if you given your manual transmission version a foot-actuated parking brake. I’m looking at you Challenger…) into that passenger side footwell.

    It isn’t comfortable.

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    I used to see export-model Explorers and even a few RHD Explorers floating around the old Hazelwood MO plant…

    Saw a few Mondeo sedans running around Cincinnati before the Contour/Mystique twins came out…I assume it had something to do with the Batavia transmission plant.

    I’ve made it my whole life without ever driving a RHD car, and I just can’t imagine when the opportunity would present itself.

    Back in the 80s and 90s, I used to occasionally get copies of an English car magazine, I think it was CAR. They had little snippets of reviews in the back of each issue. Till the day I die, I will remember that they referred to one of the then-current Cadillac models as “flash as a rat with a gold tooth”…I am going to assume that’s not a glowing recommendation.

  • avatar
    Jagboi

    15 sounds like about the right number that will sell. It will only sell to those who want to be different, no matter what the item is. They will also have another RHD car for the daily drive.

    I’ve driven quite a bit in the UK, and I sure wouldn’t want a Camaro, it’s too wide and visibility too poor. Going through roundabouts would be real challenge in this, and overtaking on a single carriageway (2 lane road) impossible.

    In the rear world, it’s inherent limitations would make it a slow car to drive. I could drive a diesel Range Rover much faster.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    The reality is the Comaro is not a replacement for the current HSV Sedans sold by Vauxhall.

    I wonder how well Comaros will sell in the UK, unless they are really cheap.

    I don’t know if Holden would sell Comaros here. The Mustang is a much better vehicle to look at. I’m seeing a few around.


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