By on October 7, 2015

Subaru Legacy 2.5GT Limited

Two out of four ain’t bad, I guess.

The perfect vehicle, as proclaimed by auto journalists and web commenters alike, is a brown diesel manual wagon. Here, however, the rally-legend Subaru turbo flat-four is a better choice for a hot daddymobile than a nasty oilburner. The low-key blue paint won’t turn heads at the PTA, but will be near invisible to over-zealous traffic enforcement.

The Subaru Legacy 2.5GT wagon, in other words, is an Impreza WRX STI for grownups.

This 2005 Legacy wagon has the relatively rare five-speed manual, again cementing the rally roots of this quick family truckster. This one could use a little detailing as the rear tint is badly marked up and the finish on the steering wheel isn’t the best. But, for under $9,000, this looks to be a great buy.

It’s not as collectible as the Legacy Spec B, but that was never available here as a wagon.

I keep seeing a black Legacy 2.5GT on my commute and it never fails to catch my eye. Moderately lowered with big dark wheels and dark tint, it idles with that distinctive Subaru burble. The wife would kill me were I to dump the minivan for something smaller, but my daily drive could use a bit more fun.

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60 Comments on “Digestible Collectible: 2005 Subaru Legacy 2.5GT Limited...”


  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    125k? Set aside some cash for new head gaskets.

    • 0 avatar
      PenguinBoy

      While the normally aspirated EJ25 has a well earned reputation for eating head gaskets, I haven’t heard of many problems with the turbos.

      But this is a 10 year old Subaru, so it’s reasonable to expect some expensive repairs will be needed soon…

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      Replace “head gaskets” with “turbo.”
      If this one hasn’t already been replaced (which is a distinct possibility) you are just about at the end of the life of the VF40 turbo. Especially if the banjo bolts haven’t been removed/cleaned.

      2005 being the only year for the stick makes it difficult because 2005 was also the worst year for this gen LGT.

      • 0 avatar
        zamoti

        Didn’t these things have a history of mangling the crank snout and requiring delicate repair using some sort of crank sleeve? I wanted a Legacy XT real bad for a while, but kept finding reasons not to buy one. Banjo bolts drying out turbos, head gaskets, etc. I like the IDEA of a turbo wagon, but I don’t think this generation was a particular high point for Subaru durability. Guess my Volvo V70 turbo 5 was as good as I got.

        • 0 avatar
          Land Ark

          I’ve never heard about the crank issue, though I am not denying it is possible.

          The most common issues revolve around the up-pipe catalytic converters coming apart and getting sucked into the turbo or banjo bolt if they are still in place.
          Once the cat and banjo filters are removed it still suffers from a significant reputation for turbo oil starvation.

          For 2007 they re-routed the oil feed lines which helped immensely, removed the up-pipe cat completely from the factory, and started using the more durable VF46 turbo. It helped but 2007+s can still suffer from similar issues – even when meticulously maintained.

          • 0 avatar
            zamoti

            Found it, the throw out bearing shreds itself and the crank snout in the process. Photos of the carnage can be seen here:
            http://legacygt.com/forums/showthread.php/throw-out-bearing-failure-156181.html?s=e38be02f263e7c75bedd6c82ee5de89e&p=3286057

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Wheel bearings, CV joints, differentials.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Differentials? What goes wrong?

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Leaky seals and what not as they age. Something not commonly maintained as a fluid change by owners. There’s a diff pressure sensor failure issue as well.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            “Not commonly maintained” sounds about right. It baffles me how everyone knows to change engine oil but not the rest of the fluids in their vehicles. My coworker basically let his Grand Cherokee fail all around him through deferred maintenance and not repairing the small things as they cropped up. Then he says “wow what a piece of crap, it needs all this work” The rear diff was making some ominous noise at 160k miles, I asked him whether he’s ever changed the gear oil in it: “…uh, well… no.”

          • 0 avatar
            EAF

            Indeed, the differential springs leaks, as well as the tail-end of the gearbox which houses the gear selector + seal. Real PITA to replace this $3 seal without dropping the gearbox. I hear the case itself “expands” with age and reeks havoc with seals and bearings… strictly hearsay on this later issue as I’ve never come across it.

            I just replaced a factory cat-ted up-pipe that had rusted through. The replacement was an aftermarket piece without a catalyst and without a provision for the EGT probe which apparently tears off and kills turbine wheels as well.

            I should have checked the banjo bolt screen, I completely forgot about it, thanks Ark!

          • 0 avatar
            Advance_92

            Bend a resistor to fit the plug for the front O2 sensor and it’ll read ‘good’ to the ECU.

        • 0 avatar
          Land Ark

          And if you do a lot of hard launches, everything goes wrong.

        • 0 avatar
          PenguinBoy

          On my 2002 Legacy, the centre diff locked up solid at just over 100k km, it felt like a part time four wheel drive being driven in “4 High” on dry pavement. Also had a noisy bearing ~inside~ the transaxle.

          The car had be dealer maintained by the book since new, so lack of fluid changes or other maintenance shouldn’t had been a problem. Also, it wasn’t the car I used to commute to work, so the majority of the miles on it at that point were highway miles. The original brake pads were still good at that point – so that’s the only time I’ve had a set of brake pads outlast a manual transmission!

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Ah so the “center diff” on the manual cars is a viscous clutch based system, not a traditional “differential” per se.

          • 0 avatar
            wmba

            @ gtemnykh:

            No, the center differential on the manual cars is a gear-based one. The limited slip device between front and rear drives around that diff is a viscous unit – unfortunately it has a low torque rating even at full lock-up, so it is not much of a help in limiting slip.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Ah so it has both then, that makes sense.

    • 0 avatar
      old blue

      My old Legacy GT wagon, 2006, black over black is still going strong without any problems at well over 150000.

      My advice, do all the maintenance, more than the suggested
      maintenance, especially radiator fluid changes. The head gaskets
      will thank you for it, and the turbo will last longer. I had no issues whatsoever mechanically.

      My daughter now has it and she is giving it less love than I had.

    • 0 avatar
      old blue

      My old 2006 LGT wagon, black over black leather is still going
      strong at well over 150,000 miles, having had no mechanical
      issues whatsoever. Just maintenance and brakes.

      The secret, lots of regular maintenance, BEFORE the indicated
      mileages, especially the radiator fluid. The head gaskets and
      turbo will thank you.

      My daughter now has it, and is giving it less love than I had.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    Resale value in Mountain standard time would be around $20k or more. But I have seen a few of them in Denver and SLC.

  • avatar
    MBella

    The best Legacy. In my opinion this is where Subaru peaked. Both the Legacy and Impreza of this generation were fantastic cars. Each generation afterwards gets progressively cheaper made and worse.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      See my comment below, this generation was already the beginning of cheaper interiors. Perhaps the surprising 90lb weight loss from going 00-04 to 05-09 can be explained by the hollow sounding plastic.

  • avatar
    smallblock

    Well, it’s almost the unicorn. Now try finding a 2.5 GT non-Limited wagon. That’s my holy grail.

    Seriously, can we just get all these together and take them to SOA headquarters and demand that they build cars like this again? I literally just bought a 2016 Outback 2.5i, didn’t want the 3.6 for the mileage but wouldn’t mind more power, and wish it was lower. I parked it next to an XJ Cherokee and could swear the Outback is taller.

    Wonder if it’s on the original VF40 turbo? We had a 2005 LGT sedan (automatic, wife’s, she won’t learn manual but at least she doesn’t drive my car and coincidentally it has never hit anything) and the turbo seized at 61,000 miles. I had the out of town dealer put a new shortblock and turbo in it. Subaru covered the parts, but I was still out a lot.

  • avatar
    motoridersd

    I owned a 2008 Spec.B for 6 years and 105k miles. I loved that car. Replace the suspension on this and you have a very good car. The 6 speed in the Spec.B was better, but the forum peeps that have these 5 speeds still love them.

    I wanted a wagon, but the limited window when the 2.5GT wagon was available as a manual made them very hard to find, and the ones I did find were pretty beat up.

  • avatar
    NotFast

    My buddy and his wife both had LGT (wife: wagon, him: sedan). He got rid of the wagon when the turbo cracked and his sedan when some bad shop joyrode it and slid into something and bent the frame while hooning.

  • avatar
    PenguinBoy

    This represents “Peak Subaru” IMHO.

    I used to have a normally aspirated Legacy Wagon of the previous generation, and this generation was a solid step up in pretty much all respects.

    I thought the Legacy / Outback that came after this was a step backwards, and of course the “regular” Legacy wagon is no longer available in North America. We ended up replacing the Legacy with a Forester a couple of years back. It’s nice enough, and one of the only reasonably priced vehicles that’s available with AWD, reasonable creature comforts, and a manual transmission – but if a “regular” Legacy wagon was still available I would have opted for that instead.

    While I really like these LGT Wagons, I can’t see ever owning one. The combination of high resale value (at least in my area) and above average repair costs as they age makes Subaru one of those cars that only makes sense to buy new.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      As far as interiors go, I’d argue this is one generation past peak Subaru. The 00-04 cars are the last to have that quintessential Japanese “soft touch vinyl everywhere” kind of vibe to them. The 05+ is the beginning of noticeable cost cutting that hit all of the Japanese automakers, most noticeable inside the vehicles. My brother recently did headgaskets on an ’07 Outback. The valve cover bolts were corroded on so badly he had to tack on a weld to break them free. On the 00-04 cars, there are little rubber covers on the bolt heads that prevent moisture from entering and causing these problems. Apparently this was dropped on the 05+ cars. So there was other areas that felt the cost cutting as well.

      I’ll take a rust free 2004 H6 3.0 Outback over any 05-09 car, turbo or no. I’d be avoiding any head gasket issues the naturally aspirated EJ25 is known for, and get a buttery smooth, Porsche-esque flat six that still gets tolerable mileage. That leaves some CV boot issues, wheel bearings, subframe and rear quarter panel rot to keep ahead of. That’s not bad IMO. Another bonus: the “H6” cars got Subaru’s VTD, an awesome center differential (planetary gear) based system that splits power 45/55 front to rear rather than the usual 90/10 in Subaru automatics. These cars also got “VDC” an early variant of stability control that could help in low traction situations. Supposedly it is effective enough to allow forward motion up a decent slope even when 3 wheels lose traction.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Agree! H6 Limited or LL Bean two-tone FTW.

        IMO this one is a bit overpriced at $7k. I wouldn’t spend $7 on a nearly-11 year old Subaru with 125K miles.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Maybe you wouldn’t (and I certainly wouldn’t), where I am there would be people lined up 10 deep. Here, I would call this car radically underpriced. Made worse by the fact that all the 2005 Subarus here are getting junked due to rust.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Yeah, I can see a Subaru prime area like CO or ME it would be a quick sell at the price. They’ve rusted here too, always the rear arches, and along trim seams between fender and plastic cladding.

            Subaru is second in rust only to Mazda. I think 2010+ Subaru fixed the issue, I’m not convinced on the Mazda side yet that the problem is gone.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            The rust that khrodes is referring to is more than the visible stuff on the body, it’s the front subframe. Most shops will have a weld slag hammer that they’ll bang on car subframes during safety inspections. If the ‘hammer of doom” pokes through, the car is toast. Of course if the car has a lot of body rust, chances are the subframe is nearing its end, and the fuel lines and brake lines aren’t far behind.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Found one H6 on Ebay, and it has got cloth seats – how unusual.

        http://mall-of-georgia-mazda.ebizautos.com/detail-2003-subaru-legacy_wagon-5dr_outback_h6-used-13946142.html?popup_photoviewer=true

      • 0 avatar
        PenguinBoy

        “As far as interiors go, I’d argue this is one generation past peak Subaru. The 00-04 cars are the last to have that quintessential Japanese “soft touch vinyl everywhere” kind of vibe to them. The 05+ is the beginning of noticeable cost cutting that hit all of the Japanese automakers, most noticeable inside the vehicles.”

        That’s a fair comment. When new, my 2002 Legacy had the solid, well built feel of quality that I associate with the “Golden age of Japanese Cars”. The generation that came after was sleeker, and had higher equipment levels, but I can see what you mean about some of the the interior materials – although the effects of cost cutting were still pretty subtle at this point, and not nearly as noticeable as they would be after 2009.

        The cost cutting is certainly evident in the interior materials in my 2013 Forester. On the other hand, the Forester is *much* better equipped than the Legacy, and cost less in absolute terms than the Legacy did over 10 years earlier.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          I test drove a 2015 Outback recently, and I think it’s fair to say that things are turning around. I did not expect a mid-level “2.5i Premium” with cloth to feel so darn expensive and full of content. A key point (to me anyways) was that the cloth used for the seats was very nice and didn’t just feel like the cheapest fire retardant material they could find. The one glaring fault that stood out to me was the god-awful lumbar support that even in the most retracted position jutted out into my back. Apparently it’s a pretty common complaint, as people on the Subie forums have figured out how to unzip the seat cover and remove the plastic piece that makes up the lumbar unit. Also, the suspension tuning really impressed me. I went out of my way to hit a few potholes with the front wheels and the damn thing just smothered them. Much different than the ’04 Legacy Wagon GT of my friend’s, which was much stiffer. Likewise the new car feels tomb-quiet, I want to say quieter than my gf’s 2012 Camry which is my benchmark for decent modern NVH control.

  • avatar
    GermanReliabilityMyth

    Everyone’s typing “LGT” but all I see is “LGBT.” Subconscious associations are pretty powerful, I guess.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    Yes the manual wagon is hard to find. Yes the white with black interior LGTs are hard to find, and yes Spec Bs are somewhat hard to find.

    Now, do a nationwide search for a 2007 LGT wagon. I just did and miraculously there is one for sale in the US.

    2007 is the best year as far as reliability goes for the GT wagon. I bought mine in 2010 with 36k miles on it and I now have just over 68k miles.

    It will probably be my last Subaru. I love how it looks and drives, but I have come to realize that Subaru Reliability is a sales pitch and not much else. Plus anything newer just looks awful.

  • avatar
    Sob93

    You’ve got to be kidding. Money pit and buy a pan to catch the oil.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Yeah I was surprised to see this as well. Comparing it in a favorable light to a VAG diesel has an element of irony in it: either the author is implying that the “nasty oil burners” are so awful that even one of these turbo legacies with all of their issues is preferable, or he is simply ignorant of their poor reputation.

  • avatar
    omer333

    Oh no, it’s in my neck of the woods! Thankfully I just got into a lease on a 2015 Accord Sport (yay!) with a CVT (boo!), there were no 6MTs in Utah and I wanted it in blue anyway. For some reason though, you can hit a seventh gear when you’re manually shifting the CVT in Sport mode.

    However, I did get veeeerrrrryyyy close to buying a 2010 Impreza GT with the 4-speed auto. It had juuuust under 50k in mileage and the original owner (the seller) had all the service documents. I chickened out, because I was afraid of the cost of ownership of the car; y’know, synthetic oil for every oil change at 3750 miles, head-gaskets, timing belt, etc. Yet, I thought it was a fantastic car and I implored the owner to keep it.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Enjoy the Accord, I’d be curious to hear your impressions, what with just leaving a lemon-lawed Dart. The CVT is just about the best in the business, or so I’m told, so there’s that. My friend bought a 6spd Sport and has been loving it. An easy 34mpg on the highway just driving it normal, and he went and tore up some back roads in Vermont with it along with some friends, one was in an S5 and the other in a WRX. Within the limits of public roads and sanity, the Accord kept up just fine.

      • 0 avatar
        omer333

        I wrote this on my Facebook page because some of my friends were asking me about the car:

        “I have to say I like this car. It’s an honest car… handsome, in an understated way. If you know Hondas, then you would guess its an Accord in “Sport” trim just by looking at the wheels, and you’d be right.

        It rides quite nicely actually. It doesn’t feel like I could die going around a turn, it handles quite well, thank you. I gotta find some twisty roads, because the chassis feels like it could hang on Laurales Grade.

        It doesn’t have the burble in the exhaust like my Dart had, but it can get out of it’s own way without much trouble.

        The only thing I wish it had was the manual transmission. If you want a color besides black, gray, or white in a 2015 Accord, you get a CVT automatic. Going grayscale gets you the best manual transmission not in a Mazda. I wanted a blue car, so I get the CVT, but it has flappy-paddles on the steering column and I managed to hit seventh gear in “Sport” mode when I was shifting it myself (the CVT is advertised as a six-speed). Maybe if I keep the car I’ll do a transmission swap.

        I agree with Car & Driver’s long-term review of the Accord in “Sport” trim (they had a manual-transmission model): if you needed a mid-size family sedan and you actually like cars and you liked to drive, you could get one of these not feel upset you didn’t get something German. It’s that good.”

        I forgot to mention the interior, I actually like it. I think the seats are great and I like the dash, it’s not overly-busy with buttons and knobs all over the damn place. I also like that the backseat are is pretty spacious, I was able to fit my wife, mother-in-law, and youngest daughter (who rides in a regular child-seat, no booster yet) in the back with no problems while me and my father-in-law were up front.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    Oh it’ll burn oil alright. Don’t you worry about that.

  • avatar
    Quentin

    My best friend has an 05 LGT sedan and my brother had an 05 OBXT. Neither aged gracefully at all. The little chrome parts on the HVAC vents fell off, trim pieces didn’t hold up well. My friend lost a turbo. My brother traded his on a Rav4 before the turbo went. I never liked the clutch on them. Funny, though, had the manual LGT wagon lived for one more model year, I’d have purchased one. I got my first real job in the summer of 06 and was planning on replacing my 2001 Impreza 2.5RS with a white LGT wagon (black interior, limited trim). No stick, no sell. Bought a new 07 GTI instead.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    B&B demand manual wagons
    One gets posted, B&B call it “expensive to maintain” and unreliable.

    Im not saying a Subarus cheap to keep on the road, far from it. On top of the mentioned issues you got rust and dinky sheetmetal (the Imprezza being the worst).

    Im just saying “wheres the car guy attitude?”, where car work is like breathing? Any and every car should be preserved?

    I only ever tried out a 96 Legacy, it burned and smoked oil at about 154k I beleive. Inside was cheap and outside you got a Ford Escort eith a Contour front end. Cant say I “get” Subarus.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      “Im just saying “wheres the car guy attitude?”, where car work is like breathing? Any and every car should be preserved?”

      Well, I realized my time has better uses, I want a car that runs all the time, and frankly they’re recycleable wear items.

  • avatar
    rustyra24

    I would check this thing over with a fine tooth comb. At this mileage the most common problems should have already happened. Here is small list of problems associated with this model.

    VF40 is prone to blowing up due to banjo bolt filters.
    Uppipe with cat can destroy turbo.
    Rear wheel bearings are a common problem.
    Throw out bearing can destroy transmission snout.
    CV boot under turbo gets hot and splits.
    Oil pick up can break in half.
    Burnt valves due to crappy stock Subaru tune.
    Ringland failure leading to oil consumption and catastrophic problems.

    I bet the valves are on the way out already if they have not been replaced. Cylinders two and four take the brunt of the tuning on this car.

    I wouldn’t buy this car even if it is a unicorn. I am sure I missed a few problems but those are worst.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    “The perfect vehicle, as proclaimed by auto journalists and web commenters alike, is a brown diesel manual wagon.”

    Your criteria is WEAK.

    10 Holy/Wholly Attributes of “the perfect vehicle,” codified:

    1) Rear wheel drive (or light AWD system, sending no more than 18% of power to front wheels)

    2) Diesel (turbocharging a diesel, unlike a petrol motor, is not only fine, but the only way to fly)

    3) Manual transmission with hydraulic foot operated clutch & 5 or 6 speed gear lever

    4) Durable yet supple whale peni foreskin leather interior trim* (or PeniTex per 30-mile fetch; see below)

    5) Mocha and/or dark’caramel brown exterior paint option

    6) 0-60 time of less than 7.5 seconds/top speed of 150 mph @ 48mpg

    7) Starting MSRP of $12,998 with fully equipped model maxing out @ $16,339, including destination

    8) Factory standard bumper-to-bumper warranty that is 12 years/120,000 miles

    9) Only station wagon or true hatchback configuration

    10) Actual center console mounted, non-electronic hand brake

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Penitex – ROFLMAO!

      I’m willing to pay $50K+ for this combination of attributes, but I am really not a huge fan of brown. Make mine dark green please. Oh, actually that is a requirement as well, available in a decent range of COLORS.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      11. Nothing should EVER break, because while we expect others to fix their cars we’d rather not have to mend our own.

      12. Nothing less than 300hp, anything less is LETHALLY DANGEROUS

      13. Less weight than 2500 pounds, suspension complexity be damned, we want a LIGHT chuckable car! May as well add “Mazda Miata inspired handling”

      14. Styling inspired by a 1981 Cressida, nothing but straight lines and generic shapes. AND a greenhouse that lets me see a full 360 view!

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      Should come from the factory used – only suckers buy new.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Well, I own a 2008 LGT, bought it new and have been very happy with it. It has had the driver’s-side wheel bearings replaced, as expected, and a cross-threaded auto-trans cooling line finally gave up. Only 65,000 miles, and every service religiously performed. It works great and uses no oil.

    I went in to order a ’16 STI, and was offered a mere $7K in trade-in. So, I left, because as far as I’m concerned I’m driving the best $7K car I know of. And that’s 75 cent weenie Canuck bucks, folks.

    Just returned from a trip out west where my brother and I test drove a new Mercedes C Class and the BMW 428i. He drives a 2009 G37xS. Neither he nor I see much need to change after driving these latest German cars.

    Over two weeks away, and my old beast started right up, and sorry, that flat-four doesn’t have the usual four cylinder noise when being revved, it’s much smoother. And still goes like hell.

    Some things are worth hanging on to until inevitable old age finally gets them.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      “only 65k miles”

      Well then the fun is only about to start! Sorry, but a wheel bearing at 65k miles is Hyundai circa-2000 tier. I do wonder why Subaru in particular is afflicted by this issue, is it something inherent to the suspension/knuckle/wheel design? Is their supplier South Korean? In my limited experience, it’s water getting past the seal and introducing grit and rust that kills them. I lost a wheel bearing on my ’98 MPV at 160k miles when I nailed a particularly awful pothole (blew out the shock, ruined a ball joint, broke a sway bar end link). That’s the only time I’ve had issues with them, even on older vehicles.

  • avatar
    midenginebias

    I currently own an 07 Legacy Wagon GT with a slush box. Right now, it has 163k miles on the clock. I bought it with 143k on the clock with a thick pack of service records. I took a bit of a hit to clear the initial check engine light, but I bought the car at a steal price, so I felt okay with it. I ended up having to remap the ECU just to clear the CEL. I am concerned it won’t pass smog.

    I took it canyon driving with the slush box and wasn’t impressed. I’ve been spoiled by 3 MR2s in the past (91, 93, 01) and even my prior Corollas out of HS shifted better and more crisply.

    I’m only holding onto the car because of expected El Nino weather. Otherwise, the Hawk pads, .75″ lift front, 1.25″ lift rear but with H&R lowering springs give near OEM ride height but more composure over higher speed turns, dive, and squat.

    The most disappointing thing outside of the slushbox is the gas mileage. When it’s in “Intelligent” mode, I average 20-21. With Sport mode, it’s 18-19. I do drive spiritedly, but admittedly, was completely spoiled by my N/A Mr2s. I used to wring those out and still average 25-27mpg.

    • 0 avatar
      FAHRVERGNUGEN

      Low mileage seems to be the situation whether auto or slush. My ’05 automatic is still fun as snot with the sport shift mode and buttons on wheel, but the gearing is not the greatest so that at 65MPH, the turbo seems to be still at work and i get maybe 22 max?

      • 0 avatar
        midenginebias

        With Intelligent mode on and 70mph driving, I average 24-25mpg. The gas mileage did drop a bit when I added tires with more grip, but I would still prefer the 5-speed manual. I have already changed the transmission fluid in the automatic as a precaution. Diff fluids are next.

        Right now I drive in Sport mode. I can’t deal with Intelligent mode. I’ll take the 2mpg trade off for some half-decent throttle response and less lag.

        But, lightweight mid-engine cars with quick steering racks have a way of spoiling the driving experience for all other cars.

  • avatar
    midenginebias

    With Intelligent mode on and 70mph driving, I average 24-25mpg. The gas mileage did drop a bit when I added tires with more grip, but I would still prefer the 5-speed manual. I have already changed the transmission fluid in the automatic as a precaution. Diff fluids are next.

    Right now I drive in Sport mode. I can’t deal with Intelligent mode. I’ll take the 2mpg trade off for some half-decent throttle response and less lag.

    But, lightweight mid-engine cars with quick steering racks have a way of spoiling the driving experience for all other cars.

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