By on November 4, 2015

Porsche cayenne diesel

Porsche announced Wednesday that it would stop selling its Cayenne Diesel model after regulators announced those cars were allegedly installed with an illegal “cheat device” to fool emissions tests.

Audi removed all diesels vehicles from their online configurator, even though the Q7 diesel was not mentioned by the Environmental Protection Agency has having a “defeat device” installed. The luxury brand has not yet announced any stop-sale of its cars. Volkswagen’s Touareg TDI, which is equipped with the same engine as Porsche and Audi, is still currently listed as on sale.

On Monday, the EPA announced it had uncovered a “temperature conditioning” program in cars equipped with Volkswagen’s 3-liter diesel engine timed exactly to federal emissions tests that reduced nitrogen oxide emissions in those cars. Volkswagen refuted the claims that it had installed an illegal cheat device in those cars.

In a separate statement, Porsche North America said it was “surprised” by the revelation that its Cayenne could illegally pollute.

The EPA notified Porsche that its 2015 Cayenne Diesel included the software, however Porsche’s stop-sale extends to 2014-2016 cars.

More information as the story develops.

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17 Comments on “Porsche Cancels Sale of Cayenne Diesel; Audi Pulls Diesel Cars From Site...”


  • avatar

    Maybe its time for a new movie.

    “Who killed the Diesel car”?

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    Uh oh :-(

  • avatar
    Speed3

    Bye bitches!

  • avatar
    PeterKK

    Does anyone honestly believe that VW was the only one doing this?

    • 0 avatar
      PeriSoft

      Thing is, it’s pretty easy to check once you know to look for it. And I can’t imagine that people haven’t been checking. If everyone else is doing it, why haven’t the same methods used to expose VW done them in?

      I guess it’s possible that nobody’s bothering to sniff any other tailpipes, but it seems kinda unlikely given the import. Hell, if I were VW I’d be testing everyone else’s cars MYSELF and sending anonymous evidence boxes to media types. The fact that nobody else has been caught after weeks and weeks suggests that they’re either a lot cleaner or a lot smarter than VW, strange as the idea is.

      • 0 avatar

        Have you noticed despite the clear advertising opportunity to say “We are honest, we don’t fudge emissions or MPG figures, BUY FROM (insert major OEM name here); a brand you can trust!”. No one is trumpeting their honesty.

        I wonder why…..?

        • 0 avatar
          PeriSoft

          Probably because that boils down to “We aren’t Volkswagen”, and because a good chunk of carbuyers probably still aren’t cognizant of the VW disaster in the way that we enthusiasts are. So it’s not worth spending a bunch of coin on a new campaign that basically says, “We (and all of our competitors except that ONE hint hint) aren’t cheaters”. It’s not a super-compelling line.

          Now, if it does turn out that, say, everyone in the business but Chrysler (or Ford, or Honda, or Subaru, or whoever) was cooking the emissions books, then the sole honest manufacturer standing might trumpet it. But it’s pretty weak sauce to go to your target audience who may or may not have heard of the issue and say, “Heeyyyyy! We’re not cheaters! Woo us!”.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Even then, it’d still be corny. Ford could have done a “We didn’t take a bailout…unlike some other people you know” ad campaign, but knew better than that.

          • 0 avatar
            PeriSoft

            Kyree– exactly. The people who cared already knew.

        • 0 avatar
          SunnyvaleCA

          Plus, clean-cars are for everyone else. If I gain advantage by polluting, I’m more than willing to suffer from my own pollution. (Obviously, I’m not willing to suffer for other people’s pollution benefits.) Just saying.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      Yes PeterKK. The original university testing specifically cited BMW and possibly another brand as not having the same issue or at least to not nearly the same extent. It does seem that VW went far out on a limb by themselves, advertised that their diesels were cleaner and more efficient than anyone else’s, sold cars that every forum said were under rated in both horse power and fuel efficiency in ways no one else’s diesels were, and were full of $41t the whole time. Sorry about your brand affiliation.

  • avatar

    This just came in. The institute that tests cars to determine whether they are road legal in the Netherlands (RDW), is going to test ALL diesel cars that are available in the Netherlands to find out if cheating devices are being used. That means that cars from a total of 22 brands will be tested. The testing will take six to eight months. I wouldn’t be surprised if the testing will be expanded to include gasoline cars too. The RDW has developed new testing methods. Within the EU the Netherlands was the only country that voted in favor of enforcing the latest emission standards. However, last week the EU agreed to allow diesel cars to exceed them by 60%.

  • avatar
    CarnotCycle

    Still odd reading headlines about Porsche-diesel anything.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      CarnotCycle,
      Porsche have a fantastic 4.2 litre V8 diesel. I would love to have that in my BT50.

      BMW have a 3 litre triple turbo diesel that pumps out around 290kw as well.

      It’s a pity VW has created this nightmare.

      I’d say all manufacturers are maximizing emissions regulations. That’s what turbo engines are all about. Calibrate them to pass emissions and FE regulations, then put down your right foot and watch your good FE dissipate.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Criminal acts by VW, Porsche and Audi, just exposed weaknesses in emissions “testing”.

        Except what’s becoming abundantly clear is the need for tightening up and reforming the “tests”, especially in Europe.

        And all this “gaming” tunes/mapping or entire engines, needs to stop. Eco Boost? Turbo gas engines, simply for the sake of smaller engines doing the work of bigger/simple engines, supposedly with better FE, are becoming popular because of these weaknesses.

  • avatar
    kurtamaxxguy

    As of 8:20 PST, 11/4/15, VW USA appears to have removed references for Touareg TDI models. Only the Gasoline V6 engine models are listed.


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