By on June 17, 2016

sensai

The meme is called I Hope Senpai Will Notice Me, and it commonly refers to a situation in which someone hopes desperately to catch the attention (no matter how temporary that attention might be) of a romantic interest and/or social superior.

When it happens in the auto industry, it usually comes in the form of an auto industry alpha male temporarily deigning to notice one of our many beta/omega/is-there-something-worse-than-omega-cause-if-so-that-word-applies automotive journalists.

I inadvertently participated in a “Senpai, Notice Me!” moment of my own when I agreed to face Bob Lutz in the CTS-V Challenge. Robert Farago told me not to attend. He’d correctly diagnosed the event as one in which auto journos would crawl on their hands and knees to lick the spittle dripping from Bob Lutz’s super-alpha chin; in particular, I remember the odd shudder of ecstatic, erotic joy that visibly wiggled through Wes Siler’s body when Bob turned to him and offhandedly said, “Hi, Wes.”

Farago, as always, was right. But I wanted to drive a new track and I didn’t give enough thought to the fact that the whole event basically amounted to one giant kneeling-before-Lutz. The best I can say is that, unlike my colleagues who participated, I didn’t beg to have my photo taken shaking the man’s hand before I went out and put five seconds a lap on him.

Bob Lutz is now my colleague at Road&Track, having retired from the day-to-day grind of the auto biz. That leaves Elon Musk as the undisputed super-alpha of carmaking. Elon Musk. I like that name. Musk, as you may know, is a word for glandular secretions that male deer use to excite the hoes, er, wait, the does. It’s an appropriate name for Tesla’s Maximum Leader. His secretions excite women. They also excite men to the point that they will do anything to engineer their own “Notice me, Senpai!” moments with Elon. I was once told by a real O.G. of the pimp game that when a woman is in love with a man, a kiss with a fist excites her like nothing else. When Elon mentions people, even to disrespect them, it gets them excited.

Does that explain why pre-orders of the model 3 are on track to reach the 400,000 mark?

model3

It’s a tempting theory. Let’s put it into the language of the pickup game. We have prospective electric-car buyers playing the role of the attractive woman. The Nissan Leaf, a thoroughly satisfactory electric vehicle that is already in production, plays the role of the reliable omega male at the woman’s job. He’s always been there, he always will be there. He’s reliable and decent. A well-known property. His price is respectful. He doesn’t demand too much. Naturally, the woman doesn’t even notice his existence.

The Tesla Model 3? That’s the unattainable alpha male. He demands commitment from the woman, in the form of a $1,000 deposit, before he’ll even think about scheduling a date with her. He’s very evasive about when he’ll be available, and for how long. After closing the $1,000 deal, he said he’d be available for dinner and a movie in 2017. But now it’s looking more like 2018. He’s really sorry, but he has things to do, like land spaceships on droneships. Just thinking about how important that is… well, it makes the buyer feel like Lucy Mancini felt about Sonny when she first heard about him.

The conversation going on between Nissan and the buyers right now will be depressingly familiar to anybody who has ever played Duckie to someone else’s Blane:

Buyer: I can’t believe Elon is willing to sell me an affordable electric car in 2018 if I give him a thousand dollars today.

Nissan: I have an affordable electric car right here.

Buyer: But the Model 3 will only cost, like $35,000.

Nissan: The Leaf costs $29,010.

Buyer: All I have to do is to show my devotion, and be patient, and one day I’ll have an electric car.

Nissan: You don’t have to wait. We can do it right now. I’m here for you. I’ve always been here for you. I’ll be waiting in the showroom for you to realize we’re good together.

Buyer: (turns away, looks at a poster of Elon pointing at the moon, sighs)

So where does that leave the Chevy Bolt? I have to admit that I don’t really give a shit one way or the other about electric cars, but from my brief and disinterested reading of the spec sheets I get the impression that the Bolt is going to be able to do everything that the Model 3 is supposed to be able to do, and it’s going to be in production at the end of this year. Pre-production cars have been rolling for ninety days now. There have been a few Bolt pre-orders, but not enough for GM to brag about them.

Obviously, the Bolt is the “beta male” here. He’s interested in the buyer, and the facts are on his side, but you can’t convince the buyer with facts.

Chevy: Why did you unmatch me on Tinder?

Buyer: I’m interested in someone else.

Chevy: Oh, him again.

Buyer: I don’t know how to tell you this, but I placed a deposit with Elon last week.

Chevy: Are you fucking kidding me? After I went through a complete design and engineering process for you?

Buyer: Elon says that he’s going to use my money to engineer the things that the Model 3 needs.

Chevy: So you let this guy put his ACD transaction in your bank because he’s going to get around to engineering the car sometime?

Buyer: I don’t expect you to understand. The Model 3 is special. There’s something about it. I can’t explain. In fact, a couple of my friends placed deposits, too.

Chevy: ARE YOU SERIOUS?

Buyer: We all went and did it together. Elon said it would be special. (sighs)

Chevy: I can’t even get you to look at my Website and you went with your friends to place a deposit with Elon? You know he doesn’t care about you. All he cares about is… that rocket.

Buyer: (sighs again, thinking about the rocket) Chevy, stop being creepy. I said I’d call you next week. Or sometime.

Chevy: (hangs up the phone, fires up the XBox)

The natural response to observing scenarios like these, whether we’re in love with our dream girl or trying to figure out why buyers aren’t excited about the Bolt, is to become bitter and dismissive of the person with the options in the scenario. We tell ourselves that women or buyers are stupid. When we do that, however, we are lying to ourselves. Women, and electric-car buyers, have their own internally consistent set of rules that they follow, the same way that men and carmakers do.

Most of the time, anyway.

Women are attracted to “alpha males” because they are trying to get the best biological material possible for their children. Sure, we live in a world now where only migrants and immigrants and the deeply religious have children before their 39th birthday, but that change is too recent to have percolated into human beings engineered by 100,000 years’ worth of evolution.

Similarly, buyers are attracted to the Model 3 because it fulfills the true, actual requirement of electric-car ownership for them in a way that the Leaf or the Bolt does not. So what’s that true, actual requirement? It’s as simple as this: Owning an electric car — the right kind of electric car — confers social standing in certain peer groups.

What determines “rightness”? It’s as simple as this: branding that women can understand. What, did you think that this whole buyers-as-women analogy was accidental? Tesla’s customers for the Model 3 are almost entirely composed of two different types:

* Women; and
* Men who take their ideas, self-worth, and social standing from peer-group relationships with women.

How many good ol’ boys did you see standing in those reservation lines? How many people with “Glock Perfection” T-shirts or “TapOut” apparel? Didja happen to catch any African-American men with brand-new Air Jordans and sleek tracksuits? Why not? Do you think that black men don’t have $1,000 in their pockets? You think the same “bros” who paid ten grand over sticker for Hellcats and twenty grand over for GT350s can’t come up with a spare G for a reservation slot?

Stop kidding yourself. The Tesla Model S might have a lot of appeal to men, because of its reputation as a “ludicrous mode” drag strip weapon, but the Model 3 is Ladies’ Night. Now here’s something that you probably already know: American women, as a rule, aren’t super-sensitive to sub-branding. I’m sure you have heard the old story about how “Legend” used to have greater name recognition in this country than “Acura”. That’s the female buyer talking.

Ask a man what kind of car he has: “I have a 911 Turbo, 996 generation, with X50, 19-inch directional Cup wheels, Sonderwunsch console trim, Bose stereo, PCM-delete center stack.”

Ask a woman: “I have a Toyota.”

The only women who don’t say “I have a Toyota” when you ask them about their car say…

wait for it…

“I have a Prius.” Or did you think that the expansion of the Prius lineup into three cars was random chance? Did you think that GM’s highly-successful-until-it-wasn’t expansion of the “Cutlass” nameplate to cover almost their whole lineup shortly after the 1977 Cutlass Supreme became the best-selling car in America was just random coincidence?

Now, let’s look at what these three brands mean to upscale American women.

Nissan: are you kidding, ugh

Chevrolet: Seriously? Wow, just wow. I can’t even.

Tesla: (sighs, thinks of Elon landing a girthy, titanium-alloy rocket on a very receptive barge)

Nobody wants an electric car. Nobody gives a shit about the day-to-day benefits of an electric car. ‘Cause a) there aren’t any and b) we can’t remember them even if they exist. Your Nissan Leaf buyer is the same kind of guy who buys a Mitsubishi Evolution, except that when their parents divorced the Leaf buyer identified with the dutiful, suffering mom and the Evo buyer identified with the tatted-up, childcare-payment-skipping father. They are otaku. They volunteer for Bernie or delight in editing Zoe Quinn’s entry on Encyclopedia Dramatica. Women aren’t interested in their existence and neither is anybody else.

The problem that Chevrolet faces is that, for most people, a $1,000 reservation on a Model 3 has greater value and worth to them than an actual, functioning electric car in their driveways. Elon knows this. Chevy knows it, although they have to be careful about admitting it to their masters in the Democratic Party. It will ever be thus. It doesn’t matter if Teslas shed control arms or ball joints. It doesn’t matter if Teslas spontaneously catch on fire or feed children to alligators. What matters in 2016, to everybody who matters in 2016, is…

Feelings.

Nothing more than feelings.

Elon brings the feels.

The only way any of this will change is if the Middle East erupts and gasoline goes to ten bucks a gallon faster than the frackers can turn their operations back on. And then, maybe, just maybe, the Bolt will become a roaring success.

Or maybe people will just beg Elon to deliver the Model 3 faster. Please, Elon! Acknowledge my existence! Say my name, even if you can’t remember how to spell it! Notice me, Senpai!

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143 Comments on “No Fixed Abode: Three’s Up, Bolt’s Down...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    As your brother Bark says: “BUY EXPERIENCES!”

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    If I were going to be in the market for a car next year, I’d give both the Bolt and the Volt a close look. But, I bought a PHEV Fusion two years ago, so it’s going to be quite a few years before I’m back in the market. But, give Tesla a $1000 deposit for some vaporware that doesn’t have much in the way of support? No way.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      when I saw some of the photos of people waiting in line to put down a deposit, I saw people who were there mostly because they wanted to be part of something. Same as the people who line up to buy Apple’s latest iThing on launch day. There’s no real reason to; they’re going to be making as many as they can sell for at least another 18 months. Like it was said, it’s a status symbol amongst their circles; whether it’s to be among the first with the new iPhone, or to be able to strut around saying “I put a deposit on a Model 3!” It’s almost like a middle schooler who lives on the approval of his/her peers demanding a particular brand of clothes or shoes.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        If nothing else, Elon Musk gets the whole “gotta have it” mentality among tech-heads.

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        Lining up for new tech that you can get online is “stuff white people do.”
        And that’s just the millennials too, not us cynical Gen-X’ers. I guess they have to find some way to meet-up in the offline (aka real) world.

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        “Same as the people who line up to buy Apple’s latest iThing on launch day. There’s no real reason to; they’re going to be making as many as they can sell for at least another 18 months.”

        This exist in many circles. To my knowledge there will be no practical limitation on the Hellcat twins, the GT350 (except the R), or the M2.

        If you want one, you’ll be able to buy one. Of course, they can only make so many per day so until that initial demand is satisfied and people are willing to pay extra, ADMs will exist.

        So how many paid 10, 20, 30 thousand or more on a car that most likely will not appreciate, at least in the distant future, just to be among the first owners?

        I can kinda see it for something that’s limited, such as an GT3 RS. But for most cars, believe it or not but buyers actually paid ADM for Pt Cruisers, no way.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          yeah, for “scarce” items that’s different.

        • 0 avatar
          Blackcloud_9

          This is true. When the PT Cruisers first came out my wife and I were interested and went to a Dodge dealership to look at one. They had taken the Mulroney sticker off the window and had hidden it in the glove compartment. I think the car had an MSRP of ~23k (When we found it the glove box). When they asked us what we would be willing to pay my wife said point-blank about 5k under sticker. They looked at us like we were idiots and said “We were thinking about 28k.”
          Needless to say, we left at that point.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            Monroney.

          • 0 avatar
            Coopdeville

            To be fair, your wife’s response was equally ludicrous. Brand new model with no incentives, about $700-1500 in MSRP markup, maybe $600 in dealer holdback. Where exactly was the $5000 off supposed to come from?

            Second only to my other perennial favorite, the irate customer who couldn’t understand why I wouldn’t just “waive” their $6k in negative trade equity, because their friend had it done for them, yo.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Mulroney sticker ? Must be Canadian.

        • 0 avatar
          SoCalMikester

          friend paid top dollar on a challenger SRT8 on the eve of chryslers BK in 2008. and this was AFTER xmas, so the lot was dead. they had like 20 in stock, too.

          smdh…

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Man, Jack and I agree to such a great extent on the (de)merit and even somewhat vapor-for-now status of the Model 3 that it’s eerie, but Jack went so much further than I did regarding the X & Y dichotomy (as well as alpha-beta thing).

        Let the whining from butt-hurt Model 3 deposit place(hold)ers commence!

        Unleash the collective vagina wail!!!

        (The sound of X rocket smashing into a droneship bellows in the background.)

        Next up: Musk takes pre-order deposits for condominiums on Mars!

        Thanks for kicking ny weekend off properly, Jack, and for KEEPING TTAC GREAT!

      • 0 avatar

        “Premium” ticket packages for music shows that include nice seats, a VIP bar, a special t-shirt and maybe a meet & greet with the band can cost $1,000 or more. Somebody told me they paid $1,250 to see the Rolling Stones (as far as I’m concerned, for that much money, Mike Bloomfield and Jaco Pastorius better be in the band before I’m ponying up that much do re me).

        Nowadays, there is an abundance of people willing to spend $1,000 just for the experience of standing in line to get the latest thing, with the concomitant status and virtue signalling.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          I put down a $1,000 deposit on a Tesla 3 on the night it was introduced. From home, with my computer.

          I really don’t see why this is subject to so much ridicule. Given current interest rates, it costs me almost nothing. I can get my money back any time.

          And I have the right to buy a car in a couple of years which may just be really cool. Or not, in which case I’ll just take my money back, knowing I’ve lost like $40 in interest.

          Since I don’t go around telling people I did this, there’s no signalling of status or virtue. I really don’t think about it, except when I come to TTAC to be ridiculed. Which I’m still not getting, but whatever.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            yes, but you’re (and Orenwolf is) a car person. I’m sure you’ve got reasons you’re interested in a Model 3. I’d probably agree with most of them. I’ve no quarrel with EVs, the engineer side of me forbids it. I’ve driven an electric Focus and I do find the characteristics of electric drive pleasing. If it had more than 60-70 miles of (real world) range, I’d probably be leasing one.

            I think where the disconnect is is that Jack is making a general statement about a population, not claiming that 100% of the population is the same. It’s that Tesla carries itself as an agile tech startup, and attracts a fanbase which mirrors that of tech companies, not car companies. The real “car people” like you, Orenwolf, JPWhite, and others here kind of get lost in the noise.

          • 0 avatar
            philipwitak

            re: “…I put down a $1,000 deposit on a Tesla 3 on the night it was introduced. From home, with my computer. I really don’t see why this is subject to so much ridicule.”

            me either. deposit programs like this go back two decades at the very least. porsche offered a similar opportunity to potential boxster buyers back in 1996.

            certainly worked out well for me.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Good point. Tucker did exactly the same thing.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    There is more…model 3 or a tesla is a big F U to GM. Who frankly, deserves it for their past role in this space and continued half baked support for the bolt.

    GM is not committed and wont be until they role out a real EV charging soution like tesla is doing. There is also the fact that as an engineer who is stuck fixing all the stuff that breaks on my current ride because of bad engineering, makes me not want to buy another GM ever…

    I was really interested in the 3 until it was revealed. I thought it was going to be an audi a4. The glass roof, useless trunk, and terrible dash turned me off.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    wow.

    I think you may have hit the nail on the head here.

    awaits the 500+ comments to follow.

    Hey Mark? how quickly does your phone start ringing and your email inbox start filling up when Jack posts articles like these?

  • avatar
    multicam

    It’ll be long, long time before I ever end up in an electric car. I just like the freedom of being able to get in my car and drive wherever I want without any planning or consideration of where to get a charge. I couldn’t take an electric car across my home state to my small home town, visit a few friends, then drive further across the state to visit my grandparents in another small town, then go to the beach, then drive home. It just wouldn’t make it.

    I live on Oahu right now and if I was planning on staying here permanently then I would definitely consider it, but I’m not the type to spend a lot of money on a car. I got my daily driver for less than $6k and it’s already the perfect island car- a convertible.

  • avatar
    Papa Smurf

    I first heard the expression “gives me feels” from a 20year old while in nursing school last year… It sums it up I guess.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I’M HERE FOR YOU GM! Just give up this max-efficiency and coffee house phase and go back to offering big-displacement pushrod engines like you used to. Remember how fun that was? I’ll even let you go bankrupt on my face if you want.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Bertel, is that you?

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Ay dios mio!

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        I think Ajla would be better off buying a Jag XJ with a blown engine and dropping a small block Chevy in there. That might get him close to what he wants – his Charger has left him cold, the interior of the current Caprice is “ghastly” (his words not mine)…

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          It was actually Corey that called the Caprice’s interior ghastly.

          I think the “detective package” interior is okay, but those are very rare and relatively expensive. The normal 9C1 interior is usual cop car suckitude, but I could live with it for the right price. The bigger question is, how happy would I be with long-term with an old police car?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Probably not very happy.

            You really need Cadillac to start throwing V8s in non performance trims.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @bball40dtw, don’t hold your breath on that.

            I wouldn’t want you to get a knot on your head when you hit the floor after passing out from holding your breath.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I’m going to go on a hunger strike until Lincoln builds a RWD sedan.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          I thought it was 28 who wanted an LS-ified XJ.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            He does want one.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I will buy a 2004 to 2006 mint Jaguar XJ8 Supercharged as a weekend pleasure car before I’m 50.

            It’s one of the best styled, bad-a$$ luxury cars of the 90s/2000s era.

    • 0 avatar
      MeaMaximaCulpa

      A modern (LSX/LT4 style – direct injected, coil on spark plug) all aluminium, pushrod big block V8 (minimum 502 cid) with forged internals would be a dream come true for me.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    So…the car buying process isn’t rational. People buy cars they find sexy.

    Alrighty then.

    I guess what’s missing here is that the love for Teslas may not be all that irrational, assuming you want an electric car. After all, they’re sexy, they’re fast, and they have a good reputation. Meanwhile, the Leaf is ugly and the Bolt isn’t a known quantity. Makes sense that the Model 3 would be so hot, then, even if it isn’t smokin’…

    • 0 avatar

      Sales is a scientific process. The trick is to make the prospective buyer imagine owning whatever it is you’re selling. The most successful sales techniques involve putting the item in the hands of the prospective buyer. Once the buyer is “hands on” it’s much easier to make the sale. Ownership transference is the technical term.

      I took training from Tom Hopkins 30 years ago. Still the master. Read his books if you want to understand the process.

      Having said this, I have nothing but admiration for people who sell insurance. You can’t touch it, smell it, feel it, or, imagine what it’s going to look like when you get home with it.

      Which makes the sales of the Tesla Model 3 a mystery to me. You can’t touch it, feel it, smell it… None of that. You just have to imagine how wonderful it’s going to be.

      I suspect Musk has either employed a lot of successful insurance agents or sent a lot of people through their sales training.

    • 0 avatar
      ronald

      “So…the car buying process isn’t rational. People buy cars they find sexy.”

      This – a thousand times. Is a hybrid rational? Does it pay for itself? Do the extra two cylinders you paid for in your car pay for themselves? How about the leather seats?

      Before you look down upon someone buying a electric/hybrid car (or any other product) to “be cool” or “part of a group,” remember that you also made choices when you bought your product . . ..

      As Frank Zappa said, “Everybody in this room is wearing a uniform. Don’t kid yourself.”

    • 0 avatar
      Jagboi

      Just imagine yourself sitting on the soft Corinthian leather….

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    You are correct that nobody ever grew-up dreaming of owning a Nissan, or a Chevy sedan.

    The political aspects still baffle me. Why is Tesla considered Democrat? because most of their history was under the current administration? Because they are actually building stuff in the US instead of moaning that nobody builds stuff in the US? Beats me.

    Also, you should get out more. Lots of women know cars. I’m guessing (from what you wrote) that they are the same women who consider you a beta-or-omega male, but still. They are out there.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      “Lots of women know cars”

      Where are they? Last Grand-Am race I did, there were two female drivers in ninety-three registrants. Hell, the last autocross I did, there were two women out of eighty-three drivers, and one of them was my wife.

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        There’s a difference between knowing and loving cars, and the dick-measuring contest that is a race meet. That’s a very male thing, the cars are just an excuse.

        • 0 avatar
          yamahog

          Even still, things like cars and coffee skew very heavily male. Where’s the evidence that a healthy fraction of women enjoy cars? Is it in the sales charts where women love buying Tuscons / CR-Vs / Rav4s and all the other vehicles that say ‘yeah I love cars!’

        • 0 avatar
          FormerFF

          You don’t know squat about racing and what motivates people to do it.

          • 0 avatar
            Jack Baruth

            Sure he does. It’s all about dicks. It’s basically gay sex. 100% dick oriented.

            Truth be told, the only time I ever thought about my dick during a race was when I went into the wall at Mid-Ohio at triple digits and I thought, “I hope I can still use my dick after this.”

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            I enjoy racing, but I realize it’s not the only way to enjoy cars. Are we going to claim that women don’t like bicycles because they don’t club-race those (much)? Or that people who run do it for the love of shoes?

            Racing’s racing. It’s about demonstrating who’s fastest. On foot, on a horse, in the water, in a car, whatever. The notion that women don’t like cars because they don’t race (much) is just weak logic.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            True gear head guys love cars in a very mechanical-working-feel-your-cogs-move-in/through-my-hands, depend-on-you, treat you right way.

            Most women who claim they love cars do so in a “it’s so cute or hip/looks like me/fits my inner emoji” or “gets the work done,” utilitarian way.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Plenty of women know cars. They know if their rival on the PTA drives the new Q7 or the older model. Whether the neighbor’s BMW is a 320 or an M3. And that Volvo XC90s are respectable again.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Meshing with VoGo’s comment.

            Yeah my wife “knows” cars.

            She can tell a Yukon Denali from a regular Yukon at a considerable distance and I swear she can detect the rumble of an old Muscle car from a distance greater than I can.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            My wife knows about cars. She picked up her car’s mild misfire a week before the ECM did. She recognizes different makes/models. She will come with me for G-force infused driving just for the fun of it. And she supported me when I wanted to buy a C7 – no push back at all. She just said she was surprised that’s what I wanted. Not really sure what that meant until I spent a lot of time on the various Vette forums. Sure, one would expect fans to be on the patriotic side, but all the “god, guns, guts” talk, big bellies, right wing political positions, teatard nonsense, etc. surprised me. Totally the opposite of me and my wife. But who cares? Buy what you like, for whatever the reason. Just enjoy what you buy!

        • 0 avatar

          While I plead guilty to making a Big Swinging Dick reference in my recent Koenigsegg article, do you have any idea just how trite the whole “dick measuring contest” and “he’s compensating for a small penis by driving a [fill in the blank]” cliches are?

          What exactly are women measuring when they engage in competition with other women? We can all think of ways in which women compete with each other.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nylon_riots

          It’s interesting, but hardly surprising, that someone who argues “lots of women know how to…” seems to have a predilection for demeaning men.

    • 0 avatar
      Yuppie

      I guess the Jack is associating Tesla with the Democratic party because of the electric car rebate?

      • 0 avatar
        Jack Baruth

        Not once in the article do I associate Tesla with the Democratic party. The original poster isn’t reading.

        • 0 avatar
          heavy handle

          You are correct. You wrote “Elon knows this. Chevy knows it,” but I read it as if you had used a comma instead of a period.

          My question is still valid in a general way. You would think most gop’ers would be “hell yeah American-made crazy fast rocket-science car!”, but they go all weird when discussing Tesla. To the point where they claim to dislike tax breaks!

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            It’s because electric cars might be good for the environment under certain conditions, and anything that doesn’t pollute to the maximum possible level is a threat to freedom in general and their manhood in particular.

            Seriously, it’s incredible how many otherwise sane Republicans lose all trace of reasonableness or critical thought when confronted with anything that’s even partly environmentally motivated.

            But maybe I’m just bitter because I got coal rolled this afternoon by an angry man in a F-350 while standing on a sidewalk in downtown Bellevue, Washington, a ritzy suburb not normally prone to such things. I have no idea why he did it, except that maybe he could guess (correctly) that I was about to jaywalk when the coast was clear and took exception to that.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “You would think most gop’ers would be “hell yeah American-made crazy fast rocket-science car!”, but they go all weird when discussing Tesla. To the point where they claim to dislike tax breaks!”

            Are you suggesting, sir, that there just might be a bit of cognitive dissonance among those ranks? Because I will not sit here and listen to such things.

            “But maybe I’m just bitter because I got coal rolled this afternoon by an angry man in a F-350 while standing on a sidewalk in downtown Bellevue, Washington, a ritzy suburb not normally prone to such things. I have no idea why he did it,”

            since it’s not legal for him to literally p!ss on you, this is what wannabe-alpha males do to try to assert dominance.

        • 0 avatar
          Acd

          Reading comprehension isn’t always the B&B’s strong suit.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I’m not going to even attempt to address the tangled gender bullsh!t, because I think it says more about Jack’s particular hang-ups than about gender relations in the real world.

    I’ll just focus on this: “Nobody gives a shit about the day-to-day benefits of an electric car. ‘Cause a) there aren’t any and b) we can’t remember them even if they exist.”

    Not right. Here are the reasons electric cars are great.

    1) No gas station visits. You charge when you’re at home anyway. You never have that experience of realizing only when you’re already 15 minutes late that you are going to be sitting on the shoulder halfway to your destination unless you take ten minutes for a fill-up.

    2) No short-trip guilt. Short trips in ICE cars are horrible for both the car and the environment. Except for CO2, you’re polluting just as much if you drive your ICE car two blocks to the store to buy a case of beer you don’t want to carry home on foot as you would if you drive it 20 miles across town. And if you take your ICE car on lots of short trips the ICE car itself will suffer issues like prematurely rotting cooling and exhaust systems. Electric cars don’t care one bit whether the trip is short or long.

    3) Instant torque off the line. My C-Max in pure EV mode has only 95 horsepower and can’t exceed 85 mph. But it will still beat almost any non-performance ICE car handily away from the light. And of course we’re all familiar with the Model S/Model X low-speed acceleration feats.

    4) You can drive faster without alarming passengers. Passengers hate hearing the engine near redline, or even really exceeding 3000 rpm. They don’t notice fast acceleration as much when it’s silent.

    5) Transmission smoothness and immediacy. No jerky shifts. No waiting for a downshift (or having to execute one) before power is available.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Alright, reasonable points, but I’ll respond to them unreasonably because it’s Friday and why not:

      1) Who is at home every night? Who in this world lives such a studied, predictable life that they know when they’ll need to refuel their vehicle ALL THE TIME?

      2) Get a GSX-R for short trips. It will still pollute, but nobody cares.

      3) Nobody without a performance vehicle cares how fast a car is off the line.

      4) The hell with passengers. I’m not an Uber driver. You take your chances.

      5) Sir, I drive a manual transmission with impeccable smoothness.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Alrighty then:

        1) With “convenience chargers” you can charge almost anywhere, including outside your latest Tinder match’s apartment.

        2) I’d pay good money to watch you carry enough beer for a proper BBQ home on your VFR800. I promise to click repeatedly on the ads on the resulting YouTube video.

        3) Great; more open lanes ahead for me.

        4) Do you want that Tinder match to be thinking about your driving or your sparkling storytelling and conversation and how right at that moment she’s the only girl in the world?

        5) And by the time you’ve managed to execute that impossibly smooth downshift the Tesla’s already a couple car lengths ahead.

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Baruth

          “2) I’d pay good money to watch you carry enough beer for a proper BBQ home on your VFR800. I promise to click repeatedly on the ads on the resulting YouTube video.”

          I don’t drink beer. How much do I need to carry? I’ll try it.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Last time I had a good house party (which was a depressingly long time ago, what with one munchkin, another on the way, and an all-consuming job) I think I brought in four 12-packs. And it has to be the good stuff, which still mostly comes in bottles, although Seattle hipster breweries are increasingly moving to cans.

            Also include a couple fifths of rum or vodka as a base for girly drinks.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            I think you could do it on an adv. bike with hard bags and a top case.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          “5) And by the time you’ve managed to execute that impossibly smooth downshift the Tesla’s already a couple car lengths ahead.”

          who’s racing?

        • 0 avatar
          everybodyhatesscott

          2) I’d pay good money to watch you carry enough beer for a proper BBQ home on your VFR800. I promise to click repeatedly on the ads on the resulting YouTube video.

          I can fit a case in my medium sized messenger bag. I’m sure I could manage to get a couple cases home if it was a big party

          • 0 avatar

            I don’t drink much beer, but I’m pretty sure I could get a couple dozen cans of beer in the Jansport backpack I wear when I’m running errands on my bicycle. Might have to unbox them but they’ll fit.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            I’ve ridden a beach cruiser to a party uphill while balancing a 12 pack of bottles of Torpedo on the top bar. It wasn’t ideal.

      • 0 avatar
        doctorv8

        This P85D driver agrees with all of dal’s points wholeheartedly, but I would be lying if I didn’t crave the sound of a revvy, hi-po V8 from time to time. I scratch that itch on the weekends….but in day to day urban driving, the Model S has no peer.

      • 0 avatar
        FormerFF

        I think you’d be surprised by the number of people who are home 350 nights per year. (I’m one of them.)

      • 0 avatar

        1)
        ans Like 80-90% of adults. But I agree where’s the fun in that.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      0-30 mph times (from Car and Driver):

      Ford C-Max in EV mode: 4.1 seconds.

      Ford Fiesta 1.6L automatic: 3.0 seconds.

      But I have no doubt you win plenty of races against your unsuspecting opponents.

  • avatar
    slance66

    I think Jack pretty much nailed this. Tesla has become a holy grail of sorts, fostering irrational devotion from the slathering masses.

    The stereotypical categorization of women is probably off for quite a lot of them, including my wife (thanks to the miracle of Top Gear). She’d like a Range Rover Sport, but what she really wants is an Aston Martin to go with it. She says things like “I saw a blue Maserati today on the way to Stop & Shop”. She’d divorce me on the spot if I told her to get a Prius.

    • 0 avatar

      If you wanna make people around here fall all over themselves ranting and raving about what an idiot you are, just imply that their Tesla devotion is irrational.

      My rear end is still red from the beatings it’s taken around here from Tesla lovers over my personal irrational devotion to the internal combustion engine.

      Yeah, I’m old skool.

      • 0 avatar
        slance66

        Too bad for them! Perhaps they are intoxicated by Elon’s “Musk”.

        As far as I can tell, a Civic beats the pants off of all three of these cars in every way that matters to real world users.

        A Model S is a nice car. A friend of mine in the Bay Area has one. It lets him drive a quick, “luxury” sedan in the diamond lane by himself and he can afford it. Plus they have charging stations everywhere. In suburban Boston it makes no sense. It sucks in the snow, there are almost no charging stations anywhere and it costs way too much.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          Too many new(er) cars suck in the snow. My hybrid will not allow enough wheelspin to rock out of a snowdrift. And unlike some cars where you can directly (or indirectly) disable traction control it, I can’t.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I have a longer comment that’s stuck in moderation purgatory because I quoted Jack’s use of “sh!t” without bowdlerizing it, but I’ll just add this:

    This is the world’s most retrograde way of saying “Tesla’s achieved cool. Nissan and Chevy haven’t.”

    Cool is sometimes silly, sometimes not. Even if it’s silly in this case, you don’t need to dive into bad pseudopsychology to explain why it’s there. And it’s not totally silly in this case anyway. Both the Leaf and Bolt look like compliance cars. They’re dorky small hatchbacks, not a class of car Americans have ever dealt with well. The Tesla is a nicely styled sedan that has a near-luxury vibe to it even if it is not likely to be actually executed to near-luxury standards.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      I freed your statement and will respond to it asap.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      The Leaf looks like a compliance car? I don’t think so. It’s as ugly as the i3, with equal amounts of dorkyness. It stands out for all the wrong reasons. Nissan wanted it to look the way it does. No way is a new design a compliance car.

      A compliance car is something like the Ford Focus Electric and Mercedes B class electric – cars that look dull, drive dull and don’t have much going for them except for the half hearted effort by their respective manufacturers to throw something against the wall and incentivize it so they can put a check mark in the appropriate CARB box.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        it’s not how it looks, it’s what it is. “Compliance cars” are cars where the EV hardware was shoehorned into an existing platform. The Leaf, while being a distinct model, is still Versa-based. The Focus and 500 EVs are even more compliance cars because they’re not even distinct models. The Tesla Model S, X, and Chevy Bolt are not compliance cars since they’re basically built around the battery to get 200+ mile range.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Chevy and Nissan are cool, just not cool with their EV cars (although I like how the Bolt looks). They have the Camaro, Corvette and GT-R.

      No, I didn’t forget about the Z, its omission was intentional.

  • avatar
    orenwolf

    This has to be one of the most blatantly trolling articles I’ve seen on TTAC in awhile. There’s so little truth in it, though, that it probably belongs on your personal site – except of course then it wouldn’t generate any revenue.

    So, for starters, congrats on the automotive buzzfeed post of the day. Mouths fed, etc.

    Second, I don’t believe for a second that you think the leaf in its’ present incarnation is remotely comparable to a model 3 or bolt, and as Ivesaid before, I doubt the bolt will have the driving performance characteristics of the 3. But you know all that. As you pointed out, you just don’t care about the segment. So you try to kick over anthills instead.

    I’m disappointed, but I understand. I patiently await the next article of yours with the level of research, insight, and candor that stands on its’ own instead of resorting to labeling and blatant trolling to generate traffic.

    Have a great weekend.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      I firmly believe that the Leaf beats the Bolt and Model 3 in all performance categories.

      Because it moves under its own power and the other two don’t. Not yet. And not in the hands of customers.

      You could do a two-year-lease on a Leaf and return it and STILL not be able to get a Model 3.

      So there, nyah nyah!

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        I like the Leaf because it’s so cheap.

        We’re thinking of moving for several reasons, and may be pushed further into the boonies by ridiculous Seattle housing prices (up 55% regionwide in the last four years, with steeper increases in the city proper). I may be forced to commute by park-and-riding, rather than catching the bus outside my door the way I do today. ($350/month for parking in my office is still not gonna happen.) And in that scenario I’m going to buy a cheap used Leaf, hopefully with a new battery. It’s absolutely the perfect car for the park and ride.

        Totally dorky, though. But I have more important things to worry about than whether the chicks waiting for the bus dig it.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          What of the mighty fleet of Japanese luxury?

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            LS460’s not going anywhere. But I wouldn’t park and ride with it more than once in a while. I don’t want to subject it to sun all day, door dings, and so many short trips.

            The Legend would continue living with the relative in whose garage it resides now. It’s proven to be every bit the reliable Honda, despite all its miles, and she’s driving it often. I use it only on weekends.

        • 0 avatar
          zamoti

          They’re basically giving away Leafs after they come off lease. I found several 2012s and 13s with maybe 22-25k on them for about $8k-10k. As a commuter with a reasonably low TCO, it seems like a pretty good deal. You might find a comparable Versa for less, but that’s about it.

    • 0 avatar
      baconator

      Funny. I live in the Silicon valley bubble-world, where having even a deposit on a Tesla does in fact mean exactly what Jack says it does. This article is so obviously true that I’m surprised it’s even controversial.

      It doesn’t help that the Leaf is eye-searingly ugly and the new Bolt completely anonymous-looking. Whereas the Model 3 looks like the Model S, which looks like a slightly more feminine version of the Aston Martin Rapide. And in my part of the world, driving a Model S says “I’m wealthy and connected,” whereas driving a Rapide means “I’m a third-world kleptocrat’s heir, with no skills and a coke habit.”

      Swear to god, half the people I know with a deposit on a Model S are currently driving a Subaru or a 10-year-old Honda Accord. They can currently afford a $40k or $50k car, but just didn’t care enough about what they were driving to spend any more than the bare minimum. Until Teslas came along. Say what you will about Musk, he understands what makes people want to buy a car.

  • avatar
    Driver8

    Heh.
    These same feelz will leave them stranded miles from an extension cord.
    I’d offer to pick one up in my ICE vehicle, but if they can afford a Tesla, they’ll probably be on the wrong side of thirty.

    Until fusion and charging that’s as fast as filling a tank of gas, they will stay toys and virtue signals, but society will eat itself long before.

  • avatar
    yamahog

    Can’t wait for a cheap, cheap 3rd gen loaded Prius with the HUD. Holla if you hear me. I’m going to feel so smart and vindicated if I can pick one up with less than 100k miles for less than 10k.

    But there are elements of the model 3/electric cars that have some intrinsic value – I think Tesla is going to develop some sort of leadership in autonomous driving, supporting the underdog, supporting Musk so he has more money to plow into hyperloops / rockets / whatever else. No gear changes, not sucking down fuel to sit in stop and go traffic, ect.

    You hit the nail on the head about the emotional/sexual appeal of the Tesla but so what? People are self-absorbed, the average american with means has had had their material needs basically since birth, people jump at the chance to feel what they want to feel. Look at the girls with eating disorders who can catch d1ck and fit into any clothes they want. How can they dominate base survival instincts? They want some aesthetic / feeling so badly they might kill themselves in pursuit of it. Obviously they’re mentally ill and their pursuit is non-functional for broader society but it serves as a bound of how badly people can sacrifice for a feeling and goodness gracious its so much better that people can buy feeling than trade their health for it.

    If someone buys a tesla to scratch some itch / feel something, bless them. There are fewer externalities than someone buying a brodozer.

  • avatar
    roadscholar

    Fuck you’re good.

  • avatar
    chaparral

    Jack,

    The Model 3 gets the attention because it has the Model S’s killer app. The Bolt doesn’t, and the Leaf isn’t even close.

    It’s been a long time since Woodward Avenue had an undisputed sedan king. One shot, in imperfect traction conditions, zero to shut down. Do you want anything other than an adequately powerful electric motor, a good traction control system, and big drive tires?

    The Model S isn’t far off a bike. Tesla promised a version of the Model 3 that’s almost as fast. They primarily sell high-content, high-power cars. GM probably nailed their rationally-set functional requirement of 0-60 in 6.5 s with the Chevy Bolt. But the requirement is wrong, and therefore so is the car.

  • avatar
    olddavid

    This says more about your deep insecurity than anything automobile related. Perhaps a good Jungian could help, provided you stick to the medication regimen.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      I tried a Malaysian, a Manchurian, and a Thai. They all said soul brother too beaucoup.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      Baruth reminds me of that black knight in Holy Grail who keeps losing limbs.

      The less of him there is left, the more offensive he becomes.

      • 0 avatar
        olddavid

        Nah, I disagree. I remember the first time I read one of his irreverent screeds, I thought him the resurrection of Hunter with an automotive bent. Perhaps his early writings set the bar too high and, subsequently his wings melted. Possibly a more realistic parallel would be Bret Easton Ellis with his alternate weeks as darling or hair shirt wearer – you pick. Whatever your thinking is on his work he forces you to use your brain to attempt to fit his twisted worldview into some semblance of standard thinking and that is a good thing. I have also found that his R&T musings appear to benefit from a strong editor. Regardless, JB is that rare automotive writer who could amuse with any topic possibly with the exception of golf. He doesn’t strike me as patient enough to understand that particular perversion.

        • 0 avatar
          05lgt

          The Gonzo is strong with JB. If you agree with more than 49% of what he writes, seek professional help.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          olddavid,

          That’s some impressive exoneration you’ve provided for Aging Jock Syndrome.

          And weren’t you the guy who the other day said you had some kind of problem communicating?

          I don’t think so :-)

  • avatar

    A

  • avatar
    Pch101

    That was a fun read. But what you’re missing is that Musk has convinced a segment of the public that Tesla is an innovative tech company that is devoted to innovation, as opposed to a normal ol’ boring car company.

    You are a late adopter who doesn’t fathom the mentality of “early adopters” and “innovators”, as those terms are understood in the context of the technology adoption cycle. Neither of those groups is focused on practicalities. And political conservatives who freak out at the sign of a power cord attached to an automobile need to understand that these consumers aren’t even necessarily motivated by environmentalism, either.

    I would suggest that you read Geoffrey Moore’s “Crossing the Chasm” to see how this works with tech companies and the demand for technology products. (And it remains to be seen whether Tesla will “cross the chasm”.)

    The fact that Tesla isn’t particularly innovative and is focusing on a drivetrain that went out of vogue over 100 years ago makes no difference. The fact that every other automaker knows how to install a big battery in a four-wheeled device and lose gobs of money in the process of selling it also makes no difference. There is a segment of the public that perceives Tesla as being courageous and ahead of the curve, and that’s all that matters.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Not to be a dick or overly defensive but I was working with the FSF and meeting with Stallman before the release of Windows ME. I bought my 911 by selling tech and I bought my YZF by writing production MySQL-based products when people thought you couldn’t use anything but Oracle or Sybase for million-user bases.

      The $10,000 Thinkpad butterfly 701? I had one.
      The 600X? First guy on the block.
      The $1k Motorola flip phone that was half the size of the StarTAC? I was the first Verizon agent in the Midwest to take delivery.

      I understand the mindset and the mentality, having both profited and lost by it. :)

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        “writing production MySQL-based products when people thought you couldn’t use anything but Oracle or Sybase”

        You’re a saint, don’t let anyone else ever tell you anything different.

  • avatar
    Frank Galvin

    Nailed it Jack.

    The Tesla screams alpha dog. My wife was with me at a Cars N’ Coffee and saw the Model S up close (parked next to an Aston Rapide). She loved it. Why? She noticed the luxury, the design, the attention to detail, and thought it just looked cool. Whenever I showed her the rear hatch with jumpseats she was even more enthused. Was there a mention of its range, superior crash testing, environmental benefits? Hell no.

    In a moment of weakness – I mentioned getting a Prius. She told me no, and that I’d lose a peace of my soul. Also, she associates it with what we call the know it all Western Mass hippy. Bearding college profs with the strategically placed Warren, Obama, Jill Stein, and Bernie sticker. We hate them.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Never met your wife, but I think I’d like her.

      Don’t be jealous, I bat for the other team. :)

    • 0 avatar
      yamahog

      There’s something awesome and hilarious (to me) about DFL stickers on Priuses.

      If the stars align and I get a 3rd gen prius (with the HUD. nbd. what’s up?) I’m going to get an Obama / Biden ’08 bumpersticker. And someone somewhere is going to realize that the bumper sticker is older than the car and then they’ll get to see the best satire of their trip to the grocery store.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    Auto journalists with a mancrush on Lutz is a lousy analogy for consumers putting down a deposit on a Model 3. But a great way for you to remind us you are the better driver on a track.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    You might mean “ACH”, not “ACD”.

    What’s funny is that GM had that same emotional appeal with the EV1. It was a groundbreaking vehicle at the time in a way that the Volt and probably bolt definitely are not. But, surely, GM could have captured some of that emotion. With the Volt, in particular, GM seems set to fulfill the niche of having the most unremarkable partial-EV on the market. That may be a profitable niche, but it may not be.

    As for the Bolt: the styling is ungainly. That alone would put me off. At the same time, I am not about to put a $1,000 deposit on a car that hasn’t been seen in any worthwhile form, whose release date is unclear, and which I’m not sure will ever surface as promised in the first place.

  • avatar
    b787

    Articles like this are the reason I come here every day. I don’t fully agree with you – I believe Model 3 buyers are the same people who want Model S, but cannot afford it – the thing is, this piece is just well written and fun to read.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    Ladder theory at its finest. Ugh.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    All of this from a stupid cringe worthy Internet meme? Jesus…

  • avatar

    Two or three years ago the Concours of America (formerly Meadow Brook) had a class of vintage and modern electric cars. There was a then newly available Tesla Model S brought by a woman and her husband. The woman was almost orgasmic over the car. That’s not hyperbole. Her excitement about the car was almost sexual. The lady was aroused.

    As for Elon Musk as alpha male, Mrs. Musk got tired of him.

    • 0 avatar
      acmoney

      I’ve seen (or heard) the same thing. One of the women I used to hook up with (who is now married) was on the phone with me describing a blue Model S. I swear I had never heard her talk or breathe that way before. I couldn’t even get a word in edgewise. No Tesla model really fits my needs/wants right now but her reaction is something I think about often

  • avatar

    Otaku volunteer for Bernie? That’s a way to smear with a wide brush. Maybe it’s time to lay off Tumblr for a while.

  • avatar
    Geekcarlover

    You almost have to admire Musk. He actually has the balls to treat his customers worse than Honda did in the 80’s. All they can say is “Thank-you Sir! May I have another?”

  • avatar
    an innocent man

    People put money down on the Model 3 because it allows them to be hip, to “own” an EV, without having to actually drive one every day. “Yes, I have a Tesla, it’s not MY fault they haven’t actually built it yet.”

  • avatar
    brn

    What the hell kind of “article” was that? Jalopnik is looking better and better.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    You make a lot of highly specific claims about the buyers of a number of cars based on… your status as a writer? It’s all very amusing, but until you bring real data you’re just spewing BS. Because it amuses you (and me). Fortunately, this slips past Marks ban on fiction.

  • avatar
    ilkhan

    I have my deposit in.

    The leaf and the bolt hold 0 interest for me at all. I’m coming from a ’16 Mustang GT. GovMotors and Nissan don’t care about 0-60 times on the bolt or leaf, and neither has any interest in setting up the infrastructure to enable only-vehicle electric households. So I don’t have any interest in them. But gas is still going to go up, and the coyote, while an awesome engine, is thirsty.

    Elon is doing *amazing* things, and on a timeline that (while maybe isn’t as on-track as Elon wants) is considered impossible by every competitor.

    But I’m still a ford fanboy, so a 200 mile range, supercharger/autopilot enabled, AWD 400HP Focus RS-E would get me to switch back to Ford in a heartbeat.

  • avatar
    JustPassinThru

    Jack’s nailed this one.

    People who buy Teslas, are buying everything BUT the car. The idea; the status; the dream…when the actual hardware could be had for a fraction of the cost, immediately, as in a used Leaf.

    Electric vehicles today are image vehicles; and their real cost-of-ownership or even environmental involvement (which is far from zero) don’t enter into the equation. How do I know? I own, not a Tesla, but a Zero. Purchased used, from someone who tired of the Dream.

    It’s both fun and frustrating. Cost of use is next-to-nil. Performance is up there with a typical modern 650; the new Zeros are much better but this specimen is a 2012.

    I’m braced a lot, when stopped, by tech junkies. But oddly, no one has answered my Craigslist ad to sell it – which I ought to do, being on Funemployment and low on cash.

    Nor is the Zero setting sales records at the local franchise. Everyone loves these things, until the time comes to buy. The need for either access to a fast charger or else an outlet near pavement, plus eight hours to charge, is the reality which dashes the dream.

    Those who want this thing will get no trash-talk from me; but I don’t expect it to turn out well for either Musk or his customers.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    The Model 3 is sexy. The Bolt looks like a Honda Fit. The Leaf looks like a Renault Megane that accidentally bit its tongue.

    The Model 3 is from a sexy company whose image is that of a group of brilliant people revolutionizing an industry to make the would a better place. The Bolt is from a company known for cruddy vehicles driven by your racist uncle—and for killing the electric car. The Leaf is from a company known for third-string cars sold to people with third-string credit ratings.

    Men and women care about status and are hedonistic. You could have just written that, and left the super-creepy pick-up artist stuff out.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “The Model 3 is from a sexy company whose image is that of a group of brilliant people revolutionizing an industry to make the would a better place.”

      image and reality are not congruent to each other in this case. But then again, we live in a country where a lot of people truly believe Donald Trump honestly believes any of the words he ejaculates from his mouth.

  • avatar
    tnk479

    Brilliant writing as always Mr. Baruth. I found myself nodding in agreement from the first sentence to the last.

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