By on March 8, 2016

Sajeev's Ford Ranger Aftermarket Exhaust, Image: © 2016 Sajeev Mehta/The Truth About Cars

Mike writes:

Sajeev,

Is there some solid information out there about how various mufflers perform and sound? Mine are rusted out and need to be replaced (’96 Chevrolet Suburban 5.7-liter, true dual exhaust with crossover). I’m finding lots of baseless opinions, but little fact. Many forum posts keep referencing someone’s test with a Mustang and fifteen mufflers from 2002. Or some chart showing “flow percentage” but with no reference to who or how this “test” was performed. Perhaps you have some direction?

Also, do you or the B&B have suggestions for quality forums for this Suburban? I’ve not owned much ‘Murican stuff before and am a bit overwhelmed at the quantity of forum options.

Sajeev answers:

I used to care about comparing and contrasting aftermarket mufflers, but no more. Here’s why:

  • 2016 Ford Mustang GT horsepower: 435
  • 2016 Chevrolet Camaro SS horsepower: 455
  • 2016 Dodge Challenger R/T, SRT 392 horsepower: 485
  • 2016 Ford F-150 5.0-liter V8 horsepower: 385
  • 2016 Chevrolet Silverado 6.2-liter V8 horsepower: 420
  • 2015 RAM 1500 5.7-liter V8 horsepower: 395

I’m sure the same trick works for old school Japanese and German metal looking for more burble-per-buck. Finding them won’t be tough: plenty of folks love the “better” sound, more bling, and a whopping 6 extra horses after spending $800+ to buy/install/dyno test their aftermarket setup.

Their loss is your gain.

Given the amount of real estate on your ride, I reckon a late-model LS-powered truck muffler (avoid the ones with DoD flappers) will drop-in easy. A muffler shop has a few lying around (waiting to be scrapped) so with any luck, you can get them bought and installed for $50-100. Go listen to a new, stock V8 truck at idle and tell me that isn’t a nice rumble. And they don’t drone (at all?) on the highway: good sound, more than enough CFMs, and OEM construction designed for 100,000+ miles.

A win-win. How about you put your money where your mouth is, Sanjeev?

You got it, son.

Here’s my 2011 Ranger with a 2.5-inch 2010 Mustang GT muffler (free) and an uber-rare 2.5-inch Bassani Catback ($75, Craigslist) exiting after the cab a la Ford Lightning. The Bassani muffler’s straight-thru design was far too aggressive, turning a Duratec Ranger into a Duratec Ricer. So I reinstalled my Mustang muffler, sending the Bassani off to TTAC’s turbocharged Ford Sierra project.

The exhaust shop rotated the Mustang muffler to mate to the Bassani’s U-bend tailpipe, then made a new 2.5-inch tube going back to the catalytic converter ($100). Before the Bassani plumbing, the skinny (skinnier than the upstream tubes) factory stuff did a good job keeping the Mustang muffler as quiet as stock on the highway. But now it always makes a 16V Duratec burble, kinda like an NC Miata.

Sajeev's Ford Ranger Aftermarket Exhaust, Image: © 2016 Sajeev Mehta/The Truth About Cars

I got the best aftermarket muffler for my application, and it’s a factory part. I should dyno several mufflers to waste my self funded autojourno budget prove the point, but do you think a stock Duratec Ranger out-horsepowers a 5.0 Coyote V8? Not possible.

I will let the B&B recommend some forums. Have at it!

[Images: © 2016 Sajeev Mehta/The Truth About Cars]

Send your queries to [email protected]com. Spare no details and ask for a speedy resolution if you’re in a hurry…but be realistic, and use your make/model specific forums instead of TTAC for more timely advice.

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48 Comments on “Piston Slap: And the Ideal Aftermarket Mufflers Are … Factory?...”


  • avatar
    JimZ

    the actual horsepower/fuel economy “gains” to be had by simply replacing the muffler are small enough to be lost in the noise of day-to-day variation. Just like nonsense cold-air intakes (CAIs) or supposed “high flow” air filters. The only possible time they make any difference is at wide open throttle and high engine RPM. Which is how you drive maybe 0.000000001% of the time.

    the rest of the time, your engine’s throttle is the airflow bottleneck. reducing the restriction upstream or downstream of a barely cracked open throttle plate is worthless.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      If I’m at a dragstrip I’ll be at WOT.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        Which is as relevant to the average person as the stock price of Wenzhou Jovean Heavy Group Concern.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          The average person isn’t going to be researching or shopping for performance modifications in the first place.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            then what was your point in stating the patently obvious?

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            Becuase you said an air flow modification would only make any difference when at wide open throttle.

            My point was that when I’m going fast I will be at WOT and high RPM so if the modification only works in the conditions you listed then that would be acceptable.

            The fact I will not be at full throttle all the time (or even 3% of the time) driving my vehicle is irrelevant becuase the goal of the hobby is to get an improved timeslip.

            And yes, the average commuter does not care about any of this but drag racing and performance modifications are niche leisure activities.

          • 0 avatar
            Sigivald

            I dunno.

            I mean, sure, not literally “average person”.

            But I get the impression that a fair number of less-informed enthusiasts or half-enthusiasts really think that K&N on their car is “totally boosting power” all the time.

            Things like a high-flow air filter are so cheap and simple that they’re not exactly a … filter (hah!) for high-spending very-informed/concerned power enthusiasts are racers, eh?

      • 0 avatar
        ellomdian

        And that has literally NO RELEVANCE to any discussion in the article. Dude is trying to find cheap, effective mufflers for a Suburban. Jimz comment was directly related to the discussion, yours was argumentative and absurd.

        Go talk about drag racing somewhere else. Your repeated defense of your idiotic, useless premise wastes digital ink.

        What the hell happened to the commenters around here?

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      JimZ – I had run across a test with the 5.4 F150 with a CAI. The cost of the unit and mpg gained would put break even around 4.5 – 5 years.

      Driving more smoothly would give you the same gains.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        I’d be surprised if any legitimate test could show a statistically significant improvement in fuel economy from an aftermarket intake. As JimZ said, the factory-level restriction ahead of the throttle plate is completely irrelevant under normal driving conditions, and even at WOT you’ll be doing better fuel-economy-wise if the engine isn’t allowing as much air and fuel in.

        Anyway, I would only install an OE or OE-like (Bosal, Walker Quiet Flow) exhaust system unless I had plenty of experience driving or riding in the same vehicle with a specific aftermarket exhaust and knew that I preferred that sound. The minimal gains typically aren’t worth the extra noise unless you really enjoy that particular sound, and almost nobody around you will share your appreciation. It only takes seeing $1000+ wasted on some terrible droney exhaust once before you appreciate the engineering that goes into stock exhausts.

        That said, I did enjoy some loud exhausts in my younger days. They can be a lot of fun as a short-term toy for kids.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          rpn453 – agreed. IIRC the test I cited was around 0.5 mpg. In 5 years it would pay for the mod.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            I just figure that confirming the accuracy and repeatability of a 0.5 mpg difference requires a longer and more strictly controlled test than anybody would be willing to do!

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I briefly considered replacing the mufflers on my 06 GTO but I leave for work early in the morning and I know I don’t like being disturbed by loud cars when I’m trying to sleep.

    I have also resisted the urge to put cans on my LGT wagon to add the boxer rumble.

    In fact, once I finally get around to replacing the exhaust on my Impala, I plan to try to bring it back to stock sounding. It’s been loud since we restored it in ’94. I used to love it.

    As I get older, I have stopped appreciating a loud exhaust and tend to find them pretty obnoxious. It coincides with my overall desire to keep cars as stock as possible while only including subtle and purposeful modifications. I believe this is how you determine that you are officially old.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      I’m not sure I ever thought a loud exhaust was good, but now I sure think they’re bad.

      If I ever decided to get, say, a WRX, I’d *stop at a muffler shop on the way home from the dealer* to have quieter pipes put on.

      … which is why I’m not really the target market, of course.

  • avatar
    IAhawkeye

    As for the forums for GM full size trucks and SUVS whenever I had a problem with my ’04 Silverado I ended up just Google searching for the answer and going through all the various forums that way.. I never found one I truly liked.

    For the muffler I’d say keep it stock. Whatever you do don’t straight pipe it. Me and my friend both did it to our trucks at the same time w/ his dad’s tools. It sounded good to me at the time(I was 16), but it’s not subtle.. to say the least, in addition to the other bad things it does.

  • avatar
    RyleyinSTL

    Replacing your muffler, and hoping to gain anything but a new soundtrack for your snow covered parking lot donuts, is lunacy.

    Sajeev is on point here.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    On modern vehicles I’m all for replacing mufflers for looks or sound. I had a cat back Dynomax installed on my old 04 F150 for the sound and the dual outlets made it easy to get dual chrome tips peaking out under the bumper.

    I’ve got a few performance bonuses coming my way and I’m going to take a small portion of that and have a little exhaust work done on my Highlander, only because it has the V6 and Toyota didn’t bother to give it the dual exhaust look from the factory and right now it is quieter at idle than a 4 cyl RAV4. I just want a little rumble at idle and some noise in the upper rev ranges when it downshifts.

    In neither case did I go into it looking for more HORSEPOWER!

    • 0 avatar
      formula m

      Flowmaster or magnaflow are common aftermarket brands. I have a stainless steel OEM style replacement on my Silverado and it sounds great whenever I’m loading something into the bed while it’s idling. Don’t notice much noise other than at low speeds which I like.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I too readily acknowledge bolt ons are for sound, especially on the little 4 bangers I deal with.

    I have found on the butt dyno that bigger piping from the cat back does make for more power and torque. Problem is 9 times out of 10 a straight through muffler is fatigue inducing anti social agony. So I generally put on a larger diameter baffled muffler. Still more flow than stock, but no drone, and generally pretty cheap (muffler + piping is like $200-300).

    I got lucky a while back with a Maxima… it was a Cali version so it had like 8 cats. I put bigger piping and a straight through muffler on and it sounded orgasmic. Wasn’t so lucky when I put a test pipe on my old Accord and tried the same… that was a mess. I generally keep the noise mods on the intake side though since that doesn’t drone.

  • avatar

    Aftermarket “performance” mufflers have a common characteristic: they sound great at idle but drone at highway speeds. If you’re on the highway for say, a half hour or more, the drone will drive you up a wall (figuratively speaking). That has been my experience.

    • 0 avatar
      CobraJet

      For years I ran some off-brand mini turbos on my 69 Mustang. The drone on highway trips became unbearable. I went back with a reproduction factory dual set-up. Ford engineers back then developed some strange dual systems. Mine has a proper H-pipe leading to two long resonators. After that, the pipes go over the rear axle where they dump into each end of a single transverse muffler, actually just a big hollow chamber from what I can tell. From there the exhaust finds its way out each end of the muffler into two outlet pipes to the rear of the car. I know I lost some horsepower with this system, but is much more pleasant overall. It has a nice rumble at idle and fairly quiet operation at speed.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    I second this. I put an OEM 2000 ish Z28 single in dual out muffler on the Alero. It was mainly for aesthetics, but happily it sounded decent. No drone and just a slightly deeper idle due to less restriction out the back. You could only tell something was different when starting it next to a stock car.

  • avatar
    mfgreen40

    I would agree that installing a bigger , louder system increases power mainly at high speed. But here is an opposite example. Years ago we replaced the 307 Olds engine with a warmed over 455 Olds , temporarily using the stock exhaust system until we could get to the muffler shop. Under normal driving it was fine but it would not spin the tires from a dead stop. With the proper racing exhaust system the 455 turned into the torque monster they are known to be. The droning noise inside that station wagon did get to you quickly.

    • 0 avatar
      JuniperBug

      In the past, stock systems – especially ones with catalytic converters – often were a choke point, and as you experienced, opening up the exhaust netted gains. Since somewhere shortly after IROC Camaros, that has stopped being the case, though.

  • avatar
    suspekt

    Keep it stock and maybe delete one of the mid mufflers or downstream one-way cats….. aftermarket peices are rarely built as good as oem…..

  • avatar
    JuniperBug

    When I bought my car it had a Borla Touring (which is their quieter option) and one of those “cold air” (which really draws in hot underhood air) intakes. Honestly, it was embarrassing how much noise it made compared to my slow forward progress in traffic. I have no problem if my ride makes noise while I’m ripping away on some back road or track at WOT near redline (in fact, I kind of like it), but being one of those bro-dudes who needs everyone around him in traffic to hear his ride as he’s parallel parking is just pathetic.

    I reverted to the stock muffler and intake, and noticed no difference on the street or track other than now being able to open the throttle without ticking off everyone around me and assaulting my own eardrums.

    For those who are actually in search of performance, depending on what your car is, getting a performance tune or standalone engine computer will get you way more performance for your money, without added noise.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I kind of like the idea of heading down to the local muffler shop and see if they have a can they removed from someone else’s truck in their hopes of building a bro-dozer and repurposing said factory muffler underneath the 96′. I love me an affordable repair that is good for the environment (recycling).

    The LT you are sporting needs more than a muffler upgrade to deliver performance, so why bother.

  • avatar
    shaker

    The only gains from an aftermarket exhaust are profit for the vendor, and irritation for your neighbors.

    “Hot Rod” pickups, driving by my house at 5AM, sounding like they’re pulling the Space Shuttle up the street; yet they’re only pulling the lone driver and a bedliner.

    Yeah, I get the desire to give the audible ‘middle finger’ to everyone; I’m sorry that you’re angry – it’s not my fault.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      hey, I had Flowmasters on my Mustang, solely because I liked the sound. But I was mindful enough to be gentle on the right pedal until I got out of the neighborhood.

      • 0 avatar
        shaker

        “gentle on the right pedal”

        Well, thank you! :-)

      • 0 avatar
        DubTee1480

        If only my neighbors were easy on the throttle. There’s a guy with a 350Z and another with a G35 and both of them seem to relish winding their engines up to 4K+ on their way out. I’m glad to be moving at the end of the week and that I’ll no longer have to put up with that.

        • 0 avatar
          shaker

          Back in my day (when we used to walk uphill both ways to school in blinding snowstorms) police used to hand out tickets regularly to cars (and bikes) with loud aftermarket exhausts.

          Then came the Harley-Davidson ‘revolution’, and the cops’ (personal) bikes (just like every other Harley) have the OEM exhaust gutted or replaced with one that’s (not kidding) 5 times as loud as stock.

          It’s the first thing that a buddy of mine has done with his new Harleys – gut/replace exhaust, re-jet/retune as required.

          This nod/wink seems to apply to cars these days as well.

          • 0 avatar
            DubTee1480

            Thanks, that explains a bit. I installed a DynoMax Super Turbo on my 2.8 Sonoma in my youth after the OEM one rusted in half. But it was never that loud, just a healthy burble at idle and the typical drone at highway speeds. I’d like to eventually install a Mustang 5.0 muffler on my 5.4 equipped Expedition tow rig but I’ve never seen the allure of loud exhaust for just the sake of loudness. Even our dirt circle track cars had racing mufflers…

  • avatar
    John

    A long time ago, I owned a fast motorcycle, and bought an aftermarket muffler with a valve that allowed an infinite choice between straight-though, and very baffled and quiet. Redline was 10,800 rpm. I tested it on a deserted road, and the results were impressive. Straight through, I had no power at all until 5,000 – 6,000 rpm. Very restricted, there was tons of power off idle, but none at all over 8,000 rpm.

    • 0 avatar
      Slow_Joe_Crow

      And would this have been about the time that Yamaha had an automatic valve in their stock sport bike exhaust systems that did it for you?

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      John – in the days of carbs unless you did some sort of tune aftermarket mufflers just make noise.
      I used to have a ’96 YZF1000. When it came out in Canada it had a better power to weight ratio then the ultra lightweight GSXR750. A buddy of mine had a CBR900. I beat him in drag races all of the time. All of the poser-boys loved it since track magazines loved it. I also killed him on any typical rougher back country road because my bike was much more stable.
      To make a long story short, he piped his bike. I told him that he would just lose again but with a lighter wallet. Sure enough, I beat him off the line even worse and even up to 3/4 speed. Top end he closed in slightly but never caught me. That same day he wrecked it trying to prove he was better in some twisties. Luckily he never got hurt.

      @cbrworm – I loved the torque from my YZF. You hit mid RPM range and the thing exploded like the Millennium Falcon hitting hyperspace.

  • avatar

    That’s worth 30 HP for sure;) For nothing else, it looks very nice and I’ve always liked the side exits on the Lightnings.

  • avatar
    mfgreen40

    Motor cycles are touchy, When the ex. is opened up the fuel jetting needs to be increased as well.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I love the aftermarket exhaust on my T-Bird, but it can be quite droning on the highway.

    That sound when I manage to get the engine to rev to 3000 rpm before shifting is worth it, though.

  • avatar
    Noble713

    I’d say a muffler by itself is pretty useless….

    but a full stainless steel turbo-back/cat-back exhaust is good for weight savings*. And a big pipe with no restrictions definitely drives differently. When I had to get my Chaser JCI’ed (Japanese car inspection) I needed a noise-reduction muffler insert that dropped the muffler’s outlet down to ~1.5inches…..the car drove like crap with that thing in. Terrible power and throttle response.

    Bottom line, as long as you are spending <$1000 on a full stainless exhaust that isn't too drony, it's worth it IMO.

    *If you are fat…just do some CrossFit instead.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I’ll replace my exhaust only if it rots out or gets damaged.

  • avatar
    Slowtege

    Black over charcoal LT1 / 6-speed 4th gen Camaro driver here (no mullet, but a mullet wig…). Bought it two years ago with a welcoming idle you could hear across a decently-sized parking lot. Intake, shorty headers to stock cats, and an SLP exhaust. I get the anti-social thing, especially as a more introverted person.

    Regardless, I do my best to restrict my starting-up occurrences to between 9AM and 9 PM on weekdays/nights. Friday and Saturday a little later. I park right by an oft-visited park that has plenty of people and loud cars ripping around at normal and stupid-late hours. I do my best to be courteous and will idle out (clutch no gas) to the main streets before introducing more revs.

    Drone is 1800-2800, but at 1500 it’s a low rumble, which means at 60 mph all I hear is road noise. Once I hit 75 we get into the “drone zone”. Above 2800 and heavy throttle, it’s the thickest snarl and apocalyptic sound around. Many smiles (and laughs) per gallon happen. And hey, Seattleites need their dose of The Sound of Freedom–it’s for their health.

    I understand the appeal of a car that will just be quiet, and find myself thinking, “If I owned X car with Y (smaller) engine, I could take a muffler from Z car (same company) with a larger muffler and get the benefits of vastly increased airflow but with a stock sound, and maybe twin exits on the muffler.” I’d just bump up the cat-to-muffler pipe diameter a little.

    If you look at the Ford Modular/Triton motors (my family has/has had the three largest), the Air filter for the 4.6L V8, 5.4L V8, and 6.8L V10 are THE SAME! It’s a mammonth 12″ x 8″ x 8″ mildly conical unit. If it’s good enough for a huge V10, then it’s more than enough for a 4.6L, which I would totally throw into an SN95/New Edge Mustang GT…if I fit in the cabin…

    So all that to say, stock is good. And at over 30, I am getting older and more “car mature” via not wanting to put up with certain things. The Camaro is not getting lowered, and I think all I really want to do is, as it’s a ’97 with the newer 5-spoke rims and updated interior and taillights, go back to the split-5 spoke “salad shooter” rims from ’93-97 because they are the exact same size but look awesome and wonderfully ’90s Chevy. But I’m keeping the breathing mods. It sounds too good right now and is just so grin-inducing. :D

  • avatar
    MrIcky

    I agree with most of what everyone has said, except: the OP has a 96 with what I’m sure is already a custom exhaust (I think factory those were 2 into 1 in ’96- exiting in a single pipe). So the horse has left the barn and probably not going back to stock either way.

    I don’t think anyone independantly tests mufflers because the odds of it being more than 3 hp different is slim. I ‘think’ the modern suburban has a 2 into 1 that splits back into 2 after the muffler, and the stock single muffler is really big. So although I could be wrong, I don’t think using a take off is going to work. And the exhaust for a Camaro is pretty specialized with a tuned resonator.

    So you’re going to be left to wing it based on sound. If you want to improve the HP on the old Suburbans by messing with the exhaust, the exhaust manifold is where to look. The stock one is not great.

    If you want to talk about intakes- on a 96 all bets are off, but on a modern car it really depends on what car. Many cars are tuned to run quietly, which mean intake resonators and complicated paths. However your typical sports/muscle cars don’t make silent running a priority and the stock intake is pretty good. Not that you should change intakes on a Camry, but it actually can make a difference on a Suburban/Tahoe when it’s tuned for quiet running.

    Unless you drag race your car, you’ll never know for sure how much an intake means because you can’t provide enough air with fans to close the hood at most dyno shops. Open element intakes on NA cars will naturally do better with their hood up but may lose that improvement with the hood down. You can look at the IATs but that doesn’t tell the whole story.

    • 0 avatar
      Plumlee0622

      Even with any pro mod the vehicle will always lose and gain that The variations would be so slight making any cost-effective changes would be taken seriously that any thought other then where can I dump this pile of s*** would be insane. No one can take this seriously even my previous comment on the main page is poorly detailed that I conveyed enough information that any serious inquiries of purchasing aftermarket Mufflers for this vehicle would be nothing more then the purchasers misunderstanding or desire to listen to reason. A muffler on a vehicle of such need of design and probably more than likely engine transmission electrical and even though probably the more reasonable and easiest to understand no aftermarket modification can fix a manufacturers mistake the vehicle was designed with no purpose other than to fit a need for passenger space or work materials its large oversized application the design lacks any and all reason to exist other then to mock a design flaw in ingenuity even in it’s time everything about it is un conventional and isnt a reasonable discussion piece for any real debate on aftermarket Muffler performance.when its tank size power to weight is more then enough to be a joke. Lose 1500+ pounds add 200 more hp and change the body down until it can fit to some standard that aerodynamics would mean nothing no performance will be added to this vehicle without serious cash and an idiot with the desire to waste resources on junk. It still all boils down to the opinion and the desire to fix something that shouldn’t be concerned and unless it’s rusted to the point a clog was eminent in the exhaust and at this point the current owner should decide on purchasing a vehicle that fits hes or her desired need, or want. a toy is a toy a everyday tank exploration while trying to exsplore a better quality muffler is ridiculous.

  • avatar
    Plumlee0622

    On my 2014 Chevy Malibu 2.5 liter I took off the stock Muffler added the stock Muffler from the 2014 Chevy Malibu 2.0 Turbo which was more of a performance muffler and fit perfect also changed the cat from the 2.0 the 2.5 liter Chevy Malibu original cat was terrible noticed more output not noticeable sound difference. Also gave me the option for dual. Probably a reason why they discontinued making the original 2014 Chevy Malibu Muffler to the best of my knowledge. test are all done by preference best sound to meet consumers desire reliable family, carpool, gas saving,and meeting the demand 4 gas Improvement and staying with emission standards. Performance cars is putting more money into of course cats Muffler design is optimized for less vibration max airflow. Tested and tested to optimize all performances into 1 fully customized Performance Machine all working together to accomplish the American Dream. The question is pointless 96 suburban at best most likely price ranging in the 700 to $1,900 range spending any money on a muffler would be redundant to the point that the idea of it is a joke rusted Muffler would be the least of your concerns the only reason you would have to put your foot into your vehicle is going up a hill passing or for off-roading saying it’s four wheel drive and then again the muffler is the least of your worries even if you’re only goal is to drive it until it blows up or falls to pieces you would still be putting money into an overweight 20 year old outclassed by any technological standard 20 years is like 70. If you have any welding experience I would just straight pipe it and call it a day or just walk away ahead and put the money in your savings running like hell before it sucked anymore brain cells, while wasting any other person’s time. invest in something worth the energy and time you put in making any money that would be cost-effective and makes sense. spending money to make money not spending money to lose money. Before asking redundant questions ask yourself is it worth it. start a budget around the money wasted on a day-to-day basis every time put gas in. And I guess to finally answer the question. the effort it would take to mass produces the changes of one after another modification after modification after Bend after Bend after test after test.would take more money than any individual would waste when the companies who create new and improved mufflers are paid Millions to clone a system after performance testing each and every change possibly each change more accurate with instruments that read more performance data at one time than any muffler shop. Even though not every vehicle even though same design almost to the last Bolt are the same not all vehicles are designed or put together the same because of human error because like I said the money it would take to do the exact testing to match preexisting vehicles to its exact aftermarket Muffler would be more than the headache. That’s why more and more companies design specific aftermarket performance parts for the ideal performance parts consumer much simpler cost effective and does more. Or find a buddy that can do all the work you’re wanting and has some basic knowledge have your particular vehicle you have in mind and can do some testing and would have the time to invest and the money to spend on waste and other materials needed to assemble repetitively your chances are better in the lottery then the money you would have and the time you can invest and the lack of team effort put in that is put into specialized custom built for all vehicle application with matched design and functionality the only down side is what limitations they are put to being if it’s too raise fuel efficiency noise reduction and HP. It all has to be cost effective. It all just boils down to difference of opinion and falsh marketing sales promises or just what someone esle recommended just because it sounded good. Stock was built for gas efficiency better admissions better quality All to a standard that is monitored by the government. With my muffler and catalytic converter swap I was able to notice not only has sound quality change but better release of air flow that my previous stock Muffler was not designed to achieve but also no record have better gas mileage after application. After all that was done saw the difference deleted a few governors that added Optimum performance to my swap out. All test are inconclusive because I do not have controllable variables to prove any change in fuel economy because too many variables because I can not exactly duplicate each and every application between braking throttle position changing of lanes coasting tire wear transmission fluid spark plug usage airflow air to fuel mixture in the list just keeps piling So is alot of words your 96 Chevy Suburban needs to be crushed so as to open up space for a new vehicle that a muffler replacement question such as this wouldnt exist. If you feel other wise and think anywhere from 6 to 15 mpg top speed 75 down a steep hill (only speculating) but I’m not too far off should even register thoughts I performance aftermarket stock more than $10 should be a sign that someone else should be making decisions I also will add in the Suburban is a toy then why the f*** would it matter if it’s a everyday driver proper care or maintenance would have been taken or should have been taken inconsideration. Last thing thank God without truly studying a vehicle from the inside out you can’t make true accurate to car mods. It’s what makes the average driver the average driver. If every person went in thinking that each Muffler did exactly what the manufacture Muffler shop said race car drivers drag car drivers any car enthusiast mechanic that works on his own vehicle or appreciates the knowledge and experience or just like to get paid to work on cars and do it the right way they know what it takes to perform each test diagnostic under there specific need or want of that desired performance part and most Build design modifications themselves based of want desire no one person has the same option or knowledge or same out come so there for youve been answered. Peace im out.

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  • highdesertcat: ILO, I believe Ford has more to offer Toyota in the North American market than Nissan and/or Mitsu....
  • DenverMike: “…all companies matter…” I’ll make an exception for GM. GM is just the...

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