By on December 29, 2015

2014 GMC Sierra SLT Crew Cab Front Three Quarter in Iridium Meta. Photo courtesy GM/Pickuptrucks.com

A California man sued General Motors this month for revising its tow ratings for his 2014 GMC Sierra 1500 5.3-liter V-8, which meant he couldn’t tow his toy-hauler and golf cart, according to court records.

The complaint, which was filed Dec. 11 in Central California’s district court, said General Motors intentionally misrepresented its claims for Richard Quintero’s truck, which he purchased in July 2013 for nearly $47,000.

According to Quintero’s attorneys, the man opted to buy the 2014 truck because its advertised tow rating of 8,800 pounds was significantly higher than the 2013 model’s 6,900 pounds. GM lowered the 2014 trucks’ ratings to 6,800 pounds in a letter to owners, which was less than Quintero’s 1,000-pound golf cart and 6,700-pound trailer.

In the lawsuit, Quintero’s attorneys say that internal testing done by General Motors when the truck was new revealed the lower tow rating, but that the automaker opted to publish its own internal figures instead of the actual figures to assert supremacy in the competitive truck market:

In other words, GM knew, or should have known, at the time it made the representations regarding the original Towing Capacity statistics that these statements were untrue or misleading.

In trucks equipped with its 5.3-liter V-8, GM lowered its max payload and tow ratings by 2,000 pounds. For 6.2-liter V-8 owners, those numbers were reduced by 200 pounds.

The lawsuit alleges that GM tested its trucks to the SAE J2807 standard, which was developed in 2008, but didn’t make public those figures in 2013.

Quintero’s lawsuit seeks to combine other GMC Sierra and Chevrolet Silverado owners’ claims into a single class-action lawsuit. The lawsuit is seeking more than $5 million from GM.

Lawyers for GM have not filed a response to the claim.

Source: GM Authority and LegalNewsLine.com

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69 Comments on “General Motors Sued For Inflating Truck Tow Ratings...”


  • avatar
    eggsalad

    IANAL, but yeah, if a truck was advertised and sold as suitable for a specific task when the manufacturer knew it was not suited for the task, the guy has a case.

    But what would be proper restitution? Perhaps a straight trade on a brand new truck, similarly optioned, but with a *true* 8800 lb tow rating. The trade in will still have decent value, so I would estimate it would cost GM $12-15,000 per affected vehicle.

  • avatar

    Seems to me like Car and Truck reviewers should be actually putting those towing numbers to the test. They should have a flatbed with X amount of pounds on it to test.

    • 0 avatar

      Until all these fly-by-night bloggers who Ctrl+C, Ctrl+V the press release into their reviews go away, this won’t happen.

      • 0 avatar
        eggsalad

        And there is going to be a LOT of traffic on Davis Dam Road, the official required test pull, if everybody with a car blog is testing all the trucks up that hill.

        https://goo.gl/maps/GbaK5c5jmWm

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      Is it that the vehicle couldn’t physically tow 8,800 pounds, or is it that doing so would, over time, cause an excessive amount of wear and tear?

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        Physically, a half-ton pickup could tow 15-20K lbs. It’s all in the gearing and momentum. With enough of a start, I can pull a 1750-lb. empty hay rack (almost 12 times my weight) at jogging speed. But in addition to wear and tear over time as you pointed out, tow ratings are also a function of safe braking abilities.

      • 0 avatar
        mason

        “Is it that the vehicle couldn’t physically tow 8,800 pounds, or is it that doing so would, over time, cause an excessive amount of wear and tear?”

        After owning HD pickups for the last 2 decades, I get quite the chuckle out of anybody that says their half ton “comfortably” tows 9k lbs. Everybody bawks at Rams consercative half ton tow/payload ratings, but as is obvious in the above article they’re the only manufacture of the big 3 in this segment thats not high off their own fecal matter from having their heads shoved up their rectum. If you need to tow that kind of weight step up to an HD. Period. Sure, a half ton CAN tow 9k lbs for short distances. They can not safely and reliably haul that much over long distances or on a regular basis.

        RE Long distances: Anybody towing large campers/boats/enclosed trailers in this weight range. If your loading up your family for the weekend and pulling an 8k lb camper plus cargo/food/equipment with a half ton, and I see it ALL the time, your an idiot.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          What’s your opinion on pulling 10K with a heavy-duty F-150 (thicker frame, heavier axles and wheels, tranny cooler, etc.)?

        • 0 avatar
          Spartan

          Funny, you said “your an idiot”. Just thought I’d point that out.

          Anyway, I have a 2012 F-150 4×4 EB Plat and I’ve towed my 8,500 lb travel trailer cross country and back, twice. No issues. I’ve racked up thousands of miles towing that thing and aside from regular maintenance, again no issues.

          A half ton can easily tow 8,000 lbs and to say that they can’t just because is ridiculous. Not everyone wants or needs a half-ton truck. These aren’t the half tons of yesteryear. By your logic, you should use a tractor trailer if you plan on towing 20,000 lbs because a 3500 series truck shouldn’t pull that much weight, either.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            @Spartan – I’d have to agree. I have a HD Sierra that I bought specifically to tow my 250 SeaRay Sundancer boat. I’ve never scaled it but I suspect it is somewhere around 7500-8000 pounds loaded sitting on the trailer. I’ve used our ’07 Chevy ‘Hoe to tow it and while it doesn’t handle it with the confidence of the HD it’s no white knuckle experience either. But I also don’t tow mountain grades which is something altogether different. Around town I prefer the ‘Hoe over the HD because it turns on a dime which makes pulling into gas stations and lunching at the ramps much easier.

            And weight is only the half of it. The ‘Hoe pulled our pontoon better better than the PU. 6.0/4:11 vs 5.3/3:73. Why? Because the PU is pushing a lot more wind and the gearing in the ‘Hoe is better than the PU. Acura actually had 2 different tow ratings for their MDX specifically that addressed wind resistance. They rated it to tow more with a boat than a box trailer.

          • 0 avatar
            Detroit-Iron

            I don’t know either of you but just based on this post it sounds like mason spends his time towing things rather than correcting grammar for strangers on the Internet. To his point I think there is a reason that a new wrecker will set you back $150k-$200k vs maybe $60k for a maxed out 350 and it’s not just the hydraulics.

          • 0 avatar
            mason

            Spartan, here’s “your” sign. (Better?)

            What are you basing your experience on? Have you ever owned and towed similar loads with an HD pick up? Not belittling, just asking. I’m pretty sure I already know the answer to that.

            “You’re” running a light duty drivetrain, I.E. LR C/D tires that are nearly maxed out at that load, suspension that is tuned for comfort rather than hauling, undersized cooling fans and oil coolers, smaller brakes. The list is long. These are just a few of the differences between a LD and a HD pick up. HD pick ups are designed to be ran at max GCVWR. Half ton trucks are designed and built with comfort in mind first, with occasional towing. Unfortunately that is lost among many buyers.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            “I don’t know either of you but just based on this post it sounds like mason spends his time towing things rather than correcting grammar for strangers on the Internet”

            You get this same attitude/thinking on any boating forum under the towing section. Nothing unique about his way of thinking that you need 3/4 ton diesel to pull anything heavier than a 16′ Lund fishing boat w/20 HP outboard. I agree with a lot of what mason says but not all of it.

        • 0 avatar
          87 Morgan

          @Mason..

          You are dead on. Too bad GM can’t counter-sue this guy for being an idiot and putting his family at risk. If your going to consistently tow 7600 lbs as is stated above, you need a HD. Period.

          I have a 5.3 in an 08′ Suburban and I would tow my pop up camper and it was not a fun experience, no longer as it was totaled. The 5.3 is a great drive train for a family hauler but I have towed with several different Ford, Dodge, and GM drive lines and have found the 5.3 to be the least appealing option.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            Love our ’07 Tahoe for towing. It wouldn’t even know that little pop-up camper of yours was behind it. Completely different experience than what you had with your ‘Burb. But as I alluded to above, drop it into “3” and the gearing is spot on for towing w/Hoe which is why it does so well.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            I hate to break it to you, but your personal truck preferences have nothing to do with the case or the allegations being made.

      • 0 avatar
        Lack Thereof

        Two main factors here.

        One is that it must be physically capable of maintaining certain speeds on certain grades at certain outdoor temperatures, which is all laid out in the SAE J2807 standard mentioned in the post.

        The second is the durability issue, which is really just up to the manufacturer and what kind of warranty issues they want to deal with. Towing more than the manufacturers listed tow rating voids the warranty.

        There are those of us who don’t particularly care about maintaining 60 MPH on a mountain pass (especially considering that you’re usually sharing the highway with tractor-trailer rigs crawling up the same mountains at 30 mph or less). Us types tend to judge trucks based on their tow ratings with the biggest engine option… and then buy a version with a smaller, more economical engine, knowing that the frame and suspension are still just as capable.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      How, exactly, would this be accomplished? Determining the maximum tow number is not the same a measuring 0-60, it involves a lot of factors.

      • 0 avatar
        Lack Thereof

        See the SAE J2807 standard linked in the post.

        Add a sprinkling of what level of towing-related warranty issues the manufacturer is willing to deal with, and you’ve arrived at the published maximum tow rating.

  • avatar
    mason

    And this is why GM and Ford were both so reluctant to adhere to 2807. Both manufacturers have falsely inflated their numbers using slightly sketchy methods.

    I doubt he’ll get a dime though. Last I knew SAE J2807 was not mandatory.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “Last I knew SAE J2807 was not mandatory.”

      That’s too bad. Tow ratings historically are born in the marketing, not the engineering departments. So IMO they are pretty much meaningless if they don’t meet the SAE J2807 criteria.

      • 0 avatar
        mason

        Carlson, they may be required now (my previous comment was not a known fact), but between 2009 and 2013-14 SAE J2807 was 100% voluntary. If 2807 is mandatory on current vehicles it has only very recently become so.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          It’s not mandatory. J2807 was written in 2008, revised in 2010, and Toyota was the first to use it in 2013. Technically, OEMs could use it to rate their crossovers, but I doubt that they’ll do that.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      This has nothing to do with J2807 being mandatory. GM used their own system and advertised 8,800lbs. This guy needed to tow about 8,000lbs so he bought the truck. He then receives a letter in the mail saying it’s only 6,900lbs. GM is now telling him he can’t tow the load he bought the truck for. 5 million does seem a bit excessive though. I bet most of it would go to the lawyers anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        mason

        That’s the whole point, without a standard to quantify a trucks capabilities its going to be hard to pin them down to anything. Both GM and Ford have both admitted to using shady techniques in the past to boost payload/tow ratings. Removing, bumpers, spare tires and stripping the guts out of doors come to mind. They’ve got mandated standards for publishing fuel mileage, HP, etc but nary a requirement for establishing tow ratings. Personally I hope the guy gets something out of GM but its not going to be easy.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    The gross disparity between advertised and actual tow rating (2000lbs) looks like fraudulent misrepresentation.

    I find it absurd that GM could be so negligent in putting that 8,800lbs number on paper without a second of conscious thought on the possible repercussions.

    There must be a caveat which GM will rebut with around how the capacity numbers were formulated and cannot be taken as plain facts.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Two different standards. The SAE test obviously tests to higher standards that what GM was using. It doesn’t mean the truck can’t tow 8,800lbs, it just means that it can’t do it up the Davis Dam road within the SAE test’s minimum requirements. The average midwestern truck owner shouldn’t even bat an eye at this. If said owner lives near in Arizona and plans to drive up that way, then he should be concerned.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Seems to be the way these days. Everyone lies about everything for a few bucks, it’s just sport to them.

    In the vehicle arena, we have had Ford and Hyundai lying about mileage, oops, sorry. VW, well, we know what they did. In the truck fanboi world of extreme partisanship, where people argue about the most arcane things, we have incorrect tow ratings – a topic that ran for months here on TTAC a couple of years ago. As I recall it, the world Ford Ranger could haul twice as much as any fullsize US pickup while getting twice the mileage in some sundazed minds.

    In Canada, FCA has had an ad on TV for the Journey for several years with an outright falsehood. They say Journey is the best-selling crossover in Canada. Even a glance at Tim Cain’s website would show this is a lie, whether you count the thing as an SUV, CUV, crossover, sedan, wagon, used hockey sweater or the big bag of hot air it is. But on they go with the ad.

    It’s getting to the point where I am cynical about any pronouncement from just about anyone.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      The lines between CUV and SUV are pretty blurry. What counts as a crossover is mostly determined by that manufacturer’s marketing department.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        http://www.ford.com/suvs/escape/

        Escape is SUV!!!

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        My personal criteria is whether the drive system is FWD-based or RWD. So the JGC and Durango, while unibody, still count as SUVs in my book.

        The Escape/Tribute/Mariner/Maverick/Kuga has never been an SUV. It was only advertised as such from the get-go because its blocky shape reminded people of the once-compact Explorer, and even after moving to the curvy Kuga model, the “SUV” name still stuck around.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      After driving a 12 Leaf for three years, I’ll have a hard time believing any EV range numbers from Nissan in the future.

  • avatar
    myheadhertz

    What was the rear end gear ratio in his truck? The gearing makes a big difference in towing capability.

    • 0 avatar
      kjb911

      was about to say sounds like he purchased the 3.08 and is pissed that he got swindled into the truck and now wants out…sad part is I blame us the sales people because far too many do not even check to see what kind of ratio and engine is in the damn thing to begin with!

      a regular cab 1500 Silverado with 5.3 and 3.42 ratio is capable of 9,500lbs while the double is 9,200

      6,500 / 6,200 for the 3.08

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Sorry I can’t answer your question, but since you brought it up: You used to be able to get full-size pickups with rear ends of 3.0something or even shorter (like 2.93 or something stupid). These were only available on the regular cab 4×2 “value” packages (Dodge even called theirs “Miser” for a time) with the six-cylinder engine and either a 3-speed manual or 4-speed auto with OD. These trucks could barely get out of their own way and topped out at 55 without OD, but could get low-20s for MPG on the highway. Nowadays the shortest rear axle available is a 3.08 (on Chevy/GMCs), and we now have V6s that can get 25 MPG on the highway while putting out either side of 300 HP.

    • 0 avatar
      OldandSlow

      That was eggzackly my question – put a 3.73 rear diff and a proper tow package, there should be no problem at all pulling a toy hauler, provided that trailer is set up correctly.

      With that said, I prefer a HD 3/4 -or- a 1 ton pickup for towing.

  • avatar

    Yeah, I could see 500 lb or so but 2,000 lbs is clear fraud. That’s a whole ton. Does this mean they have to go back and change those annoying Chevy commercials where they have three trucks behind doors and ask “regular” people which has highest towing/payload ratings and “SURPRISE” they are all Chevys? Because I’m assuming they were lying in that commercial as well.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      Fortunately for GM, there’s one born every minute. Anyone that has bought a GM product in the past four years and expected more than the possibility of survival is hopeless.

  • avatar
    Quentin

    I’m surprised that a half ton truck is rated as low as 6800lbs. What changes so much that there are versions that are rated for over 10000lbs and some that are rated 35% lower. Is curb weight (4WD, crew cab), GVWR, and resultant limited tongue weight how many of these get lowered from 10k to under 7k? I wouldn’t think that brakes and drivetrain would notice the extra 500lbs that a crew cab and 4WD tack on in the Davis Test… I’d expect that a truck weighing an extra 500lbs would lose 500lbs of towing capacity, I guess.

    Disclosure: I’ve never purchased a truck and if I did, it wouldn’t be for towing anything more than a utility trailer.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      There are two parts to the equation.

      One is the entire power train combination. The smallest engine with the lowest (numerically) rear axle ratio will have a lower rating than the big engine version with the highest ratio. From those numbers they will generate a maxe GCWR or gross combined weight rating, ie the maximum that particular power train combo should motivate.

      You then subtract the weight of the truck to get the tow rating, so yeah the top rating will be on the regular cab 2wd truck and the rating of the 4×4 crew cab will be reduced due to the added curb weight. Depending on the mfg they may or may not subtract another 150lbs for “driver weight” when determining the advertised rating.

    • 0 avatar
      Silence

      Start adding options, and the tow rating starts evaporating at an alarming rate.

      Cargo rating is a bit of a joke, too. A top spec truck with gas, loaded trailer, has a laughably minuscule cargo rating.

      Beyond that, it’s no surprise that GM is the company to be off by a whopping 2000 pounds.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I remember as a kid here in Australia a vehicle could not tow more than the vehicle weighed. Simple regulation.

    Or course you were required to have the necessary braking, safety etc for the time.

    Even now you can buy a midsizer that can tow 3 500kg. But this is the limit for this size vehicle and it can’t be exceeded. So no matter what midsizer is manufactured it can’t exceed 3 500kg.

    American full size pickups here can tow a maximum of 4 500kg if the manufacturer has the vehicle rated to tow that much. Even a HD can only tow 4 500kg. This can be exceeded with 5th wheel setups or dog/pig type trailers on MDT and HDT trucks, including articulated vehicles.

    Why can’t the US just have a simple regulation aligned to your class of vehicles ie;

    Class One – maximum weight allowed to tow is 10 000lbs.

    Class Two – 15 000lbs

    Class Three – 20 000lbs.

    Even have payloads factored into classes.

    The US more so than here in Australia has this marketing system of “Best in Class”. Why? Because most everyone of our pickups all tow 3 500kg.

    To me Best in Class has nothing to do with mostest, fastest, biggest, morest, etc. But this is what occurs when a manufacturer has too much input in designing a model to rate their vehicles on.

    Best in Class should be an overall rating, or it just isn’t Best in Class.

    As this guy is finding out, more isn’t necessarily better or best.

    Supersize me!

    • 0 avatar
      TonyJZX

      Lord knows I agree with you, its seems like common sense. If I tow a 3.5 ton load (eg. 3.5 ton caravan), I should have a 3.5 ton vehicle doing the work.

      Thing is thats not how it works (anywhere I believe).

      eg. if I’m towing a 2 ton vehicle on a 1/4 ton trailer, then I need 2.5 ton vehicle but quite obviously you see the opposite.

      You see a 4,000lb vehicle towing another 4,000lb vehicle on a 1/2 ton trailer.

      The law says that’s ok. It doesnt look right to me but no one bats an eye.

      It seems worse in Europe, you see FWD hatches towing godawfully large looking trailers and the Euros cant be wrong can they?

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Big Al from Oz,
        Finally the weight police, hav finally banned a lightweight, US 1 ton Pickup from towing a 36-38ft 5th wheeler. You have to get a proper Japanese Truck. No, not a Japanese car i.e. Tundra

      • 0 avatar
        S1L1SC

        It also come back to speed and expectations – most of the euro compacts don’t try to do 60 or 70 mph on the interstate / autobahn / motorway and expect to stop on a dime.

        A lot of the US consumers hook up a 1/2 ton trailer and the expect the entire rig to behave the same way as when they drive their truck without a trailer.

        I have a 1991 Buick Roadmaster Wagon – 4,700 lbs curb weight, max tow rating of 5,000+ lbs with the tow pack, 7,000 lbs with a weight distribution hitch – good luck finding any manufacturer advertising these kind of ratings today, as the liability from something going wrong is so much higher… (And yes, the brakes in that thing sucked to begin with, pulling 7,000lbs gets really interesting, especially when people cut you off on the interstate.)

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          A 7000lb trailer requires brakes and if you’ve got properly working brakes on each axle with a properly adjusted controller you should be able to stop in a similar distance as you do w/o the trailer.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    2015 Chevrolet/GMC SILVERADO/SIERRA DOUBLE CAB 1500 Double Cab 4WD 5.3L V-8 9200 lb
    Notes: 3.42:1

    2015 Chevrolet/GMC SILVERADO/SIERRA DOUBLE CAB 1500 Double Cab 4WD 6.2L V-8 9200 lb
    Notes: 3.42:1

    2015 Chevrolet/GMC SILVERADO/SIERRA DOUBLE CAB 1500 Double Cab 4WD 5.3L V-8 11000 lb
    Notes: 3.73:1 and towing package required

    2015 Chevrolet/GMC SILVERADO/SIERRA DOUBLE CAB 1500 Double Cab 4WD 6.2L V-8 11900 lb
    Notes: 3.42:1 and towing package required

    Funny, look at the towing specs. for the 2015 models. 9200-11,000 5.3/CC/4WD. I got this off trailers.com so i can’t be certain that it’s 1005 accurate.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      That was supposed to be “100% accurate”. Supposedly you can’t edit your own comments all of a sudden.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Silverado/Sierra 1500 Crew Cab Short Box 2WD (XFE) 5.3L V-8 7,000 (d)
        Silverado/Sierra 1500 Crew Cab Short Box 2WD 6.2L V-8 9,700 (q)
        Silverado/Sierra 1500 Crew Cab Short Box 2WD 6.2L V-8 10,600 (s,z)
        Silverado/Sierra 1500 Crew Cab Short Box 4WD 5.3L V-8 9,500 (q)
        Silverado/Sierra 1500 Crew Cab Short Box 4WD 6.2L V-8 10,400 (s,z)

        Here’s the specs. for the 2013 models off “onlinetowingguide.com”. 9500 lbs 5.3/CC/4WD. Where are they getting the 6900 number for the 2013?

  • avatar
    kit4

    I hope he wins.

  • avatar
    OldandSlow

    Someone should have sprung for a Silverado 2500 HD with a Duramax rather than a mall sled.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    It sounds as if Quintero has a good case. He deserves to win.

  • avatar
    Ol Shel

    I call BS. He uses a 6700lb trailer to tow a 1000lb golf cart? A 6700lb trailer?!

    To me, that sounds like the only combination of possessions he could come up with that would allow him to sue GM for $5 million.

    Anything that should be on a 6700lb trailer would exceed the INFLATED towing capacity of his current truck, and he probably used his HD truck or his company dump truck to pull it.

    Oh, and the above is just my opinion. Pure fiction. I don’t need him suing me, too .

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      More than likely, the trailer in question is an RV camper with some way of hauling a golf cart because heaven forbid you walk while “camping”.

      • 0 avatar
        Ol Shel

        I think you’re right. I wasn’t picturing a travel trailer. Thanks.

      • 0 avatar
        outback_ute

        Maybe he needs somewhere to take a nap after the first nine… Good pickup though Quentin, I was thinking of most trailers I have seen golf carts on that I would estimate at more like 500 lb.

        @Carlson Fan, sounds like the guide didn’t get the letter, or didn’t bother to update their numbers.

        Given GM caused this surely they can change his rear end ratio or even upgrade his truck to fix his problem without ending up in court.

    • 0 avatar
      Lack Thereof

      A “toy hauler” is typically a hybrid camp trailer, with beds, kitchen, and RV necessities in the front, and vehicle stowage in the rear.

  • avatar
    salguod

    I think he’s got a good case, based on the simple facts presented here. Regardless if GM knew ahead of time or not, or if the truck can actually safely tow 8800 lbs, the tow ratings may have an impact on warranty coverage. He bought the truck to tow and paid for 8800 lbs of capacity.

    The only thing I wonder is if his weights are for the empty trailer and cart. Tow ratings typically must include all passengers and cargo. Trailer ratings, particularly campers, can be exclusive of optional equipment, although newer trailers I think typically come with an “as shipped” weight. At 1100 lbs from the original max rating, GM may claim that he was going to be over the limit anyway. With 3 additional passengers, food and water for several days and all your camping gear, it’d be easy to add another 1100 lbs. I used to tow a 2000 lb pop up with a 3500 lb rated Odyssey and with 5 of us, 4 bikes and our gear for a week, I assumed I was near the limit.

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    What GM forgot was that old disclaimer from commercials, “Capable of towing 8,800 pounds by a test driver on a closed course. Do not attempt this with your vehicle.”

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    My old Frontier was rated at 6500 pounds so that seems low for the big GM trucks.

    And yes other makers have been optimistic in the past. However no other makers have felt they were overstated enough to warrant officially lowering them effecting insurance, liability, and potentially warranty coverage.

    I wonder if somewhere in some “better call Saul” type law office if lawyers are looking over accident reports for someone injured driving one of these trucks that was within the old standards but over the new one.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    US Pickup ratings have come under scrutiny here and the few people who try to tow a US imported 38ft 5ver, with a 1 ton,now find it is illegal and have to purchase a more cumbersome Japanese Truck, that ironically is much cheaper

  • avatar

    if a mistake was made and the published capacity rating is different, pay the guy and move on.

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    He wasn’t even trying. My buddy pulled a Jefferson marlago FS35 (6000 lbs w/o trailer weight) halfway across the country with a 5.3L GMT900 Tahoe.

  • avatar
    Firestorm 500

    “Specifications are subject to change without notice.”

    The guy doesn’t have a case.

    • 0 avatar
      tariqv

      If the specs at the time of purchase were overinflated then he definitely has a case. A manufacturer has a right to change the specs at any time as long as the changes do not apply to previously sold products


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