By on December 16, 2015

1992 Volkswagen Corrado SLC

It’s been a while since I’ve written about a Volkswagen product in a positive light. They certainly haven’t made it easy. That said, new cars aren’t my thing, and Wolfsburg did make the occasional interesting car back in the day.

I’ve been on a binge lately of looking at hot hatches that are becoming eligible for historic plates. That seems appropriate as I’ve passed the halfway point to my theoretical retirement. The Volkswagen Corrado has always fascinated me, so I fired up my usual searches.

Ugh. Finding an older Volkswagen that isn’t either thrashed or stanced is a challenge.

I suppose that’s at once a function of the popularity of Volkswagen’s performance models, and of VW’s perceived quality issues. I’m a bit concerned about this 1992 Volkswagen Corrado SLC, as it’s a first-year VR6 model. Can anyone tell me if these powerplants were particularly troublesome?

I can say that any car with factory BBS basketweaves automatically moves to the front of my desirability list. They are, by far, my favorite wheel of the ’80s. The black paint isn’t my favorite, but it looks nearly perfect. The light-tan leather looks wonderful, though I picture myself needing to clean up Heinz and Crayola frequently from the rear seats.

Yes, $7,000 is a bit steep for — though I’ve found a few others with a $10,000 asking price. There is an enthusiast following that could bring the value up over a basic commuter, but I’d think $4,500 is more realistic for this car.

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101 Comments on “Digestible Collectible: 1992 Volkswagen Corrado SLC...”


  • avatar
    davewg

    I had a VR6 in my ’96 Passat GLX and never had any issues with it.

    I still miss my ’92 Corrado, but wish I’d waited for the SLC with the VR6 instead of the G60 I had.

    • 0 avatar
      andyinatl

      Had VR6 in ’97 Passat GLX back in the day, and at around 70K it developed somewhat reasonable water pump leak. Not a puddle, but noticeable drops on the floor every morning. Those also had “lifetime” fluid in the transmissions.

      My only Corrado memory, although it was with G60 model, was driving with my mother on the hot July day with heater on full blast, as the darn thing was overheating.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      I had a 93 Passat GLX with the VR6, and basically a sedan version of this Corrado. It was my favorite car I’ve ever owned when it wasn’t having issues. However it was always having issues. I still have its drivetrain, and am always toying with the idea of a Corrado like this. I think it’s one of few FWD cars that will ever really be classified as a classic in the near future.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        I was toying around with the idea of buying a VR6 Corrado when they were new. I’d driven a G60 and only the supercharged engine had stopped me at the time, so the SLC was tempting. Two things changed my mind. The automatic seatbelts were annoying and useless, which caused me to think about the purchase long enough for the second thing to occur. Autoweek did a long term test of the SLC. Their update at around six months said they’d soured on it because the body was so flexible that the car had developed a symphony of creaks and rattles, as hatchbacks are want to do. I can’t imagine an old one is better than they were after their first oil changes.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      Brilliant engine. Friend of mine had the same car. Add Schick cams and blew away M3’s and Mustang’s on a daily basis.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        -eye roll-

        • 0 avatar
          VW16v

          Isn’t that predictable. But was also expecting the girly -eww.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Corey could have just said, “Sure, that’s possible. Until the Corrado’s diff exploded, fuel pump died, coolant pump impellers broke off, and the entire electrical system stopped working.”

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            LOL.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The last Corrado I rode in was incapable of having both power windows work at the same time. Also, many trim pieces were missing or cracked.

          • 0 avatar
            VW16v

            ~Eww, the trim pieces cracking on a 20 year old car. I’ve seen 2 year old Acura’s with half the silver paint on the dash rubbed off. Now, that deserves two snaps and an eww. The g60 was pos car. But, the vr6 was the cats meow compared to the buzzy junk Japanese cars around the same date.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It wasn’t 20 years old. It was in the late 90s, early 00s.

            I think the VR6 was a great engine. I had an R32. This was a good car when new, but they fell apart. Everything crumbled around the engine block.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      My wife’s VR6 Passat had a never resolved oil leak from new at the main seal (numerous “fixes” including 2 oil pans, but never the apparently defective block), the door locks and power windows were intermittent from year 3 until disposal, the ABS was intermittent from year 1 on despite replacing everything (but the wiring harness) more than once, the theft deterrent system was dealer defeated with wire cutters and jumper wires in its first week, the traction control was non-functional, the nice BBS logo’s fell off the wheels every month, the fog light covers cracked at least annually, interior bits fell off starting in the 3rd year… (tired of typing, it goes on) Yup, it was a “no issues” VW.

  • avatar
    mcg

    The abusive boyfriend of the auto world. Anyone I know who has owned one curses them and then takes it back wistfully a few seconds later.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    I think the prices for 90’s cars like this are poised to take off somewhat. They are affordable for those of us who lusted after them as teens as we reach our peak earning years, and are very hard to find unmolested. $7K is pocket change, and you can’t make an average one nice for that. The super clean interior alone makes it worth a large premium, as that is the hardest thing to fix these days. Assuming it is as nice as it looks in the pictures (black hides a lot of sins in pictures). The fact that it is offered by a new car dealer is encouraging.

    My garage being full keeps me in check, but if this was a ’92 16V GTI in similar condition I might be tempted. I also don’t really fit in Corrados.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      How can you fit in a BRZ but not this!? Seems like the Corrado would be larger inside due to the blocky shape and less safety bits.

      Agree RE: clean interior. In a light color especially, it’s pretty rare on this sort of car. No stickers or whatnot on the exterior, no mods. I’d probably try and get it for $6,000, but this comes closer to an appropriate price more so than any of the other cars featured in this series.

      Lack of CarFax bothers me, because I can’t see how many owners. Also, lack of under hood shot bothers me.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Lack of headroom, as usual.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Oh, I didn’t think you were that tall – 6’1 or something.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            6’2″, but I have a 29″ inseam. So I have the torso of someone who is more like 6’6″+. And my little short legs make it worse, because most seat tracks go UP as they go forward. I don’t fit in much of anything with a sunroof, never mind low-slung sporty coupes with a sunroof. No mandatory roof hole in a Scionbaru. Being weirdly proportioned sucks.

            Seriously, this is THE reason I bought an M235i instead of a loaded 228i – I could get it with the sunroof delete. $4K to not have a hole in the roof. F’ing Germans.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            That’s quite a high expense to not have a roof vent!

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Are you built like a cartoon strongman? At 5’8″, I never thought I’d find someone with a shorter inseam than me.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            You’re shorter than me mom!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Krhodes used to the the Jolly Green Giant before it was animated.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            I’m built like a gorilla. Seriously. Huge wide shoulders, big barrel chest, no butt, little short legs. REALLY long arms. If I was in shape I would probably look like those cartoon guys, but I am a middle aged fat [email protected]

            It sucks. Clothes that fit well are a huge pain to find.

            On the plus side, I find old Italian cars to be remarkably comfortable. I fit in them.

            As for the BMW – yes, a bit painful. But on the plus side, they threw in almost 100 extra hp as a bonus. Which I have no legit use for, but is an awful lot of fun on occasion.

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        If it’s like my Passat, the dash design has you sit more upright in order to see over it well. My head was always hitting the sunroof over bumps.

  • avatar
    sproc

    These were great hot hatches, but I’d still rather have an Integra GS-R. The Integra had a much better shifter and the cockpit had amazing visibility, while I found the Corrado a bit claustrophobic. Of course, pretty rare that a non-hoopty version of either surfaces anymore.

    • 0 avatar
      Pig_Iron

      I remember cruising the forums to see who was thought to have had the best handling FWD compact coupe. The Corrado consistently came in #2 behind the Integra Type-R. So I started looking into what made the Carrado front suspension so special.

      I thought maybe it had a steering knuckle separate from the strut like the Ford RevoKnuckle, GM HiPer Strut, Toyota Super Strut, Renault Double-axis Perfohub, and so on; but no, the Corrado was totally conventional, just really well designed built. I haven’t seen anyone else reproduce that since.

      I know a woman who runs a bookshop that had a Corrado with the V6 and stick. She pines for it every time I mention it. She says she would pay just about anything to get another new one. Sadly, that’s the kind of loyalty VW has squandered.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      Friend of mine had vr6 Corrado added Schrick racing cams. He would destroy every gs-r on the road. Could not stand those buzzy little Acura’s. Lots of noise with very little speed.

      • 0 avatar
        JuniperBug

        According to Car & Driver, the GS-R did 0-60 in 6.9s while the Corrado SLC did it in 6.8. GS-R’s top speed was 135 to Corrado’s 137.

        If that iota of extra performance makes the difference from “very little speed” to being a cam swap away from “blowing away M3s” for you, I don’t know what to tell you, but I’m pretty sure it wouldn’t be worth saying, anyway.

        I guess I could point out that the Acura cost less new, held up much better over time, and had an actual independent suspension out back, compared to the ‘rado’s torsion beam that was known to cause lift-throttle oversteer when trying to hustle it in the curves, but I doubt that’ll matter to you.

        • 0 avatar
          Power6

          Comparing simple 0-60 of a GS-R vs the SLC is one of those cases of the numbers not telling the story.

          6.9 seconds is revving the bejeebus of the little vtec 1.8 managing wheelspin at launch to keep up on the hot cam, winding it out past 8000. Cruising in any gear at a resonable RPM the teg is an absolute stone. Lets see some top gear acceleration comparisons betwen the teg and the corrado.

          On the track the lack of accessible power and the other shortcomings of the Integra dont matter much, but as a street car…the Corrado was a nicer car with more usable power. For me my GS-R was an excercise in frustration, a car so racy with engine hobbled by soft suspension, tiny tires and brakes. The Type-R made more sense.

          • 0 avatar
            JuniperBug

            That all sounds very reasonable, and I don’t doubt that the VW’s 6 had a much more accessible powerband. Of course, with high-revving 4 cylinders you just have to let them spin faster. It doesn’t hurt them, but it takes a bit more work. The VR6 is a well loved engine, and for good reason.

            I was responding to the VW fanboyism that believes that even though the two cars were within sneezing distance of each other when pushed, the Acura was slow while the Rado outran Mustangs and M3s. And if we’re already bench racing, it doesn’t hurt to point out that the GS-R is much more composed in the bendy bits, even if it can’t keep up with its bigger R-branded brother on the racetrack.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    Alternatively, you could set $7000 on fire.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Lol, for all the nice looks it will NOT be fun to maintain. At least all the interior bits are there and in pristine condition already.

      Surely parts aren’t too hard to come by, pretty common VR6 engine, yeah?

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        For $7000, I wouldn’t want to deal with the headaches. I’d rather look like a redneck in a SN-95 Mustang or a F-Body Camaro. You know what, I’d rather have a Probe/MX-6 than this.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I mean if you tell me to spend $7,000 on tidy old early 90’s sports coupe, I’ll turn up with SC400.

          http://www.ebay.com/itm/1992-Lexus-SC-SC400-V8-/172008517188

          End of discussion.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Ebay, ugh. I am reminded of Dal’s odyssey in finding a half decent Legend and how utterly mentally defective sellers were at the time.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’m on my second Ebay purchased car, and I’ve regretted it zero times. :) I don’t see how it’s any worse than dealing with some unaccountable small town Chevrolet dealer or the like.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            Now that’s how you do it!

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Sport Coupe?

            http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ford-F-150-F-150-Lightning-SVT-5-8L-/191757560484?forcerrptr=true&hash=item2ca5a42aa4:g:lCsAAOSwcOFWakAy&item=191757560484

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Lol, oh lord I can’t Lightning. However, it’s interesting to note that’s not the fastest vehicle where the Taurus steering wheel made an appearance…

            http://ipocars.com/imgs/a/a/h/w/h/aston_martin__virage_coupe_5_3_limited_edition_1995_5_lgw.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            A 1995 Aston seems like a poor choice. Like choosing the wrong Jesus cup bad.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m glad you had a positive experience, perhaps you found reasonable sellers.

            In PA dealers can be held accountable in the court of law if they shaft you on things they may or may not have known about. This is because the Commonwealth granted them a professional license. Private sellers cannot be held accountable as they are not “professional”, they can simply plead ignorance. “Your honor I didn’t know about the frame damage, I thought the car pulling to the left all the time was bad alignment”. This is not common but does occasionally happen in the Commonwealth.

            Most big box dealers will also allow you to return your purchase within a specific window (say three days) if you are dissatisfied. How often it is honored I really cannot say. We used to allow returns on anything we offered our cheapee Great Lakes warranty on (so newer stuff) but never the AS-IS models.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Indeed, a mid 90’s cost cut Aston with either/and/or Jag/Ford bits isn’t great.

            Starting with V12 Vanquish and +, I’m alright.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I knew PA was a shifty place where people would try and shaft you as soon as I experienced the alcohol purchase procedure.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The Templar Knight doesn’t have time to judge people on the Aston, he’s splitting his time between the local VW and Mitsubishi dealerships.

            “You chose… poorly”

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Maybe I’ll just buy 3 Probes for under $7000.

            https://www.carsforsale.com/vehicle/details/9722673

            230K miles!

            https://www.carsforsale.com/vehicle/details/14415649

            180K miles

            https://www.carsforsale.com/vehicle/details/12724255

            this one looks sketchy…

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            You could probably build one good Probe out of those three.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Perhaps. Maybe I would just have lots of Probe pieces and a three cars that do not work.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            That’s pretty much how I envision the yard of my non-existent house.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I have been contemplating buying a piece of land near our place in Northern Michigan with my in-laws. We have a place on a lake, and there is no storage. Since land is dirt cheap away from the lake, I’d like to buy a couple acres and build a pole barn. Then I would have room for non working cars and boats.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Beside it you can build a grand cathedral for the Church.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            That’s a good point. Can it be connected to the garage?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Why of course, my son. The Pope needs to park his chariot somewhere.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Also a very nice way to spend $7k on a toy car. But not even remotely the same thing, being a slush-o-matic luxobarge. Different strokes and all that.

          • 0 avatar
            dantes_inferno

            >That’s pretty much how I envision the yard of my non-existent house.

            Right after an IRS raid of the premises.

        • 0 avatar
          dantes_inferno

          > I’d rather look like a redneck in a SN-95 Mustang or a F-Body Camaro.

          Remove a couple of your front teeth and get a mullet haircut, and your wish shall be granted.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I don’t know if anyone is into this model but people were into Sciroccos when I was in college. I don’t think they were inflation adjusted 7K “in to them” but they were a thing nonetheless at the time.

      Maybe we should call this series “unscrupulous dealers who need a lesson in broken legs”. Oh but 28 our overhead… I say heads need to roll.

      • 0 avatar
        Tosh

        At the time the Corrado came out everyone wondered why it wasn’t called Scirocco. Maybe US marketers thought US customers had forgotten how to pronounce ‘Schee-rocko’?
        I drove an early G60, and I loved its space and handling. But it had motorized belts, rough-revving engine, and I was done with Euro crap falling apart already back then in ’89.

  • avatar
    xflowgolf

    Everytime someone mentions a Corrado, I think of this write-up, which describes the typical Corrado ownership experience quite accurately: http://forums.mwerks.com/showthread.php?5806043-Every-time-someone-says-the-Corrado-is-a-future-classic…as-story

    I owned a dark green ’92 VR6 Corrado. Absolutely love the shape, and the sounds that car made. One of my bucket list cars that lived up to the expectations of breaking down on me multiple times, often as result of a failed cooling system component raining coolant everywhere, as well as obligatory window regulator failure. Still glad I owned one though. :)

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      Ha! That link was a great read!

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      There is a big difference between buying a car as a daily driver, which would have been the case 20 years ago for this, and buying it as a weekend toy. At 2-3K a year, it shouldn’t be that big a deal to maintain.

      If you are buying this car in 2015 to use as a daily driver, well, good luck with that!

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        You should be able to DD an early 90’s car! That should be new enough to have modern conveniences and reliability.

        I do it.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Eh, I wouldn’t. Maybe if it was refurbished first and all of the fluids, rubber bits, and suspension were changed out.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Even then, it is 22 years old. Even if you go all through it, weird stuff will break if you start putting 15K a year on it. And it will be an expensive PITA now and again. Buy this as a toy, daily drive something else new(er), be that Camry or BMW. Or even something old and anvil like, like an early ’90s RWD Volvo. If I was on a tight budget, I’d still happily daily drive a 945.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          22 years old is 22 years old. *I* would not think twice about driving something like this daily (but no way as my only car), but I also used to daily drive Peugeots. An enthusiast who can turn a wrench, sure. For the average person who has to actually depend on the car and pay someone to do repairs at $100+/hr, as I said, good luck with that.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      Are we sure JB didn’t cut his teeth as HeadlinerG60? That was a beautiful parable. My favorite comment on the story: “For the record, both my Corrado’s are broken.”

  • avatar
    dswilly

    I am no Corrado expert but a friend cycled through about three of them so this is what I remember. I think you want the G90 supercharged version vs. VR6, I don’t remember why. I drove one of his from Dallas to KC, its maiden voyage when he bought it. It was a blast, then it fell apart. Corrado parts are crazy expensive even though you would think they share much with other VW’s. Like Porsche expensive and you need to fix them often.

    • 0 avatar
      xflowgolf

      Disagree, the VR6 is far more desirable. The G60 was never quite enough to motivate the car adequately. It was heavier than the comparable mk2 platform it was based on, and as such, a well driven mk2 Golf/GTI was always faster on track than a comparable G60 Corrado. The VR6 mostly made up for that, but the car was still a bit of a pig by driving dynamics. A similar era Integra would run circles around it on a track day. They were beautiful though, and the VR6 makes glorious noises.

  • avatar
    Nedmundo

    We drove a 1995 Jetta GLX VR6 for 110k miles, and the VR6 was by far the best aspect of that car. It was smooth and powerful, and sounded glorious. The engine itself was generally reliable, though at one point a component detached from the fuel pump, which caused the engine to cut out while we were going 65 in the left lane. In Camden, New Jersey, no less. No bueno. Otherwise, most problems were electrical, with gauges dying, bulbs going out, etc., on a disturbingly regular basis. And if any bulb in the gauge cluster died, you had to replace the whole cluster for several hundred bucks. Oh, and the exterior door trim was attached by weak glue, so it all simply peeled off. After a few attempts by the dealer to reattach the trim permanently, I finally gave up, and simply covered the holes in the doors with black duct tape.

    Then, at about 80k miles, the body started to flex over even moderate bumps, enough to break the seal around the driver’s door. Some of this may have been caused by an overly stiff suspension we had for a little while (replaced with something more reasonable) that sent lots of shock through the body, but I was still surprised, and it left a bad impression.

    With this, I’ve stayed away from all VAG products, and doubt I’ll return any time soon. But that VR6 is fantastic, so a Corrado could be a decent buy, provided you don’t intend to rely on it as a daily driver.

    BTW, I considered an Integra GS-R when we bought the Jetta. I loved it, but the short gearing meant high revs and lots of noise on the highway, so it wouldn’t have been as good for road trips. In stock form, however, its suspension was vastly superior to the Jetta’s, and of course it wouldn’t have put me on a first name basis with service department personnel!

    • 0 avatar
      never_follow

      I have a 96, a couple of your statements are off, and some remind me very much of my car.

      Cluster solders were bad in some cars, and this still seems to be a VAG problem with wonky gauges. But replacing bulbs in mk3 clusters is a piece of pie, they’re little guys that you replace with a flathead… so someone took you for a ride.

      95s still had door trim with actual tabs and weren’t glued on, strange that your car had the later cheapskate glue on type.

      Body flex is quite terrible without aftermarket bracing, but throw on a couple of Neuspeed bars front and back, and you have a nice stiff ride.

      While I love the sound of the VR, it sort of made the car a front heavy pig, which is why Cabrio VR swaps are great. Nobody will race it, but with the top down, it sounds glorious! It’s just a shame we missed getting the 16 valve outside of the Passat. All the 6 cylinder power, none of the weight. European market GTI’s are the best of the lot IMO.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    “Finding an older Volkswagen that isn’t either thrashed or stanced is a challenge.”

    Or?

    Any late ’80s-mid ’90s VW or Audi will be rare in the US simply because their low sales volume in those days. Audi was mired in the aftermath of the UI debacle, and VW was in a trough of their perpetual boom-bust sales cycle in the US.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Corrados are the kind of cars you enjoy visually. IMO a late 90s Maxima is a better car in every other way.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Sort of like an 80’s Jag (either two or four doors). Love how it looks inside and out, but everything else on the similar market at the time was superior.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        Was there another V12 powered PLC in the 1980s? Pretty sure the V12 SLs didn’t come until the 90s…

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Most XJS models -weren’t- V12 though, right? That was like the halo thing.

          There were Aston and Bentley/RR V12 PLC’s in the 80’s. The V12 850 also came out for 1989.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            I wouldn’t know, the majority of XJSes I find for sale online are V12 models.

            And I thought Aston sold only V8 models until they got the Duratec 3.0 based V12…and I’ve never heard of a V12 Roller/Bentley before their associated buyouts.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I can’t recall seeing one without a V12 except in MY94-96 when the I6 was offered as well.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Maybe the one’s I’ve seen just didn’t have the V12 badging on them, or I’m recalling incorrectly. It’s been a while.

            I’m wrong on the other 80’s V12 Brits.

    • 0 avatar
      dantes_inferno

      > IMO a late 90s Maxima is a better car in every other way.

      And much easier for law enforcement to profile.

  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    Near 25 year old VW, what could go wrong?

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    Run!

    I just remember my brother bought one in the mid 90’s that was only like 5 years old, and to say it was a lemon would be an understatement. there really should have been a lawsuit from the 1st owner.

    When he bought it, it was from a VW dealership and included about an inch thick of repair invoices despite being a relatively new car. It was in the shop about every 2 weeks. I seriously think there was probably $15,000 in repairs for a car that had been on the road for about 5 years. Luckily he had an aftermarket warranty, but hey fought him tooth and nail.

    It was the model before the VR6, a supercharged 4 cylinder.

    It was a beautiful car that had incredible handling, but he said he’ll never touch another VW product again.

    They have absolutely disappeared from roads.

  • avatar
    CliffG

    I am hopeful that this is no longer a problem, but Corrados and Integra Type Rs shared a malady, that is parking one on the street seemed to be invitation to missing pieces of it when one came out to it to the next morning. One friend was forced to move his Corrado into his back yard as he was getting tired of it being pieced out – really, stealing door handles? Another lost two heads off his Type R and just had to give up on it. They are old enough now I would think they are probably garaged fixers so that is all in the past? 1988-1998 featured a fair number of small bottle rockets but finding ones that haven’t been hammered/modified to death is almost impossible.

  • avatar
    Cabriolet

    Brings back memories. Had the 4 cylinder supercharger version. Purchased from a foreign diplomat who purchased it for his sun to go to college with. Car needed new tires and the radio was stolen so i had to replace that also. Other then that the car was a runner. Drove it for 4 years without an ounce of trouble and when i sold it i got more then i paid for it. Wish i had that car today. The day i sold it to a young fellow his mother had me take it to the family mechanic to be checked. The mechanic went over the car with a fine tooth comb but could not find anything wrong. I remember the mechanic telling the mother if this thing has troubles it would be costly to fix but the kid wanted the car. Last time i spotted the car a few years back he was still driving it and it looked good. I was tempted to ask him if he wanted to sell it but bit my tongue. Still loved that car. It was a driver.

  • avatar
    z9

    I had the G60 version. I didn’t have any major problems with it, other than the fact that a few days after purchase, the oil cooler dumped oil into the radiator, rendering the cooling system useless. Since it was a relatively new model no spare radiators were being produced so the dealer eventually took a radiator out of another new car. Which was quite nice of them because otherwise I might still be waiting for a replacement. OK, yes, the ABS failed after a few thousand miles, and probably a bunch of other little issues and then I got rid of it after less than a year. So right, no major problems. Par for the course with a 90s VW. But there was one thing about the Corrado I truly despised, that I have never hated so much on any other car: there was something about the absurd heaviness of the doors combined with how they operated that seemed to injure me and my passengers on a regular basis. Somehow the door would always end up slamming into you when you least expected it. When you end up with bruises from your car it is time to rethink the relationship. So while I would love to drive a beautiful sweet-sounding gas-guzzling VR6 down the coast at sunset, I look at these cars and immediately think Battered Owner Syndrome.

  • avatar
    Gene B

    I had one of these for 12 fantastic years and 151k miles, and then I sold it under duress (kids, family, etc.). I had the supercharger rebuilt at 147k. It had a beautiful interior. It was supurbly made by Karmann. I think this car pushed them out of business. It drove so well and was useful, with nice rear seats and a good trunk. Yes it had issues but none that were too terrible. I miss it terribly. I always wanted the V6 but it was never in the cards. And they never made a car so nice again.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I have a ’97 Jetta GLX VR6 that sits in the garage. The engine and transmission are fine; everything else around them (power steering, power windows, vacuum lines for locks, instrumentation, cruise control, manual seat controls, A/C compressor, powered sunroof) has fallen apart.

  • avatar
    Cabriolet

    Last year i purchased a 1990 VW Cabriolet with 60,000 original miles. The second owner was a young kid who wanted to go the hot rod route. Coil over springs European bumpers and i could go on and on. Finally after having god only knows how many butchers working on it he gave up. He put it up for sale thru Craigslist. The car was a mess. The body was great, nice paint and interior and a nice top. No rust no accidents but ran like shit. I gave him $3,000.00 only because he had the original parts. I put a few months of work into it. Im retired so i have the time. Who ever worked on the engine i would not let them touch my lawn mower. Replaced the struts, radiator, fuel regulator, a few relays replaced the bumpers with the original, replaced the instruments lighting with LED’s and washed and cleaned the interior. The car runs 100% I spent about $1,000.00 in parts plus my labor and the car looks great. My insurance is $140.00 a year full coverage and i can drive it anywhere. I use it as my second car and it keeps the mileage down on my new Mini Cooper S. The last Cabriolet i did this to years ago i brought for $2,500.00 and spend about $800.00 and drove it for 5 years. Sold it for $5,800.00. These cars are simple and parts are cheap. If you can work on the car yourself they are great or you have to have a good honest mechanic who knows VW.

  • avatar
    Power6

    I think those are the same wheels Audi put on my Mom’s ’89 80 Quattro. Look great but boy what a PITA to clean!


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