By on May 9, 2015

 

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Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Vitesse, $2.4 million

It’s impossible to visit Manhattan without noticing wealth and privilege. Though I’m loathe to use the P word as it’s been corrupted by politics, how else can you describe someone driving a S Class Mercedes-Benz with “MD” New York license plates other than as affluent and expecting special treatment from parking enforcement that won’t be extended to some zhlub from Jersey in a Camry?

New York City generates so much wealth that the people there can afford the opportunity and real costs involved with insane traffic, general congenstion and expensive infrastructure. I guess it shouldn’t be surprising, then, that the New York International Auto Show is where car companies go to show off their goods from the top shelf.

 

Aston Martin Vulcan

Aston Martin Vulcan

Detroit may not be the center of the universe that NYC is, but the North American International Auto Show in Detroit is a huge event with the participation of a number of the largest corporations on the planet. Some of the displays cost millions of dollars to build. The Chicago Auto Show is, by some measures, even larger than the Detroit show. And while the Detroit show is more about new product and concept reveals, the Chicago show is about selling cars. While they sell a few cars in America’s second city, car enthusiasts living outside the NYC metropolitan area have a tendency to regard that region as hostile to automobiles, but the fact is the metro region is one of the biggest car markets in the world. Combine that fact with the area’s wealth and you end up with a car show that has, literally, tons of high end cars.

 

Koenigsegg Agera HH

Koenigsegg Agera HH

There was a time, before the auto industry’s existential crisis of 2007-2009, that just about every car manufacturer of note in the world had a presence at the Detroit show, including the ultra-luxury and exotic automakers. Ferrari used the Detroit show to introduce the 612 Scaglietti, Rolls Royce had press conferences at the Detroit show, and VW’s Lamborghini brand and Aston Martin, then owned by Ford, also had displays. Those brands haven’t had official stands at the NAIAS in years, nor have they had corporate presence at the Chicago show. Since Fiat was given Chrysler in the government bailout in 2009, you might have occasionally seen a Ferrari on the FCA stand, but lately Sergio’s outfit has been promoting Alfa Romeo and Maserati, so both of those brands had some cars at the big midwest shows this year, but nary a prancing horse could be seen at Cobo Hall or McCormick Place.

 

Maserati's stand at the New York Auto Show

Maserati’s stand at the New York Auto Show

However, the Maserati displays at the Detroit and Chicago shows this year were just small sections of the larger FCA stand. At the New York show, they had their complete North American lineup. The Maserati display was larger than those of BMW, Lexus and Mercedes-Benz, and about the same square footage as FCA’s Dodge and Chrysler brands had. Maserati does sell cars in New York – I saw one on the West Side Highway near Canal Street and the Holland Tunnel, though I’d say the most common luxury car that I saw in Manhattan was the S Class Merc.

 

Lamborghini Aventador

Lamborghini Aventador, just $400K

Aston Martin not only had their full line out for inspection, they had their limited edition Vulcan track car front and center in their display; not quite the ideal car for Manhattan. Rolls-Royce, which hasn’t had an official display at the Detroit or Chicago show in years, had their full lineup in New York, as did their former stablemate Bentley.

 

Lamborghini Huracan

Lamborghini Huracan

It wasn’t just high end automakers, either. While in the long run the introduction of the new Chevy Malibu – hundreds of pounds lighter than the outgoing model while being larger and with more interior space – may prove to be the most significant new product reveal at the NYIAS, it was the introduction of two American luxury flagships, the production Cadillac CT6 and the concept version of the next Lincoln Continental, that seemed to have gotten the bulk of the attention. Besides the big Mercedes sedans, I also noticed more than a few slightly older, big Cadillacs, like 10-15 year old Devilles and STSes. They were privately owned, not livery cars, so maybe there’s a market for the CT6 in Manhattan.

 

McLaren 650S Spider

McLaren 650S Spider

Another mainstream luxury car maker, Jaguar Land Rover, used the New York show to introduce the Range Rover SVAutobiography, which has $120,000 worth of luxury and “bespoke” kit added to the $80,000 base Range Rover. Jaguar executive board member and director of design, Gerry McGovern, alluded to the maximum Range Rover as being at home in New York’s affluent Hamptons, and closed his description of the SVAutobiography with, “And, it’s very expensive.”

 

Range Rover VeryExpensive SVAutobiography

Range Rover VeryExpensive SVAutobiography

As Jaguar Land Rover and America’s two luxury brands introduced models at the top of their lineup, McLaren used the New York show to bring their carbon fiber based supercars down to a new price point, going after the Porsche 911 market with the McLaren 570S. Like Aston Martin and Maserati, the McLaren display featured examples of all of their current models, the new 570S, the 650S Spider, a 675LT, and the GTR dedicated track version of the top of the line hybrid hypercar McLaren P1. I don’t know a single car enthusiast that doesn’t regard the McLaren enterprise with respect, so all of those remarkable sports cars would have drawn me in, but for the occasion McLaren brought out a truly legendary automobile, a Gordon Murray designed F1. Not just any F1, but one of the three F1 GT “longtail” cars built by the factory to homologate bodywork used in the 1997 FIA GT Championship.

 

The new McLaren 570S

The new McLaren 570S, note the kiwi shaped cove in the door. McLaren’s logo is a stylized kiwi. Bruce McLaren was from New Zealand.

Jalopnik’s Raphael Orlove was photographing the F1 longtail while I was at the McLaren display and he concurred when I said that I could spend the whole day at their stand.

 

The 570S from the rear

The 570S from the rear

If you go to as many corporate auto shows and enthusiast car shows as I do, you can get a little jaded. I generally don’t take photographs of 1957 Chevy’s, ’69 Camaros or perfectly restored Isetta microcars. It was hard to feel jaded near the McLaren display, and not just because of their own cars. Right next to the McLaren stand was a display from Brian Miller’s Manhattan Motorcars, which has franchises for Porsche, Rolls-Royce, Bentley, Lamborghini, Koenigsegg, Bugatti, and Lotus. Porsche, R-R, and Bentley, as mentioned, had their own displays, so Miller brought out some exotics.

 

McLaren 575LT

McLaren 575LT

Maybe it was because their fellow Italians at Ferrari skipped the NYC show, but Lamborghini didn’t have an official display, so Manhattan Motorcars had a red Aventador and a metallic orange Huracan. The two Lambos are not common cars, but they were flanking an even rarer car, a Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Vitesse. The 1,200 HP Bugatti is the fastest production roadster ever made.

 

McLaren's dedicated track P1, the P1 GTR

McLaren’s $3.1 million dedicated track P1, the P1 GTR

Even rarer than modern day Bugattis, though, are cars from Koenigsegg. Christian Koenigsegg, the mad genius from Sweden, has built just over 100 cars since he started building hypercars about a dozen years ago. The Koenigsegg Agera HH on display at the NY show is as rare as they come, a one-off Agera R customized by the factory for David Heinemeir Hanson, a Danish computer programmer who was responsible for Ruby on Rails, a web application development framework that has made him a very wealthy man. The car is painted in his favorite color scheme of blue and black, to match his one off Pagani Zonda HH.

 

FActory owned McLaren F1 XP GT "longtail" homologation prototype.

FActory owned McLaren F1 XP GT “longtail” homologation prototype.

I’ve been to lots of auto shows including one of the top three concours in the U.S. and I don’t think I’ve ever seen as concentrated automotive wealth as sat on the McLaren and Manhattan Motorcars stands (with the possible exception of the classic luxury car section of the Henry Ford Museum with its Bugatti Royale and Duesenberg J). I was only able to get retail prices on nine of the ten cars at those two displays. Not counting the McLaren F1 Longtail, there was about $9 million in cars. If you include the F1 you could at least double that figure. In 2012, one of the 10 competition F1 Longtails that were built for racing sold for over $13 million. No doubt the factory owned prototype would fetch similar or even more money, perhaps even enough to buy a nice Manhattan condominium.

Photography by Ronnie Schreiber. For more photos of the vehicles in this post, please go to Cars In Depth.

Ronnie Schreiber edits Cars In Depth, a realistic perspective on cars & car culture and the original 3D car site. If you found this post worthwhile, you can get a parallax view at Cars In Depth. If the 3D thing freaks you out, don’t worry, all the photo and video players in use at the site have mono options. Thanks for reading – RJS

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86 Comments on “Motorcars, Manhattan and Money...”


  • avatar
    Felis Concolor

    NYIAS: no expense was spared to ensure attendees no expense was spared.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    Nice cars for the 1%.

    • 0 avatar

      Few of these cars live in NYC. With the froth of the stock market and stock brokers (they’ve moved all the back office and support staff to New Jersey or further) you see every morning Germany, Italy and England’s finest sitting in traffic, dodging potholes, and filling the engine with carbon deposits.

      For you outsiders, this is only Manhattan….the rest of NYC has mostly normal cars, with a preponderance of CUV, which is the most practical choice for a hostile environment with low speeds and massive potholes.

      The real exotics live in the house in the Hamptons, or upstate in Dutchess County. NYC roads are too crappy for the 385/15/20 tires on these cars, and driveways and speed bumps can be fatal.

      The workaday cars are either street parked cars, which justly look as if they’d been through the wars, or garage kept cars, new BMW 5, Mercedes, or Maserati, which have a $500 per month garage bill.

      The NYC burbs (Bergen, Nassau, Westchester) are a very unusual place for car spotting, and my brother and I used to see every single new car in Fort Lee, NJ before the car magazines wrote about them. In some towns, Tesla is a common car. If that is the baseline, then, yes, you need to go exotic. With QE and the flow of free money to stock gamblers at the highest end, these toys are going to find willing buyers.

      Great article. It can’t all be 90 months on a base Camry depress-0-fests.

      • 0 avatar
        SatelliteView

        Allow me to drive a very mundane point thorough your, and your think alikes’s head.

        There is no need to be defensive about these cars. Man up. The average price of a new car in USA is about $32.5k only 1% of all people on earth can afford to drive $32.5k new car.

        In a sense, most Americans to the rest of the world, is what people who can afford these cars to the rest of Americans.

    • 0 avatar
      Landcrusher

      Nice hate remark. The 1% can’t really afford these, but keep it up and maybe your fellow travelers will be able to sell some more policy changes to increase income disparity while punishing success and keeping people from bothering to try to create better things.

      Do you even think about the people who earn their livings making these cars when you spew out that bile, or are you so stupid as to not realize what you are doing? I, and many people I worked with, who used to make a living making and selling prop planes for regular people lost our jobs when you idiots went after the corporate guys and their jets. The jets are still selling just fine, btw.

      So, go ahead and go after Ferrari and watch them keep coming as the guys in Bowling Green lose their jobs and sports car manufacturing gets sold off to the Chinese. Or, if you really care about people who work for a living, sit down, shut up, and let people do their jobs. Some guys get well paid to assemble those engines, and he would rather keep that job than be on the dole or become a nameless cog on an assembly line making something you and yours don’t yet find objectionable Between meetings to get filled with your dogma.

      • 0 avatar
        jjster6

        I couldn’t agree with you more. The pinky commies have newspeak now days. “Death to the rich” has been replaced with “income disparity.” In their world all work has equal value and very person should be guaranteed an equal outcome. The arguments of a weak mind.

        • 0 avatar
          bunkie

          The founder of the hedge fund where I recently worked, reacting the idea that his $450 million in annual income should be taxed at regular (rather than 15% rates), compared it to the invasion of Poland by Nazi Germany. Take from that what you will.

          • 0 avatar
            Landcrusher

            The rhetoric is always about your putz there, but when the legislation gets done, the cost is borne by the guy selling people on Vanguard funds or his customers. Mr. Putz may lose a point or two, but he won’t care because the new rules will make it much harder for anyone to become a competitor or otherwise secure his place.

            There is always a legislative or regulatory bait and switch.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Um…….. if it isn’t the top 1% buying these cars then who is?

        Nice cars for the 1%.

        No hate in that.

        The only hate I see in this thread is ideologically based on the so called right. I never could understand how the low end of the right vehemently defends the high end since both ends will never meet. The high end goes out of its way to keep itself away from the low end…… unless you are mowing their lawns.

        Must be because of the fantasy/delusion of freedom for the opportunity of prosperity and success, and an upward social mobility achieved through hard work in a society with few barriers.

        And one wonders why there is so much gun crime ;)

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Time to break out the popcorn ;)

          • 0 avatar
            Wayne

            and watch John Oliver episode on income gap: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfgSEwjAeno

        • 0 avatar
          Landcrusher

          Lou,
          What’s the point in saying it at all if its not hate? The term 1% is now a term used exclusively to make class warfare points. That’s hate. It’s extra hate because, as you did here, it’s used to engender hatred for the 1% by pointing to the lifestyles of a fraction of the 1%, insinuating that it’s unfair, and that it’s bound to be due to a rigged game.

          Most of the 1% are hard working folks who have been successful in their careers. They don’t look much like the super rich demographically. A portion of the super rich may have played some unfair tricks to get there, but there is no correlation with ideology in that crowd. I’ll bet they lean big government liberal rather than conservative. Do you really want to compare the Kochs to Soros? I don’t think so.

          As for the split between the wealthy and not so wealthy right, it’s not nearly as suspicious as that on the left. I’ll stick with the team that wants equal opportunity rather that which promotes policies designed for equal outcomes which only really preserve the power of those on top.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Landcrusher – thanks for the clarification. This blog format does lend itself to confusion as to who is talking to who.

            I try to understand the various players on both sides of the fence. I’m not going to develop an appreciation for who you are and where you are coming from if I arrogantly assume your views are not worthy of my time. I’ve been accused of being spineless by one of the bloggers because of that.

          • 0 avatar
            tedward

            Correction then I’m backing out of this one. The top 10 – 15% works their butts off and sometimes buys a toy or two. The 1% is mostly inherited wealth entirely managed and preserved by the other group. I don’t have a problem with either existing but categorize them properly. The 10%ers in metro ny suburbs do tend to swing liberal and there are a lot of rags to riches stories there. The 1% are insulated personally from any personal consequence of government policy change and that’s where all the single source mega Pac donations come from. That insulation is what causes so much angst.

            When the 10% are riled up politically, that’s when landslide political victories happen.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          Perhaps they (or, rather, we) defend the high end because we realize what it took to get there (hard work, long hours, innovation and determination), and aspire to get there ourselves. We dont hate the rich because we are working towards that goal ourselves, and make no appologies for it.

          Unlike you, we dont plan to get there by unfairly taking from those already there. Thats not how it works, or at least it shouldnt be. You attain that status by carving out your own niche, by being innovative and creative, by taking an idea in your head and working at it until it becomes a reality. If all goes well, you take others along for the ride by hiring employees, building factories or retail stores, and everyone benifits. Does the guy on the factory floor hired as an entry level wigit maker benifit exactly as much as the guy in the office who started the company? No, and thats where we disagree. That factory worker does benifit by having a job to support himself and/or his family. If he wants to be rich like the guys in the office running the operation, its up to HIM to get there. Noone need hold his hand and kick down the barriers for him. Take night classes. Take on more responsibility at work. Show up everyday on time and sober, ready to do the best he can, not as little as he can get away with. Show the management he has what it takes, and he’ll move up. Some unemployed guy with no prospects can take his place on the assembly line and the cycle begins again.

          We are not bitter because we are not rich, and therefor we dont view the rich as evil undeserving rats. We view them as job creators and as someone who has achived what we ourselves strive for.

          Are there bad rich people? Yes. There are people who got there via underhanded means, by scamming people, lying, cheating, stealing and so forth. Does that mean you automaticly become evil when your bank account reaches a certain level? No. The majority got there honestly, and deserve recognition for doing so.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Landcrusher,
            “Unlike you, we dont plan to get there by unfairly taking from those already there.”

            So, it is fairer and easier to take from people with less?

            I do think if we look at the 1% they don’t pay their way as those who sit lower in the income scale. This is coming from a person who leans to the right in most issues.

            The 1% have gotten to where they are with not just hard work, but also, hard protection of their position.

            Many perform hard work, but also most who work hard do not use their money to best advantage themselves.

            It’s funny how aspiration and how to chase these aspirations can form some deluded views.

            The reality is you don’t become rich by being nice and sincere with integrity.

            Perception is different than reality.

            This comment supports my view of having a livable minimum wage.

            All below your type will prosper.

            Why are you scared of that?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Landcrusher – like I first said “Nice cars for the 1%.”

            If you or anyone else want to take that on as a hateful statement then that is your choice.

            I don’t begrudge anyone working to be a success but unfortunately the American Dream had come to mean “ultra” as in ultra-rich or ultra-famous et al as the benchmark of success. A McMansion and some uber-cars all on credit play into that new ideal.

            I’m not for the redistribution of wealth by raping the rich. I do see the inequalities and there needs to be a narrowing of the gap or the rich will be stripped of their wealth by the have-nots. Revolution isn’t an entirely new form of redistribution.

            I don’t pigeon hole myself into right wing, left wing or even centrist doctrine. I look at what works and what doesn’t.

            Deadweight had some very interesting comments. The current system doesn’t work for those who are not middle to upper class. The system for the most part is unsustainable and any real growth we’ve seen in the past several decades has come from borrowed money.

            You can’t fix any of it with left wing or right wing entrenchment and the ideal/belief that the other side is full of extreme nutjobs or lazy parasites.

            Your battles with Pch101 are a prime example.

          • 0 avatar
            Landcrusher

            You mixed up posters, Lou. No harm though.

            The problem I see with your position is that you just don’t have the percentages right. Not that many people are wealthy due to government protections that others didn’t have. Some are, but that’s a reason to stop unfair government meddling, not try to mandate outcomes.

            If I believed a live able wage law would work for everyone I would be for it. It won’t. It will hurt most those who are earning the least today. Make the law 15 and a good chunk of those making under ten are going to get hurt, BADLY. The minimum wage is always zero.

            If you want to mandate transfers then mandate companies give workers accurate info on who got promoted how, why, and when. Mandate the books be open enough that workers can really see their value before negotiating. Mandate compliance costs be totally tax deductible to allow new companies to compete.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Landcrusher – thanks for the clarification. This blog format does lend itself to confusion as to who is talking to who.

            I try to understand the various players on both sides of the fence. I’m not going to develop an appreciation for who you are and where you are coming from if I arrogantly assume your views are not worthy of my time. I’ve been accused of being spineless by one of the bloggers because of that.

          • 0 avatar
            Landcrusher

            Lou, big al, tedward,

            First, I mixed up posters as well. Sorry.

            Next, I can’t respond to anyone’s intent, only their words and what that intentions that implies. I’ll be glad to compare hate speech between different camps. Just one thing though, if a camp likes to depend on terms like dog whistle or to take words in common use and all of a sudden make them racially charged (ie thug) then I’m not going to give slack on their buzzwords (ie 1%). I’m also no fan of ridiculous equivocation. Recent example being a comparison between ISIS and the Mohammed cartoon contest groups who are supposedly both hate groups. Sorry, No comparison.

            If you have any real interest on the reality behind income groups, then you need to read some of the conservative and libertarian leaning sources for some balance. Many of them blow HUGE holes in the common wisdom. The reality is that people in the U.S. are actually going to change percentiles greatly during their lives. Most wealthy did not just inherit, and most trust fund recipients fall down the ladder. The common mistake made in the interpretations by the left are to treat the groups as static when they are not. We also get bad anecdotal inputs because we rarely learn of the loser’s origins and always suspect the winners had advantages.

            Some on the left are now looking at wealth instead of income. Not sure if this is a good thing or not. I just don’t care about dollars. I care about power. The correlation of wealth and power is not that absolute and it’s a lot harder to turn wealth into power than the converse. That’s the only thing we really need to watch for.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Landcrusher,
            First, I don’t know where this will end up in this part of the thread.

            You are correct, the left does tend to confuse wealth vs income.

            I’m no where’s near to being a 1%’er, but my wealth would put me into the top 10%. My income isn’t in the top 10%. I have invested my time and money to create this wealth. So, I do in some ways sympathise with your plight.

            But, I do believe on retirement, wealth should be used to scale what a person is entitled to for handouts, ie, social security, medical, etc.

            I do know that the US and Australians have many tax breaks in which wealth can be written off against income. I do believe this should cease.

            I’d bet many of these expensive luxo barges are used as tax write offs as is many other things like eating out, company furnished frills, etc. These are the areas that need to be addressed.

            I’m involved in real estate and I can my rental money is used as income, not business and any expense incurred for the management/maintenance of my properties is written off against my tax. It’s called negative gearing. We use this as a form of tax minimization. But, it has aided in the inflation of real estate prices in Australia (amongst other instruments and red tape (environmental)).

            Many people complain about this, but the home they are living in is being bought by a person with a similar income to them.

            So, I do believe there is room to maintain investment, whilst keeping the consumer economy.

            This is where we are failing. We need to keep consumerism alive along with investment.

            At the moment consumers are spending, but not enough is being invested by business, ie, the wealthy.

            I just bought another property. So, I’m doing my bit.

            What must be addressed is how the wealth is converted to wealth.

            Unfortunately we need income to create wealth. If a person’s income isn’t high enough they don’t have enough income for wealth creation, ie, purchase a home, buy into investments, etc.

            That’s why I support a higher and livable minimum wage. This will allow the expansion of the middle class, who will use more money for wealth creation.

          • 0 avatar
            Landcrusher

            Big Al,
            I just don’t worry about consumerism at all. I think the whole living wage thing is a lie, built on a myth, and will have many more poor victims than wealthy ones.

            Complex tax codes are also a trap. One of the things that was used to kill aircraft sales was changing the tax codes for business aircraft. Owner flown planes, mostly piston, got the shaft because the percentage of hours needed to keep the pilot trained got limited by taxes below what’s required by the FAA. Break the threshold and they disallow deductions. Meanwhile, the targeted jets can always write off training because they are very rarely owner flown. So you either had to lie about training flights or hire a pilot for your little plane? Nice.

            The other trap was bonus depreciation. It’s crack for manufacturers who then over supply the market. It’s a trap for businesses who then get clobbered when the market for the used plane is destroyed.

        • 0 avatar
          jim brewer

          Uuhhhhh…..you guys do realize that the top 1% is only a little more than $200k right?

          These cars are way out of reach of the “1%”

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @jim brewer,
            So, if the wealthy 1% aren’t buying these vehicles, who are?

            I know! The police in Dubai, Abu Dhabi, the UAE.

          • 0 avatar
            Landcrusher

            Jim,
            Not so. Nationally I believe it’s 380. A few states have a 1% around 250.

        • 0 avatar

          I fail to see how it’s a hate term.It’s a economics term that became popular with the left and populist movements nothing more.

          • 0 avatar
            Landcrusher

            It’s political, not economic, and the origins are in class warfare where the one percent play virtually the same part as the Jews in traditional European schemes to use hate to further a cause or gain power.

      • 0 avatar
        VW16v

        1% cannot afford these cars???

        • 0 avatar
          Landcrusher

          If you have been in the 1% for years, then yes, but now you are most likely in the top .1%.

          Folks who can really afford these cars are super rich. The top .01%

          The 1% pay about 25 to 28% federal income tax, sometimes much more.

          The top .1% pay less, and some of the top .01% pay much less. The real middle class pays 15 to 20% effective tax rate like the super earners.

          Those paying less who aren’t fat cats are really lower middle class or poor based on income. Some of them just can’t produce much, but many are under performing. No system ever invented can separate the two groups so subsidizing the low earners easily leads to subsidizing lack of production and bad choices.

          The big debate is not over who cares, it’s about how to best manage the issue. One side has to depend on calling names and bad science for some reason, even though they often actually have a few good ideas.

          • 0 avatar

            I wouldnt say many are under producing. American productivity has seen huge gains with no wage growth. This mean there are some other barriers to increasing wages other than working hard.

      • 0 avatar
        Synchromesh

        I’m sorry, you’re upset that people started using ancient propeller-driven airplanes less and started converting to jets? Are you serious?

        The guys in Bowling Green had it coming too. GM is infamous for making even good ideas into awful executions so who’s fault is it that the upper GM management are greedy morons? Blame them, not everybody else.

        • 0 avatar
          Landcrusher

          You don’t understand. I sold new aircraft starting at $120,000. You could finance them for 10 years and expect them to still be in great shape and over 60% of original value at ten years out to thirty years.

          My customers did not start using jets except a few who were planning to move up to a jet all along. They stopped flying themselves around for business or pleasure, raised their prices to compensate, or bought less safe and reliable planes that are much older to keep flying.

          This was not creative destruction at all. It was government abuse killing jobs that were not replaced. Some of the jobs are now back, but everyone except Cessna is now foreign owned and Cessna has offshored some work. The jets will follow as the skills learned from the smaller craft transfer.

          Its like they decided to attack Hummer through legislation, killed the hiking boot market instead, and you came on and joked about people not wanting boots.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Landcrusher,
            What is the cost of maintenance on aircraft?

            Poor example. A $120k vehicle if maintenance of the life of the vehicle is taken into consideration would be cheaper, even with the added depreciation.

          • 0 avatar
            Landcrusher

            Planes do cost a lot to maintain.

            It depends on the plane. You have what’s called engine reserve which is the per hour cost towards the rebuild. My engine costs 35 to 45 to rebuild/replace and has a TBO of 2,000 hours. Not sure how much of that cost is liability and compliance. Your annual inspections run 2 to 3k and you can expect about 20 dollars per hour. Most private planes are used 25 to 50 hours per year per owner (partnerships are common).

            Owning costs more than renting, but its not easy to rent a nice plane for travel and make it worth the savings. If you like 172s, owning becomes silly unless you like to work on your own plane or rent it out. I got into ownership because you couldn’t rent a plane like I wanted and thought it would rent out well. It didn’t because the Cessna mafia has been lying about the safety of their aircraft for decades and bad mouth any close competitor ruthlessly. It’s a messed up business.

      • 0 avatar
        SatelliteView

        Everything is correct, except that jobs, first and foremost, go to China because quality is the same for less.

        The guys who lost their jobs should learn new skills. The company does not exist to provide jobs, the company exists to make profit. A job is not an entitlement – get off your ass and learn to adapt

        • 0 avatar
          RideHeight

          “get off your ass and learn to adapt”

          Yeah, I’ve done that and it’s easy to pontificate if one has, but most people will upon their initial successes enburden themselves with children and overspending so they are utterly incapable of boot-strapping once they hit their mid-30’s.

          And retraining is financially disastrous (student debt) if the jobs you’re retraining for have also disappeared in the interim. One must be monk-like in asceticism and focus to bring off such an effort so it’s clearly beyond the reach on 95% of affected workers.

          If you can’t make the metamorphosis to super-rich your life will still be negatively impacted by the social overburden of the New Economy so don’t get too smug. Unless, of course, you can afford to.

          • 0 avatar
            SatelliteView

            RideHeight,

            You’re correct about inability of most people to boot-strap. This is the problem. If several will go over-board, and it will be understood that such mentality is a dead-end, there will be change. No pain, no gain.

            Regarding student debt. Plenty of federal and state help available to make attending a university almost free. I got my diplomas mostly on federal and state government’s dime, despite earning middle-class income

        • 0 avatar
          Landcrusher

          Satellite,
          Its not just some of the jobs going away for cheap labor which hasn’t been nearly the issue you would expect. For instance, your Garmin devices are built over there, but the avionics are still built here due to the need for quality.

          It’s the companies themselves being shut down and sold off because their business was destroyed by hate and class warfare. Yes, if you lose your job get another, blah, blah, blah.

          That has nothing to do with this discussion. This is about a quarter of the population deciding one day they don’t like a business and killing it. When they come for you, maybe you will get it? Tell me what you do and I can maybe keep you up nights.

          I suppose no one cares for a Vegas casino owner losing a few million over a President smarting off, but we all care for his laid off employees.

          Now imagine the hate speech was followed up with changes in the tax code specifically killing business trips to your town because there is a casino nearby while the Vegas guys get off with some compliance hassles.

          That’s the game.

          • 0 avatar
            SatelliteView

            If I may ask, what businesses have been destroyed by the “hate and class warfare”? Business environment in USA is the best in world (I don’t count city-states). If a particular state in not competitive in terms of its policies, there are plenty of others to move one’s business to. Many business wave good bye to California. This is normal.
            Smaller business’s are threated very well everywhere. And as far as I’m aware, there is no class warfare on small/er business anywhere, even in California.

            I do ecommerce. It ain’t going anywhere. Thanks to open trade the affordability y of various products will remain.

          • 0 avatar
            Landcrusher

            Satellite,
            I used to work in hardware and software so I can fairly say you have little idea what’s going on in the rest of the economy. We liked to think we were making so much because we were innovating so much, but the reality has been that the Internet and most tech just don’t suffer the amount of regulation and liability issues the rest do. That being said, I can easily see regulation cutting into that world.
            Remember the President’s attacks on Las Vegas and the hit they took? How much pain has there been over Keystone and the war on Coal? Do you know how many local window manufacturers were destroyed by mandates not for efficiency, but for preference for certain types of manufacture? All in the name of being green, your windows now may be shipped from across the country unless your local guys recovered. Many are back now. I have told you about piston GA. There was the yacht business in the eighties. They have been after the gun guys for a while.
            I could go on. Wannabe Wal Mart?
            ECommerce is so wide a term as to be meaningless, but the buy local crowd is alive and well on the left already. I can see them talking down sales, boycotting targeted businesses, and calling for taxes. How about we make software manufacturers more legally liable? How long before everyone smaller than Oracle is out of the game? Are you regulated as a bank? Maybe you ought to have to be a banker or broker to do your job. You likely think you are fairly paid for value added to the economy. Well, the idiots can disagree tomorrow, and being right ain’t gonna help you, buddy.

  • avatar

    I’d have a hard time getting too worked up over a doctor in an S-class – sure, doctors are paid well, but the good ones do provide a pretty useful service, and they do spend quite a bit of time and money becoming doctors. And while an S-class is expensive compared to a Camry, it’s not exactly in supercar territory.

    For the Maserati and Range Rover, I think part of it is that the top-of-the-line cars are halo cars – sure, very few people will buy a $200k RR Autobiography, but it might make them think better of the brand and maybe look at a $50k Evoque or whatever the replacement for the LR2 is. Maserati’s super bowl ad last year suggests it wants to position the Ghibli as a mainstream luxury car, priced competitively with a well-equipped BMW 5-series. Which, again, is expensive, but not “also own a mansion and a helicopter” expensive.

    • 0 avatar

      It wasn’t so much the S Class as the license plate. Privilege in NYC isn’t just about having money – it’s about avoiding some of the unpleasant aspects of the big city. My nephew is an EMT and he keeps an EMT placard on the dashboard of his personal car. He told me that he tries not to abuse it but that it has saved him a parking ticket or two.

      FWIW, I’m not thrilled about California’s commuter lanes and special privileges for folks driving EVs or hybrids.

      Do any other states besides NY and NJ give out special plates for doctors? Around here doctors expect to park like everyone else.

      • 0 avatar

        Privilege in NYC:

        #1 having an NYPD placard

        #2 having a HANDICAPPED PASS

        #3 having PBA cards – or being the child/spouse or parent of an NYPD officer.

        #4 having lots and lots of MONEY.

        Everyone who can’t handle it can move to Atlanta, but I’ve been here 33 years and the only way I’m leaving is FEET FIRST.

        NYC till I D.I.E.

      • 0 avatar
        tedward

        Ronnie
        Doctors need the plates in N.Y. There just isn’t any parking and if they are expected to be able to respond to work calls they need the plates to identify why they are in the restricted areas around every hospital. Every school, firehouse and police station has a similar arrangement. The teachers don’t get credentials that let them cross parade routes like the others but they need parking too as they can be tasked with being in some random school away from public transport on short notice.

        The plate is just a response to their lack of official badging in other words.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      “I’d have a hard time getting too worked up over a doctor in an S-class – sure, doctors are paid well, but the good ones do provide a pretty useful service, and they do spend quite a bit of time and money becoming doctors. And while an S-class is expensive compared to a Camry, it’s not exactly in supercar territory.”

      Doctors, even highly paid, specialized ones, nor attorneys, even highly paid, specialized ones, aren’t a sign of the incredible wealth inequality gripping the globe (again).

      Rather, extreme upper wealth is concentrated in finance (“Top 25 hedge fund managers now average $400 million each”: http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-hedge-fund-pay-20150505-story.html ).

      That’s 10 billion in annual compensation being paid to 25 individuals, for those keeping track at home, or stated alternatively, enough annual money to pay 118,000 people a salary of $85,000.00, which is roughly the amount needed to live a middle class lifestyle in most parts of the nation today.

      I’m not making any moral judgment, by the way; just relaying some basic income math.

      It’s up to individuals to decide whether this system that’s been constructed is sustainable over the long term, whether it makes economic and/or moral sense, etc.

      • 0 avatar
        Astigmatism

        This, precisely. Much is made about “the 1%,” but the real unbalancing of the income and wealth curves has been among the 0.01% or so.

        A pretty good hint as to whether the market truly rewards performance and hard work, or simply makes power more powerful and wealth wealthier, is that 12 of the 25 hedge funds in DeadWeight’s stat (the ones whose managers banked $400m per) posted returns last year that were lower than the S&P 500, and each one of them _still_ earned more individually than every doctor in any given hospital system, or several hundred partners at a major corporate law firm, put together.

      • 0 avatar
        SatelliteView

        Well, if it’s bullshit and all for nothing, let’s, you and i, become #26 and earn or $400 mil? It can’t be hard, can it?

        • 0 avatar
          Astigmatism

          The question isn’t whether it’s hard, the question is whether the market is actually rewarding what it should (performance and added value) rather than bullshit, as you put it, or chance, or politics, or any number of other things. Plenty of things are difficult, lucrative, and yet not particularly valuable to society – winning the lottery, for example, or bank robbery.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      madanthony – if you factor in how long it takes to become a Doctor especially a specialist, I do not begrudge them their incomes.

  • avatar

    I was in Dubai a few weeks ago. I was walking to the Chrysler dealership to see about whether they’d gotten Hellcats in UAE and suddenly a Black Bugatti Veyron Super Sport passed me – following a McLaren Mp412c.

    Since the thing on the internet is “video or it didn’t happen”…

    I actually have a video of it.

    As for MANHATTAN MOTORCARS… I made yet another video with BRIAN COOLEY of CNET there doing a photoshoot of the rolls Royce Drophead coupe.

    (Yeah – I have video of that too).

  • avatar

    The Bugatti Veyron Super Sport is the fastest, most powerful, street-legal PRODUCTION CAR in the world.

    Koenigmnessegesegs whatevers are just tuner car tuned to be fast, but they’ll never hold up – nor take the Bugatti’s record.

    Same goes for the Hennessey Venom Lotus Exige.

  • avatar
    Joss

    The irony of it all. How a classless society seems yearning. How so much money seeking will become worth so little.

    Then there’s Paris the heart of the revolution where poor wheels are banned.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Joss,
      I’ll let you know in a month if what you state is true. The “wheels” in Paris from what I’ve read are “newish wheels”. This is a good idea in many large cities.

      EU cities are quite different from what we have in Canada, US, NZ and Australia. There just isn’t the infrastructure to operate the kinds of vehicles we operate.

      Also, read up on the “French Revolution” and Napoleanic Laws. They differ from what the “Anglo” world does. I looked at real estate in France. They have some very unusual laws.

      “Viva la Francois”, most beautiful country to visit, with great food.

      But, life is more of a struggle for the worker. Many aim to be civil servants, not as entrepreneurs and business owners.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    When in the US I don’t see as many of these exotics as I do in Australia on the road.

    In NYC I didn’t see one over the couple of days I was there.

    NYC isn’t the best environment for the super or mega cars, even the one percenter’s would realize this and keep their toys in the garage for weekends.

    They are beautiful vehicles, but what is the average transaction price the one percenter’ pay for their vehicles. I’d bet it isn’t as high as many would think.

    For these people, transportation is just that, transport. They would be more worried about time perched uncomfortably in one of these in a suit and tie.

    I’d say aircraft is more important to them than cars. Every move they make evolves around dollars.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Big Al from Oz – I used to see quite a few exotic cars in my town until the Principal of the FCA dealer got canned for deceptive business practices and poor management. He dribbled out of the d!ck of a 1%’er who earned his wealth. He rode on the coattails of someone else’s wealth which is much worse than some lazy slob collecting a welfare cheque. The former should of known better whereas the latter often doesn’t.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      I just depends on where you’re driving. I see these cars daily, but I also happen to live in a very affluent area on the north shore of Chicago. Ferrari, Rolls, McLaren, Austin, Bentley all seem to be a daily occurrence and predominately in the small neighborhoods. I counted Rolls Royce’s one day just on a whim and counted six in a matter of a half-day of driving, a mix of both old and modern models. I moved here from Northern VA/DC. The mix definitely leaned more towards Porsche, Ferrari and Lamborghini. On a side note, I don’t even care for Rolls Royce’s, but it’s had to not be taken aback my the visual impact of a Ghost II or Wraith in person.

      Not arguing your other points, just an observation about the frequency of sightings. It’s actually rather distracting being a car guy.

  • avatar

    I like a good political debate as much as or more than the next guy but weren’t those some very cool cars?

    If you could have one, which of the above would you pick? I’d probably go with one of the McLarens, probably the 650S. Lambos are too attraction seeking for me, the Piech BSD er Bugatti Veyron leaves me cold, and even though I think Christian Koenigsegg is a mad genius, I have a feeling that the McLaren would be more reliable.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Ronnie,
      Those cars a very cool, but alas a dream to many who can only see them on sites like TTAC or magazines.

      That’s why it turned political.

      Sort of like having a travel site and concentrating on Monaco.

      Not many can relate to the vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      DJTragicMike

      Well, you did mention “money” in the title and “privilege” in the opening grafs. It was bound to get political.

      I’m with you on the McLarens. If you aren’t driving a Ferrari, at least have something with prestige. I’d reserve judgement on which one I’d buy AFTER I drive them all. Ha!

    • 0 avatar
      Landcrusher

      I’d be interested in what all you get going from stock to Autobiography.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Ronnie Schreiber – If I had the money for something exotic I’d buy a Mercedes G63 AMG 6×6. Any of these supercars would be a waste of technology and beauty in my part of the world. The roads aren’t the greatest in the summer and these cars would have to be parked in the winter.
      Since the question was based upon what was above:
      The Veyron would be cool if one could find a place somewhere to see how fast it can go. I think one of the McLarens would be my first choice. the 570S and 575LT look great.

    • 0 avatar
      tedward

      I’d take a big pass on all of them and try to score a carrera gt. I’ve been in plenty of exotics and they suck at cruising, even the new ones. Journalists hugely exaggerate the tractability of modern supercars. The solution is to not compromise the thrill factor and avoid being in cruising situations in any car as wide as an f150 with crap visibility and zero ground clearance.

      I feel like modern supercars are all competing to be the least awful normal car. It’s totally besides the point to me at least.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      It would be the Bugatti for me because of the Bugatti name. I had the Monogram kit of Snoopy driving a Bugatti when I was a kid, along with a model of the Type 57. I also remember reading about how Bugatti ran a German checkpoint in one of his cars.

      Later on I “drove” two of his cars in Flight Simulator, along with “flying” his unbuilt racing plane. Bugatti blue and black please.

      Which reminds me how two tone cars used to be popular; I think they fell out of favor with the European aero look in the 1980s. So maybe a QOTD would be “What two tone colors would you like to see return, and on what cars.

  • avatar

    I think the debate on wealth and politics is very polarised. Part of the reason for this is that there is frustration about a small chunk of society who act as if they have no connection to the rest and show little sympathy for the very difficult conditions a large number of people live under. With a bit less inequality the 1% would still be wildly rich but there would be a lot less misery around. I personally would not want my good fortune to be at the expense of others which is what a very unequal society depends on. I don’t hate the rich but I think they could pay a bit more than they do proportionally. Think of it as a demonstration of success and big-heartedness. Decency, if you like.

    • 0 avatar
      Landcrusher

      Why would a very unequal society depend on one persons wealth being at the expense of others? Where is your assumed causal link between disparity and exploitation?

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        I’ll give it to you. Until recently I worked at one of the world’s preeminent hedge funds. In particular, I worked in the arm of the firm that invested in commercial loan funds. The list of firms that rich people are funding includes all of the players who cater to people on the edge: rent-to-own, title-pawn, large-scale low-income real estate investment firms, etc. They do this because the returns are fantastic, often approaching 15%. As Orwell famously said “there is more money to be made taking pennies from the poor than pounds from the rich”.

    • 0 avatar
      SatelliteView

      The “a bit more” will never stop. In 5 years after last raise the “a bit more argument would resurface. After another raise, the “a bit more” would become a topic again, etc etc. Never enough

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    Steering out from political commentary, I also visited the NYC show in mid-april and the super-car exhibits were fully packed like a #6 train during rush hour.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      Which points out the total fallacy upon which this article is based. No self respecting person of means goes to the NYIAS to rub elbows with the crowds from Queens in order to examine supercars. They make appointments with the dealers to do so.

      The reason for their appearances at the NYIAS id so that the folks who can’t afford the cars will buy the posters, keychains and logoed clothing. That’s where the real money is.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Bunkie – valid point. Doesn’t Ferrari make more money off of merchandising than it does off of cars?

      • 0 avatar
        VenomV12

        That’s not true I have seen someone order a 918 at the Auto Show before. Often times the only time or the first time they can get to see car like that is at a major auto show. Go to any of the major auto shows and you will be guys walking around there with $50,000 plus watches on, it’s an event something to do, somewhere to go and see all the cars in one place. If you don’t think any big dogs go there, take a look at the guys who are allowed to go behind the ropes of the displays like Aston Martin, Ferrari, Bentley etc, the ones that they open up the cars and allow to sit in, they are people who either own those cars already or are potential buyers.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        If you’re doing it right, the dealer himself or a family member treats you to lunch or dinner and you discuss the car over drinks. Not sure if that’s how things work in NYC, but that’s how it works in some areas of the country. I even know of one dealer that has a suite at an NFL stadium.

      • 0 avatar

        Organizers of the big shows allot VIP credentials for the media previews to exhibitors, who in turn give them to affluent potential customers. That way they can check out the cars without having to rub elbows with the general public. I see some very well dressed folks with VIP/Hospitality credentials at those previews. The don’t just get invited behind the ropes during the public days, during the previews they get invited into the private lounges in the back of the displays. As VenomV12 points out, the big shows are events. Additionally, the charity previews have some heavy hitters. I was at the Chicago charity shindig a couple of years ago and was talking to a guy who was seriously considering a Lexus LFA.

        The Detroit show has something called The Gallery held at one of the local casinos, where they have the exotics and ultra luxury cars that won’t be on display at the NAIAS in Cobo. They invite about 400 shooters. The Aston Martin salesman I know told me that he got a couple of “firm handshakes” at the last one.

        Rich people go to auto shows for the same reason as other consumers, they can check out a bunch of brands all at once. If you make an appointment with the Lamborghini dealer, you won’t be able to check out McLarens at the same time.

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    The whole 1% nonsense has gotten out of control. 90% of the people throwing that term around are doing so erroneously. My mother for example the other day was talking about something and somehow the whole 1% thing came up, and I had to remind her that she is in the 1%. I told her what you and all these other people are thinking about is really the one tenth of 1%. The look of shock on her face was quite hilarious.

    Also I don’t understand the whole MD comment, do you know for a fact that the S-Classes with MD on their plates are actually owned by physicians and if they are does that actually get you any special privileges or is that just coming out your you know what? I don’t know of anywhere in this country that gives you special privileges for being an MD. In some countries plates with MD are reserved for physicians but once again it denotes no special privileges other than letting people know you are a physician. Everyone hates the doctor until they or one of their loved ones is in grave danger, then they are begging on their knees to the same physicians they talk smack about.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      VenomV12 – the other day I was following 2 pickups. One was a first gen Tacoma that was in excellent shape. It had a 99%’er bumper sticker in the window next to a Greenpeace sticker. The other pickup was a F150 eleventh generation 2005ish lifted redneck pickup with various NRA type stickers on it and Molon Labe prominently displayed.

      Like it or not “1%’er” has found its way through society. I’ve seen it used by hardcore Jeep guys, dirtbikers and various sports types.

      The first time I saw it was when I used to drag race my YZ490. Various Hell’s Angels chapters would come out to race. Some of those dudes sent a chill up my spine and I noticed the “1%” on patches and bikes. It had nothing to do with income. A fellow racer pointed out that it meant that they had killed someone. That is the only 1% I worry about.

      • 0 avatar

        That’s an urban legend about bikers and the 1% patch. With bikers, a 1% patch simply means that they’re an outlaw M/C. It dates back to the early days of biker culture and the disturbances in Hollister, California in the late 1940s. The establishment American Motorcyclist Association tried to distance itself from the rowdies by declaring that 99% of motorcyclists were law abiding and only 1% were outlaws. The outlaws then embraced the 1% tag.

        Some M/Cs may have special patches for members who have done extraordinary service to the club, a la “Men of Mayhem” on Sons Of Anarchy, but it’d probably be a lot more discreet than how they do it on a fictional show. Like my buddy Ricky, prez of the Ghost Riders Detroit chapter tells me, “Aw man, that’s just tv!”

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          @Ronnie,
          Saw an interesting doco on what you just mentioned.

          LA is supposed to be the home of the Hells Angels.

          A very weak group of individuals.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    It’s a shame the NYIAS doesn’t reflect the true diversity of NYC’s car culture. This is kind of like judging NYC by strolling down a few blocks of Park Avenue.

    The real culture comes out when you get into the boroughs. You have the Puerto Ricans with their ’70s Japanese RWD cars like RX-3s, Starlets and Corolla wagons. You have the Jamaicans with their old, rare, pristine BMWs like E34 5 series, or one off cars like old Cressidas. You have Dominicans praying at the temple of VTEC. You have Caribbean Indians into anything fast and Japanese. You have a huge Maxima subculture spanning cultures from all the inhabited continents- Russians, Jamaicans, Americans etc thanks to their cheap price of entry, their speed and their durability over NYC’s awful roads. Etc. etc.

    The real NYC car shows were the glorious Flatlands street races in Brooklyn during the early aughts. This was C&C before any of us had heard of the things. We would all convene at the McDonalds on Linden, and people from all over with all kinds of cars would show up and we would all just hang out. Then occasionally go over to Flatlands Blvd and race. The cops were semi OK with it until one fateful day someone threw a bottle at a cop car and broke their rear glass. Soon after they put rumble strips on the strip and really clamped down. I didn’t really care about the races though. It was the night time car show that I enjoyed. Various little street racing leagues throughout the NYC area showed me the depth of the car culture there.

  • avatar
    ckb

    Times must have changed. I was at the NYCAS 2 years ago right after the P1 was released. I asked the booth guy why it wasn’t there and he said McLaren is saving that car for a REAL auto show like Geneva or Tokyo and not some dump like NYC (paraphrasing). I quickly tried to convince him I wasn’t with them, but still no P1.

  • avatar
    healthy skeptic

    If I had the money for an exotic (or even a lot less, but was still well-to-do), I would simply sign up for one of those exotic car rental places for a year. You get to sample a variety of cool stuff over the course of a year, the cars don’t become garage queens (are you really gonna commute in a Ferrari, or routinely take it to the track?), and in the end it’s still a heck of a lot cheaper and more convenient than owning one.

    Maybe one day I’ll do it.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    I would prefer a sweet little Ferrari from the 1960s over any of these lovely but ferocious beasts.

  • avatar
    Boxerman

    Here is the thing. To be consiodered a 1%er you need a combined income of over 250k. If you live in NYC or LA and make say 300K, 50% goes to tax. Then to be earnign that much you are probably living in a really expesive city, expesive real estate, expensive parkign, expensive food, expensive schools, expensive everyhting. Yeah youre not starving, but probably not buying more than a jeep either.Your lifestyle si the same as a couple making 150k somewhere like demoines.

    The venality against the so called 1% is confusing a white collar professional making 300K and paying 50% tax with the .01% making 100 mill and paying 15% tax. The president did this on purpose, because to meaningfully raise taxes/revenues he had to hit the upper middle class, there simply are not enough uber wealthy. Simpele solution vilify the entire middle/upper middle class as one of the 25 hedge fund guys paying 25% tax.

    So now in the public mind 1% means swaning around in a private jet to your yacht. In reality for 99% of the 1% it means mortgage and car payments just like everyone else, yes the hosue is a bit bigger and the cars bit newer/nicer. The 99% of the 1% inherited nothing worked hard studied hard, took risk and got lucky, yet we wnat to punish them through what Envy? 25 hedge fund managers is being used as the typecast for fellow citizens.

    Adolf Hitler also once hit the same winnign formula. Blame a minority for all your ills, give the power to redress to gov and your ills are gone. What its really about is whipping up the crowd to give pols power, and pols and gov are the real drag, cost and burden on society.

    We have the most progressive tax system on planet earth, with the highest real tax rates when you take into acount property, sales, state etc. Thats before we factor in that in most countries medical and college is paid for by gov.

    I would much rather have a growing vibrant economy with oppotunities for the takign than soemhtign rigged, to give money to the poor, at the expese of the middle and upper middle class while the .01% get a 25% tax break and corps pay an effective 11%. The facts are small businsees which employ 55% of people paya real +40%.Those are the real facts, the rest is BS. You wnat decent jobs, it comes from small business, and thye are being destroyed by tax and regulation, while we fixate on whata feew large corps and hedge find guys are doing.

    As to cars. The Maclaren 570s was stunning, and at only 185K it will be a 85K used car one day, a day when a new car will also be 85K. If you are an ethusiast, a used 570s will be the future equivalnt of a used 40k 308. I dont begrudge the first 185K owner, he is depreciating the car for me.

    The NYS was great.


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