By on May 18, 2016

2016 Infiniti QX50 AWD Front 3/4, Image: © 2016 Matthew Guy/The Truth About Cars

2016 Infiniti QX50

3.7-litre V6 (325 horsepower @ 7,000 rpm, 267 lbs-ft @ 5,200 rpm

Seven-speed automatic transmission with Drive Sport mode, all-wheel drive

17 city / 24 highway / 20 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

15 (Observed, MPG)

Base Price: $35,850 (U.S.) / $37,900 (Canada)

As Tested: $44,495 (U.S) / $50,080 (Canada)

All U.S prices include a $995 destination fee. All Canadian prices include $1,995 freight and PDI fees, and A/C tax when equipped.

From krill-hungry Lincolns to Predator-style Lexus grilles, the automotive market is littered with luxury crossovers like rocks covering the landscape of my home province of Newfoundland. With few exceptions, they’re all ponderous boxes offering the driving dynamics of tapioca pudding. Adding a sport package to these machines simply upgrades them to slightly warmer tapioca pudding.

The 2016 Infiniti QX50, though, surprised me … and I like surprises — for example, buying a new type of beer and finding it to my liking, or having a tool work better than expected. These are all experiences that give me pure joy. Heck, I even bought my first house largely based on the fact its floorplan wasn’t what I expected.

The 3.7-liter V6 engine in the QX50 is the biggest surprise, even though it appears in myriad forms in nearly every vehicle Nissan/Infiniti makes. The VQ V6 delivers 325 horsepower here; not a huge amount of power compared to its competitors, but it sings a song all the way to its near-7,000 rpm redline.

The engine is positioned behind the centre line of the front axle, contributing to the QX50’s positive handling characteristics and pleasant ride. The seven-speed automatic is a welcome relief from droning CVTs, and features a strangely petite shifter that’s perfect for Donald Trump or someone else gifted with small hands

2016 Infiniti QX50 AWD drivers seat, Image: © 2016 Matthew Guy/The Truth About Cars

Testing at my home in eastern Canada in April gives me an opportunity to sample the QX50’s all-wheel drive on snow-covered roads. A switch on the centre console, between the knobs for the furnace-quality heated front seats, allows drivers to switch into Snow Mode, thus blunting throttle response and adjusting traction control. Speaking of which …

2016 Infiniti QX50 AWD traction control, Image: © 2016 Matthew Guy/The Truth About Cars

… Nissan really doesn’t want you to turn off the traction control. The button for doing so is down by the driver’s left ankle, well out of view of any biped with eyes in their head and not their feet. I circled it in the picture above because it truly answers an ergonomic question no driver has asked nor dreamed to ask, even during those drug experimentation years.

Space abounds in the QX50. It’s big enough for this six-foot-six author, even with its sunroof, and provides for a comfortable driving position. Elsewhere, there are odd vertical creases on the passenger side of the dashboard under which the airbag resides, a styling flourish that left many riders puzzled and became the butt of crass remarks comparing it to various parts of the human anatomy. Quality, soft leather covers many touch points, but there are some hard plastic pieces in a few places where none should exist.

IMG_5893

Oddly, given the wealth of leg and headroom, the centre console is very cramped and fails to provide any practical real estate in which to lodge a phone being charged by the convenient USB port. Sure, the cupholder is there — notably covered by a nicely actioned, leather-trimmed lid — but I refuse to dump my phone into a well in which spilled remains of yesterday’s coffee may lie. The QX50’s centre console real estate is so tight that two large double-doubles cannot reside side-by-side in the cupholder. At least the covered storage underneath the centre armrest is deep, if narrow.

IMG_5904

The infotainment system provoked neither awestruck wonderment nor fits of rage. It was simply … there. Response times were adequate, screen resolution was adequate, and there was an adequate number of redundant buttons. Sensing a pattern here? Adequate.

As a personal preference, I do favour a black interior rather than the tan trappings of our tester, but that’s a very subjective opinion. No matter the colour, the leather smells great. Every vehicle has that new-car smell; the QX50 has the sumptuous, deep aroma of new leather. I tried to no avail to put the smell in a bottle with the intent of selling it at high-end boutiques: Eau d’Nissan.

For 2016, Infiniti stretched the QX50’s wheelbase by 3.2 inches, with all of that newfound space going to the passengers, and most of that to rear seat legroom. It’s certainly noticeable, too. Space for legs is good both front and rear and the 18 cu. ft. of cargo space is well shaped, easy to load, and lit from above by a light on the hatch. Why is this worth mentioning? Way up there on the hatch, the light won’t get covered by items in a fully laden cargo area. The fancy chrome handle on the cargo cover flops around like a freshly caught carp when not secured.

IMG_5883

Fuel economy was dismal, with the Infiniti swilling premium fuel at a rate far exceeding its 17.2 miles per gallon city rating. Ignoring the optimistic on-board computer and using technology available to Wyatt Earp, I used a pen and calculated a consumption of approximately 15 mpg. I’m willing to chalk some of that up to a green engine, winter tires, and 100 km of rural driving, but there’s no escaping the 3.7L VQ’s prodigious thirst when hauling around 4029 pounds of all-wheel-drive crossover.

Starting at $35,850, the QX50 AWD makes a good case for itself at that price point. Our tester, continuing the Infiniti tradition of forcing customers to buy certain option packages in order to get other ones, was loaded to the gunwales with $7,650 worth of options and fees to ring the bell at $44,495. At that price, it’s value proposition is murkier.

A $2,000 Premium Plus package mainly serves up a navigation system and Infiniti’s trick Around View Monitor, which allows a top down view of the vehicle during parking manoeuvres. Sadly, tasty saltine crackers are not included in the Premium Plus package. From there, the $2,400 Deluxe Touring package offers 19-inch alloys and HID headlamps that light up the dark side of the moon but have a strange and abrupt low beam cutoff point. The $2,750 Technology package includes lane keeping and other semi-autonomous driving features. It adds up quickly. Our tester had all three packages, with slightly different content and pricing for the Canadian market. I’d leave the trio of option boxes unchecked and drive away for less than 40 grand.

Infiniti has struggled with its identity since its rocks-and-trees advertising campaign that launched the brand in the late ‘80s. Even now, its product offerings range from milquetoast convertibles to brawny body-on-frame SUVs. The QX50 surprised me, pleasantly, and I think the QX50 inhabits the sportier side of the Infiniti showroom, offering an unpretentious alternative to the small crossovers from BMW and Mercedes.

Selling Points: siren of an engine, agreeable interior space, and that leather smells great
Deal Breakers: small centre console, alarming thirst for fuel, option pricing by Prada
The Bottom Line: a crossover for those who want more sport and less utility.

Infiniti Canada provided the test vehicle and insurance for this review.

[Images: © 2016 Matthew Guy/The Truth About Cars]

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109 Comments on “2016 Infiniti QX50 AWD Review – Athletic Heavy Drinker...”


  • avatar

    That 3.6 is a strong engine with a nic engine note in the smaller cars.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    The mileage experienced here wouldn’t be typical. Should get at least 18 in town driving, with the modern 6-speed and 3.7. Spend all your time on the highway and you’ll see 22.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    “For 2016, Infiniti stretched the QX50’s wheelbase by 3.2 inches, with all of that newfound space going to the passengers”

    That’s a good thing, because the old EX was ridiculously cramped inside, especially next to the G35.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Dal will be here to marvel at what could have been, and will be (?) maybe after the C-Max lease goes away?

    Purple is not my favorite color for this car, and it’s a shame you -must- have the 19″ wheels to get the HiD. I’d want the HiD with smaller wheels, as Infinitis never ride gently, no matter which model you select.

    It looks old in there as well (because it is) – you can see the 2008 roots showing right through.

    In any event, enjoy them while you can as this model will end up replaced by the Mercedes-ish QX30L or similar. I give this one a couple more years, as the VQ engine series and RWD nature of Infiniti slowly dies out.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Haha, yes. I still like these. But the wife (for some very good reasons) is now solidly converted to electric driving, and I have a feeling that a plug-in hybrid or BEV is going to be a permanent feature of the dal20402 household.

      The other car may not always be a giant luxury sedan, but one thing is certain: it won’t ever be a CUV.

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      I really like the EX. Its one of my crossover crushes. Big longitudinal 6, rear biased awd, and actual good looks.

      Who are we kidding, its not really a CUV, its the quintessential hot hatch on stilts. But heck, they arent even really tall stilts.

      I like it.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    The QX – is that what was the EX, or the JX? Their new naming scheme is stupid. Is that something that DeNysschen was responsible for, during his stopover between Audi and Cadillac?

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      It used to be the EX. I don’t mind the new naming scheme. Q=sedan and QX=CUV/SUV–that’s simple enough, but I wish they had waited until the next new model instead of halfway through the model run.

  • avatar
    TybeeJim

    Isn’t this based on the MB GLA250 with a larger engine in Canada?

  • avatar
    Nellakwah

    I want to like this car a lot – reminds me of a poor man’s Macan. Probably has great dynamics for a crossover given the engine location, RWD bias, etc. But I can’t get over some of the dated interior parts where I’d spend all of my time, and I wonder how much of “the 3.7L is so unrefined” that everyone mentions is actually true.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      It’s not that bad. There are two main things which quiet it down over the 3.5.

      1) Having a 6-speed transmission. It needed this.
      2) More cabin sound insulation, also needed.

      They have done some general refinement over the past few years as far as engine management is concerned, I believe. There’s also a big difference in these engines when cold vs. warm with regard to making a racket. They sound rough when they’re cold and it’s cold out.

      • 0 avatar
        maxxcool7421

        6-speed … this is super weird to me. This should be a 7-speed with a 3.5 V-lsd rear end. the city millage would bump up slightly and highway would be the same and it would accelerate .1 or .2 seconds faster…

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I just don’t think they have one available. Their other Nissan vehicles (save Z) are all CVT now. They need a box that can do duty across the Infiniti line.

          • 0 avatar
            maxxcool7421

            Hmm the G37 still has a full fat tranny (the 7 speed infact). odd.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Oh, didn’t realize that one actually.

            Grr, my knowledge is coming back from when I read up on this stuff couple of years ago. The M got the 7-speed starting in 09 or 10 – but only on the RWD version, the AWD still had the 5-speed.

      • 0 avatar

        Corey, AFAIK, it went like this:

        2008-2010 EX35 – 5-speed auto, 3.5
        2011-2013 EX35 – 7-speed auto, 3.5
        2013+ EX37/QX50 – 7-speed auto, 3.7

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      The radio/nav controls look basically like the same ergonomic nightmare they’ve used for the last ten years.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        Oh my god, Nissans have driven me crazy with that. I always go for the big knob below the screen to adjust the volume. Nope, that’s the “selector” knob. The Pathfinder drove me absolutely bat$h!t.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      If you’re comparing the 3.7 with engines in more expensive six-cylinder German competition, it’s pretty coarse. But if you’re comparing it with the 2.0T fours it’s priced evenly with, it’s great. At least as refined, more powerful, and sings to 7000 rpm.

      • 0 avatar
        Nellakwah

        That’s helpful – 325 naturally aspirated horsepower is definitely intriguing. The 3.5L in my RDX is really smooth at idle or WOT, and one of my favorite parts about it. It pulls nicely, but 40 or so more hp would always be welcome, though. I should probably just test drive the QX50 at some point.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      The interior definitely needs to enter this decade. I would love if Infiniti fired an arrow back at Lexus with similar “1986 Nakamichi 1000ZXL tape deck” interior styling, but with a much more rational infotainment interface. Combine that with the new 2.0T/3.0TT engines and a facelift and this thing could be a contender.

      Infiniti needs to update the FX/QX70 ASAP as well. Maybe combine this and that, now that this has basically grown to become it.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      “reminds me of a poor man’s Macan”

      You’re not the only person who’s said that; many reviewers agree with you.

      • 0 avatar
        Nellakwah

        It’s a shame – I felt like when the G35 sedan/couple first came out along with the original FX, Infiniti had a sharp, sporty lineup that was strong on value. They were really interesting cars to me – german dynamics without the premium. Then, their next iterations had this swoopy and cheap looking cladding that started to resemble an expensive Pontiac to me. I know nothing of their dealer experience, etc., but when it came time to buy a new car they were never really in the consideration set – by way of research or knowing folks that owned one. Doesn’t help that I follow car news as best I can, and I have trouble keeping up with the names and changes lately.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    The problem with this and it’s brother (FX/EX/Q-whatever) is they’re profiles are too swoopy and take the utility out of sport utility.

    There’s not really a good reason to buy one, they’re thirsty and not even practical. I’d bet good money a Tahoe/Suburban with it’s big blocky shape and big V8 gets better or equal millage.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      But then you have to drive (and park) a giant, nautical Tahoe or Suburban. This is intended to give you most of the driving qualities of a G37 with a little bit more utility.

      Also, based on my experience driving a Suburban-engined Pontiac, I’d expect the Suburban to get about the same mileage as this on the highway but much worse in the city.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      The Chevy SS supposedly gets 15/22 – small block V8 with 415hp and 415 lb-ft. 4000 pound car.

    • 0 avatar
      cbrworm

      These are really more sport, less utility. When they came out as the EX35, they were ridiculously fast and good handling for the class – I think sub 6 second 0-60 w/ RWD. They should be quicker now with the 3.7 and 7 speed auto, although lots of little cars are now available with 300+ HP.

      They used to be really lacking in rear seat and storage space. It sounds like they have addressed the rear seat space.

      As for the electronics, they look essentially unchanged from the 2007+ G35/G37/QX40.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I like it.

    Naturally aspirated V6 with 325hp that spins to 7000, available RWD, conventional automatic, and the one I built on Infiniti’s site priced out to only $36k (which for 2016 is a screaming deal).

    Why is this less money than a Maxima SR?

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Yeah. Besides thirst, it’s biggest problem is that most people think it’s a gussied up Nissan Rouge (which it is NOT).

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Same people who think the FX / QX70 is a gussied-up Murano (also not true).

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          You know, I like the FX in all years except 2010/11, when they had that guppy face. But the resale value on them is ridiculous for some reason, and the interior quality is not the same as it is on the Infiniti sedans until quite recently.

          They go used for like, GX money.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Hmm. I like the FX (my neighbor has one), but I’d rather have the GX.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            IKTR. For the same fuel economy you may as well get a considerably larger space to roam around in, seven seats, a Lexus badge, and a nicer interior.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            There is also something alluring about it being one of the last mid-sized BOF SUVs in our market.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Maaaybe when I replace my car, I will go check out an LS AWD and a GX and see what’s what. I’ve never actually owned an SUV before.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Psst. 28 is an LS pusher.

          • 0 avatar

            Yeah what is up with resale every time I look I think “well those should be cheap by now” but they never are.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Don’t bother with AWD on the LS. Adds weight, cuts 20 to 26 hp depending on year, tends to come with undesirable air suspension. Plenty of snow tire options for the OEM 18″ size, and a set of the 18s themselves can be had pretty cheaply.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            @Mopar I think it’s one of those cars where if people have one, they’re into it and replace it with another. That’s the only reason I can come up with how it holds value better than any other Infiniti.

            @28 @Dal, I have experienced RWD + winter roads here, and I am not a snow tires switch to and fro sort of person. Unless the GX drives like a tractor, I’d end up in one of those most likely.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Charger replacement!

    • 0 avatar
      maxxcool7421

      Demand. Hardly ever see a QX## versus the 25 or so Maximas. It is what ever the market will bear.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      I was inside of it. It may be drives nice but the interior is blend, outdated, boring, unsophisticated, uninteresting and crude. Perfect for old people

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Very nice. Providing decent back seat room often results in an ungainly appearance – and that’s no different here – but in this case you end up with a good car you can actually haul your friends around in.

    Small nit – that center console is too busy for me.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Would you prefer screen only options with a dial, like a modern Honda? People complain “This has no buttons, this screen crap is nonsense.”

      Give em some buttons, “This looks too busy.”

      Not singling you out, it’s what I see here all the time.

      • 0 avatar
        Nellakwah

        I actually like the recessed screen – just the buttons under it that look close to parallel with the ground and they’re very small – always reminded me of old school 90’s units. I get it’s looked that way for 10 years, but just needs bigger, simpler buttons on the next iteration.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          They’re not that bad, in use. My M has the same layout except everything is a bit larger. You can use the large buttons to navigate, or the dial, or the arrow buttons, or the steering wheel, or the screen for some of it.

          They are clearly labeled like MAP, DESTINATION, STATUS, etc.

          What looks worse on this car is the climate control, and the small buttons down by the radio. In my car they’re large and up high, with up/down temp, and +/- fan very simply. Don’t have to focus from the road to find them.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Just 18cu ft of seat-up cargo room?!?! That’s terrible. I know it’s not billed as a utility vehicle, but that is on par with a subcompact hatchback! For reference, most compact SUVs (CRV, Rogue, Escape, Rav4) have 35+ cu ft of rear cargo room. The diminutive Honda HRV has 24.3cu ft. It is truly an engineering accomplishment to have such crappy space utilization as this Infiniti. For comparison, my folks’ 09′ RX350 has 38.3 cu ft of cargo room with the back row in place.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      RWD and the slopey rear, plus there’s really not much vehicle behind the back seats to begin with. I suppose that’s where the 2nd-row space came from.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      I get the impression that this is a trendy 5-door alternative for G37 or 3-series buyers who would rather have a CUV form factor *because*. People who want an entry level luxury vehicle for the commute and errands and have infrequent backseat passengers. If the hold can fit a briefcase or shopping bags it is probably enough for the intended use.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        …and thus don’t need a four door form factor yet that is nearly all which is available.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          The back seat is pretty useful after the wheelbase stretch. The cargo hold is, indeed, tiny.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          Need 4 doors. Must impress friends by giving them a ride to lunch once after purchase then never again?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Never fear, the AWD coupe/2+2 hatch thing is coming soon. I am not giving up on my market prediction.

          • 0 avatar
            Zykotec

            @CoreyDL,well so far the Beetle Dune is only FWD if I recall correctly, and I guess the LR Evoque is more a hacthback than a coupe, but your day will come XD
            (or your prediction is 40 years late and was already built by AMC)

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I believe where we’re headed is something like an S60 Coupe CrossCountry, or an A5 Allroad type deal, or 428i-Allweather.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            “Never fear, the AWD coupe/2+2 hatch thing is coming soon. ”

            That’s kind of what the Toyota C-HR is, I think…

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            That’s a bad example, don’t put that one up there! It’s so god-awful looking.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Where the hell is my flying Delorean? I tire of ground only transport.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Kid seats.

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        A few years ago at the car show, I was thinking of a G37, and got in and found it doesn’t fit my 52L shoulders very well. Then I got in an EX37, and it fit much better. I don’t need the SUV form for my uses, but I do find they can be more comfortable for people who don’t slot into little sedans as easily.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    That front plate looks like it’s taken some snow banks the hard way.

  • avatar
    FOG

    Okay, take a Buick Verano or Lucerne, slap a different logo on it and some fancy sounding descriptions and the Lemmings all come out and say, “It’s an Infiniti and it is awesome.” I have never been impressed with this overpriced brand of metal.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Could you rewrite this so it pertains to anything?

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        Teacher- “Fwomp womp bwoom mwooomp fwomp fwaaah.”

        Charlie Brown- “Yes ma’am, I’ll remember to put on the winter tires this year.”

        Lucy- “You blockhead.”

      • 0 avatar
        FOG

        Corey, we can always depend on you to completely miss the point and say something foolish. It was entertaining though.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Please point to someone else who’s agreed/understood what you said. Feel free to look around.

          • 0 avatar
            FOG

            Sorry, forgot I was talking to brilliant people who cannot be swayed by mere logic. The article was a nice piece, but I have never felt that driving an Infiti is any better than a Buick, it is just costs more. This particular vehicle looks much like Buicks available today.

            Corey, I didn’t look around because this is a flippin’ blog. Also I tried not to use too many syllables in my explanation so you should be able to decipher (Corey, move your lips if you have to) it.

            I don’t expect anyone to agree with me on this. The bias toward foreign luxury cars is too prevalent. (Corey, prevalent means “way lots more”)

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Insulting my intelligence only works if there are facts behind it, keep that in mind. Do let me know if I start incoherently rambling like you do. ;)

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            FOG,
            You have the right to your own opinion. But when you come out with a statement that labels people who disagree as lemmings, then you aren’t winning friends and you aren’t influencing people.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      What ~$38k RWD vehicle with 325hp does Buick sell again?

      • 0 avatar
        FOG

        Hence the term “overpriced” and AWESOME RWD, WOW! #@% 325horsepoop, that means nothing!” “Dude, it’s an Infinity. Get with the program.”

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          You might be having a stroke, do you have a friend who could assess your current health situation?

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          That made even less sense than your first comment.

          • 0 avatar
            FOG

            VoGo, your point is well taken. Corey, we should just let it drop. The intent was light banter about what I have observed to be a bias that credits Infiniti, Lexus, and Acura with putting out a much higher quality product than they actually do. My observations have been wrong in the past.

            Corey, I was under the impression based on your first response that you wanted to engage in this banter. I was mistaken and I apologize for that. I realized you were serious when you suggested that my comments could only have been from someone suffering a major brain attack and I might want to seek medical attention.

            I have learned my lesson, it won’t happen again.

          • 0 avatar

            I don’t get it FOG, and I like both Buick and Infiniti.

            You asked for the real reasons these are praised over Buicks. When the real reasons people like were given (power, superior dynamics, fit and finish in some cases) you made fun of that. Wut?

  • avatar
    SunnyvaleCA

    Options increase cost of car by 21%? This is surely a Porsche competitor!

  • avatar
    SomeGuy

    So I’ll lay out my bias up front: I have 2 Infiniti vehicles, a ’11 FX35 RWD and a ’08 G37S Coupe with the manual.

    I think the review does a good job on the interior description. This is so similar to the FX for the fact that while the vast majority of the interior is of great quality, they chose some odd places for the cheap Nissan plastics (think around the air vents).

    The infotainment is just… there. When I got my FX35 I demanded getting a car with the premium package. I know you said you would uncheck some options, let me warn anyone on that advice: Don’t. Resale on these cars is pretty strong and the more options you got the better.

    Good review!

    • 0 avatar

      I think the reason it is stronger on the higher trims is because Infiniti still doesn’t give you common things like Bluetooth streaming until you get navigation. Which is ridiculous. I know that’s a feature I use all the time, so I’m constantly ignoring the non-Nav EX37s I see on the used market.

  • avatar
    jkk6

    +Continues to be assembled in Japan.

    I like the Tochigi plant.

    350z, FX35, G37, Q50’s are all guaranteed 200k mile cars.

    Maybe I’ll pick one up in 2022 for something like $8k used, if I can find one that is.

  • avatar
    mleitman

    Is that “real” (i.e. Imperial) or US mpg? If the former then YIKES!

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    I have always secretly wanted one of these. Ever since they first came out.
    But the cargo, rear room and MPGs have always sucked.
    I understand the sporty drive and the looks make up for a lotta bad..but really, why today?
    I would rather get the Edge 2.7 ecoboost and have everything. Or any number of faster, larger and better MPG options available today. This is just old.
    Kinda like Chrysler stuff…
    Well, maybe not the hill high speed turning, but I am trying to remember exactly when I ever took any of my cars to the edge in turns.
    NO… guess I am really one of those that wanna have it but seldom, if ever, use it.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      MPG and ancient infotainment aside, to get this kind of driving experience, you’re going to have to pay a LOT… LOT… LOT more money. The X3 3.0TT starts at $48K. GLC only has a 4 banger. Not even going to talk about the Macan everyone compares this to.

      Plus now with the longer wheelbase this looks like it can fit an infant seat in the back, which opens it up to a lot more people. I’m sure leases on these are dirt cheap too. I’d love to jump on one for my wife but knowing my luck as soon as we bought it gas would spike to $5/gal which would be a lot even on her 10K miles/yr. I had a 350Z for 2 years and the abysmal gas mileage was part of why I sold it. A 328i is just as fast and gets 50% better gas mileage lol.

      This thing definitely has a unique place in the market though. It’s everything the X3 pretends to be.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        X3?
        No…for a really better deal and performance I might consider the CX60 with supercharged/turbo charged 4.
        But I was only considering the 2.7 TT from Ford because of the extra heft…and still getting better MPG.
        But then again, I am a twin turbo nut…I love the power.
        And you can count on the price of fuel going way up. And I tend to keep my cars forever. So any fuel price mistake I make today will be around for a long, long time.

        Of course the luxury in this car is better than anything I would consider…except the MKX TT.

  • avatar
    Spartan

    It’s 2008 again! Aside from the stretched wheelbase, updated Nav screen (as of2010) 3.7L and 7AT, this is essentially a G37 on stilts with an ugly mug upfront. I never saw the appeal of these things. They look awful.

    They’re a good deal if you can get one under $40k, but they are fuel hogs and the interior is old now. The NVH from the VQ37 feels very much out of place in this car. I had a ’10 G37S 6MT and even in that car, the NVH was a bit much for a “luxury” car.

    Infiniti’s are cool and all, but unless you can get one for a song, buy a BMW if you want RWD. Sometimes, I kick myself for not buying a 335i because chances are, I’d still have it. I got rid of my G37 as soon as the backward hat bro’ crowd got ahold of them a few years ago.

  • avatar
    Mackie

    Even the console in my Micra has a place for my phone.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    So what you are saying is this nice 2016 Infiniti delivers the same real world F.E as my 2008 Suburban with the same HP and a four speed auto which requires regular lowest octane available pump gas.

    All I can say to Nissan…Do better.

    I’ll pass.

  • avatar
    33873

    Looks really dated, almost like a Porche Cayenne knockoff…”Nissan-style” *shudder* interior looks cheap, too

  • avatar
    laserwizard

    Hideous product that induces projectile vomiting upon seeing it.

    There is no reason to buy this hideous thing unless you want to prove you are a blind idiot.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Indeed. True arbiters of taste stick with Fords of the 1997 vintage- a fine, fine year. First year of the ovoid F-150, 2nd year of the ovoid Taurus, etc etc.


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