By on April 19, 2016

chieftain

For a guy who never goes on press trips, I’ve sure been in a lot of airports lately.

Last weekend, I was in Southern California, following up on a few weekdays spent in the Miami area. This weekend, I was in Las Vegas to hang out with my brother, do some electric karting, and one other thing that slips my mind right now but I’m sure I’ll remember later.

From Friday night to Sunday evening, I traveled by a diverse variety of conveyances, including but not restricted to: an Indian Chieftain, a Prius, a Prius V, two Altimas, a Jetta, and a white Lincoln Town Car. I met a former political prisoner who has witnessed three suicides, accidentally taunted the police, hit a wooden box on the freeway, and learned about predatorial fish.

Part One: A Brief Discussion Of The Indian Chieftain

Some readers may recall that I am a thorough and unabashed fan of the Indian Roadmaster touring motorcycle — enough so that I joined Club Eaglerider so I could ride one at least thirteen days a year. Therefore, once I made plans to be in Vegas for the weekend, I promptly pulled up the Eaglerider website so I could get my Roadmaster for the weekend. After some thought about my itinerary, however, I decided on the Chieftain.

The Roadmaster and Chieftain are fundamentally the same bike, each possessing a retro-appeal 111-cubic inch, 95-horsepower engine and throwback styling applied to a thoroughly modern aluminum frame. The difference is that the Roadmaster is a “dresser” and the Chieftain is a “bagger.” The Roadmaster has a luggage case that also serves as a backrest for the full-size, heated, leather passenger seat. The Chieftain, by contrast, has no top case and much more modest accommodations for your lady friend.

This doesn’t sound like it should make much difference, does it? Thanks to those minor changes, the Chieftain is 821 pounds compared to the Roadmaster’s 930. Just for purposes of context, my CB1100 is 541 pounds, my CB550 is 421 pounds, Danger Girl’s R3 is 381, and my son’s TTR90 weighs 138. Yet after just a few minutes on the Chieftain, even with my distaff companion riding behind me, I could see just how much more nimble and frisky the bagger is compared to the dresser, most likely because all the weight savings comes from places that are relatively high on the bike. The Chieftain likes to turn and it likes to accelerate and it doesn’t feel terribly bulky, even in the stop-and-go traffic of the Las Vegas Strip at 10 p.m. on a Saturday night.

I’d never thought much of the “bagger” idea before this weekend, considering it a prime example of a motorcycle that is good at doing exactly nothing in particular, but the truth is that this would be a very nonthreatening bike for a novice rider who doesn’t see himself ever doing 140 mph on the freeway or a wheelie down some urban thoroughfare. It goes a long way to explain why America’s best-selling motorcycle is a $24,000 bagger from Harley-Davidson and not, say, the Suzuki Hayabusa. Missing from that explanation, however, is a subsidiary explanation of why the most popular motorcycle in the country is one that appeals to fortysomethings and up, as opposed to one that targets young men. Oh, I remember why. It’s because the average 25-year-old “man” in this country would rather be pegged by his polyamorous girlfriend than be exposed to the soul-numbing danger of riding a Honda Ruckus on a sidewalk.

Part Two: Predatorial Fish

Danger Girl and I had an appointment in downtown Las Vegas early Saturday morning that absolutely required we be on time. I suggested taking an Uber; she demanded a taxi. This is a conversation we have fairly often when we travel. She’s a big believer in planning things out and having schedules. I’m a big believer in doing whatever I want to do and then dodging as many of the consequences as possible. But this wasn’t the hill on which I wanted to die, so we got a cab.

“I don’t work the Strip,” Frederick, the cab driver, declared when we got in. “I’m a professional transportation consultant.” He was bald and bullet-headed and sort of resembled the creature who tries to buy BB-8 from Rey in “The Force Awakens.”

“You dealin’ with a professional in this here cab. I don’t stand for no bullshit. Let’s hear some music.” He cranked up the radio. A song started. “Whatchoo know about this here?” he said, staring me down in the mirror.

“Is that, uh, Creep by TLC?” was my querulous reply.

“Fuckin’ right it is. Now you need to go to the Jazz Festival. It’s got Boney James.”

As we pulled onto the freeway, Frederick began planning our weekend for us, stopping his monologue every thirty-six seconds or so to express his anger with our fellow motorists. “This ugly bitch behind us. Ridin’ my ass. Whatchoo do that for? If I stop suddenly, you gonna hit my tail! And then I gotta have this cab fixed! Man, this ugly bitch.” He brake-checked the bitch in question, who appeared to be about sixty years old and generally frightened by everything outside her TrailBlazer, with casual menace.

The Prius V whined in protest as Frederick accelerated again. “Now over there, that spiral building, that brick building?” He leaned across the car and pointed out the passenger window. “That building right there, that’s where Boney James gonna… FUCKIN’ JESUS!” There was an appropriately almighty thump and a cloud of flying wood splinters around us. For about three seconds, Frederick frantically tugged randomly on the wheel in a battle of wits with the Toyota wagon’s stability control until conceding defeat. “What was that?” I looked behind us.

“That was a large wooden box.” I replied.

“It was DEBRIS!” Frederick clarified. “Motherfuckers leaving debris boxes out here!” For about three minutes we rode in silence. Then he started up again. “Now, you need to get over to that bar there. They got SHARKS! In a pool! With a waterfall. And they got predatorial fish! You need to check them out!”

“Truly,” I offered, “I’ve had enough excitement for the day. You might want to call it a day yourself.”

“I work midnight to noon,” he responded, “and I normally stop at 10:30.” Having been over-tipped by Danger Girl, he drove away while I stood on the curb and tried to figure that last comment out.

Part Three: From Morocco With Love

uber1

It was late on Saturday night when Danger Girl expressed her desire to go to the Bellagio and visit the gardens. I had to drop off the Chieftain, as we’d be leaving for the airport immediately after finishing our plans on Sunday, so I put her on the back of the bike and took her down the strip to the famous fountains. They started just as she got off the bike. I twisted the throttle to the stop, jammed through the next green light, and headed down West Harmon at redline in third gear. Six LVPD motorcycle cops were standing next to their bikes next to the Cosmopolitan as I blasted by, and they gave me the are you freaking kidding! look in unison. I waved with the left hand and hit the clutchless upshift to fourth, blatting out of the concrete-lined underpass like a Saturn V rocket leaving the pad.

After tossing my keys in the night drop at Eaglerider, I called up another UberX. This fellow was driving a very nice late-model Civic. He told me the story of how he was born in Morocco to a family that had social dignity but not much money or property. Once a year starting at the age of 15, he faithfully followed the complex process for requesting a green card in the United States. At 20, he got his shot. “It has been ten years now,” he noted, “and Morocco is nothing but a child’s dream to me. What do you remember from 10 years ago? Not the stories you tell, but your true memory?”

He seemed like a decent-looking guy with a lot to recommend him, so I asked him how his Vegas dating life was. “I have always been alone,” he responded. “Who would want me? I work in the casino at day, drive in the night. Sometimes I think about going back. The economy is good there now. There is a lot of work. But,” he offered by way of warning as I stepped out of his Civic and into the floodlit entrance of the Vdara, “I have never had a plan, and what has happened, has happened.”

Part Four: The Uber-Tour

uber2

“Before we go the airport,” Danger Girl stated, “I want some In-and-Out.”

“That’s what I’m talking about,” was my response.

“Very funny. We can take a taxi to In-And-Out and then to Eaglerider to get the stuff you forgot when you dropped off the bike, then to the airport.”

“That will cost us a hundred bucks,” I moaned. “If ever this was a situation that called for Uber … ”

“Fine.”

Our driver pulled up in a worn MkV Jetta. I explained that we were about to undertake a complex itinerary. He was very friendly and decent about it. As he drove down Polaris, I figured out how to replace destinations in the Uber app so he would get paid for everything, and I laid some extra cash on his passenger seat. We arrived at In-And-Out and Danger Girl jumped out to order the food.

“I was in the Philippines,” he said, “I was demonstrating for Marcos. You know who Marcos was?” I nodded. “Things got bad. They put me in prison. They beat me. There is so much corruption. I got out and my wife was gone. I followed her to Hawaii. But … ” There was a long silence, interrupted only by the bleating of horns in the overstuffed drive-through line. “I was still beaten inside, though my body had recovered. We divorced. I came here to work in security.”

There’s no wait West of the Mississippi like the wait for In-And-Out. We swapped tales of various jails and workhouses, talked about the trouble we’d escaped and the trouble that had found us. “Now,” he continued, “I work security at the casino. We can’t touch the people who cause the problem. I fight them with my mind, you know? I talk to them, I work it out. I don’t hurt them.” Although he was six inches shorter than I was, he had the same dead eyes I remembered from certain explosively violent acquaintances from my twenties. “But there is the biggest problem … that they jump.”

“They jump?” I repeated, like an idiot.

“Yes. They get on the roof, and the alarm goes, and I get there, and they jump. I watch three people die since I start this job. Why, I don’t know. Something in their heads. Me, I would never jump. There is always a chance. Always something to live for. Five years ago, they murder my brother back home. He was police. His deputies, they kill him over jealousy. Money that would mean nothing here. For a while I did not want to continue. But I would not jump.

“After all,” he said as Danger Girl tumbled back into the Jetta with the bag full of burgers and I put the airport terminal into Uber, causing his phone to bong in recognition, “this is such a wonderful place here, how could you be sad in Las Vegas?”

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140 Comments on “No Fixed Abode: The Uber/Taxi Diaries, Predatorial Fish Edition...”


  • avatar
    JimZ

    ” Oh, I remember why. It’s because the average 25-year-old “man” in this country would rather be pegged by his polyamorous girlfriend”

    you forgot “while posting it to his Tumblr.”

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I’m a gay liberal, but I find Jack’s commentary on my generation amusing—mainly because a lot of it is true.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Seriously? We are so f*cked as a society.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Maybe so, but we didn’t raise ourselves. There wasn’t some chemical in the water that mutated everyone born in ’82 and later. Y’all created that monster.

          • 0 avatar

            I had an interesting chat with a friend of mine this weekend. Her parents are very successful and high profile individuals. However, as she put it

            “My parents raised my brother and I to always question authority, to believe that we didn’t have to listen to anyone and we could make our own rules. So, I have a fine arts degree and no career and my brother is a stoner.”

            I suspect that a lot of my cohort were raised by parents who are just overgrown children wearing adult costumes.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Yep, the era of “You can do what you want, and be anything! Everybody gets a gold trophy.”

            Cut to Renaissance Poetry major living at home til age 32, in debt. But boy is he good at liberal type ranting on his blog!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Derek makes a good point, although I do wonder about biochemical or environment changes between 1980 and 1995 which were not present previously.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Derek! Good to see you again.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            there’s nothing wrong with questioning authority. but that’s more about looking for ulterior motives and being pushed to go against one’s self interest. it needs to be balanced with the willingness to realize that a lot of times “authority” is telling you to do the right thing (but not always.)

            “Question Authority” has turned into “ain’t nobody going to tell me what the f*** to do.” It’s been perverted about as badly as “the customer is always right.”

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Question authority has morphed into obey authority.

          • 0 avatar
            bunkie

            To quote Dudley from the Muppet Show:

            “Can open… worms everywhere…”

          • 0 avatar
            raph

            @ JimZ, very astute observation on both counts.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            @Derek,

            Questioning authority is good.

            Problem is, what passes for “questioning authority” today, amounts to little more than “questioning the straw man that my parents and grandparents were told was authority back in the sixties.”

            While those who genuinely question authority, like David Koresh, gets incinerated to the cheers of self proclaimed “authority questioners” everywhere.

          • 0 avatar
            SSJeep

            Chemtrails. Definitely chemtrails. And Aspartame.

        • 0 avatar
          e30gator

          I agree, we are f*cked. So many people in our society and on this site (editors, commenters) who are so unsure about their own sexuality that they try to fool everyone, including themselves, into thinking that they’re straight/manly, despite all the evidence to the contrary. They’re not fooling anybody.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Haz a sad.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        @Kyree: As you know, I’m a straight member of The Vast Right Wing Conspiracy.

        Oddly, I have several liberal friends and family. I think we would get along well, and I share some of your taste in cars.

        Generally, I prefer to laugh about our differences than fight over them.

        My conservative friends nearly disowned me when I had the Leaf; too much Fox News, I say.

        Politically, at the moment I’m drawn to elements of Ron Paul, The Hair, and even The Bern. At my age, I no longer believe that any one candidate is our savior, or our doom.

        • 0 avatar
          hubcap

          “My conservative friends nearly disowned me when I had the Leaf…”

          Why would your choice of vehicle invite scorn?
          It’s just a car. Isn’t it?

          • 0 avatar
            bunkie

            “Why would your choice of vehicle invite scorn?
            It’s just a car. Isn’t it?”

            You must be new here…

          • 0 avatar
            SCE to AUX

            Subsidies, and the receipt of them.

            Never mind that I liked the car, and won’t leave money on the table – even if I think it shouldn’t be there.

            News outlets like Fox have maintained a steady campaign against EV subsidies, which will probably cost taxpayers like me less than $15 billion spread over a decade, while promoting foreign wars we can’t win, each of which costs orders of magnitude more.

            When all your information comes from FUD News, you begin to lose perspective.

            It’s true, my friends would have been OK with just about any other vehicle, ironically produced by any company receiving corporate welfare from its community.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            @SCE

            Tell your faux conservative friends you are just contributing to bleeding the beast.

            The only realistic way to be less governed, is to become less governable.

            Which requires generating less value for the Junta to get their greasy hands on, while costing them more in upkeep. If everyone would just become a net drain on the state, the problem of the state would relatively quickly resolve itself.

        • 0 avatar
          vww12

          Savior? No.
          Doom, heck yeah.

    • 0 avatar
      Felis Concolor

      Tumblr’s Gate: Siege of Genderqueers.

      • 0 avatar
        wumpus

        “Subsidies, and the receipt of them.”

        Subsidies are for other people. Government largess handed to oneself is *always* earned. It isn’t always as obvious of “keep your government out of my medicare”, but it is there.

        I suspect that shunning you is far easier than questioning what handouts they have taken (and giving up believing that such is the source of all evil) or other definitions of the tribalism they have bought into.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          I had a queasy feeling about taking a free antenna with a DTV tuner when the Nation went digital several years back.

          • 0 avatar

            “@Derek,

            Questioning authority is good.

            Problem is, what passes for “questioning authority” today, amounts to little more than “questioning the straw man that my parents and grandparents were told was authority back in the sixties.”

            While those who genuinely question authority, like David Koresh, gets incinerated to the cheers of self proclaimed “authority questioners” everywhere.”

            You’re correct. Even better is that my friend’s parents both work for the provincial and federal government respectively!!!!

          • 0 avatar
            PandaBear

            “I had a queasy feeling about taking a free antenna with a DTV tuner when the Nation went digital several years back.”

            Remember, they are refarming those analog bandwidth for more valuable purposes (and billions of auction income), so don’t feel bad about getting a couple $40 devices in the process.

  • avatar
    EMedPA

    That Street Glide looks like a really sweet bike. Unfortunately, too many years of EMS and Emergency Medicine have ruined the idea of motorcycle ownership for me.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    “It’s because the average 25-year-old “man” in this country would rather be pegged by his polyamorous girlfriend than be exposed to the soul-numbing danger of riding a Honda Ruckus on a sidewalk.”

    I feel like I am supposed to hate this, but my eyes are welling up with tears of laughter.

    *EDIT* Just finished. Wow, good… portraits?

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    I thought Boy’s Own was defunct. And British.

  • avatar
    e30gator

    Why is it that 90% of non-sports bike riders dress like they got kicked out of a 1980’s hair band and spent the next 2 decades sleeping on their friend’s couch? For all their supposed rebelliousness and nonconformity, why try so hard to wear the same uniform? No offense, I just don’t get it.

    For example, Jeep owners don’t exactly have their own special look, but when someone looking like Jack is standing in line at a supermarket, one can usually assume they’re traveling via Harley (or similar) and be right on the money.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Except in my case; I drive my 911 to the supermarket.

      Just kidding. I don’t go to the supermarket, I delegate that to women.

      In all seriousness, there are only so many ways that someone can dress. Ninety percent of the people I see while eating lunch downtown are wearing the same unhappy combination of Third-World-sewn business casual clothing and square-toed, unpolished black shoes.

      Ninety percent of the people I used to play golf with as a kid wore the same outfit.

      Ninety percent of the road cyclists out there dress like Lance Armstrong to maintain a rolling average of 12.3mph.

      I can’t think of any subculture where there is a genuine variety in appearance. If you go to Moab and look at the people who take their Jeeping seriously, they’re pretty uniform as well. You talk about Jeep *owners* not looking alike but the same is true of Harley *owners*. A lot of people own Harleys, but the only people who use them on a consistent basis are people who look like extras from that one film with Eric Stoltz and Sam Elliot.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        LOL, square toe shoes.

      • 0 avatar
        e30gator

        Okay, so I guess supermarkets are for women. But…

        I don’t see many boaters dressed like pirates. The people sitting down in a restaurant eating lunch are wearing clothes commensurate with their income level and possibly worker dress codes. Typically, they’re not wearing costumes. If I say to you that the guy next to me in traffic revving his engine was dressed like a biker, you’d have a vision of someone wearing a leather vest and chaps.

        A serious bicyclist looks like Lance Armstrong to reduce wind resistance, a golfer wears khaki shorts and a golf shirt to stay cool.

        So, my question: are there any real benefits (for the riding experience) to dressing like a Sons of Anarchy extra, or is it more for the sake of wanting project an image?

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Baruth

          I’ve completed a lot of 100-mile road-bike rides and a few Cat 4 races in a T-shirt. Until the day comes that you’re within 10rpm of a rated European pro, wearing spandex is a despicable foppery. Hell, I know more than a few people who won money in a pro-level BMX race wearing Wrangler jeans.

          Everything’s a costume when you get right down to it. If you’d grown up on the East Coast with people who sail, you’d know that they have a costume as well, although it’s not pirate-related.

          There are plenty of people who play dress-up on motorcycles of all kinds, whether you’re looking at the sportbikers who wear leathers to Alice’s Restaurant or the Gold Wing crowd with their Aerostitch. I don’t do much of it personally. The horsehide jacket I’m wearing in that photo is my singular concession to motorcycling apparel and it’s mostly because I’d rather use the aforementioned horsehide as friction material against the road than my own skin.

          • 0 avatar

            I rode a bicycle from Seattle to Boston in ’75 in cut-off jeans and t-shirts. And Bell Helmet serial #7022. Since around 1990, I’ve always worn the kind of lime green jersey that’s visible from the International Space Station, as protective coloring, but for years I also wore spandex shorts, because they are smooth underneath. Then I got a recumbent, and I use whatever shorts I normally wear in the summer.

          • 0 avatar
            phlipski

            Road cyclists – is there a more bitter and insufferable group of people? I love riding a bike, but the shear insanity and list of unwritten rules of these people is mind blowing. No triples, no camelbacks, no fun…

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            philipski, yes…

            I love spending time and miles on my bike, but never do it socially, because I can’t stand a lot of other cyclists, especially roadies. I’ve never met a more hypercompetitive and dissatisfied bunch of people, and they like to express those traits by telling you exactly why your equipment, clothing, and riding style are inferior.

            Honestly I’d rather put up with the clueless car drivers who think I’m supposed to be doing 22 mph on the sidewalk.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            “Until the day comes that you’re within 10rpm of a rated European pro, wearing spandex is a despicable foppery”

            My irritation with costumed road cyclists summed up in a single sentence. I see enough paunchy guts shrink-wrapped in spandex to wonder if they all truly believe the wind resistance created by their girth can be overcome by their clown suit. And wouldn’t the gain in self dignity be worth pedaling just a tiny bit harder?

          • 0 avatar
            Dingleberrypiez_Returns

            I hate to defend road bikers, because I find most of them insufferable (despite commuting on bicycles for long periods of my life), but you really can’t deny that the gear (including spandex) makes riding significantly more comfortable. If you’re more concerned with how you look, that’s totally valid, but some folks aren’t.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            Jack, I really like to wear cotton and would prefer it riding my road bike, but it gets soaked with sweat quickly. The synthetic stuff wicks the sweat away and is much more comfortable while riding. When not riding, I can’t stand the stuff and take a change of clothes with me if I’m more than a 30 minute drive to get home from where I’m riding. For short (under 20 mile) rides and if the weather is right, the t-shirt comes out.

            Synthetic is a bit more aerodynamic. I meet your performance criteria I suppose. I can average in the low to mid 20 mph range on flat terrain and typically hit bursts on hills at 35 to 45 – and on rare occasions 55. I’m not sure if it gives me a huge speed advantage, but its a pain have loose clothing flapping around at higher speeds.

          • 0 avatar
            Quentin

            I certainly don’t wear lycra because it looks cool. It makes road, gravel, and mountain biking more enjoyable because I don’t have wet cotton rubbing against my skin or my shorts bunching up at my crotch.

          • 0 avatar

            Shirts are one thing, but tf you try to ride distance without bike shorts, you’ll end up chafing some sensitive parts.

          • 0 avatar
            vww12

            “If you’d grown up on the East Coast with people who sail, you’d know that they have a costume as well” –spot on.

          • 0 avatar
            IHateCars

            I’ve done enough track riding to understand that wearing full leathers while riding street or track is not a fashion thing. It’s about keeping your skin on your body after a low-side thing.

        • 0 avatar
          JustPassinThru

          To ask the question is to answer it.

          There are two types of riders: Those who like to ride; and those who have the bike as a prop. Most (not all, of course) Harley riders are in that group. Many of the other owners of slouch-down, heavy “baggers” weighted down with chrome but liberated of mufflers.

          The other group, chooses a bike for the riding experience. The ride…which is not improved by the droning blat-blat-blat of open pipes. Which is not helped by heavy, hot, water-absorbing leather gear. Synthetic armored riding clothes, including Kevlar jeans, are far more comfortable and better protection.

          I ride a Suzuki V-650. Which, FWIW, has more than enough speed for triple digits, felony arrests, double-points on the license. Total weight is about 300 pounds – much more pleasant to maneuver around in parking lots. Nor is a dropped machine such a frightening thought.

          Most of the Harley pirates I have seen take the twisties slower than old men in Camrys. They’re posing in a paradigm, but I think the “Cruiser-Face” is the real deal. I’d be unhappy on one of those ungainly, slow, loud monsters, too.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            ” Most (not all, of course) Harley riders are in that group.”

            I’d like to see the raw results of the survey you took to determine that.

          • 0 avatar
            JustPassinThru

            “I’d like to see the raw results of the survey you took to determine that.”

            Some of us don’t need to parrot back what we’re told on the Daily Show or Yahoo “News.” Some of us can look, see, perceive, process and conclude.

            And some of us know that information of pedestrian value doesn’t need to be analyzed in ways that Global Warming or CAFE Fuel-Saving, never is.

            Some things are self-apparent – to the sentient.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            Ah. “It’s true because I says it’s true.”

            got it.

          • 0 avatar
            hubcap

            I think your SV is closer to 400 pounds. In fact, probably slightly over unless you shed some parts.

            A WR450F, a non street legal Enduro, is 275# wet. Your SV might hail from the same magical land as Norm’s cars. If that’s the case all bets are off.

            Absent that, it weighs more than you think.

            And it is a nice, do everything well, type of bike.

          • 0 avatar
            e30gator

            I get it. There are two types of bikers: those who ride because riding is fun (I’m sure there’s some out there) and those who are total posers.

            Most of the Harley guys I’ve come across
            (99 percenters?) are friggin dentists and plumbers peacocking around town for attention, or so it would seem.

            Bonus points for cruising the Walmart parking lot in the “If you could read this, the b*tch fell off” shirt.

          • 0 avatar
            JustPassinThru

            “I think your SV is closer to 400 pounds. In fact, probably slightly over unless you shed some parts.”

            It’s a Wee-Strom; and yeah, you’re right. Just looked it up. But, I’ll TELL ya…compared to the Honda CB1100 I rode for a couple of years, the thing feels light as a feather.

            I dropped the CB in a parking lot on a road trip to Portland – in the rain, of course – and the monster was so heavy I couldn’t get out from under it without help. Took three of us to right it.

            Even allowing 400 pounds, it’s still 180 pounds lighter than the Honda four; and it’s half the weight of these…whatever they are…

          • 0 avatar
            JustPassinThru

            JimZ: “Ah. “It’s true because I says it’s true.”

            got it.”

            You got any proof of this? I mean, a survey or a celebrity quote, or something other than just WHAT YOU SAY about what I say?

            No? It must be so, because you say it.

            FWIW, I think we can all observe various grouped characteristics of those who

            –ride Harleys

            –with open pipes

            –and leather chaps

            –bareheaded

            –very slowly. As if, they don’t know how to ride. Because they don’t do it much and they have a kludgy thousand-pound monster underneath them.

            I can spot the types. Most people can. And most people who actually like riding, don’t have Harleys as their primary rides.

            Just as most people who like driving don’t have Cadillacs as their DDs.

        • 0 avatar
          sabotenfighter

          LOLWUT? Did you miss the whole part about his daily bikes being sporty Japanese bikes or something? By your metric, he should be dressed like a squid not a stereotypical Harley rider.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        I’ve always wondered if Americans’ lives wouldn’t be more interesting, if they started treating it more as an experience, and less like a costume party.

        Around LA, it looks like the Harley Guys have been toning down the silly a good bit, after their peak home-atm years. The ones that still show up at biker spots regularly, tend to look more road worn, as opposed to uniformly preworn.

        But the bicyclists….. Now, that’s a whole ‘nother world. We’re talking sitting in traffic for an hour each way with a Carbon Colnago on the roof; just to ride it around for 45 minutes, while wearing what is best described as an unfit-for-children carnival outfit. All while sucking on completely disgusting gu-packs, the way those who used to dress up like that suck on you-know-what…. The grungy messengers and Rivendell woolsock-and-toeclippers may look their own branch of weird, but at least they don’t roll around x-rated.

      • 0 avatar
        Piston Slap Yo Mama

        Anyone here watched Quadrophenia? Rockers vs. Mods – the eternal struggle. The guy on the 2-stroke Vespa with 18 mirrors and a cute girl sitting pillion is WAY cooler than the poseurs on the motorcycles in their greaser Baruth uniforms. No offense Jack, I just don’t dig your threads.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        You guys are missing out on the supermarket. There’s nothing but wall to wall beauties that stopped in on the way home from yoga class at my neighborhood Von’s. They’re friendly too. I’ve got more than a couple buddies that want to go to Von’s with me whenever they get out of a long-term relationship. It’s the closest thing to a freshmen mixer in adult life, and the girls are to club girls what a Four Seasons suite is to a public restroom.

      • 0 avatar
        rocketrodeo

        There are some real advantages to the Aerostich, speaking as someone who wore one long before it was cool. That, an electric vest, and a really good helmet allowed me to find the edges of my personal envelope. It was toast after 275,000 miles and a couple of slides. Best $800 I ever spent. Got another one just like it. Bikes come and go, but the best gear lasts a lifetime.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Well, half the time it’s because they’re wearing their jacket and other gear, and standing in line holding a helmet. There’s a contractor that comes into my office every other day. Even without the helmet, I can always tell when he’s ridden his motorcycle, instead of one of his other cars.

      • 0 avatar
        JustPassinThru

        I’d buy that, Mr. Williams – except that even the jackets are far different these days. I started riding in the 1980s, where it was leather or road-rash. And yes I did get some, one warm morning in Michigan when I had doffed the leather in favor of the sun.

        That put me off for years; and when I got back on, in 2008…I was pleasantly shocked at the lightweight body-armor options. A rider can go with black synthetic; or lime-green designs and look like a Power Ranger. Or, if he goes to the Harley-Davidson™ Motor-CloZ Botique® he can get Fair-Trade soft-lined leather with a Harley-Davidson® eagle on the back.

        Most Motor-CloZ Botiques stock a variety of glue-on tattoos, for whatever character you’re cosplaying this weekend.

        Just the very jacket, or the helmet (or lack thereof) is pretty much a giveaway – serious riders or play-pirates.

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Baruth

          How do you define “serious rider”? I commute 200 days a year on a motorcycle and cover between 10 and 15k a year on various bikes. I own four motorcycles. I’ve ridden 200 miles in a single day with a broken left leg. Am I not “serious” because I don’t always wear a helmet to ride? Or am I not “serious” because when I do wear a helmet it’s an Arai sportbike helmet?

          I have two jackets — a hi-viz Fieldsheer and a horsehide jacket by Hillside USA. Do I become less or more serious when I put the Fieldsheer on instead of the Hillside?

          I’m also perplexed by your comment that a CB1100 is impossible to lift. When mine was knocked over by a meth addict, the fellow who picked it back up for me was a 160-pound intellectual who doesn’t even lift, bro.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            I can lift a 710 lb Dyna if need be.

            don’t ask me how I know.

          • 0 avatar
            JustPassinThru

            Well, Jack…I’m eighteen years older than you; and for the last twenty I’ve had a sedentary job with twelve-hour shifts. So, physically, I’m…not a hundred percent.

            Also, I was underneath the thing when it went down. Adding to the fun, it was done up with two military dufflebags on the luggage rack and pillion seat. The two guys who came to my rescue were senior citizens…not feeble but not in the prime of life, either. So we had three guys with a mean age of about 62, trying to upright that CB.

            Serious rider? That’s a tough one to pigeonhole. We can start with what it is NOT. Someone who rides 200 miles a year, done up with cosplay leather, on a Harley that’s got more years than miles…is not serious.

            Neither is the kid on the crotch-rocket who’s popping wheelies with no helmet, shirt, or long trousers. He may ride a lot…but not for long, not like that. He’ll learn or he’ll decide the agony of road-rash wasn’t worth it; or he’ll die.

            What do I say to someone who rides bare-headed? I try to say nothing. I believe in the right to choose. However…the day before I got a ride in the Roscommon County EMS ambulance service, I rode across Ohio bareheaded. Bee-youtiful August weather. The following day found me in Michigan and under mandatory-helmet laws.

            I was an out-of-stater. I put it on.

            Before noon, I had been run off the road at 50 mph; hit the pavement hard. My helmet, stowed the day before, was 3/4 fractured down the middle. My bike didn’t follow me – it went under the truck that caused it all. Brand-new SR 500, squashed.

            I was in the hospital for a month. Broken pelvis; chipped vertebrae; seven broken ribs; two broken wrists, one broken elbow.

            My head, miraculously, was not harmed. Not even diagnosable concussion.

            As far as I’m concerned, folks can ride as they like. I’m pretty negative on open pipes, but beyond that, I’m a live-and-let-live guy. But like many here, I have opinions I will occasionally vent.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            I just couldn’t think of riding without some sort of armor on at all times, even in the dead of summer. (Even though my outfit of choice around the house is a pair of shorts or jeans, depending on the season; no shirt.)

            I also like having a few thousand pounds of steel and a few airbags around me whilst doing 60mph.

            (Self-preservation instinct + healthy dose of paranoia, I guess.)

          • 0 avatar
            rocketrodeo

            I define a serious rider as someone who manages the known risks. When you lack experience, you’re dealing with unknown unknowns. The trick is to treat them as known unknowns. There isn’t one single thing you do, or wear; it more of an attitude that extends beyond the stereotypical ATGATT. Myself, I go for impact and abrasion protection as much as possible. My attitude is informed by a few slides, though, and observing a few dozen others close up–a couple of which were fatal.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    What did you think of the Prius v as a people hauler?

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      It seems like a pretty heavy penalty in weight and fuel economy to pay over the regular Prius just to get what amounts to a slightly larger cargo compartment.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Agreed. Plus, I think the C-Max concedes a few MPGs for a lower transaction price, far more features and a better design.

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Baruth

          The C-Max is such a pleasant vehicle to operate, too. It truly feels upscale.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The Prius V is also hideous in the van-car PT Cruiser Venza sort of way.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “The Prius V is also hideous in the van-car PT Cruiser Venza sort of way.”

            heh, van-car. That’s like a bit I heard from comedian Maria Bamford:

            “Someone told me I should get a Ford Flex. I asked ‘What is it?’ ‘Oh, it’s a house-truck. Uh, it’s a car-building.\'”

        • 0 avatar
          Felis Concolor

          I was surprised to hear my SO’s comments mirroring my observations after test driving a Prius V during our year-long car shopping comparison; we normally don’t share too many reasons for liking/disliking something, but after a couple hours in the V, her desire for a C-Max jumped several notches.

          I just keep pining for that drivetrain in the 3-row version.

        • 0 avatar
          cgjeep

          Wife going to look at a used CMAX this week. Her Sonata in the shop and they gave her a Focus loaner. She really liked it and realized it rode/handles way better than her Sonata but wished it were larger. So I suggested it. Wish me luck.

        • 0 avatar
          Piston Slap Yo Mama

          Except that you ruined the C-Max for me by pointing out that the plush mid-sized one we rented in Austria with dual sliding doors is NOT available in N. America. Why Ford, why?

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        In other markets, the Prius v gets a third row of seats (like the Chevy Orlando or Kia Rondo), which would make it much more useful.

        It would also cannibalize the much more profitable Highlander Hybrid, though, which is likely why Toyota does not offer it here.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      I owned a 2012 v for a couple years. They really should have shipped it to the US w/ the Camry Hybrid 2.5HSD drivetrain for the mountains, but it handles everything else with aplomb. I sold it to a friend who is carrying around his 18 month old twins and 4 year old in it. Hard to find a more practical, efficient vehicle. I regularly pushed over 45mpg when I wasn’t crossing the continental divide here in WV.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        My Mom has a 2012 as well. After a few initial niggles it has been bulletproof. Wretched to drive, but 45mpg with her lead foot and I will never have to fix it. Well, other than the taillight she broke.

        At the time, it was massively cheaper than a CMax, but I sure would prefer the Ford too. Hugely cheaper than the regular Prius then too, and much better rear seat access for aged Grandparents.

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      v owner here. Wife demanded that car as it has a reclining rear seat and the seat is flat enough for her back ache. It is cheaper than a long wheel based car and it is more fuel efficient than a minivan. She’s happy with its fuel economy coming from an IS250.

      I’d probably pick either a regular prius or a real minivan like Sienna instead.

  • avatar
    maranello

    Interesting little vignettes. Vegas – waiting room for lost souls.

    • 0 avatar
      Kevin Jaeger

      Yes, I always enjoy a short stay in Vegas but if I spend too much time there I find it depressing. I think the mindset of all those lost souls is somehow contagious.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        My boss says the same thing. He always says after about three days he can’t really take it any more, and has to get out.

        I’ve never been – and I can’t decide if I want to just for the spectacle, or no. I wouldn’t end up gambling much because I’d get p-ssed after losing a hundred bucks and stop.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Las Vegas is really fun at night. While we were driving down the strip, some bachelorette in an adjacent limousine threw her—rather large—brassiere into my car via the sunroof.

          Then morning comes, and you see how sad the city is, and how downtrodden its residents are. Plus, I’m not really a gambler.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            So basically, alcohol + night time only attraction. Got it!

            Also, I recall while growing up when my parents would watch COPS, how many episodes were with the LVPD. Just seems like there’s a ton of crime/drugs there. (Not surprising.)

          • 0 avatar
            Kevin Jaeger

            You can find any kind of entertainment you like in Vegas. Sure, it’s known for booze and gambling but you can find practically anything you want.

            Last time I was there I rented a road bike and did a ride up through Red Rock Canyon and back to the hotel – very scenic.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Corey

            I have no doubt there is a criminal underbelly to Las Vegas but its not readily apparent. I’ve had no issues on two trips there one to the strip and one off strip, but then again I don’t go looking for trouble, either. I’d also add there are numerous activities you won’t find anywhere else. Las Vegas is basically adult Disneyland with the option of gambling, drugs, drinking, and sex tossed in without the nasty aftertaste of the People’s Republic of Kalifornia. 28 highly recommends Las Vegas.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I have never been to Disneyland/World, either! Now I’m just too old for it.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Brother Corey, the Church demands you visit Las Vegas.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’ll go! I need a list of non-gamble events to do. I have a feeling when I see all the nasty people with their cigarettes and oxygen tanks my Ocean’s Eleven fancy delusions will be gone away.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Off the top of my head:

            -Shoot machine guns.
            -See a show… Penn and Teller for instance.
            -Drive a bulldozer or work a construction crane.
            -Visit the Mafia Museum.
            -Visit the Atomic Testing Museum.
            -Visit the pawn shop from Pawn Stars.
            -Drive dune buggys out at Red Rock.
            -Drive a Ferrari at Las Vegas Speedway.
            -Rent high end cars from Sixt and cruise out to the desert.
            -Eat at fancy restaurants.
            -Take a helicopter or plane ride to the Grand Canyon.
            -Fly a bi-plane with a real pilot behind you to prevent you from crashing.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I like all of those things! Except maybe P&T.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The only thing I will caution you on is most of those activities have a triple figure cost. What I recommend doing is getting a decent reward miles credit card (I like Southwest’s) and stay off strip but close. You won’t be in your room much so something like the Sands is not a bad choice. I also recommend Uber over the local taxis when walking isn’t possible.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Well I’ll pick two, and sit around the rest of the time cause I ain’t spending thousands on a Vegas trip!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Be reasonable but don’t be afraid to spend money, its vacation after all. However the no money strategy is as follows:

            Get miles card/use miles: Free flight
            Get friends/split room: Cheap room
            Get Mlife card/eat one big buffet meal a day and take food with you for later: Cheap eating
            Sit at slot machine, pretend to gamble/tip the girl: Cheap drinks

        • 0 avatar
          JMII

          Oh Vegas is a “must”. It doesn’t even need to be night time because inside a casino time has no meaning. The people watching is top notch. Sitting next to each at the slots can be a self made millionaire or some drifter down to their last dollar. Their situations could swap instantly so there is this odd zen to everything there.

          I like it there because girls in very short skirts keep bringing adult beverages to you. Almost all of the shows are excellent with top notch talent. But yes… after 3 or 4 days you will want to return to the real world. Before leaving just make sure to head over to the Grand Canyon for a bit.

          The strip itself is very safe as its FULL of tourists. The call girl flyers / hand outs are about the worst part of walking around out there. Just stick to the main areas because it gets very sketchy only one block away.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I think five is optimal, longer if one plans to take a trip outside of town. The next time I go I want to see Zion in either a day-trip or two day stay.

          • 0 avatar
            Nick 2012

            I can’t say enough good things about Zion National Park. Its 2.5 hours away from Vegas, and to me, you see much more on a per-hour basis than Yellowstone or the Grand Canyon.

            Do the Angles Landing trail. It isn’t for the timid.

            http://www.sltrib.com/home/1898235-155/2-utah-trails-among-worlds-most

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Thanks for the recommendation.

          • 0 avatar
            bunkie

            The perfect Vegas vacation is three to four days provided you get out of town at least a little bit.

            To add to 20-Cars-Later’s list:

            Rent a bike and ride the incredible roads 20-50 miles outside of town.

            Forgo the packaged “adventures” by doing a bit of the legwork yourself. On our recent trip, I contacted a flight school and arranged the rental of an airplane and hired an instructor. I did all of the flying, got a spectacular air tour of the area and it cost me a lot less per flight hour than some package. You don’t even have to be a pilot to do this and it even counts as instruction toward your license.

            Go see the Hoover dam. There’s nothing like it.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Great suggestions which had not occurred to me.

            Does one at least have to be studying for his pilot’s license in order to rent the plane and hire an instructor?

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            I could be satisfied with the reduced-priced drinks and buffets..for a couple days at least.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          I’ve only been there when I’ve had to work a display at CES. I don’t gamble; I’m an engineer, have taken Probability & Statistics, so I know how bad the odds are. but yeah, after a couple of days in Vegas I just get worn out by the constant barrage of lights and noise and anger and hatred.

          One year they put us up at Bally’s (dump) and as I was walking to our 7:30 a.m. shuttle, I passed a woman who was sobbing about how much money she lost that past night, all the while her companion was doing his best to console her.

          Only thing I could think at that point is “*that* is why I don’t gamble.”

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Haha wow. I’ve always wanted to stay at the guilded Mandalay Bay, because I like the building.

            There’s a chance I could end up at a conference there in 2017. This year, I’m goin to San Antonio!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I hear really good things about Mandalay Bay but where it is physically located makes it difficult to get out to do activities (you take a tram to Exaclibur if on foot). I’d rather stay center strip like I just did.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Pai Gow from what I remember has a 69.5% chance of not losing (29.5% of winning, 40% of push). I sit, drink, play minimums, and just try to enjoy myself. I witnessed one gentleman drop $2500 in about an hour at Cosmo, I was up 75% at the time. I quit after I lost two hands and kept pushing like five times.

          • 0 avatar
            fvfvsix

            @Corey – if you’re not a gambler (I’m not, but live close enough to Vegas that people from back east *always* want to meet up there), then the best hotel is the Four Seasons. It’s actually the top 6 floors of the Mandalay Bay, with a completely separate entrance and a secret door from the casino floor. You’re in a casino, but you can choose how much misery you want to encounter.

            A good time to visit would be September during Barrett-Jackson, which is also inside the Mandalay Bay

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Good tip on the Four Seasons, thanks.

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          It’s pretty fun if you don’t get sucked into gambling away the college fund. I always set my limit at $50, which usually lasts an hour or so on the cheap slots.

          The night sights are fun and fascinating; by day you see past the veneer and it’s sad.

          Try to catch a few shows; I highly recommend “Love”.

          Not someplace I have to go more than once every 8-10 years….

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I saw “Love”, not a bad show but I didn’t care for it given the 96 bucks or so it was (also not a big Beatles fan).

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            Just have to set a low limit and stick to it. Don’t part with more than you’re willing to lose!

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            my limit is $20, and never drink on the casino floor. which makes it not worth doing.

      • 0 avatar
        05lgt

        I’ve found it depressing in less than an hour every time I’ve been.

    • 0 avatar

      I used to go to a convention that was in Vegas every year, and it seemed kind of silly that it was there. Until they cancelled it and merged it with another one, and had it in Houston. There was very little around the hotel/convention center to do, and I missed being able to walk outside the hotel and have 100 places to eat/drink/gamble/people-watch

      It is amazing how quickly you go from strip to tractor-trailer storage yard, though.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Wheel

        One more place to stop in Vegas with an automotive theme: the car museum at The Linq Hotel/Casino (formerly the Imperial Palace). It doesn’t cost much to get in, or you can print out a free admission coupon at their website. Lots of cars there are actually for sale. I always stop by whenever I’m in Vegas.

        http://www.autocollections.com/index.cfm?tab=main&action=main

        Also love the In-N-Out burger. I hit the one at the corner of I-15 & Tropicana Blvd. They have a company store next door with lots of cool merchandise, especially car themed t-shirts. I probably have 5-6 by now.

      • 0 avatar
        NeilM

        “I saw “Love”, not a bad show but I didn’t care for it given the 96 bucks or so it was (also not a big Beatles fan).”

        You spent 96 bucks on a Beatles show when you’re not a big Beatles fan? That’s nuttier than playing the slots.

        (The best Cirque du Soleil show was of course “O”, but that’s long gone.)

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          The groom of the bachelor party I was part of wanted to see the show.

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          “O” was excellent as well! As a huge Beatle-olo-gist, “Love” was fascinating in how George Martin and his son melded the songs as well as placed vocals within other songs. And the scene with Julia Lennon was chilling now that we understand the depth of emotional damage it did.

          So for me $96 very well spent.

        • 0 avatar
          eggsalad

          I don’t know your source for this info, but “O” still plays at Bellagio 10 shows a week.

          Source: I work for Cirque.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      28-

      Actually, up to a point, there is nothing official about being a flight student with one exception: as a post-9/11 thing, you need to provide proof of citizenship or provide authorization for flight training if you are an alien. Bring your passport or birth certificate and that’s all you need. The only time it comes to the attention of the FAA is when you get ready to solo. At that point you have to A) get a third-class medical exam and B) Have your instructor apply for your student certificate. Point B is new as of this month. Previously, the paperwork provided by the doctor who did the medical served as your student license. Training is tracked via your log book. Each time you take a lesson, your instructor signs your log as proof.

  • avatar
    Felis Concolor

    Oh, I remember very well: we made a point of leaning out the windows and screaming “DIE, MARCOS!” whenever we drove past his hideout on our way to suffering pounding shorebreak and kiawe thorn punctures at Sandy Beach or risking gruesome death at Toilet Bowl by Hanauma Bay.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I guess you have to step up to black car service to get the driver not to regale you with anecdotes?

    • 0 avatar

      I’m guessing that Jack is the kind of person who wants/encourages anecdotes from drivers. Think of him as a long-haired Thomas Friedman.

    • 0 avatar
      fvfvsix

      I tried Uber Black once, in SoCal. Got a fairly ragged out ‘burban. The ride to Long Beach from SNA cost me over $130. I’m sticking with UberX or Select from now on out.

      I didn’t get any cool anecdotes during that ride, so your point is valid.

  • avatar
    319583076

    excellent

  • avatar
    Driver8

    /sells all stock in ‘Tinder’

  • avatar

    Odd and interesting slices of several lives.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    Jack, for some reason my image of your taxi driver looks a lot like Vonnegut’s elevator man in Cat’s Cradle. I’ve read part two three times, and LOL’d at work each time. Thanks.

    Mark, get this man a press review car. I’m tired of Ubers and Indians.

    I’m doubly tired of reviewers that competitively fellate automakers. (If you don’t like being hit with it, don’t bring the stick in the ring.)

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Visitors to Las Vegas see a whole different world than those of us who live here.

    There is life off The Strip. There are dentist appointments, soccer games for the kids, etc. It’s a lot like life in any other mid-sized city.

    EXCEPT: There are a lot of miserable people here. Las Vegas isn’t “home” to a lot of the residents. They are people who moved here with dreams of making a lot of money working in the building trades or in a casino/hotel. The ones that didn’t strike it rich are miserable by default, and the ones who did are still miserable because of what they left behind.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    Is the reason that the best selling bike is an old fart leather pirate land yacht because Millenials are just the worst, a bunch of bubble-wrapped pansies (which makes them great punching bags, apparently)? Or is it because 20-somethings can’t afford to shell out new motorcycle money once they’ve bought a Chinese knockoff of Rossi’s helmet and a good pair of riding flip flops? There’s plenty of squids who look like they only have that chin strap beard because they can’t grow anything more substantial, they just aren’t necessarily the ones buying new bikes.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      granted I only see a small slice of motorcycle riders, but around me Harley ownership seems to have a large portion of veterans. many Vietnam, but more and more Persian Gulf/Iraq vets as time goes on.

  • avatar

    Jack- could you do a review of the Club Eaglerider thing- It sounds very interesting. I like the idea of flying to destination (family) instead of riding my bike from TN to OR.

    Anything to be watchful for with the program? I have been riding for 25+ years and have become more conservative over the years but I fully believe riding, any riding, is good as long as you are doing it safely. Risks we take while riding are our own, and we are only accountable to ourselves and maybe our wives for those risks.

    Dang it- found this after searching a bit more.
    http://www.bike-urious.com/introducing-club-eaglerider/

    Still think your insight would be better, or let us join using you as a reference so you get something out of it.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      I’ve only been a member for one month and one rental. It went very well.

      My referral code:

      http://www.eaglerider.com/membership?referral_code=FCUSS

      FCUSS

      Thank you!

  • avatar

    Best wishes to the new Mrs.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    What a great post ! .

    I too enjoy meeting the locals wherever I go .

    Then the comments are fun to read here , so many different ways of living life .

    SWMBO loves Vegas so I have to schlepp her and sometimes a carload of Teenaged Foster boys out and back , as mentioned Vegas is so much more than the strip and miserable people , you have to want to see that though .

    FWIW , I looked at the Indian Motocycles website a bit and they don’t seem to have the stripped model I’d want and I no longer like heavy Motos although the skirted fenders and two tone paint jobs look mighty sharp to me (hey,I’m old) .

    -Nate

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