By on May 4, 2016

Takata Logo on Belt

Confirming rumbling from earlier today, the U.S. Department of Transportation is calling for the recall of 35 to 40 million Takata airbag inflators that pose a potentially deadly risk to motorists.

All of the company’s ammonium nitrate-based frontal airbag inflators that were shipped to automakers without a chemical drying agent are included in the recall.

“The acceleration of this recall is based on scientific evidence and will protect all Americans from air bag inflators that may become unsafe,” said Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx in a statement.

The doubling of the recall’s scope comes as the agency confirmed exactly what causes some of the airbags to explode, propelling shrapnel into the faces of those seated in front of them. At least 10 deaths and over 100 injuries in the U.S. are linked to the airbags.

Three investigations by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration found that a “combination of time, environmental moisture and fluctuating high temperatures contribute to the degradation of the ammonium nitrate propellant in the inflators,” the Transportation Department stated.

“Such degradation can cause the propellant to burn too quickly, rupturing the inflator module and sending shrapnel through the air bag and into the vehicle occupant.”

Because the chemical degradation occurs faster under the right conditions — high humidity and temperature fluctuations — the recall is being phased to prioritize the highest-risk vehicles first.

Five recall phases are planned, beginning this month and ending by December 2019.

Older model vehicles are in the first group, and a list of the vehicle priority rankings can be found here.

A total of 28.8 million airbag inflators have already been recalled since the safety issue was discovered.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

73 Comments on “BREAKING: Department of Transportation Recalls 35–40 Million Airbags; Time Plays a Factor in Risk...”


  • avatar
    VCplayer

    I think it’s time for a Takata Deathwatch tag.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      They deserve to die, after this, and the seatbelt fiasco 20 years ago.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        not really being up on the legal happenings…has it been charged Takata actually did something to cause this, or only active with the cover up?
        Were actual corp decisions made to use poor quality materials?

        As word and discovery comes, it turns out they are just now finding out what is causing the airbag failure and early explosions.

        This makes a big, big difference to me. Especially if we are gonna form a hang party and do some lynchin at the town oak tree.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Would it not be cheaper to simply disable the aging airbags so they never fire? The government should simply authorize individuals and shops to disable affected airbags and provide instructions on how to do so without screwing over the computers.

    • 0 avatar
      Ubermensch

      Doing so would likely result in far more injuries than leaving the defective airbags in place.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        Right. About 3 people die annually from faulty airbags, and about 50,000 are saved by modern safety devices.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        not true.
        Wearing your seat belts would be fine.

        I hate airbags and the forcing of explosions in my face.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Hear, Hear, TT.

        • 0 avatar
          VW16v

          “I hate airbags and the forcing of explosions in my face.” Hilarious!!!

        • 0 avatar
          Steve Biro

          Agreed, TT. Air bags exist because too many drivers refused to wear their seat belts. And air bags continue to be more powerful than they need to be in order to account for the few who still don’t wear their belts. I am not a mean-sprited person. But, after all this time, if one is still not wearing belt while driving, perhaps natural selection should be allowed to take its course.

        • 0 avatar
          beachjesus

          Airbags deploy at different speeds depending on whether or not you are wearing your seatbelt. If you are belt-less, they deploy at top speed, but slower if you are belted.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Cheaper? Yeah. Safer? No way. There is a chance a defective airbag could kill you, but there is a far greater chance an airbag will save your life.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        where do you get this information? From a government site? And airbag lobbyist?

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          There has been enough frontal crashes pre and post airbags, in enough different “government” jurisdictions, that the likelihood of all the benefits being just some weird, made up conspiracy, is pretty slim.

          • 0 avatar
            TrailerTrash

            no…but data can be manipulated and hand picked.
            For instance, I read some of the data. There was all the with and without damage and total lives saved.
            There was never any side important data.

            For instance, they never list any damage done by the airbag that the passenger would never have received if there was no airbag.
            Just total lives saved.

            So in the instance below like we have with Brett Woods, damage was caused by the airbag that would not have otherwise been done.
            These stats are never used.

        • 0 avatar
          ScarecrowRepair

          @TT: Where do you get YOUR information? Gut instinct?

    • 0 avatar
      lonborghini

      That’s not going to happen. Remember, it was the government’s idea to require the installation of these explosive devices in our cars in the first place. If it had been up to the consumer, who would have checked the box for an optional interior bomb package?

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        You know, there are probably several community colleges nearby that offer courses in beginner statistics at very reasonable rates. You might want to check that out.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        it was Takata who chose a propellant that degrades due to environmental factors.

        • 0 avatar
          VW16v

          “it was Takata who chose a propellant that degrades due to environmental factors”.

          Please site the fact that Takata chose this propellant due to environmental factors? It appears the decision was to save a few penny’s on each airbag.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            that’s not what I said, nor what I meant. Let me re-word it.

            “The propellant degrades due to environmental factors, and Takata is responsible for choosing it.”

          • 0 avatar
            TrailerTrash

            JimZ

            you are correct.

            However, it is not known, from my reading anyway, if Takata KNEW they were choosing a chem combo that was going to deteriorate.
            How can anybody know this over a period of 15, 20 or 25 years?

            I can hardly believe Takata knowingly chose a chem combo that would degrade.

            The ONLY way they all get out of jail free is to place a sticker warning telling owners THEY have to replace or check after a period of time.
            That’s as unfair as Mr. Speed Talk Lawyer after every drug ad on TV explaining all the real bad side effects of drugs…all while beautiful music is playing.
            They put the responsibility and cost onto future owners.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Not a chance. A single TV ad of a woman’s post collision face; slammed into a steering wheel, vs into a soft pillow, and every woman would have wanted them. Ditto for all non Baruth feminized males :)

        ABS brakes on motorcycles have huge take rates, despite neither being mandatory, nor nearly as cheap in comparison to the cost of the vehicle as airbags.

        Doesn’t excuse government getting involved in something that is none of their business, but airbags are a genuinely beneficial development. That would have become the norm even in a free country.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          “That would have become the norm even in a free country.” Ouch. I guess it is a given that the American Experiment has ended.

          Airbags were offered a few times before they were mandated. Take rates were practically non-existent. It probably didn’t help that the car companies that offered them were selling lots of junk that they should have mastered long before but apparently hadn’t. Would a sane person have trusted the GM that made the Citation to put an explosive device in their steering wheel?

          In fact, the first mandated airbags killed lots of short and light people because of government regulation that required airbags strong enough to work in barrier crashes with unbelted large test dummies. That made them far too strong for small women and children, with fatal results.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Considering how many cars I’ve owned with airbags in them and never once having one fire off for any reason, I consider them a waste of space, time and money. I was never a fan of anyone using an explosive in the cabin of a vehicle simply because of the potential danger that has now become real. I’ve been in a wreck where I hit the side of another car at 45mph and the seat and shoulder belt held me perfectly secure away from the steering wheel. My only injury was a pair of bruised knees hitting the underside of the dashboard in an ’86 Buick.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Would you want to be VW now or Takata right now, I take VW cheating to this mess anyway.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    This article should headline with a picture of a mushroom cloud.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    We received letters from BMW saying this:

    “This notice is sent to you in accordance with the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act. BMW AG has decided that a defect, which relates to motor vehicle safety, exists in certain Model Year 2006-2015 BMW 1 series, 3 series and X1, X3, X5 and X6 SAV’s.” The letter continues to explain what can happen if an airbag ruptures -that it can seriously injure or kill the driver, passenger or anyone else in the car.

    The vehicles outlined by BMW’s letter are not the same ones in the vehicle priority rankings link included in this article. Seems it’s a safe assumption that the vehicles listed by NHTSA are in a higher risk category than those not included, and that other non-priority vehicles (such as the 06-15 BMW’s) will receive the airbag replacements at some undetermined point.

    Anyone know of timeframes for these parts coming available?

  • avatar

    TOTAL RECALL

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Problem: who has 35-40 million approved replacement airbag modules for the various makers and models, in addition to the 28.8 million previously recalled, *in stock*? How much excess capacity do existing airbag makers have? How fast can they ramp up production to meet the recall demand, in addition to annual new car production? What will happen when you tell drivers they have a lethal device on their car, but there will be a 3-4 year wait for a safer replacement, so keep driving and don’t worry?

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        Also, if Takata rapidly ramps up production – with all the risks that entails — how safe will the new airbags be vs. what you currently have?

        Risks exist in life.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          they’ll be *safer* since the propellant is “fresh” and hasn’t had a chance to degrade, but at this point I’d rather have an inflator which uses something other than ammonium nitrate.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Perhaps, and I’m no expert on manufacturing air bags. But I do have expertise in ramping up production rapidly, and I can tell you that it is fraught with unpredictability.

            You can’t just hire people off the street who will replicate your current, experienced workforce. When you work machines on 3 shifts instead of 1, you get all sorts of tolerance issues. And then you have workers and managers who are new and don’t know how to keep the product within tolerance levels, but they ship anyhow, because they have such high production targets. And of course, we have Takata’s history of transparency on quality issues…

            Better the devil I know, in this instance.

          • 0 avatar
            TrailerTrash

            this whole plan seems like a sure set up for future disaster.

            Or, to put it another way, knowing what we all know now about the chemical make up in these designs, is anybody here feeling real good about their airbag in 15 to 20 years????

            I mean…planning long term chemical stability is nonsense, especially when it involves an explosion in people’s cars and faces.
            Seems to me all these designs are difficult and likely to eventually cause harm or some kind of failure.

            Isn’t this a sort of fool’s errand? Isn’t this forced safety by the government onto our lives and now this Takata failure sorta caused by the government?

            Does anybody offer any assurances that over time any design isn’t going to fail.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            @TT

            If you don’t feel comfortable about your airbag after 20 years, get it swapped out for a new one…. Most people do, alongside the car built around it….

            Cars tend to come with 3-6 year warranties. No reason why airbags should be expected to last the lifetime of the solar system. When you buy a pair of jeans, they tend to wear out over time. That’s a weird reason to insist on walking around naked.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Cars tend to come with 3-6 year warranties. No reason why airbags should be expected to last the lifetime of the solar system.”

            because they’re a safety device, and safety devices are to work correctly through the life of the vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            TrailerTrash

            stuki

            um…not to mention this is a sudden high replacement cost just handed to me.

            so why not give it a 150K warranty from the MFR if it is is necessary to replace?

  • avatar

    I just got another recall notice for my late 2012 TDi.

    I open the official VW envelope.

    Recall airbag….no parts yet……Takata.

    I can’t tell them the car is gone, I live for their next letter….

    The hits just keep coming !

    Oh, and BMW replaced the passenger airbomb in my 03 330i, but I’m waiting for a new driver’s bag too. Anticipated date unknown.

    Both cars were made in Germany. I had an airbag also replaced in an Acura made in Canada, too. Yea globalism.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      I’m in the same boat with an 03 330i. Last time I asked about it the dealership (SF Bay Area) was hopeful for this summer, but really had no confidence in any date.

  • avatar
    MarquisDeSolder

    Looking at the list of recalled vehicles, it seems that some of the recalls are for vehicles in “high humidity” areas. Regional recalls are cost cutting nonsense. Whose to say that a car registered in a ‘low humidity’ area didn’t spend years parked at a vacation home in a high humidity area? What about cars in “low humidity” areas which have leaky body seals and damp carpets? How about cars which were crashed and repaired with used airbags imported from high humidity areas?

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      Only airbags recalled in high humidity areas = Republican values

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Except the guy in the White House the last seven years is a Democrat, and by now his Democrat appointees are “in charge” (theoretically). Why be partisan on government actions? It really doesn’t matter who is in charge anymore, the career bureaucrats view our elected officials as transients. How else do you explain the IRS stiff-arming Congress by claiming the telephone records were deleted, the emails were wiped, the disk drives were crushed, etc.?

  • avatar
    Brett Woods

    My brother lost some vision from an airbag injury. In his case, while going through an intersection he got clipped on the rear quarter panel by a car going the opposite way. Apparently, that set off all the airbags. Then he couldn’t see and veered off the road into a lamp post and did a face plant into the steering wheel but with the airbag already deployed, his eye went into the metal cup that the airbag was in before it inflated. The eye looks alright for the most part, but he can’t see that good out of it.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      Ooooh! How aweful. Really sorry to hear.
      Yet it also makes me angry.

      • 0 avatar
        Brett Woods

        Yea, he’s okay. I thought it worth motioning since according to him the bag just stayed inflated for a second. So watch out for all the scraps and the container part if you are in one of those multiple impact collisions. Really crappy if the container fragments and slits your throat as with that poor lady. Like B&B say, they probably saved a lot of head injuries for sure. But I agree no one wants to play Russian roulette.

        Is that the full recall list in that .pdf linked in the article?

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Amazingly, I’ve never owned any vehicle on that list.

    I wonder how these vehicles will be tracked until 2019. Now is the time for used car dealers to ensure that recall work is performed on every vehicle they sell.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Most reprehensible product recall of the decade, if not maybe the last 30 years.

    They knew about this as far back as 2004, they falsified tests, they fired engineers, they lied to OEMs, and then when the OEMs were in too deep, at least Honda helped with the cover up.

    Impacts practically every maker on the planet, operators have no “quick fix” or temporary solution while waiting for an airbag. You literally drive around not knowing if the device meant to save you in an accident is actually a Claymore mine that will kill you in an accident.

    Worse than VW, Toyota, GM, FCA, and Ford recall and product liability issues of the last 2-decades combined. It is amazing to me the relatively free ride that Takata and to a lesser extent Honda have been getting in this scandal.

    • 0 avatar
      Zykotec

      I think one of the reasons it hasn’t had quite the impact of the GM or VW stories, this is a device that for the most part actually saves many many lives, and has only killed very few people.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Up to 11 that are known – hard to tell in a severe accident if the accident killed them or the exploding airbag did. It requires an ME to do more than a, “wow, they’re hamburger, death by multiple blunt force trauma. NEXT!”

        I believe the number is bigger than 11 and we will never know. Never mind the people scarred, blinded and maimed.

        • 0 avatar
          Zykotec

          Well, I still believe any medicine company would dream of a kill/save rate like the one Takata has. Unlike VW’s emissions or GM’s ignitions the Takata airbags actually save at least some people, it’s only purpose is not to cheat or steal money from people.
          No matter how small the risk is though, I do agree that this is a kinda scary situation, and I really want to know who built the airbag in my (british built/german sold) Honda.

  • avatar
    KevinC

    BMW is granting rental cars to people who don’t want to drive the affected cars. There are $$ limits and some rules that apply, but they WILL put you in a rental, if you demand one.

    Both of my cars were already recalled (E46 330CI & E39 M5) with absolutely no sign of when they might have the replacement bags in stock. Arrrrgh.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    As of MONTHS ago, I wondered at any article that speculated “Is Takata going to survive this disaster?” As if it was not a foregone conclusion at that point already. What OEM would NOT shift to a new supplier as soon as humanly possible? This recall only accelerated the inevitable BK.

    If I’m TRW or another airbag maker, as soon as the Takata scandal broke, I’d be putting the proverbial pedal to the floor to expand production as soon as possible.

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    Had this been a Tier 1 for one of the big 2.5, we’d have the idiot B&B dog-piling on top of comments like ‘THIS IS THE REASON I BUY MY CAMCORD AND MY KIDS WILL BE SAFE IM DONE WITH GM SINCE LIKE THE 1960s’

    But instead we have the idiot masses panning this off on the Tier 1.

    If you get into an accident and you like your warm climate, your skull may experience the ethical fallout of doing business with the Japanese culture, motherf*ckers.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      That’s what happens when you have a track record of selling people good cars for forty years. They give you the benefit of the doubt. Mind you the NHTSA couldn’t launch a campaign against Honda like they did with Toyota, what with Fiats being as likely to have recalled airbags as anything, and everyone else having at least some exposure. Weren’t the bad airbag inflators hecho en Mexico?

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      I see your point, Tresmonos — GM and Ford don’t get a lot of credit in some circles for the quality gains they’ve made. But remember that Takata supplied everybody, including FCA, Ford and BMW. This isn’t just a problem for Japanese automakers.

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        Not nearly the volume. Honda was their largest customer. All other OEM volume was a drop in the bucket compared to Honda. Also, Honda was Takata’s largest stakeholder.

        The B&B is generally fickle and clueless.

        Personally, I’d rather have my J body flock run allow air leakage after 10 years of ownership, than have my airbag detonate and kill my dumb 4ss.

        If any of you actually saw the chain of custody lineside storage locations (locked down by line supervisors), the poka-yokes and tooling that is involved with airbag and safety devices, there would certainly be more outrage over this situation. Operators are hand picked for these jobs, because if you screw them up, you get this. But maybe this is only in US based OEM final locations? Maybe Honda just throws these on with clicker wrenched and Jim Beam? HONDA MUST USE LABORERS THAT ARE DRUNK OR HIGH OR WE WOULDN’T HAVE THESE EGREGIOUS MURDER DEATH MACHINES /sarcasm

        This is a gross violation of trust. It’s par for the course when dealing with Japanese ethics. Being a quality engineer for a large Japanese tier 1 was an eye opening experience.

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      @ tresmonos….My thoughts exactly. Hundreds, and thousands , of Nissans , Hondas , Toyotas all with Takata air bags.

      Last nights NBC news story, what does he camera focus on? None other than the “Chevy Bow Tie” . Its seems to me that just a very small percentage of Chevys were involved. A couple of years of Silverados maybe ?

      Your right, no way would the domestics get away with pawning this off on a supplier. As you say , in the eyes of many, the Japanese auto manufacturing industry can do no wrong.

      The “pile on domestic hatred” here at TTAC, is becoming boring and tedious .

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        mikey,
        It just makes it easier and a lot more fun for me to troll the B&B. You have to wade through the peanut gallery to get to worth while commenters like you.

        The Japanese are king of spinning PR. Their warranty metrics are masked within scheduled service intervals and unreported ‘service actions’ aka recalls. It’s well known in the industry.
        Same product, slightly more regimented SPC, just more devious business practices.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          “More devious” might be a reach. I don’t think you want to stand on a soapbox extolling GM for the honesty and transparency of their leaders this past decade.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            VoGo,
            I am biased – I’ll share that in a bit. After talking with many colleagues and ex classmates of mine, I think I can say it with certainty that their business practices are more unethical. Their corporate espionage is historically horrid – this is a fact.

            There are merits to Japanese owned manufacturing, don’t get me wrong. There are also downsides to it. This being one of them.

            It’s like a slightly different flavor of sh1t cake.

            The poor [email protected] quality manager for Takata is probably blackballed from the industry.

            As for my bias:
            Nothing was more exciting than containing non conformities. It was like automotive firefighting. The days when I would be successful were rewarding. There was one day I had where I was unable to pull a known population out from the field because a Japanese President pulled some Fight Club sh1t and deemed it unnecessary and not financially worth it. It inevitably cost my immediate supervisor his job.

            Long story short, I waited for these parts to come back to my plant by tracking known julian date coded parts in warranty returns. I got back ~90% of my bad parts via service departments. The 10% keeps me up at night because I know the failure modes for that part and the target customer application (not to mention who bought this production lot of OEM vehicles). I don’t hate many people, but that Japanese CEO can rot in hell. It’s not like I didn’t try, either. After I verbally assaulted him for his decision he calmly told me that I was unlike any other employee that he has ever encountered. Probably because I had a conscience.

            When I quit that organization, I felt liberated from hell. I’m sure it’s business as usual for their now seven Tier 1 plants and their ever growing OEM sales base.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            We’re all biased; I always appreciate those who are honest about it. But you bring a ton of experience and insight to TTAC, for which many of us are grateful.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      “But instead we have the idiot masses panning this off on the Tier 1.”

      The breadth of the recall would suggest that OEMs don’t play much role in the specific design of airbags, so it is reasonable to fault the supplier.

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        That depends. They’re likely a full service supplier. Now, did they violate a print or a design directive from this many OEM’s? It’s hard to say. Did the OEM dictate the hermetic sealing process (I’m guessing this is what failed) or was it a non conformity? Did the metal frame have a material standard that was not adhered? Do other airbags have this same seal failure but just had more stringent material controls for their housing?

        From what I read, it’s a failure in the manufacturing process and there was insufficient control plan measures to detect the issue, that or the control plan measures were in place and Takata violated the control plan. If you’re making the part to print, but know there is insufficient control plan measures in place to maintain design intent after the warranty period, are you at fault for not communicating the issue to the customer as a full service supplier?

        My point was that supplier related issues in the recent past (GM/Delphi ignition failure) were painted by the press and the B&B to be strictly a OEM issue. The supplier retooled that ignition module without a print revision. They were joint partners in that crime. There were likely more engineers and management at Delphi aware of the failure modes, crash test results (and had just overall better product knowledge of the switch) than at GM. I can say that with certainty. Your supplier is generally the subject matter expert, anymore. They are also more involved with development and quality testing than the OEM design and release engineer. D&R’s are glorified paper pushers, anymore. It’s why they’re being outsourced to 2nd world labor.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          Airbags are a unique animal. I wouldn’t compare them to ignitions.

          I have no doubt that GM played a far greater role in the ignition design than any automaker played in whatever design and/or processes that caused Takata’s airbags to failure.

          Also, it would seem that GM’s internal processes contributed to the delays in making the linkage between the various fatal crashes and the faulty design. As far as I can tell, GM focused on the contributory negligence of the cases (i.e. that the drivers involved often played roles in causing the crashes) instead of understanding GM’s failure irrespective of fault (i.e. that airbags should have deployed in these cases regardless of who caused the wreck.) I wouldn’t attribute that failure to malice, but that also isn’t a ringing endorsement of GM’s corporate culture.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            I agree with your points. Delphi was in there with the D&R. They knew the failure modes just as well as the GM personnel. They signed the Control Plan agreement documentation and they likely helped author the DFMEA/PFMEA. They got off the hook far too easily.

            I need to find some sort of internal breakdown of this airbag case and read it. I’m sure I’d find it fascinating. Breaking it down and analyzing it would be a great addition to TTAC or any car blog.

            You’ve been good at grounding my bias recently – thank you.

  • avatar
    Speedygreg7

    To those who may know like Tresmonos or pch101;

    My inherited Japanese made Infiniti G20 is 14 years old, but is NOT currently on the list of recalled vehicles. I am suspicious of this since so many other Nissan of the period are included, but should I be worried about the airbag anyway simply due to its age? The warning sticker states to have it inspected after 10 years, but what does that really mean? What is checked and how is it done?

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Arthur Dailey: @Lokki, Well there are not too many car shows, new models or manufacturer sponsored jaunts to comment...
  • Arthur Dailey: @theLaine, you keep ignoring the key issue, the mathematical reality that without measures to reduce...
  • thelaine: Dr. Fauci has now written, “If one assumes that the number of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic cases...
  • readallover: We need to start a contest: Between Mini and Fiat, who can come up with the most `special editions` of...
  • JimZ: “But it is a virus that jumped to humans in Wuhan, China because corrupt goverent oversight allowed for...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Timothy Cain
  • Matthew Guy
  • Ronnie Schreiber
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth