By on July 17, 2015

2016 Dodge Viper ACR

You know what a Venn diagram is, right? It’s one of those drawings where you have two or more circles representing the members of different groups, and the area where the circles overlap shows common members of those groups. One of my favorite jokes goes like so: “The Venn diagram of people who care about font choice and people who care about food trucks is a single circle.”

Here’s another Venn diagram for you: the circle of people who have the talent and training to drive the new-for-2016 Viper ACR to its limits, and the circle of people who can afford the $117,500 plus-tax-and-title MSRP on the window sticker. How much overlap do you think there is between those circles?

2016 Dodge Viper ACR

Nominally speaking, this is the third performance variant of the current-generation Dodge (nee SRT) Viper, following on the heels of the Viper TA and the pylon-wing Viper TA 2.0. But that’s like calling Led Zeppelin “the last of the Yardbirds lineups with Jimmy Page.”

So how do you take a car that is already significantly faster around a track than pretty much everything else on the market and cut laptime further? Well, you could increase power, but Dodge didn’t bother to do it. The 8.4L V10 is already putting out 645 naturally-aspirated horsepower, delivered with the kind of brute force and persistence typically associated with 1300cc Suzuki sportbikes, as so the sole change to the motor is to fit low-restriction exhaust tips. No, the ACR isn’t a Z06 wannabe. Let’s see what you do get for your money.

2016 Dodge Viper ACR

Carbon-ceramic brakes, 390mm in the front, with six-piston calipers, both fitted to a Viper for the first time.

2016 Dodge Viper ACR

Bilstein shocks. The aluminum bodies cut 14 pounds from curb weight. The adjustable collars allow the car to have its ride height adjusted to just over four inches. It’s also possible to corner-balance the car for a particular driver, just like you do with real race cars. The damping is adjustable for both compression (how fast the shock absorbs pressure) and rebound (how fast it relaxes once the pressure’s off).

2016 Dodge Viper ACR

Kumho V720 tires. Designed from scratch to meet the needs of this car by the fellow who arguably invented the “DOT-R” concept of sticky race rubber with street-legal construction, these Kumhos are worth a couple seconds a lap all by themselves. SRT’s Erich Heuschele notes that they are designed to maintain a constant grip and heat dispersion over the course of multiple sessions. “Some of the competition has tires that drop off after a few laps,” Heuschele notes, before tactfully declining to comment on the Viper’s ability to maintain engine performance over a long track run without supercharger-induced “heat soak”. These tires are 200-treadwear and they can reportedly handle damp roads as well. Standing water? Better call your girlfriend and ask for a ride home. The front tires are an outrageous 25 aspect ratio so the Viper can use 19″ front wheels — all the better to clear the big brakes. Potholes should be avoided at all costs. At. All. Costs.

2016 Dodge Viper ACR

One of the rear diffusers, with replaceable rub strips because — you’re going to hit them on the track surface sometimes.

2016 Dodge Viper ACR

Removable fender vent, part of the Extreme Aero Package. Placement of American flag in background strictly on purpose.

2016 Dodge Viper ACR

Removable, adjustable front splitter, made of carbon fiber and reinforced with aluminum. Double “dive planes”, patiently wind-tunnel refined so you don’t lose as much front-end grip if the back end steps out a bit and changes the angle at which the planes meet the wind.

2016 Dodge Viper ACR

The full rear diffuser.

2016 Dodge Viper ACR

And that monstrous rear wing. The sum total of all the aero modifications, refined over hundreds of “CFD” iterations on a computer and hundreds of hours in a wind tunnel, is nearly one ton of downforce at the Viper’s top speed. Which drops from 206 mph to 177, courtesy of all of the wings and things. Think of the amount of wind pressure it takes to cut nearly 30 mph from a car’s speed. Now apply it on the tires. That will help you understand why this car can do what it does.

To counteract the weight of all that carbon fiber, the ACR goes on an interior diet as well.

2016 Dodge Viper ACR

The stereo loses nine of its twelve speakers. Interior trim panels in the cargo area are dispensed with. The quilted leather you’d get in a Viper GTS is replaced by Alcantara, and the power assistance for the seats disappears. Sound insulation? It’s gon-WHAT DID YOU SAY THEY DID WITH IT I CAN’T HEAR. Carpeting? Not much. But if, like me, you want a full helping of pimp juice in your track rat, you can restore every single interior appointment through the Viper “1 of 1” program. On the way to VIR, I drove a 1-of-1 with a full GTS interior, big-watt stereo, and TA 2.0 aerodynamics. Hell of a car. Like a Shelby Mustang with the interior of a Mark III.

The bare-bones ACR retails for $117,500 plus tax, title, and (can you believe it?) a gas-guzzler charge. That’s a lot of cash over and above the $84,995 you’d pay for a base Viper GT that will disappear into the distance should your ACR challenge one to any straight-line race lasting more than a few seconds. So what do you get for the money?

The below video won’t answer your question. It’s a 2:59 lap of the VIR Grand Course. Strictly speaking, that’s hauling the mail — but it’s really maybe fifteen seconds slower than what the car can do. To prevent anyone from pulling an Aaron Gold in one of just five pre-production ACRs available for the program, SRT gave us each some very nice instructors and asked us to leave some room on the track for mistakes. They also limited each drive session to just one full lap of the course. So what you see is your humble author trying to play by the rules.

Even at that relaxed pace, however, the ACR is simply the most brilliant street-legal car I’ve ever driven on a racetrack. Prior to this week, my benchmark for on-track behavior in a dead-stock supercar was set somewhere between the Viper TA 2.0 and the Ferrari 458 Speciale. (The McLaren 650S needs more front tire, in my not-so-humble opinion.) Compared to the ACR, the aforementioned cars might as well be base Mustangs.

To begin with, the ACR has all the good points of the current Viper. There’s enough room for me to swing my elbows a bit. The six-speed transmission has positive detents, reasonable throw length, and — oh yeah — it’s not some pansy-ass dual-clutch stockbroker special. Control efforts are heavy enough to communicate but not so much that it’s tiring to drive the car. Furthermore, the brakes, clutch, and steering all feel “organic”, not computer-controlled. The electronic stability control has a usable track setting and a usable sport setting and although it won’t babysit you the way Porsche’s PSM will, it can help you fix a mistake if you make one. Visibility is acceptable. Interior heat and airflow, the most miserable point of the original Viper GTS coupe and not entirely fixed in the last Viper to bear the ACR badge, is now okay if not outstanding.

I’ve said before that the Viper feels like a big Miata. You can trust it to do exactly what you ask, and then you need to be prepared for the consequences of your actions. The only worrying thing is that all of this happens at speeds much higher than what you can achieve in a Miata, so your margin for error is smaller. This ACR feels like a very big Radical. The aero grip is as real as a 747-800’s ability to leave the ground and it’s apparent in nearly every turn of the VIR Grand course layout.

Without getting too much into the details of shock/spring behavior (delightful, like smooth butter on top of a first-rate steak) or the frankly amazing ability of these Kumho tires to resist overheating, the best way to describe the ACR’s behavior on track is… cultured. It responds to the steering wheel in a way that only real race cars can. When it slides a bit, it gives you plenty of warning and all the time you need to fix the problem. It’s probably the least stressful supercar I’ve ever driven on a racetrack and it utterly outclasses the competition.

In the second half of the day, the SRT engineers gave me a small aero adjustment to the front and rear spoilers that balanced the car a bit more towards “neutral” behavior (neither understeer nor oversteer) and caused me to fall in love even farther. You can adjust your ACR any way you like in minutes, in the pit lane, and as you get used to a new track you can progressively sharpen the saw until you’re four-wheel sliding your way from every exit.

I took every lapping session I could in the ACR and got a total of five “hot laps” behind the wheel. It was far from enough. Oh, it was enough to see that the car is everything I’d wanted it to be, but it wasn’t enough to satisfy my explicit desires. I’d love to put a ten, fifty, two hundred laps on it in the course of a weekend. I can’t see getting tired of it. The beauty of the ACR is that it’s so capable and so transparent that it helps you learn more about your own abilities.

In a perfect world, these cars would be distributed the same way the aliens in “The Last Starfighter” chose their human champion: by finding the most talented drivers and making sure they each had one in the garage, along with a big stack of Kumhos to burn. In this world, it’s back to that Venn diagram and the vanishingly small group of people who can write the check and walk the walk. If you’re one of them, you shouldn’t hesitate.

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58 Comments on “2016 Dodge Viper ACR Review...”


  • avatar

    MOPAR OR NO CAR

    But, I’d rather take both HELLCATS for the price of this one car.

  • avatar

    Why would I want to cut my car’s top speed by 30MPH?
    I want my car to be able to go as fast as possible in a straight line.
    I don’t give a DAMN about the “cuhhhhhrrrrrzvzzzz” when I’m on the i80 or i280.

    Ain’t no “cuhhhhhrrrrrzvzzzz” around here.

    Not having pneumatics to retract and extend those airfoils is one of the reasons tuner-cars SUCK compared to the Bugatti Veyron SS.

    • 0 avatar
      TOTitan

      It takes very little skill to go in a straight line. Some of us like cars that can go around corners, and have the ability to drive them as intended, which is something you dont understand.

      • 0 avatar

        nor do I want to understand.

        I just wanna go REALLY REALLY REALLY FAST in a straight line – in a car capable of carrying 4 people. That is all.

        How long do I have to wait till there’s a 300MPH car?

        Bugatti needs to make that a design point.

        • 0 avatar
          Undefinition

          ‘You’re about as subtle as an elephant in heat.’
          https://youtu.be/nh0O-rzP1XQ?t=2m22s

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          “nor do I want to understand”

          GRRR! CURVES HARD, NO LIKE. WANT SPEED. ONLY SPEED. STOMP GAS, GIVES SPEED. GRRRR!

          You crack me up, BigTrucks, I’m glad you’re around here.

          I’m curious, though, where is it you think 177mph isn’t enough? Even though you deserve to have all the proles get the f- out of your big important way, I’m not seeing 177mph being a remarkably bright speed on public roads in the hands of a driver uninterested in vehicle control and dynamics.

        • 0 avatar
          baconator

          Um, what public roads in the US have sight lines and surface quality to support speeds of more than about 160 or 170? For a car with those kinds of legs, you want to be on a track, so to me, the ACR makes perfect sense.

          I’ve done my share of Vmax runs on lonely stretches of highway, but things get awfully dicey above about 150, even on truly desolate stretches like Route 50 through Nevada or I-90 through western North Dakota.

          Even Ed Brolian and his crew in the CL55 didn’t spend very much time over 120MPH over the course of an entire cross-country trip.

        • 0 avatar
          VolandoBajo

          REALLY REALLY FAST in a straight line, eh?

          You must have loved the Buick GN’s (if you live in the flat, wide-open western US).

          I used to be able to tailgate 911’s on backroads in VT in an only slightly modified carburetted Rabbit, even though there was no way I could have kept it in sight on a one mile straight stretch.

          But it was oh so much fun for me, and not hardly any fun at all for guys in Porsches with a hot GF in the passenger seat.

          My passenger, on the other hand, thought I was the master tuner of the universe.

          Mods: different mainjet, legally cat-free exhaust, front and rear sway bars…nothing else except plugs and keeping the timing tight.

          So much for fast in a straight line being everything. Not that I couldn’t clean the clock on then current BMW’s, too.

      • 0 avatar
        RideHeight

        ” which is something you dont understand”

        But he understands how to use an apostrophe and how to make more money than you :-D

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “It takes very little skill to go in a straight line.”

        It takes some skill to go over 200mph in a street car.

      • 0 avatar

        As one of those folks who like cars that can go around corners, let me say that it takes great skill to drive a car in a straight line anywhere north of a buck thirty five. Thing start happening very fast. As you get above 150 mph, even a slight bobble of the wheel means a big movement on the road.

        As for maximum straight line speed, if it was easy, there’d be a lot more NHRA champions. Drag racing is a specialized skill set.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      You are the exact kind of person who can “afford” this car, but in no way deserves to drive, let alone own one.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      “I don’t give a DAMN about the “cuhhhhhrrrrrzvzzzz” when I’m on the i80 or i280.”

      On those crowded freeways I sure hope you don’t care about going 200 mph either.

  • avatar

    Take out that engine, put in a 6.2-L Supercharged (or Twin Turboed) and make The car BIGGER – interior space of a Nissan GT-R. Then call me.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      HEMI is too TALL and HEAVY for the Viper.

      This is a RACE CAR; not a 0-200 machine. The HINT should have started with the brakes; which are far superior than anything coming on and LX platform vehicle.

  • avatar
    Undefinition

    I can honestly say that I care way too much about font choices (and can recognize them as swiftly as a Honda enthusiast can identify engine series), yet I have zero interest in food trucks.

  • avatar
    Blackcloud_9

    Love the “Last Starfighter” reference!

  • avatar
    Nick 2012

    Great writing. Hopefully you were able to have fun on the drive to VIR and avoid Ohio’s omnipresent traffic enforcement.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    This is a true millionaire’s toy. It’s one thing to tool around in your GT3 back and forth to your dental office and home. It’s a whole other order of magnitude to have an equally expensive beast like this and go to the track regularly. I just don’t have the appetite.

    I am personally praying for the day when cars like the Radical can be made road legal in the US. Meh I would settle for a FF 818C with a cammed out punched out EZ36D (Subie flat 6). One day….

  • avatar

    Great story. Especially those last two sentences. But what is this heat soak and why is it necessary to maintain engine performance over a long track run?

    “the Viper’s ability to maintain engine performance over a long track run without supercharger-induced “heat soak”.

    • 0 avatar
      Nick 2012

      Based on my (limited) understanding of heat soak, I read Jack’s statement to mean that the Viper can run harder and longer than forced-induction vehicles because its underhood temperatures remain cooler than a comparably powerful forced induction vehicle.

      Heat soak refers to a lot of things, but it is basically what it sounds like – everything under the hood just getting hotter. Forced induction cars run hot, and the mega-fast speeds of a turbo/supercharger create a boatload of heat that needs to be radiated.

      The longer you’re on a track, the hotter things get, and the more performance degrades. Supercharged Ford 5.4L V8s suffer particularly from heat soak problems because of the cast iron block. While it takes a while to get that gigantic hunk of iron hot, it will stay hot for days and can’t be quickly cooled down (this is why I love searing meats on a red-hot cast iron skillet). The car just doesn’t have the capability to transfer that heat to the air through its cooling system.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      It is a dig at the new Z06. It is suffering either from extreme heat soak or aggressive ECU pullback when tracked for extended periods (like more than 4laps).

  • avatar
    Felis Concolor

    “. . .a big Miata.” I’m glad I finished my morning meal before reading that line.

    There is a point when a car is traveling at speed where the vehicle seems to stop moving and the world simply picks itself up and hurtles towards your position. Couple that with the classic Romantic unreality of the distant landscape in the camera’s field of view and you have created an especially enjoyable video clip.

    Thank you very much.

  • avatar
    duffman13

    Jack,

    Great piece, that pace is insane and you’ve cemented my desire for a Viper.

    Also, I love VIR and Grand Course is definitely my favorite configuration – I’ve spent 3 weekends down there over the past 2 years and at a 4.5-5 hour drive each way that’s a pretty big commitment for me. For those who are wondering an S2000 driven at my best pace can pull a 3:35 on Grand Course (www.youtube.com/watch?v=lSSUBYU6bvs) so the Viper would have me lapped after 6. Haven’t gotten to the track yet this year unfortunately, but it’s because we have a new addition to the family, which is awesome. My wife promised me a Summit Point day for my birthday though, so I’m hopeful.

    I have one non-Viper related question for you.

    Really, how good are the new Kumhos and have you compared them at all to the Bridgestone RE-71s? I’m not really an autocross guy so something that handles heat like a champ for track days is more important to me. Not that it matters much, since I bought a set of Rivals on clearance, but if they’re really as good as you say they’d be a solid pick up for my next set of tires.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      The V720s on the ACR I feel to be superior to the RE-71s,but calling these Viper-specific tires is like Jimmy Page calling the Zep lineup “The New Yardbirds” on their initial tour. There’s not much besides the name to connect them to what the Rack would sell you for your car.

  • avatar
    ctg

    This car doesn’t make sense to me. It seems like a great track toy, but I don’t understand when you’d ever drive it on the street, where its essentially unusable (inability to cope with potholes, rain, steep inclines, etc). You could drive it to a track and back home (again, assuming you know you’re not going to get caught in a thunderstorm), but if you can afford a track toy like this, seems like you can afford a nice, comfy tow rig and a trailer. So if there’s no reason to drive on the street, why not take out all the street-legalization stuff? Is it any better than a Viper GTS for driving on a canyon road? I can’t imagine you could push it hard enough to take advantage of all the aero bits on any public road.

    I’m not a track rat, so if I’m missing something please feel free to explain.

    • 0 avatar
      ctg

      Thinking about it more, I guess maybe the point of making it street legal is so that you can (very carefully) drive it to Cars and Coffee to show off your badass track beast…

    • 0 avatar
      ctg

      Thinking about it more, I guess maybe the point of making it street legal is so that you can (very carefully) drive it to Cars and Coffee to show off your “track beast”…

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Yea, I wonder how much cheaper and lighter a car with this performance capacity would be if it didn’t have to be built to DOT standards. Definitely enough to be able to buy a pickup and flatbed to tow it with.

    • 0 avatar
      JuniperBug

      I imagine that part of it is the Venn diagram that Jack spoke of. If they catered only to people who are going to drive it exclusively on the track, they wouldn’t sell enough to make a solid business case for it. Status-seekers, or simply enthusiasts with enough coin to drop on an occasional street toy (that’s also everything Jack describes when/if they decide to take it to the track) need to want to buy this.

      Combine that reality with the fact that it’s nice to be able to drive to the track without having to go through the hassle of dealing with a flatbed and tow vehicle, and I can definitely see the sense of offering this car as a roadgoing proposition. If you remove the splitter and raise the adjustable ride height, I can imagine this thing being as club-scene-compliant as many other cars that’ll never see a racetrack.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      ctg – your original comment nailed it.

      I like the normal Viper, as it can be driven in good weather in much the same spirit as a Vette or Porsche, with about the same utility of the Vette (pretty much a pure 2 seat sports car, but possible as a daily driver in good weather) and more hardcore Porsches.

      But this car is track toy, wholly unsuited or street use except for an occasional, carefully planned jaunt to special events.

      Given this, it’s barely more practical as a daily driver – even in perfect weather – than an Ariel Atom.

  • avatar
    Curt in WPG

    This is perfect for me as I have neither the money or the driving skill necessary for anything other than putting this car into the wall. But it would still be a most pleasurable 20 seconds.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Be still my heart.

  • avatar
    pbr

    So Jack, the words make it sound like rather more fun than the video looks like. Giving you the benefit of the doubt the car looks like a bit of a slithery (sorry) mess in a few spots. Guess if you had over-the-shoulder in-car footage, you’d have linked it? And on your dime, one of these or a used Radical?

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      There’s side-door footage that will be on my website tomorrow morning, if you have a further interest in seeing some.

      The overhead GoPro is never flattering, it looks like drone footage.

      This is more fun in some ways than a Radical. Insofar as you could occasionally use it on the street, this might be the way to go if you have SOME money but not ALL the money.

      • 0 avatar
        pbr

        Thanks, I will look for more vid over there. The overhead is interesting enough, was just hoping for in-car to gauge your effort vs. the car. I don’t know enough to judge from the overhead.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    So aside from jealousy and class warfare, why the assumption that ability to pay and ability to drive are negatively correlated? If anything, guys with big wallets are much more easily able to afford the track time and instruction with which to master the skill. Are some rich guys douchenozzles with lots of money and no skills? Sure. But there are plenty of assclown commoners as well, guys who are much better at driving a keyboard than a Viper. By and large, racing and HPDE is a uppermiddle class/rich man’s sport, I’d expect them as a group to be better than the guys spending 95% of their time wrenching on their Civics and only 5% learning to drive it.

    • 0 avatar
      Akaishi

      There’s a couple concepts that cross paths here, the first is “If you want to make a small fortune in car racing, start with a large fortune” – if you’ve got the skills and motivation for it you’ve probably blown your fortune already.

      The second is that your typical rich guy is 70 years old and has all the reflexes of 3 marshmallows.

      Correct or not? Doesn’t really matter does it?

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      In my experience, the people who have earned a significant of money in this country while still young enough to operate a Viper without annoyance tend to be very busy people who believe in themselves and are not subject to much self-reflection.

      Take someone without much spare time, give him a lot of confidence, and render him unlikely to take directions, and you have pretty much the recipe for a low-quality HPDE driver.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    S2k Chris,
    Class warfare? I see the leftwing PC warriors aren’t the only sensitive ones picking through every line of text to see if some offense can be wrought from it. Two small proportions of the population without perfect overlap equals an even smaller proportion of the whole.

    Being able to afford the cars & track time doesn’t mean a significant portion avail themselves of it. They’re all too busy playing golf and telling us you cannot be poor if you own a fridge and can’t possibly need your wages to keep pace with inflation if you can afford a Civic you spend 95% of your time wrenching on.

    Now you can get mad about a class warfare comment.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    I’m with those who say this is for Cars and Coffee. If you must race, buy a 2000 pound race car, a trailer and a pickup truck. You’d still have money left over for a Boxster or a Corvette.

    • 0 avatar
      qfrog

      Or corporate bragging rights because as a halo vehicle this is intended to give the less extreme variants of the viper some track cred by association. Then by even more degrees of separation a proportionately smaller dollop of street cred is appreciated by each and every one of the other dodge vehicles. That proportion may or may not actually be expressible numerically for some of the more boring products with appearance packages struggling desperately to hide their glaring mediocrity behind a graphene thin veil of marketing BS.

    • 0 avatar
      baconator

      I definitely see Vipers at track days. The coupes & ACRs, particularly the 2nd-gen models, perform very credibly.

      It’s difficult and time-consuming to build a good track car from a street car, even if you’re starting with a good $20k street car and have a $100k budget. It could take a whole year of weekends to get the aero package right if you’re doing it yourself, for example; I’ve seen 911 racers do exactly this. To me, the appeal of buying a track car from the factory is that all the go-fast parts are properly dialed-in to work well together. Saves all that pesky development time.

      But yeah, I’d never ever drive this on the street if I owned one.

      • 0 avatar
        Veee8

        “It could take a whole year of weekends to get the aero package right if you’re doing it yourself, for example”
        Reminds me of Jack’s other article on Trackday Diaries: Civic Lessons. Where owners spend endless time, passion and resources on their cars yet their driver skill is left to wane…

  • avatar
    Geekcarlover

    And thanks to the group that can afford to drop 6 or 7 didgets into a supercar and don’t have the proper training or skills, we have hundreds of YouTube videos.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Great article. I get the picture. Since Road & Track and Car & Driver have the same owner these days, you should push for C/D to test this model Viper on their VIR track test days.

    As you say, 2:59 is probably way off what this beast can do when unfettered by the concern of anxious manufacturer’s reps, because many cars have gone faster than that in C/D’s hands. And you have let us know that most of their test drivers cannot drive properly anyway!

    At $117K this thing is cheap for what you get, it seems to me, all infantile drivel above to the contrary.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    Re the venn, ok so they’re not supposed to be proportional, but the circle of “can afford the ACR” is do much bigger than “can make effective use if ACR” that one can’t fit on your screen when the other gets a pixel. The thing exists to get times in the hands of the small circle that will lead the big circle to buy lots of these and the other Vipers based on the bragging rights someone else earned.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    nice article. I’d be curious to see one of these next to a destickered LM GTE or GT3 spec Viper and see if one can tell the difference. Bravo Dodge.

    Oh, and technically, it’s a 747-8, not 800. Boeing dropped to single digits for their individual models starting with the 787 (-8, -9, -10), 777X (777-8 and -9), as well as the 737Max (-7,-8, -9). Eiither the current generation 777F (a -200LR) or 767F (a -300ER) will end up being the last Boeing made with a century series model number, a tradition that began with the 707-100. Personally, I don’t like it. If your heart is set on the century series, you can still use customer codes, so a 747-8 that is bought by Lufthansa is a 747-830.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I’d be perfectly happy with a plain old ordinary Viper. I’ve come to the point where I have more lust for a plain old Viper from 1992 to 2016 than an ordinary Vette from 1992 to 2016.

  • avatar
    Allec

    a GTS trim with the ACR CF applique = to a winner combo for me ;)

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