By on November 12, 2015

2016 Nissan Titan XD

Update: Classification of Titan XD added along with light-duty comparison explanation.

Nissan has released official towing numbers for its soon-to-hit-dealer-lots Titan XD pickup tweener that splits the difference between the light-duty 1500s and heavy-duty 2500s of the world.

We’ve dug into the Titan XD’s numbers, and that of its light-duty competitors, to see just how much more capability you get with the Cummins-sourced 5-liter turbodiesel V-8.

Conclusion: the ratings are a lot closer than you’d think.

First, let’s define our competitive set using the Titan XD’s dimensions.

Nissan’s newest full-size pickup will arrive in two configurations: 4×2 and 4×4. Everything else is essentially the same no matter what trim you pick, save equipment and interior finishings. All Titan XDs will have a wheelbase measuring in at 151.6 inches in length. Overall length and width will be 242.8 inches and 79.5 inches, respectively, except for the PRO-4X that is ever-so slightly longer and wider due to it only being available as a 4×4. Also, all Titan XDs will be Crew Cabs with 67-inch beds.

(It should be noted there is information missing from Nissan’s specs. Axle ratios, payload ratings and gross combined weight ratings (GCWR) have not yet been published.)

With these dimensions, the Titan XD sports maximum tow ratings of 12,314 pounds in 4×2 configuration and 12,038 pounds when front wheels can be driven in concert with the rear. Nissan doesn’t say if these ratings are developed using the SAE J2807 standard or another methodology.

It should also be noted, since the Titan XD has a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) between 8,800 to 8,990 pounds, Nissan’s newest pickup is firmly categorized in Class 2b, making it a 3/4-ton pickup. However, since it’s on the light side of that GVWR threshold, and Nissan is marketing its truck as a tweener that splits the difference between the domestic 1/2- and 3/4-ton pickups, comparisons to 1/2-ton pickups are certainly going to be made by truck buyers.

2015-ford-f-150

Sales Champion: the Ford F-150.

Right off the bat, it’s difficult to nail down a Ford F-150 that’s comparable to the Titan XD. That theme is shared with all of these trucks compared next to the Titan.

The Nissan, with its 151.6-inch wheelbase, sits almost dead between two F-150 SuperCrew models with 145-inch and 156.8-inch wheelbases. Since capability — and not length of the wheelbase — is more important, we’re going to pick the configuration with the bed length that’s closest to the Titan. That makes the Ford F-150 SuperCrew with 5 1/2 foot bed the closest competitor.

Equipped with a 3.55 rear axle and 3.5-liter EcoBoost V6, the Ford has a maximum tow rating of 11,800 pounds in 4×2 configuration or 11,500 pounds with a 4×4 driveline. The Titan XD bests it by 514 and 538 pounds, respectively.

Ford F-150 SuperCrew Nissan Titan XD Crew Cab +/-
Engine 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 5-liter Cummins Turbodiesel V-8
Bed Length (in) 66 67 1
Wheelbase Length (in) 145 151.6 6.6
Body Length (in) 231.9 242.8 10.9
Max Tow Rating, 4×2 (lbs) 11800 12314 514
Max Tow Rating, 4×4 (lbs) 11500 12038 538

2014 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Exterior

Towing Champion: the Chevrolet Silverado.

Chevrolet touts a “best in class” towing capability of 12,000 pounds with the 6.2-liter EcoTec3 V-8. But how much weight can that engine pull when configured the same as the Titan XD?

Equipped with a 3.42 rear axle, the Chevrolet Silverado has a maximum 12,000 in 4×2 configuration or 11,700 as a 4×4. The Nissan beats the Chevy, but by not as much as it does the Ford.

Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Crew Cab Nissan Titan XD Crew Cab +/-
Engine 6.2-liter EcoTec3 V-8 5-liter Cummins Turbodiesel V-8
Bed Length (in) 68 67 -1
Wheelbase Length (in) 143.5 151.6 8.1
Body Length (in) 230 242.8 12.8
Max Tow Rating, 4×2 (lbs) 12000 12314 314
Max Tow Rating, 4×4 (lbs) 11700 12038 338

2015 Ram 1500

Participant: the Ram 1500.

Ram may advertise ridiculous torque provided by its heavy-duty range of trucks, but the 1500 series is the least capable of the domestics when configured similarly to the Titan XD.

Given a 3.92 rear axle and 5.7-liter HEMI V-8, the Ram can only manage 10,360 pounds in 4×2 guise or 10,190 pounds when driving all four wheels.

Ram 1500 Crew Cab Nissan Titan XD Crew Cab + / –
Engine 5.7-liter HEMI V-8 5-liter Cummins Turbodiesel V-8
Bed Length (in) 67 67 0
Wheelbase Length (in) 140.5 151.6 11.1
Body Length (in) 229 242.8 13.8
Max Tow Rating, 4×2 (lbs) 10360 12314 1954
Max Tow Rating, 4×4 (lbs) 10190 12038 1848

 

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

128 Comments on “2016 Nissan Titan XD Tow Ratings Compared, Apples to Apples, to Light-Duty Pickups...”


  • avatar
    APaGttH

    No Toyota Tundra comparo?

    • 0 avatar
      orenwolf

      It is, indeed an unfortunate absence. But then, this is an incomplete comparison to begin with without the payload numbers.

      Unfortunately, TTAC lately has been a lot more about rushing out stories to get “First Post!” credits than doing thorough research. Which a tragedy, because in the past this was *the* place to get the full story. :(

      • 0 avatar

        It’s difficult to have payload numbers when there are none to be had right now. When they get published, I’ll post them.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Payload and GVW will be the most telling. The Titan XD capacity will be limited based upon the truck class it falls within. Nissan keeps calling it a 1/2 ton so that means Class 2a with a GVW of 6,001 – 8,500 lb.
          The F150 Supercrew 4×4 has a 2300 lb limit and the Chevy Crew 4×4 with max tow is around 2,175 lbs.
          Those would be the lightest configurations of their crewcab 4×4 trucks with max tow/haul.
          The heaviest cargo rating I’ve seen in a Chevy is 1,800 with max tow once one adds the bling. I’ve seen a lot of max cargo F150s in the 2000-2300 lb range based on door tags.

          I cannot see the Titan XD being more than 2k if it wants to remain in the 1/2 ton class. The Cummins 5.0 considerably heavier than the engines in the Chevy or Ford.

          Ram doesn’t have a dog in this fight so I don’t see the point of listing them.

          • 0 avatar
            Shane Rimmer

            GVWR is listed at 8,800 to 8,950 pounds and the lightest variant is 6,790 pounds. That puts the payload somewhere around 2,100 pounds in the best case.

          • 0 avatar
            Wheeljack

            Ram also sells 3/4 and 1 ton trucks with a serious mid-range diesel engine if you want more payload and towing. Let’s face it – the 1/2 ton trucks are commuter cars. Ram knows that and caters to that customer with better ride quality.

            Personally I wouldn’t want to tow something that is right up against the tow vehicle’s max GCWR. I’d rather have the comfort margin of a 3/4 ton truck if I wanted to tow a 12,000 trailer.

        • 0 avatar
          emeshuris

          Perhaps you can write the story when the numbers are available.

    • 0 avatar

      The Tundra is 1) old, and 2) the sixth best selling truck in America … behind the Tacoma. For every Tundra that Toyota sells, Ford moves six F-150s, Chevy sells five Silverados, and Ram sells nearly four 1500s.

      So, no. No Tundra comparison.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        But the Tundra outsells the Titan and a Titan customer is more likely to cross shop it against the Toyota than the big 3.

        • 0 avatar

          Current Titan, absolutely. There’s no doubt about that.

          But Nissan’s play isn’t to take Toyota’s small piece of pie with the new truck. It’s to take a smaller piece from each of the domestic truck manufacturers and play the tweener game.

          In that context, Tundra is insignificant.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            I agree that is it a much smarter strategy to aim squarely at the Ford and GM trucks and hope you can sway say 5% of those customers than trying to get say 20% of the Toyota customers. However the fact remains that many of the people who will consider a Nissan are considering a Toyota more so than one of the others.

          • 0 avatar

            @Scoutdude

            I think you may see more interest from Tundra owners when we see the non-XD Titan. I get the feeling we will see that in Detroit in January, for some reason.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I wonder is Nissan will bring back the sad hipster lumberjack male models for the NAIAS. No one cared about their presentations because it was between the Ford Performance display and Yukons/Tahoes/Suburbans. Sad Titan…

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          I am expecting to see more cross shopping between the Cummins HD Ram and the Titan Cummins XD than with Tundra.

          The Tundra sells because it is a Toyota. Most buyers I’ve talked to are former “Big three” customers pizzed off about durability.

          I would be rich if I got a dollar for every time I heard a guy say that the Cummins is what saved Dodge or that engine is the only reason why they bought Dodge.

          The Cummins XD will definitely put the bulls eye upon Ram.

          We have to remember that Fred Diaz was the President of Ram when they were working with Nissan on a shared truck platform for Nissan. The Cummins V8 was supposed to be a Ram engine option. I’m sure Diaz has an ax to grind with Ram. It looks like that ax is the Titan Cummins.

          • 0 avatar

            Cummins certainly helps Ram and I would say it really does drive their 3/4 ton sales. But if you look at the sales #’s what really saved ram was design (1994) and currently comfort and style.

          • 0 avatar
            Punisher

            I agree: the big thing about this truck is the Cummins.

            This truck will be a very different animal to drive loaded than all of the half tons it is being compared to. By the numbers that is hard to measure, but the torque output of the triple nickel diesel will make this thing much much happier while pushing the capacity limits versus the gas engines.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        I get the numbers, but there are a number of the B&B that will insist that the big three trucks are crap and the Tundra is the best thing since sliced bread. I would think someone is going to be more like to cross shop the Tundra when looking at a Titan, versus Ford, Chevy/GMC, or RAM.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          People that insist that the big three trucks are crap are just letting everyone else know how foolish they really are. I have my preferences (F150), but all three build excellent trucks.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            bball40dtw – the so called Big 3 have worked on improving their durability. In 2010 JD Power put the F150 almost on par with the Tundra. Since then the GM siblings have rated higher.
            Currently Consumer Reports did not give any 2015 truck a “recommended” rating.

            This what they had said, “Sharp-eyed readers may notice that there’s no Top Pick in the pickup-truck category. That is because the 2015 Ford F-150 and Chevrolet Colorado are too new to have reliability and testing data, and the Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra and Ram 1500 are not reliable enough. With such a thin field, we decided to pass until next year’s Ratings are in.”

            I was surprised to see the GM 1500’s put in the same sentence as Ram in relation to reliability.

            The Big 3 have always dropped in reliability when ever a new model is released.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            I’d argue that while the Tundra gives up a lot to the domestics (options/configurations, EPA rated fuel economy, and even interior quality), reliability is still squarely in the Tundra’s corner. And with the short gears they put in them, a Tundra with the 5.7L is still a force to be reckoned with. Toyota’s refusal to stick a curb-scraping lower lip diffuser on the truck has to account for at least some of that poor MPG showing, the short gearing is also a factor. My theory is that Toyota’s corporate fuel economy, buoyed by their hybrid sales, makes eking out MPG in their pickups less of a priority.

            Adding it to this comparison would be very apt indeed.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            gtemnykh – agreed. Toyota could put a quad turbo V12 in the Tundra that got 4 mpg and still not have to worry about CAFE.

            They do sell on reliability but over the years the domestics have caught up and surpassed them. In 2010 the F150 rated almost identical to the Tundra. Since then domestic trucks have rated higher in JD Power durability data.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Mark Steveson,
        I do believe you might have the F-150 numbers incorrect.

        You will find the Silverado moves more 1500s than Ford the F-150s.

        I even think you’ll find Ford moves only 40 000 per month. and around 25-30 000 SuperDutys. Of the SuperDutys the lighter 250s are the biggest sellers for Ford.

        Nissan is targeting this.

        Ford should worry a little as it has the most to lose out of the Big Three with the new XD Titan.

        If Nissan only sell 5 000 XDs a month I’d bet Ford will lose 2.5-3 000 SuperDutys and the rest will come from GM and Ram.

        Ford current fire sale is really needed as the Silverado (even discounting the Sierra) outsells the aluminium F-150.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Big Al from Oz – where is your evidence?

          Ford’s F150/HD split is 63-65%LD and HD 35-37%.

          That has been constant from data I found for 2013 to data posted mid-year of 2015 where Ford was saying they were having issues with frames and getting all of their factories on line.

          2013 USA data puts F150 at 64%, F250 24% and F350 12% of Ford’s pickup sales. I could not find F450 but I suspect that they won’t be more than 1 or 2%.
          2015 SALES TOTALS – Ford
          January 54,370
          February 55,236
          March 67,706
          April 62,827
          May 61,870
          June 55,171
          July 66,288
          August 71,332
          September 69,651
          October 65,500

          If you take 65% of Octobers numbers that yields 42,575 F150’s and 22,925 HD’s.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Lou,
            So all the F-150 are aluminium???

            Hmmm……………you’d better be the one to go back and do a little research.

            I’ve predicted this all along with the aluminium F-150.

            All of those little issues I have pointed out over the past year or two will impact the vehicle.

            I predict the aluminium HDs will take a hit as well.

            Remember the HD crowd are a little more conservative than the Car/SUV pickup purchaser.

            That’s why I consider this move by Nissan to introduce the ISV Titan a winner on Nissan’s part.

            Ford will lose the most, not Ram as you stated.

            The differences between the Ram Cummins diesel and the Nissan diesel is to large. Some will move over, but the it will be proportional across all of the manufacturers, with Ford most likely to take a slightly larger hit.

            I would love to see a Tundra XD pickup. That would really rattle Detroit.

            Ford needs the Ranger and soon, to maintain pickup numbers, or how about a Ford fire sale?

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Al, the steel 150 did make up some of the sales in the early months this year but do not have any significance in the recent months. Also note the sales per month have increased since the 2015 F150 finally was up to full production.

            The Cummins name has a lot of pull so no the difference between the two engines will be insignificant to most people. Its availability in the Nissan will cause a lot of Ram shoppers to at least take a look. Whether they buy or not we will have to wait and see.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Scoutdude,
            I think they sold near on couple of thousand in October.

            The thing regarding pickup numbers or for that matter any information is you must read a massive amount of articles to get a picture of what is going on as the information given is quite limited and can be ambiguous from the manufacturers.

            These car sites are not necessarily where all the best info is. Read financials, newpapers, magazine articles, etc.

            I think you be surprised at how well the ISV Titan will sell. Nissan does have a relatively good name.

            Nissan marketing even stated that the current Titan only hits with 35% of the potential market for the Titan and the new Titan will hit 85% of the market. That 15% must be the people who are after a 350/3500 size pickup.

            So straight up Nissan will more than double sales, then add the new pickup I don’t see why Nissan doesn’t do okay. I’m not talking even Ram numbers here, but it will take on the Tundra.

            I don’t think the ISV will take any of the VM Ram diesels away as the Ram diesel is a genuine V8 1/2 ton alternative.

            I do believe the Nissan will take on some of the V8 gas light HDs and a very few of the light diesel HDs.

            I also don’t view Chev and GMC as seperate identities when it comes to numbers as the money and vehicles are all in the same pot at the end of the day.

            Some will argue otherwise, but GM is GM like Ford is Ford.

            I do believe Cummins has a significant amount of pull or brand power. But people will also look at what the capability differences are between the torque monster HDs and the Cummins.

            Unlike the 1/2 ton pickup purchaser I do think the average HD purchaser is mindful of capability and what the vehicle is used for.

            75% of 1/2 ton buyers are after a SUV/Car alternative. Yes they tow, but how much? They are more interested in how they look in one and what the neighbours think when picking up the kids from soccer or a Home Depot run.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @BAFO

            ” 75% of 1/2 ton buyers are after a SUV/Car alt…”

            Forty percent of half tons are Fleet Sales *alone*.

            That’s not counting pickup buys from small companies, farms/ranches, Mop/Pops and one-man operations. These are the backbone of the US economy. Many pickups serving as work trucks, family haulers and weekend recreation, all in one shot.

            “Fleet Sales” require proof of at least TEN, strictly commercial vehicles in “current operation” to even qualify a buyer for “Fleet Sales”.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Sorry Denver Mike you don’t have to meet that 10 vehicle requirement for the sale to be considered a fleet sale. You have to meet that requirement to receive the special fleet pricing. Have a business license and you can walk into the fleet dept sales person and your sale will be considered fleet even if you need to negotiate to get a really good price. Also there are dealers that do things like state bids so any gov’t agency can go in and get that state bid price even if it is an agency that has only 1 or 2 vehicles. So a lot of those fleet sales are to the 1 or 2 vehicle “fleets”. Of course there are lots that don’t know this and/or don’t go to a dealer with a fleet dept.

            I regularly get offers for discounts as a small business owner that direct me to the nearest dealer with a dedicated fleet dept and they only state that I need a copy of my license.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @Scoutdude – You’re talking about “Body Modifiers” or “Upfitters”.

            You may get comparable discounts if just a normal commercial buyer, and a great negotiator, but it’s not an official “Fleet Sale”

            Upfitters do buy lots of vehicles without necessarily or actually buying/owning many vehicles for their own company, besides personal cars.

            They’re just “body shops” with a specialty. Like Saleen, Quigley, Roll-a-Long, or limos, ambulances, etc. That’s why they’re exempt.

            fleet.ford.com/get-started/eligibility-documentation/

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            No I’m not talking about upfitters I know exactly what they are. A lot of times the dealer will make the sale and then take it to the upfitter to be completed for the specific vocation.

            I’m talking about someone like me with a one man business that can go up to the fleet dept and buy their vehicle and it will get counted as a fleet sale. No I can’t easily get it custom built to my specs, ie something that isn’t on the retail order sheet like some fleet customers can.

            Go look at the link you provided. You’ll see a couple of vocations require only an appropriate business license as documentation and others just need to have purchased 1 vehicle in the last 2 years or have 3 in your fleet. The definition of a vehicle is also fairly loose is actually for “driveable equipment”.

            Examples of acceptable equipment include:
            -Fork lifts
            -Backhoes
            -Cranes
            -Tractors
            -Cement Mixers
            -Pavers
            -Street Sweepers
            -Bulldozers
            -Mack Trucks
            -Bobcats
            -ATV’s (All Terrain Vehicles)

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            You haven’t said what’s your trade. But any small business with 10 Bobcats or combination of at least 10 pieces of “drivable’ equipment doesn’t sound like a self proprietor or one man band. There’s loopholes to be had in the all rules, so yeah you got me, except what percentage of smaller businesses qualify for those?

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Nissan will not move anywhere near 5000 XDs per month. They will be lucky to do that in a year.

          They currently sell about 1000 Titans per month. Adding the XD and the fact that the regular truck is new will bump them up to 1200 or maybe 1500 tops for a few months.

          Regarding the GM vs Ford thing you are about right that Ford sells around 40K F-150s per month but GM only sells about 50K Silverados per month of all versions. Even at 70% 1/2 tons Ford still comes out ahead in 1/2 ton sales.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Scoutdude,
            Nissan are already building a large inventory of the XD Titan. Nissan expect this to sell reasonably well.

          • 0 avatar
            Dan

            The current Titan is a 12 year old afterthought. When it was merely dated and not an outright antique it was moving 2000 a month, recession and all.

            In the Titan’s first four years it was moving 6-7K a month.

        • 0 avatar

          Sorry. Numbers are correct. Labels are wrong. It should be F-Series, not F-150. And Ram should be all of Ram, not just 1500.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Not very useful without payload ratings. Almost every top spec truck runs out of payload before they run out of towing capacity.

    And diesel engines are heavy. Look at what the Ecodiesel and I6 Cummins does to the payload on the Ram trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      It’s safe to say that GM and Ford are not that worried about the Titan.

      I’ll just wait for the new SuperDuty specs to come out to see if the Titan XD is really a F250/Silverado 2500 replacement. After seeing this, I know the answer already.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Well, it’s useful to the subset of the market that doesn’t haul a lot, but tows [or thinks it will].

      I mean, *I* care more about payload, but that seems to actually be unusual.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Even people that exclusively tow should care about payload.

        12000 lbs of towing capacity doesn’t do much if it can’t handle the trailer’s tongue weight. (Ram and Toyota are especially hilarious on this point).

      • 0 avatar

        I’m interested in hauling more than towing, but what I haul will never approach the maximum payload ratings.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          You just need a full sized Bronco in your life.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Mark Stevenson “I’m interested in hauling more than towing, but what I haul will never approach the maximum payload ratings.”

          Get a weigh scale and weigh all of your stuff. You will be surprised how quickly gear adds up.

          I did that once with the normal back country gear I carry in my pickup’s dry box. Tow chains, cables, jacks, tools, first aid gear, sleeping bag, bed mat, and small tent plus dry box weighed 500 lbs.

          You’ve mentioned race bikes before. How much do they weight and all of the assorted gear associated with a day at the track?

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Buy a diesel Colorado/Canyon.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Big Al from Oz – 2 bikes side by side would be tight in a small truck. Bin there done that.

            @Mark Stevenson – definitely tricky if one carries more than 1 bike and adds a trailer.

            You then are faced with 900 lbs with 2 bikes and tools. Add riding gear and assorted food, beverages, pit tents, fuel etc. and that can add another 300 lbs minimum. That puts you at 1,200 before passengers. If one assumes 180 lbs each then you are at 1,580lbs before hooking up a trailer.
            That then immediately kills off the Colorado or Canyon as a choice since most I’ve seen are around 1,500 lbs cargo. The Tacoma also is out of the picture. All this is even before you drop a trailer on the tow ball.

    • 0 avatar

      When they’re published, I’ll post the comparison. I’m interested in them, too.

  • avatar
    balreadysaid

    With a 8800lb gvwr it will be considered 3/4 ton. I like it. Just wish it had a heavy front axle rating so it could plow snow without wearing out Too fast. We will see…

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    This doesnt come off as a heavy half to me. Its max tow is what, 5% more than the Ford? It seems to have six lug wheels, I’ll bet the running gear isnt upsized.

    That makes it a half ton with a diesel engine for the pulling advantages that a diesel provides, not a tweener. In my opinion. Work it harder than a half ton and I bet you break it.

    Similar to the Colorado diesel. The diesel only adds 600 lbs to the tow rating, so, you cant really work it much harder, just that the work you ARE doing is done on a wave of TD torque.

    I do expect this opinion to be disagreed with.

    • 0 avatar

      I wouldn’t disagree, especially considering the 2016 Ford F-250 Super Duty SRW 4×2 and 4×4 are good for 14,000 pounds. If you want to 5th wheel it, that number goes up to 16,100 for 4×2 and 15,100 for 4×4.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Plus, those numbers aren’t going down for 2017. Expect towing to go up and payload to go way up on the 2017 SuperDuty.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          bball40dtw – it all depends on how much weight Ford drops from the HD’s when they swap to aluminum.
          If they drop similar weights as the F150 it will matter more at the F450 level since that truck crosses into class 4. Ram and Ford had at it over “best in class” HD towing. Ram won that battle since the F450 was a few pounds over the class 3 limit.

          The thing that Ram left out of that debate was the fact that the Ram HD that had a marginally better tow rating than the Ford crewcab 4×4 F450 was a regular cab dually 4×2.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Don’t forget about what the drivetrain can manage.

            Don’t forget the chassis.

            Don’t forget the braking system.

            There is more to towing than just “load” or tow ball weight.

          • 0 avatar
            mason

            Pretty hard to compare trucks in totally different categories, which is why Ram was calling foul. The 450 is essentially a light MD Chassis, complete with 19.5″ tires and all.

            My question is, why would Ford even want to include this truck in a competition of pick ups? You don’t see Ram throwing in their MD trucks. They’re in another league.

            Try not to be so biased in your comparisons. Ford is the worst offender in publishing payload and tow ratings. And since you consider these so called shoot outs between the big three as gospel, go back and revisit the one they did in 2013. They were both 4×4 crew cabs. The Ford should have had a clear advantage with its bigger brakes, higher capacity tires/wheels, and 4.30 gears vs the Rams 4.10s, but for some odd reason the Ford had a hard time holding its own.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @Mason

            “Why would Ford even want to include [the F-450] truck in a competition? You don’t see Ram throwing in their MD trucks. They’re in another league…”

            To HD pickup buyers, it’s not a game show. The aftermarket had been converting F-450 and F-550 cab/chassis trucks into ‘super pickups’ for years before the official/factory F-450 pickups in ’08.

            There is a need without a doubt, for pickups with medium duty potential. Ram has been toying with the idea, but it hasn’t happened because Fiat.

            I see official F-450 and converted F-550 pickups everywhere. Obviously a bad move for Ram and GM to sit on the sidelines.

          • 0 avatar
            mason

            Ram has a 4500 and 5500 chassis. I see them on the road more and more, probably as a result of Fords repeated fumbles with the 6.0, 6.4, and to a lesser degree the 6.7.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            RAM has been taking GM HD sales. The loss of customers from the 6.0/6.4 issues is mostly done. Ford has increased HD market share since the introduction of the 6.7L.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            I meant Ram 4500 and or 5500 series “pickups” from the (Mexico) factory.

          • 0 avatar
            mason

            Any idea how many F450 pick ups they sell vs the cab and Chassis configuration? I’d really be surprised if there is much of a market for them, but I’m just saying that based on what I see locally. Most guys that need a 450/4500 use it for vocational reasons and don’t want a pick up bed, especially with the increased capabilities of today’s 3500’s. I have seen one F450 pick up here locally, but it was at a truck stop and likely passing through. I noticed it had factory 18″ wheels vs the 19.5’s that come on the C&C trucks. Probably a softer ride. Those 19.5’s are a rough ride when empty.

            Ram did do a 5500 “Long Hauler” concept a few years back to test the waters. I don’t think it generated much interest which is probably why it never materialized.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I don’t have any data on the pickup vs chassis cab on the 450. I would assume that it skews way more to chassis cab. They sell enough of them to keep the V10 around. God I love the V10.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            I see F-450 pickups everywhere, the 19.5 ALCOAs give them away. But Ford only offered them in full-tilt, high end King Ranch 4X4 Crew cabs (dually) and Power Stroke. They clearly were’t catering to fleets or the normal HD buyers. Or looking for big volume sales.

            And I see almost as many F-550 conversion pickups as well as occasional Ram 5500 conversions too. Maybe I have an eye for them and pick them out of traffic from blocks away. But yeah, from CA to CO, they’re everywhere.

            I daily drive an F-550 C/C, btw, and yeah, 100 PSI tires and rock suspension. But if they’re F-450 pickups with 18″ wheels, I wont notice them unless I’m right up close and happen to spot the badges. Otherwise they look like any other 1 ton dually.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            F-450s are also distinguishable from F-350s by the wider front axle.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @big Al from Oz –

            “Don’t forget about what the drivetrain can manage.

            Don’t forget the chassis.

            Don’t forget the braking system.

            There is more to towing than just “load” or tow ball weight.”

            All that coming from a proponent of small trucks!

    • 0 avatar
      greaseyknight

      We’ll have to see what the price is. If its priced right, it will steal sales from both the HD trucks and the lighter 1/2 tons. The 1/2 ton guy can step up to more capacity and a diesel. And the HD guy can step down to something that gets better MPG, rides better, is cheaper then the HD truck while still having enough capacity and a diesel.

      The Cummins diesel is what sets this apart from the pack.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        If HD guy is stepping down to a half ton, the Titan doesn’t really offer anything over the competition besides the Cummins V8. That name means more than “Nissan” or “Titan” in the truck world. We’ll see how much that name means soon enough.

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        I agree, the diesel is exactly what sets this truck apart from an F-150, Ram 1500 or Sierra 1500.

        Disagree though about 1/2 ton guys stepping up in capacity. 5% more isnt really significant here.

        So, its really for 1/2 ton guys who want a diesel that isnt an italian 3.0L V6.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          davefromcalgary – “So, its really for 1/2 ton guys who want a diesel that isnt an italian 3.0L V6.”

          I view it more like this, “So, its really for 1/2 ton guys who want a diesel that isn’t an italian 3.0L V6 with poor tow/haul ratings.”

          I read that the average HD buyer tows 9,000lbs and the average 1/2 ton buyer tows 5,000lbs.

          Chevy PR mentioned the 9k rating since they don’t have a HD with the max ratings of Ford or Ram (even though they tend to win most HD shootouts).

          Coincidentally Ram keeps mentioning the 5k tow number since they have the worst ratings BUT Ram unlike Chevy doesn’t win too many shootouts.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            I’ve never heard these numbers before but they appear to back up my gut feeling. If one wants to tow 12k lbs, one hopefully isnt thinking “geez, the Titan is the 1/2 ton that gets closest to that”. One is hopefully buying a 3/4 ton.

            So, unless one simply must have a V8 equivalent diesel, the XD seems a fish lacking a pond. And my guess is thats its got half ton running gear holding it back.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            davefromcalgary – the 5k number is from Ram PR and the 9k number is from Chevy.

            This link covers the 9k number from GM.
            http://www.autonews.com/article/20140728/RETAIL03/307289955/ford-ram-quarrel-over-heavy-duty-pickup-towing-title

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          davefromcalgary,
          The number of people who go out and buy a 1/2 ton specifically targeting a particular tow rating would be small in comparison who just want a vehicle to tow a medium size load of 5 000lbs. A medium size load can be towed by most any pickup, even midsizers.

          The average half ton buyer is mostly looking for comfort, size and appearance. Having a half ton or even a nice and shiny new midsizer in the driveway is a sign of middle class success. The same as having the SUV/CUV sitting in the driveway.

          25% might really car what the tow numbers are. Most will just watch TV and see brand X state it has the largest towing capacity of any pickup. So, they go out an buy one not realising the one they bought isn’t the same and probably has a lower tow limit.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Big Al from Oz – ignorance is rampant among pickup buyers (or most vehicles for that matter) and sales staff are either ignorant or negligent.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      The number of lugs aren’t always indicative of the strength of the axle/wheels. Until 2015, Ford used unique 7-lugs on its HD F-150s, but now uses HD 6-lug wheels with no weight penalty. Personally, I liked the 7-lugs better.

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        Yeah, I know number of lugs could be meaningless in the end, but it doesnt make me think any less that this isnt a heavy half.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          It’s a heavy half compared to the trucks on the market when the first Titan came out 11 years ago, which is where Nissan seems to be aiming.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Seems like an odd target!

            As far as I am concerned, its 500lbs advantage over the Ford is negligible, so its really just for the diesel purists.

            That and I just wouldnt want to tow that much with a half ton more than a few times a year. Something will give.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Drzhivago138 – I thought the heavy duty payload package still had 7 lug wheels. It used to be all HD payload trucks had 17 inch wheels but that has changed. The XL comes with 17″ wheels and the XLT and Lariat come with 18″ wheels.

        Since Ford dropped weight most of the F150’s I looked at are around 1,800 lbs cargo ratings. The same 2014 model was roughly 1,300-1,500 lbs.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          The wheel sizes are still the same. 17″ steelies standard on XL (that look identical to the non-HDs) and 18″ optional on XL/standard on XLT/Lariat. But they just went to a 6-lug pattern.

          Personally, I don’t like it. Not only were the old 7-lugs really unique and cool and immediately identifiable, they also prevented people from putting on aftermarket wheels that might not be up to snuff. Unless the new HD 6-lugs have a different bolt spacing than the normal 6-lugs (I wouldn’t bet on it).

          Check out page 9 of this fleet brochure:

          http://assets.forddirect.fordvehicles.com/assets/2016_Ford_F-150_J1/NGBS/Nameplate_SpecificationLiteDoc/Nameplate_SpecificationLiteDoc_136B520D-0374-D29B-D00A-5A70D00A5A70.pdf

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Drzhivago138 – 6 bolt pattern will make it easier and cheaper to find rims. My F150 is 6 bolt 18″ wheels. The stock Wrangler SR/A’s were quiet and rode nice on the highway and actually were decent on ice but crappy in mud or deep snow. At 50,000 km they were pretty much worn out. I had a lot of flats with them too.
          I have 10 ply General At/2’s on my truck now. They aren’t as good on ice and are noisy only around 45 mph. They are excellent off-road. They are winter rated. I’ll probably make to 60,000 km with them.

        • 0 avatar
          mason

          17″ tires have historically had horrible weight ratings. In the last few years they have become more aligned but you could always get a 16″ E rated tire with similar to higher weight ratings than a 17″ E rated tire. Not to mention tire size selection is poor in the 17″ 10 Ply class. I never thought I’d go to such a large wheel but I finally caved in and bought a set of 18″ OEM take offs for my 13. Gets me a lot more cushion with my heavy pin weights given my 17’s were frequently at 80-90% of their 3195 lb per tire limit. I’m hoping the 18’s will also last a little longer, tires tend to wear pretty quickly when they are ran at the upper end of their limits.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            mason,
            You are correct regarding the limited selection of 17″ truck tyres, as opposed to pretend car like tyres.

            I was thinking of dropping 15″ inch rim on my BT50, except they will not fit over the brakes, so I’ll have to make do with 16″ for my off road kit.

            The 17″ 10 ply tyres are expensive as well. I suppose we will have to wait a couple of years then they will drop in price.

            My on road tyres will continue to be 17″ as the the rims I’ve fitted are shinny and pretty.

          • 0 avatar
            mason

            What don’t you like about 16″ tires? I’m not a fan of large wheels because of their susceptibility to rocks and curbs but they do have an inherent advantage in resistance to sidewall Flex.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            mason – I know a lot of guys who swear by Toyo M55’s. They tend to be expensive but hold up exceptionally well on gravel roads under load.

          • 0 avatar
            mason

            I actually have a set of them on my 98, they were originally on my 13 but I put a set of 18″ take offs on the 13 and am now running the factory wheels with the Toyos from my 13 on my 98. I was surprised how well they handled in the snow last year given they don’t have the mountain snow flake rating. I don’t haul as heavy with the 98 so they shouldnt wear as fast as they were on the 13.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Has the aftermarket released the “rolling coal” add-on kit yet?

  • avatar
    mason

    What will be the real tale of the tape is some unbiased real world towing. It’s extremely difficult to judge a trucks capability simply by the publshed tow ratings. What the Nissan may have going for it over other half tons is the higher curb weight,a heavier tow rig simply equates to a more stable tow rig. Published tow ratings have historically meant very little to me, particularly given the lack of regulations and transparency between manufacturers when establishing said numbers. While Ford does make a good truck they have been by far the worst offenders in the past, dropping bumpers, spare tires, and pertinent interior pieces to boost pay load ratings isn’t exactly being honest with their potential customers. Between seeing the Ecoboosts ratings and having towed a 7k lb boat through the mountains with one, I’m still not sold on their numbers.

    The Nissan isn’t enough truck for me to consider but it definitely has me interested.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @mason – tow ratings are more meaningful now since all of the manufacturers are J2807 compliant.

      • 0 avatar
        mason

        Not all, Lou. I “think” Ford did finally step up to the plate with the redesign of the F150 and are now J2807 compliant but have been adament they will not adhere to the standard in the 250/350/450 series until the body redesign.
        More smoke and Mirrors from Ford.

        Nissan is also late to the party and will be 2807 compliant for the first time in 2016.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    I twiddle my thumbs with increasing frustration at continually not seeing pics of the non-XD Titan RCLB!

  • avatar
    kit4

    No, the Tundra is not irrelevant. It sells well north of 100,000 a year and has outsold the Titan every single year it has been on sale. Titan sales at their peak never came close to Tundra sales.

    The only thing irrelevant is your opinion. The Tundra is a player in this segment. Either post the numbers or take another job.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Nobody really buys a half ton to tow anywhere near max capacity. At least not very far or very often. The “max” capacity numbers are for ‘comparison’ and that’s it. Something to consider and you move on.

    It’s no different than comparing truck’s 0-60 times or 1/4 mile ET. They tell of how they’ll perform actual work. Trying to graph torque curves, curb weight then dividing by gearing takes trigonometry and a whole afternoon.

    Except when an owner is running a half ton pickup at full capacity, all the time, they won’t be doing it for long. I’ve seen the the tiny 1/2 ton bearings in the front hubs and rear axles. They scare me. That’s why “full floating axles” on 3/4 tons and up.

    Then there’s the little retainer clips that keep 1/2 ton rear axles from flying out and goodbye wheel too!

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      This is my thinking. Just cause they can tow 12k lbs, I wouldnt, at least not regularly.

      I have a loose 80% rule. If my trailer is 5k lbs, I’d be more than happy to tow it with a V6 Canyon (7000 lbs) or Sierra (7600 lbs), but wouldnt with a CUV rated at 5k. This especially comes into play in the ultralight travel trailer arena, where most weigh in a 3500 lbs. Lots of CUV are in that ballpark, but I wouldnt want to, especially as we camp mostly in the Rockies.

      Some friends of mine a 7400 lbs trailer with a 09 CRD Grand Cherokee, rated at 7400 lbs. The little oil burner has the grunt, but the tail is wagging the dog.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        “The little oil burner has the grunt, but the tail is wagging the dog.”

        And there it is. Having the power to tow an X000 lb. trailer is nice, but having the brakes to stop it and the weight to keep it under control is better.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        davefromcalgary – I know an electrician that works for a company that has a Ram 3500 with the max tow rating. His company bought it to move around a huge bucket lift that they have. Trailer and load is right at max for the truck. He is licenced to drive heavy trailers and says it is scary. His company cheaped out by getting the 3500 instead of a class 5 commercial tractor.

        I have to agree that it makes no sense to tow at max ratings with a pickup truck. It is much safer to go up in ratings. My F150 is rated for 9,400 but I’d never want to do it. Part of the reason is it would eat up most of my GCWR. I would require a completely empty pickup just to fit my family.

      • 0 avatar
        Chocolatedeath

        I personally dont know Jack about towing and the I realize the CR doesnt always talk about it but when I was looking into getting a CUV the Enclave is rated at 5000lbs along with the Pilot at that time (2007). The CX9 that was included in the test is rated at 3500 ( the one I decided to get). They tested with a 3500lb trailer. At the end of the test they stated that the Enclave for some reason didnt tow as well as the CX 9 even though it was supposedly at its peak tow capacity.
        I say all of this to point out that I think its ok to buy to a tow point even if what you are towing is that point as long as you do your due diligence with research.
        Like I said I dont know anything about towing but when I friend needed his boat towed due to his 1989 F150 stopped working, he assured me that his boat/trailer combo even wet was 3500 and when I towed it with him in with me even he stated that it towed easier than he thought.

        My question for you is, are some vehicles underrated for towing?

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Chocolatedeath – I wouldn’t say under-rated. Some vehicles happen to be better engineered for towing or just happen to hit a sweet spot.
          Tires may also play a role. the 10 ply tires on my truck are much better under load than my stock 4 ply tires were.

          I’ve been told that most boats tend to be very light on tongue weight. IIRC 5-10% seems to be acceptable. Camper trailers tend to be in the 10-15% range.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      DenverMike,
      I totally agree with your sentiment regarding the purchase of the 1/2 ton and I would even add mid sizer.

  • avatar

    It will depend on how it actually does in the real world not the ratings in the end. If you look at RV forums you will find very few people who max tow with a half-ton and those that do usually end up trading to a HD after a few years. I think Nissan may have a market if it can get weekend warriors in and the truck performs if not it will end up like every other half ton. My inlaws are the target customer they max out a Tundra pulling a 5th wheel a non big 3 tow setup diesel is right up their want list and I imagine there will be others.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I read an article where Nissan are not considering the diesel to be the mover and shaker in their half ton line up.

    This makes it interesting in why Nissan chose to introduce the diesel half ton first. I can see the logic in Nissan’s move.

    Ford has the largest stranglehold on the HD segment and even a tighter stranglehold on the lighter 250/2500 end of the segment.

    Nissan’s logic appears to be to capture the lighter end of the HD market, which is less competitive than the half ton segment, but yet represents a relatively large portion of the segment.

    Ford will be the biggest loser out of this new diesel XD Nissan. Ram will lose very few sales as Ram sells on price point to move HDs of the lot more so than Frod and GM.

    In the end for every XD Titan sold, one less HD from the Big Three will be sold and the biggest loser will be Ford.

    Ford will lose even a larger share once the aluminium SuperDutys come out.

    I would think GM will take the HD crown as well as the half ton crown.

    Smart move by Nissan. It’s a pity the new Navara could not of been sold in the US yet.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      As usual you have it all backwards, or is that upside down?

      There are 2 main reasons that people buy Ram 2500/3500. Reason #1 price, and on this I doubt that Nissan can afford to compete. Reason #2 which is bigger is the Cummins diesel. So now those that want a Cummins will have another option. So Ram has the most to loose of the big 3.

      Ford has the least to loose because Super Duty customers are some of the most loyal out there and the availability of an almost 3/4 ton with a Cummins diesel isn’t going to sway them.

      Toyota is the most vulnerable of the bunch and no one is more loyal than Toyota owners so they aren’t really in danger.

      Finally they are 2 reasons that Nissan is leading with the Cummins. 1st and foremost is because it is a Cummins and they have a strong following. 2nd is that is the thing that sets them apart from the other 1/2 tons in having a big diesel that in theory is built to work, compared to the little 6 in the Ram.

      All in all the new Titan will be a disappointment. It will see a bump in sales initially due to those people who own Titans already who want a truly new truck, not just a new one that is the same as the old one. 10-15% gains in the first year tapering off to the same old also ran that it is now.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Scoutdude – I do agree that Ram will most likely take the biggest hit from the Cummins Titan. Many truck guys love Cummins but not Ram.

        If one looks at durability ratings the Ram HD is perpetually in 3rd place despite the fact that Cummins diesels have excellent reputations.

        University of Michigan did a study on return on investment when comparing vehicles that offer diesel and gas engines in the same model. GM trucks had the best ROI followed by Ford with Dodge/Ram in last. The study found this surprising since the study period included Ford’s notorious 6.0 PowerStroke and the subsequent 6.4.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          That is a very interesting outcome of that study. The 6.0 and to a lesser extent the 6.4 were problematic to put it nicely so I’m not surprised they didn’t come in 1st place.

          If you were to listen to the Ram diesel owner you would belive that they would come out on top instead of last, especially because the Hemi of that era sucked in MPG.

          Now if it was done back in the days of the 7.3 then no question the Ford would have come out on top.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Lou,
          I do hope if the ISF is used in the next Frontier Cummins fixes up the oil leak at the back of the engine.

          There are few annoyed people here with Cummins and the service provided.

          My neighbour has a landscaper and he bought a Foton forward control truck with a 5000lb payload and a ISF 2.8 fitted, about the size of one of those little forward control Izuzu trucks.. He was telling me about this.

          The truck was cheap, fitted with a 14′ tray/flatbed, $30k AUD or $21k USD.

          Gaskets are apparently scarce according to Cummins.

        • 0 avatar
          mason

          Lou, once again you are spreading misinformation. Here is the link you are incorrectly referencing.

          http://www.umtri.umich.edu/total-cost-ownership-gas-versus-diesel-comparison

          Unfortunately they chose to do the studies during Rams worst period reliability wise, when they first came out with the 6.7. If the tests had been conducted on prior or later models, they would have come out on top. As it is, they still beat out Ford.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            mason – I’m not spreading miss-information. The best ROI was GM then Ford then Ram. I pointed out that the study was done over the time of Ford’s 6.0 and 6.4.

            They did not mention Ram’s “worst” reliability period.

            That makes me shudder to think that they were worse than they are now.

            BTW JD Power, Vincentric, even CR all rate Ram below Ford or GM.

            I’d buy a Chevy if I wanted a HD. My purchase order would put Ford second and Ram last.

          • 0 avatar
            mason

            You must be reading a different study from the University of Michigan than I did. From the link I posted above:

            Speaking on depreciation value of gas vs diesel 3/4 tons,

            “Only the gas version of the Ford F-250 holds its value better than its diesel counterpart at 13 percent savings.”

            On resale value,

            “Two diesel vehicles show eight percent savings, while only one gas vehicle, the Ford F-250, holds its value better than its diesel counterpart at 22 percent. The Ford F-250 diesel may be suffering from a reputation problem due to a number of years where the quality of its diesel engine was suspect. This issue would lower the resale value of the F-250 diesel and allow the gas version to better hold its value”

            Both 3 and 5 year TCO are higher on the Ford than GM or Dodge.

            Worst reliability of the big 3? Does Ford or GM have a million mile club?

            https://www.cumminshighmileageclub.com/Truck/Search

            I just can’t take CR and the likes too seriously when so many guys are out there on the road proving otherwise everyday.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Scoutdude,
        Please re-read my comment.

        I did state Ram is sold on price.

        Those who particulary want a Cummins is more marginal since as we both agree Ram is sold on price.

        I’d say the biggest reason Nissan went to Cummins is actually not the case. I do think Cummins went to Nissan.

        Cummins expended a massive amount on the ISV with no real turnover to pay off the investement. Nissan hires the ex Ram dude and presto, Cummins have a person they can work with.

        Nissan and Cummins have been working together since around 2007 on the ISF with the EPA.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          No the big reason for many who purchase 2500/3500 Rams is the Cummins. A friend of mine is a self proclaimed “Chevy guy” but what does he buy for a 3/4 ton truck? A Ram. Why? Because Cummins. The 1/2 ton crew cab short bed he bought was a Chevy and he admits he wouldn’t even consider a 1/2 ton Ram as her grocery getter because it is not as nice of a truck as the Chevy.

          He is not alone in that aspect as I know a number of people who have bought a Ram because Cummins.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    Wait…the XD has a 67″ bed? It certainly looks longer.

  • avatar
    Vetteman

    As far as HD pickups with diesel engines go In my opinion Ram / Cummins has it right. After owning three GM Duramax pickups and friends who have owned Ford 6.0, 6.4 and 6.7 Powerstrokes The in line Cummins is way ahead in terms of serviceability . Labor costs to repair Duramaxs and Ford Powerstokes are to the moon because of haveing to remove the bed and cab to do major repairs which they seem to need quite a bit/ I just dumped a 2011 GMC 2500 Duramax because the Turbo failed at 36 thousand miles under warranty and they had the truck for a month and had to remove all the sheet metal except for the bed just to replace a turbo . That is crazy Fords have similar repair nightmares . I am now the proud owner of a new 2500 Ram Laramie Crew cab and it has a real diesel , A cummins and I love this truck .

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Not true. Cabs are pulled off for blown head gaskets, which are a rarity actually. Not for the turbo, same as the Duramax.

      The Cummins is a great engine, but far from perfect. No modern diesel is. Rams are known for bad transmissions though.

      The cabs are designed to come off easy, less than 2 hours. Least of your problems at this point. The front clip stays with cab and no reason to pull off the bed.

      A month? You just got hosed is all.

      youtube.com/watch?v=6uB2VHkqJWE

      youtube.com/watch?v=L53if27AkpM

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        On a Ford cab off is a little more than 1hr including recovering the refrigerant from the AC. You can do the head gaskets on the 6.0 w/o removing the cab but it takes a lot longer and is a royal pain in the back.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • EBFlex: Panasonic wants out. They realize that Tesla is a terrible company run by a guy who is very unstable and a...
  • Nick_515: Man, five full hours of sleep would be so good right now! I sometimes go three weeks with that much, tops....
  • FreedMike: Call a Lexus dealer and give them the VIN – they should be able to look it up. An Audi dealer did it...
  • tomLU86: Mopar Rocker and others, I share your sentiments to a large extent. It’s possible, or probable, that...
  • whynotaztec: I owned a body shop in Mass for several years and saw lots of rust of course. I would usually turn these...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States