By on January 12, 2016

2017 Genesis G90 Front (Release)

When the American-spec 2017 Genesis G90 finally made its bow at the North American International Auto Show on Monday, most of us already knew what to expect. The South Korean version of the first Genesis model — dubbed EQ900 — has already been out there for more than a month. Still, we were eager to see how the new fledgling luxury automaker would grow from the top of luxury market to the bottom.

On Monday, we found out.

2017 Genesis G90 (22)

The new G90 sports a 4-inch longer wheelbase than a standard BMW 7-Series and looks just as long as the luxe German cruiser. While it’s not packed with technology like the 7-Series and Mercedes-Benz S-Class, which both feature semi-autonomous driving features and complicated gesture controls, the Genesis relies mostly on convention: leather everywhere and large helpings of brightwork in between the cowhides.

The large, 12.3-inch widescreen in the center stack displays the G90’s 360-degree camera setup and controls the 17 speakers and 10-inch subwoofers buried deep within the car’s plush interior.

Under the hood, Genesis will make standard its all-new 3.3-liter turbocharged V-6 that makes 365 horsepower. Hyundai’s venerable 5-liter, direct-injection Tau V-8, which produces 420 horsepower, will make an appearance in higher trims of the G90. Both powerplants are mated to an eight-speed automatic transmission and can power all four wheels for well-heeled buyers.

2017 Genesis G90 Rear (Release)

Hyundai planted a multi-link suspension setup at all four corners and beefed up the brakes in cars equipped with a V-8.

Interestingly, Genesis withheld some of the G90’s more interesting tech features, including highway driving assistance, from the U.S. version of the car. Initially, some features will be reserved for South Korea only. We’ll still see autonomous emergency braking, smart cruise control and lane-keep assist in the G90 at launch in the U.S.

Genesis didn’t announce when the car would go on sale, or how much it would cost when it does. We’ll wait and see how closely the car’s final price comes to established players such as Audi’s A8 and BMW’s 740i, which both start just over $80,000.

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40 Comments on “NAIAS 2016: New 2017 Genesis G90 is Beginning at The End...”


  • avatar
    dwford

    I had read somewhere else that Hyundai doesn’t plan to raise prices with the start of the Genesis brand. I’d expect this to be in a similar price range as the Equus.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      This is the replacement for the Equus, right?

      • 0 avatar
        Mr. Orange

        No the Genesis sedan.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          The G90 is the replacement for the Equus and probably will get a modest price increase (for the V8), but with the addition of the 3.3TT engine, the starting price will probably say about the same.

          The Genesis sedan is being rebadged the G80 and the ’16MY will have a short life-cycle as a refreshed ’17MY is due sometime this summer/fall.

          There will be a smaller G70 sedan slotting underneath the G80 as well as a coupe and 2 crossovers.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Aside from the Fusion, has there been an NAIAS vehicle that isn’t announcing a power drop?

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Genesis – Trolling the Germans one car at a time.

  • avatar
    Easton

    This could be significant if done right. Obviously, the real significant test will come when they eventually wade into 3-series territory. In a way, it’s a shame that Hyundai is doing what Ford couldn’t get done with Lincoln.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    I am waiting for the comment from someone that they will wait 3 years to pick one up used for a bargain at $28K.

    Also, BTSR will chime in about how AWESOME Genesis is and that he’s buying one for his UBER.

    And then someone will call it the lovechild of an S-class and a Sonata.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Sorry I’m late, it will be a bargain at $28K in three years!

      Seriously though, I’m leery because it seems nearly every luxury or pseudo luxury car is built to a tight tolerance and pushes its performance limit far enough it can become a headache very quickly. The reason things like this become a “bargain” so quickly is because they are not worth what they are priced in the first place. If they were, demand and financing would be there to keep the resale inflated. Its one thing to find a 5-10yo clean Jag <10K and deal with the headaches for a toy, quite another to finance around $30K and then get four figure repair bills while you're still financing the note. Ask yourself, from an engineering standpoint what are the points of weakness and what will I do when they are breached?

      Strategery, yo.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Since this seems to be an Equus replacement, those do hold up well from what I saw in SK. They don’t get ratty looking after a few years, and I never did see one which looked to have anything wrong with that.

        That being said, the buyers in SK of the -ultimate- representation of Korean home-car wealth will be more well-heeled than buyers here.

        It’s good they’re allowing the V8 as optional still.

      • 0 avatar
        05lgt

        I think when a large portion of the perceived value is the exclusivity and other statements about your ability to spend money, the used sale doesn’t include that portion of the value. They’ll never be worth the new price to you or me, but it’s an accurate assessment of it’s value to someone.

      • 0 avatar
        honda1

        Spot on!

  • avatar

    Sick of these giant ugly gaping grills. I will NEVER own a car that looks like this no matter how cheap or how good it is.

    Where I live there’s the constant risk of collision with a deer or loose livestock. Hitting a cow at speed with something like this seems dangerous.

    There hasn’t been a model year since 1958 when so many butt-ugly vehicles have been released simultaneously.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      Whiskey, better get used to those gaping grilles. They’re not a temporary fashion statement. They’re the only response the stylists have available to the new pedestrian impact safety regulations that outlaw the fashionably tapered pointy nose that cars used to have.

      I don’t know exactly where you got the idea that if you hit a deer with a low-snouted car, you’d be safer. Actually you’d not only hurt the deer worse, you’d probably do the same to yourself — there are incidents of deer tumbling up the hood, crashing through the windshield, and then, stunned and injured, kicking the driver to death. I’d think a sloped nose and hood make that more likely, not less.

      • 0 avatar

        Being killed is not my concern. The total destruction of the car is. I can’t believe a pedestrian comes out any better when hit by one of these cars either. At what speed would a pedestrian be safer? 1 MPH? 2MPH? You can’t change the mass of the vehicle with a grill redesign.

        • 0 avatar
          05lgt

          I thought it was about having crush depth under the hood before the hard engine finished off the pedestrians skull. The shape of the nose just follows the need for a higher hood.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    Smart to make the car long to have more room in the back.

    I never have understood why you basically have to own a 6 figure flagship sedan in order to get a roomy backseat in a car. I could see this having big appeal for people who want a large luxury car without the absurd price tag.

    Even luxury cars like a Lexus GS only have a backseat appropriate for a child, why even have a 4 door luxury car unless an adult can be comfortable back there?

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    This is more Continental than Lincoln’s offering.

  • avatar
    nguyenvuminh

    The thick (if not “traditional”) C-pillar is inconsistent with their recent cars’ design. I guess they’re trying the more “formal” look but it seems out of place with the futuristic front end.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    It seems like Hyundai is finally starting to understand how to do switchgear at this level. The Equus and K900 have buttons and switches comparable to a ’90s Infiniti Q45. On the surface at least, this looks like the real deal.

    That being said, Audi called and they want the A8’s interior design back. I guess Hyundai are great artists, because they stole it.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      No, Hyundai stole the supervisor of the people who designed it.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Keep in that the Equus and K900 were not intended for the world market, but for the Korean market where they are pretty much driven by hired drivers (hence, the rear controls having better switchgear than the front).

      But yes, that was an issue they needed to address.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Lol you know, if they continued the bumper across the front so it had a normal sized grille, it would look just like an old A8 at the front.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Part of the luxury car deal is the dealer experience. Selling along side the normal riff-raff isn’t going to cut it.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      True, Fred, but I’d be willing to get slimed a certain amount if it saved me $25,000. That’s really what Genesis comes down to: If it’s priced right, there’s a lot here to like.

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        Won’t save you a dime. The S90 will be just as luxurious, just as fast, and will start around the same price (judging by the Equus and XC90 list prices). Bet you the Continental retails around the same too, and cheaper after incentives.

        So the question is, would you get this Hyundai/Genesis if you could get a Lincoln or Volvo for the same price?

        • 0 avatar
          SCE to AUX

          “So the question is, would you get this Hyundai/Genesis if you could get a Lincoln or Volvo for the same price?”

          Yes, without any hesitation.

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            That’s a silly question. Hyundai does luxury better than any Ford product and has for years now. And the Genesis V8 will still be running long after the Volvo has eaten through a turbocharger, supercharger, and two transmissions.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            TMA1,

            How do they do luxury “better”? They just copy whatever Mercedes was doing 2 S-Class’s ago. They are the outlet mall version of luxury, a cheap dated knockoff that won’t fool anybody.

            As for durability, we will see. Hyundai has been in Canada since the 1980s, but you hardly ever see one over 10 years old. Mind you, my local tech thinks that’s due to the owners as much as the cars: they always want the cheapest replacement parts and repair invoices, even when OE parts are reasonably priced.

            I know that Volvo had a transmission problem in the past (back when they were using a GM transmission, ironically enough, and GM-owned Saab was using a Japanese transmission).

            I keep hearing internet comments about failed turbos, but I haven’t seen it in a car that’s been maintained. Is it a real issue?

        • 0 avatar
          tjh8402

          @heavy handle – I would definitely buy the Hyundai. I do not like 4 cylinder engines in premium cars which eliminates Volvo. While Lincoln does at least have a six, and is on one of the best FWD chassis out there, I doubt I’ll enjoy driving the Lincoln as much as the RWD Hyundai and I doubt Lincolns six will be as nice as the big 5.0 V8. A side by side drive would be required to know for sure, but if I had to guess, I’ll probably go for Hyundai. Either that, or as I’ve said in other posts here, I’d give a 300C Hemi a serious look as well, and possibly a GS350 and a CTS 3.6. The (4 cylinder) Germans would never be on the radar. I’ve had an F10 528i (N20 powered) as a rental car and it was dull. It was an overpriced Toyota Camry. I was sharing it with a friend and after a few hours with the car I had lost interest in driving it. I let him drive the rest of the time.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          A lot of luxury buyers still prefer the RWD layout, esp. for higher end sedans.

          And notwithstanding the new Genesis brand getting pretty much the Equus service experience, the Genesis sedan (which did not get the same level of service) was still the 3rd best selling sedan in the midsize luxury segment after the E Class and 5 Series.

          Don’t expect the G90 to be as successful as the Genesis sedan as it is even more difficult to make inroads at the flagship segment, but with the improved ride, handling, amenities, interior and the addition of AWD and a TTV6, the G90 should sell better than the Equus ever did with a good chance of doign around 5-6k.

          Add another 3-4k for the next gen K900 and that isn’t bad #s for the H/K.

    • 0 avatar
      tjh8402

      @Fred: Will Genesis be offering the same concierge style service Hyundai did when they first offered the Equus? If I remember, you never had to set foot in the dealer. Cars would be brought to you to demo and test drive, paperwork would be brought for delivery, and service loaners exchanged.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    The is more in line as to what the new Lincoln should have been.


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