By on November 16, 2015

 

Ford workers in Kansas City voted down a proposed contract between the automaker and the United Auto Workers, the local union reported on its Facebook page (via Automotive News). Kansas City produces many of the company’s profitable F-150 trucks.

According to the final tally, 54 percent of union workers and just over 50 percent of skilled trades workers voted against the proposed deal. The defeat was the first major setback for the company, whose workers in Wayne and other plants overwhelmingly voted to approve the deal. Last week, several hundred workers at Ford’s axle plant voted against the proposed deal.

Workers in Kansas City threatened to strike last month when it said Ford wasn’t negotiating in good faith with workers at that plant.

Members of UAW Local 249 reported on the union’s Facebook site that only roughly two-thirds of workers there voted on the contract.

The union reported that 2,100 production workers voted to approve the deal, with 2,449 workers rejecting the deal on its Facebook site. According to some commenters, roughly 7,500 production workers are represented by the union at the Kansas City plant, which means one-third of those workers didn’t vote on the contract.

According to Automotive News, workers at Ford’s Buffalo stamping facility joined Kansas City voters in turning back the deal from the automaker. About 61 percent of workers there turned back the deal, according to Automotive News.

Ford, in its latest proposed contract, offered its workers pay raises and a $10,000 signing bonus, along with other annual payments. The proposed deal also left unchanged the company’s profit-sharing program that pays workers $1 for every $1 million in company profits.

Ford workers have complained that the contract doesn’t go far enough in offering annual cost of living pay increases and ending the automaker’s controversial alternative work schedule that emphasizes fewer, longer shifts.

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36 Comments on “Ford Workers in Kansas City Turn Down Proposed UAW Deal...”


  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    Yay! It’s our favorite pic of the 12th-gen Race Red XLT with the $250 two-tone option again!

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Hooray for two-tone!

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        It’s tutone!

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          In the ’70s and early ’80s it was “Tu-Tone.”

          http://www.lov2xlr8.no/brochures/ford/76fp/bilder/10.jpg

          http://www.lov2xlr8.no/brochures/ford/81fp/bilder/10.jpg

          Starting in the late ’80s it became “two-tone.”

          http://oldcarbrochures.org/NA/FMC-Trucks-Vans/1988-Trucks-Vans/1988-Ford-F-Series-Pickups-Brochure/1988-Ford-F-Series-Pickups-17

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I had a buddy over on Saturday. He came over in his 1987 F150 longbed that is light blue and white tutone with navy stripes. It makes me want a current F150 with that kind of paint. I don’t know if Ford a bed topper on at the factory back then, but it even matched.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            I know Ford offered coordinating toppers until the beginning of the 8th gen (1987), but I’m not sure when they stopped doing it. Well into the ’80s, a 2WD RCLB pickup with a topper was _the_ all-purpose vehicle to have.

            For all their popularity back in the day, though, I’ve only ever seen one in the metal. You can tell a factory topper sometimes by the matching paint job, but always by the little compass in the front corner, like on this beautiful ’75:

            http://www.fordification.com/myprojects/myimages/my75f250_03.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It must not have been factory then. It has a sweet emblem on it and matched pretty well. It’s funny to see what a F150 Lariat was then and what one is now. His truck is an extended cab with no seats behind the front bench.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Until the 1997 model, SuperCabs had the rear folding bench standard in all trims, but center-facing jump seats were a no-cost option and you could delete the back seat for credit.

            You’re sure it’s not a factory topper, though? The emblem might have been a compass, or might have been the blue oval.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I thought you said they discontinued it in 1987. His truck is for sure an ’87. I saw the manual. I think the bed topper had a compass logo. It almost looked like it was a logo for the game “Simon”. Red, blue, yellow, and green arrows, I think.

            It also has dealer installed mud flaps that he didn’t take off. He purchased it in Montana about 8-10 years ago while going to school out there. The mud flaps have an outline of Montana, something about big sky, and the dealer’s name on them.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            I said I didn’t know when they stopped, but that it was at earliest 1987 because I just saw an ’87 (or later!) F-150 with the factory topper last week Sunday. In that case, yes, it sounds like a factory topper is exactly what he has. Awesome.

            I should have written “until *at least* the beginning of the 8th gen.” Looking at the only 9th gen brochure I have (1995), there’s not mention of the factory topper. So somewhere between 1987 and 1995, they stopped doing it.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            My wife, and his wife, couldn’t understand why I was so excited about the truck. It only has 50K miles on it and is like a 1987 time capsule of awesomeness.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            The 4 color compass style emblem does identify it as a Ford “4 seasons pickup box cover”.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Ok, good. I’m glad this is actually a thing and I’m not going crazy.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            A little recent automotive easter egg: F250/F350’s built from circa 2007-early 2015 had a factory installed spray-in bed liner option. The line had 4 Fanuc robots in a booth and a crazy material delivery system on a ‘2nd floor’ in the paint shop.

            (just so this tidbit is preserved on the internet forever)

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Tres-

            I like these sort of tidbits. Automotive paint shops are awesome.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        red + orange = Race Red!

  • avatar
    Xeranar

    Interesting, a solid contract with real CoL factored in is usually pretty hard to win, most companies would rather battle every 5 years and throw chunks of money at workers than actually just do a simple inflation raise.

    But that’s how humans work or more specifically contract negotiators. They see every contract as a war to fight rather than a measured cost of business.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The reality is the in many cases the workers are more likely to accept that one time signing bonus than the same amount spread out over the length of the contract.

      I know that is the way it has been for Boeing for years so that has been ingrained in the contract negotiations. Of course many times those negotiations included a strike and the workers ended up worse off than had they accepted the original deal since they went for week with their strike pay that doesn’t amount for much. In the case of strike I can sort of see the appeal of the signing bonus to the worker because that gives them the money to catch up on bills and some to blow.

      • 0 avatar
        Xeranar

        There is a problem with this because they rarely discuss the fact that ‘signing bonuses’ are really just cost of living increases from the last contract added into this one. Sometimes they exceed inflation sometimes they don’t, there is really no solid reasoning of what the magic number is besides internal memorandum that dictates the ‘amount.’

      • 0 avatar
        bodayguy

        Boeing bonuses typically make up for the time missed on strike (Free vacation!! always comes after Christmas for some crazy coincidence!) and some extra to blow, as you said. Their strikes are kind of a joke, I think.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Industrial strife could be used as another excuse for less than stellar month of selling the aluminium F-150.

    Ford has so far used a few from chassis suppliers to seat frames. It seems the chassis problem was fixed in a couple of weeks. The chassis supplier should go down in history with the quickest factory refit and retool.

    Because the chassis problem went away quite fast.

    In the second half of the last week of each month Ford has so far released “reasons” for production and supply issues with the aluminium F-150.

    But yet they have a rather large inventory of them sitting around.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      The frame shortage has been ongoing all year. It wasn’t a quick fix. Ford actually had to add another supplier. Tower Automotive has started building frames in Bellevue, OH in addition to Metalsa is Elizabethtown, KY.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      So Ford faked F-150 ‘hiccups’ to throw all the BAFOs of the world, off the scent? The F-series continues to dominate, with a slight shift to increased Super duty sales, and that may be permanent, who knows?

      But what ever you call, too much F-150 inventory, divide by 4,000+ dealers.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        The percent of F-Series trucks the F150 makes up will increase next year. The SuperDuty has a retool and the F150 will have been availability in all configurations.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    What’s the longest point in time the UAW has operated at a plant without a labor disagreement or threatening a strike?

    Cause it seems like it’s every year at least once.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Maybe 4 years? That’s the typical contract length. So maybe the period between 2007 and 2011 the UAW didn’t threaten a strike? Everyone was lucky to have jobs at that point.

      (They probably still threatened a strike)

      Kansas City Assembly is in a good place to put pressure on Ford because they make two products that Ford can’t build enough of (F150 and Transit).

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I figure someone who works for Ford would come around eventually to answer my query. I bet they still threatened a strike during that time, too.

        Did not know what they made in KC, but KC has a lot of stuff going for it these days, it seems. They’ve got that cool underground tunnel industrial/commercial thing too!

        I’ve never seen anybody striking by the Ford transmission plant near my house, maybe they aren’t UAW organized.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Sharonville Transmission is UAW. A lot of the workers are from the now closed Batavia Transmission plant. They build SuperDuty transmissions right now. Maybe they are happy to build SuperDuty transmissions instead of exploding Freestyle CVTs?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Oh I had never heard of the Batavia one – that part of “town” is so far out there, middle of nowhere.

            I know there was concern for the future of the plant since they only make one sort of transmission now. My friend’s dad works there.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I think they are still making two transmissions (5R and 6R). Both are for the SuperDuty and are from the same family though. As long as Americans want Ford SuperDuty trucks, they will probably be okay.

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      CoreyDL…I only tell what I know, {or can remember} from my own personal experience.

      Here in Oshawa, we went out with the UAW in 1970 {3 months}. My first strike was 1984, 17 days. We separated from the UAW after that one. The CAW went out for 3 weeks in 1986. So makes for 3 times in 45 years.

      In fairness, we in Canada have slightly different labour laws. We cannot strike over local agreements. I believe that the UAW &GM have that clause written into their national agreement. However I believe the “no strike” clause, only comes into effect during the life of the national agreement.

      That all being said. and to somewhat answer you question. I was a shipper receiver in the “just in time” world {12 years} Our dock handled “body panels” for two car plants and Truck. Before that I spent 10 years as a production group leader, car final assembly.

      Believe me when I say, in both of those positions, an even minor strike in Michigan, or Ohio, had an immediate impact on my life.

      So to the best of my memory, there would be only two “labour disputes” that come to mind. Flint {engine cradles} summer of 98. GM had the local UAW up against the ropes. Solidarity was beginning to crack, then Rick W blinked. The other incident that comes to mind, would be American Axle early 2008. At the time, GM had a massive field stock of everything. Gas was edging 5 USD a gallon. Truck sales were diving. The UAW was doing GM a favour by halting production.

      So while it might seem that you hear the word “strike” quite often, like once a year. The reality is somewhat different

  • avatar
    mikey

    CoreyDL….I actually hated that truck, and dumped it 5 months after I bought it. The photo is just a temp. I’m waiting for a nice bright winter day, see if I can catch a good contrast with my 15 Mustang.

  • avatar
    SC5door

    FYI TTAC:

    Chicago has voted down the National Agreement. And like KCAP, CAP makes the ever so popular Explorer.

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