By on April 29, 2015

2016 Toyota Hilux Three-Quarter

After releasing an all-new Tacoma to take on the Chevrolet Colorado, GMC Canyon, and Nissan Frontier in North America, the Toyota HiLux is being readied for other parts of the world and it seems engineers haven’t been able to keep this one a secret.

Admittedly, these aren’t the first spy shots we’ve seen of the new HiLux in the metal, but they’re certainly the clearest.

2016 Toyota Hilux Three-Quarter

The front fascia of the HiLux gets a thorough makeover, ditching the mid-grille bump for a cleaner appearance. The middle grille slats flow right into the LED headlights for a cohesive design. Further down, a trapezoidal grille gives the HiLux a little corporate DNA to tie it together with other Toyota products.

2016 Toyota Hilux Front/Rear

The rear design seems to be fairly basic, excluding the chrome handle. Taillights look like they could be cribbed directly from the last-generation Tacoma.

2016 Toyota Hilux Interior Dash

However, the interior looks as modern as any, presenting the driver with a fully-featured radio and well-placed climate controls just below.

Four engines are expected to power the new Euro-Taco, ranging from 2.4- and 2.8-liter turbodiesels and a 2.7-liter naturally-aspirated gasoline engine. Other engines will likely come to the fore in due course.

[Editor’s Note: We have seen these images from multiple sources. If you know to who they can be properly attributed, please let us know.]

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206 Comments on “SPIED: 2016 Toyota HiLux, Inside and Out...”


  • avatar
    kvndoom

    Rebel militias of the world, rejoice!

    • 0 avatar
      PeriSoft

      Post of the day.

    • 0 avatar
      skeeter44

      Yeah, I was kinda expecting to read about the optional 50 caliber gun mounts

      • 0 avatar
        PeriSoft

        I mean, like, I wonder if these guys look up reviews on the internet when they need to buy a vehicle? Are there IS leaders browsing TTAC going, “Man, I’m totally not spending the money for leather in this thing. It’s just going to get blown up anyway”? Do they worry about mileage?

        I think it’s time for a hard-hitting TTAC journalist to head to the middle east.

    • 0 avatar
      cpthaddock

      Well funded rebel militias – unless they start the rebellion by taking over the local Toyota dealerships

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Mark Stevenson
      You completely misunderstood what I was trying to say.
      You can get up market Hiluxes/Mazdas, the real cheap vehicles are the basic Workmates, that cost Aus $18,000
      Tacoma does not have a “workmate” as it is a lifestyle vehicle, not work vehicle

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      “They have to use a regular cab stripper as an example WHICH ARE NOT AVAILABLE IN NORTH AMERICA. And with a ‘bed delete’ cab chassis too!!!”

      In fact their are a staggering number of very useful vehicles that are not available in North America

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        @Robert R. – I missed that little ruse when I 1st read the tread. I’ll bet you sent each other e-winks.. Congrats, well done!

        But thank the cheapskates for overusing/ruining the best thing going. The base regular cabs were not only the cheapest trucks anywhere, but gave stripper sub-compacts a run for their “Top Bottom-Feeder Auto” money!

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    It’s time the OEMs decided to consolidate their global offerings with their US products; there’s absolutely no need for both a Tacoma and a HiLux–especially when the HiLux is so much better looking. By consolidating the two models, the company would save hundreds of millions of dollars annually on engineering.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      Yeah, I’m sure Toyota hasn’t researched this and now that you have brought it up they’ll make a change. Now I’m getting out of here before the great chicken tax debate kicks off but Toyota sold a ton of trucks prior to the model split though.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @Big Al from Murica,
        You sound negative in your wanting to discuss the Chicken Tax and yet you enter it into the thread?

        WTF???

        As Forrest Gump’s mother stated to Forrest; “stupid is as stupid does”.

        Isn’t that correct Forrest??

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al From 'Murica

          And you refer to me as the troll? “Hello kettle, this is pot, and your black.”

          I believe the whole damn world knows what you think of the chicken tax. I know you know what I think of it so you can take the snark and shove it. I’m happy to talk mid size trucks though as I have driven and owned enough of them to equip a militia and own one now. I never caught what you drive by the way. I’m guessing Corolla Auto.

    • 0 avatar

      They would save bupkis. Transaction prices are so much more on the HiLux. Americans would never pay those MSRPs for a mid-size pickup.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        In what countries?

        Prices vary between countries.

        I can state US pickups are expensive because of the prices commanded outside of the US. Even in the US they aren’t that cheap anymore.

        All pickups are increasing in pricing, globally.

        • 0 avatar

          Just did a quick “Build and Price” comparison of Tacoma vs HiLux. I tried to go the cheapest I could for both trucks while staying relatively the same with regards to engine, trans, and equipment.

          Tacoma 4×2 4-cyl 4-speed automatic Access Cab Standard Bed: $22,815 USD

          HiLux SR 4×2 Extra-Cab Petrol Auto: $32,240 AUD (~$25,900 USD)

          So, 13.5% increase in price before taxes and fees. I wouldn’t call that an insignificant price difference.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            You need to scroll past that bot. Absolutely hopeless, incapable of learning anything.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Mark Stevenson,
            U.S. pickups are very expensive outside the U.S. In places like Thailand it is a whole lot cheaper, that is why 50% of new vehicle sales are Pickups

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Mark,
            I don’t know where you got your pricing.

            I have an auto trayback (fitted),petrol 2.7, 4 cylinder. For $21 240AUD or around $17 000USD.

            Hmmm…….????

            http://www.carsguide.com.au/cars-for-sale/NEW_QK915A_Tidal_Blue/new-2015-TOYOTA-HILUX-WORKMATE-TGN16R-MY14–Unleaded-Ute-/-Tray-in-.html?searchKey=cg_s.9e259ed87f57788cef5ecfa264c4d0bc

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Mark,
            I don’ know where you got your price.

            I just attempted to post the link from Carguide.com.au and it didn’t work.

            A Toyota Hilux, 2.7 petrol, trayback, auto for $21 240AUD. Or about $17 000USD.

          • 0 avatar

            @Big Al from Oz

            I guess you missed that whole part where I mentioned the model/trim and stated I found two examples of the Tacoma and HiLux that were roughly equivalent, huh?

            NA doesn’t have a Tacoma that’s equivalent to the “WorkMate” HiLux.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            You really need to ignore this Antipodean clown. It is impossible to provide him with even basic information without him turning it into a ridiculous clusterfcuk.

            I suspect that he suffers from a mild case of autism, as he often doesn’t understand what he reads and just repeats himself endlessly, irrespective of the facts. Save yourself the trouble, and scroll past him.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            “NA doesn’t have a Tacoma that’s equivalent to the “WorkMate” HiLux.”
            No but we do. Big Al from Oz, runs around in a much more fitted out Mazda. The WorkMate is similar to basic 1/2 tons on a work site

          • 0 avatar

            @RobertRyan

            *facepalm* I give up. Your logic is astounding(ly horrible).

          • 0 avatar

            @Pch101

            I honestly can’t even follow it anymore. It seems they do not understand a comparison of equals. Then Robert wants me to compare the HiLux with the Mazda pickup from Australia for some reason?

            Am I reading this right? Or has my brain turned into spaghetti squash?

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Mark,
            You are also overlooking the disparity between our incomes. We don’t have anyone working for $10ph. Even kids who work checkouts and McDonalds after school get down to $12ph minium.

            A detailer working in one of our car dealerships is on $20-$25AUD an hour. Our miniumum pay is $18 per hour, our average wage is around $75 000 per year.

            Everything in the chain to get that vehicle on the lot is more expensive.

            The costs of vehicles shouldn’t be looked at by a direct comparison in costs. As there are many factors like income, taxes etc that affect the price.

            That Hilux you priced also attracts a 5% import tax and a 10% GST.

            Does the US prices include all taxes?

            I doubt it.

            The comparison is of little value. It might give a very rudimentary idea, but not an accurate account on the real cost to the individual.

            So, as a percentage of our income what is the cost of the vehicle in comparison to the US. This might be a better way to look at it.

            I paid what most in the US would deem excessive for my pickup. $46 000AUD, now I’ve invested in total $54 000 into it and it’s a midsizer.

            So, I have a fully blinged, leather, 5 cylinder diesel, 4×4 dual cab, high end pickup for what originally would of costed $36 000USD. That is competitive.

            Many of the US commenters overlook the fact that most of our midsizers would be a Class 2 vehicle in the US with a 6 000kg GVM. US full size 1/2 ton pickups range from 5 000kg to 7 000kg GVM. Our midsizer sits smack bang in the middle.

            So, one should also view our pickups not as a direct comparison to your midsizers, but maybe somewhere in between your midsizers and your 1/2 ton pickups.

            They are an odd size by US standards.

            But for me it represents only 4 months of income.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Pch101,
            I hear your phone ringing.

            Go answer it, it might be King.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Mark Stevenson
            Toyota currently sell 550,000 Hiluxes annually. Hiluxes/ Tacomas combined 700,000
            New Hilux alone should hit 700,000

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @BAFO – Pickup OEMs don’t give a rat’s A$$ who makes what income. They go where consumers are willing to and gladly fork over, up to $60,000 USD for smaller pickups with Nav, sunroof, heated/cooled seats with leather all over. Doing that would be a ridiculous joke in North America. OEMs know this and most ran screaming from North American the 1st chance they could, including Dodge and Ford.

            You guys pay that much because the only alternative is $85,000 to $160,000 USD for US fullsize. You’re a reluctant owner of a BT50GTSi pickup and it shows!

            Midsize pickups don’t get the same respect in North America. And they happen to be the lowest common denominator of pickups. So they’re the target of cheapskates and fleet alike.

            But no, you’re midsizers would not be “class 2” in North America. Different ratings system you have over there. Yes you only rely on the sense humour of the OEMs to “regulate” pickup capacity! They’re only pulling wild numbers out of their A$$!!! The Nissan Navara and Frontier are the same trucks, aside from badges, cosmetics and what side you drive from. Wildly different “payload” though.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “Am I reading this right?”

            Pretty much. I would say that it is akin to trying to teach a pig to sing, but that would be an insult to the pigs.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “You guys pay that much because the only alternative is $85,000 to $160,000 USD for US fullsize.”

            Your counterarguments aren’t much better.

            The US trucks are not a factor — they are a tiny part of their market. The most relevant issues are scale and exchange rate risk.

            The US is a large market, so it is more price competitive, since it is a greater prize. (The large number of dealers and the tax system also help to push prices down.)

            There is also a matter of exchange rate risk. The US dollar is a reserve currency, so we get the benefit of that in the form of lower prices. Currencies such as the Australian dollar are not — companies charge a premium in these other markets in order to protect themselves from changes in the exchange rate. If and when the US dollar loses its reserve status, our car prices are likely to increase accordingly.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Pch101,
            You obviously didn’t read the cut and paste/link I furnished you with the other day.

            If the US pickup market is competitive, why do they attract the greatest profit margins by a long shot?

            Don’t you think if a market is very competitive it would attract a smaller profit margin.

            I don’t know of any market where it is competitive and profits are the largest.

            Pickups are the largest profit makers in the US.

            This alone negates your comment as a fallacy and distortion of the truth.

            Who is sponsoring you to pass the comment you do on these sites?

            Answer that question first.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            Good lord, I got my Frontier S (work truck trim with man. Windows and no cruise) for 22ish out the door (24,500) sticker IIRC. But that was still Crew Cab, V6, and Auto so the Tacoma seems high. I hated the seating position in the Taco but it seemed to have the higher quality materials but still, that’s spendy.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @Pch101 – For lack of realistic choices in pickup classes, their midsize pickup sales are tremendous, relatively speaking. The EXACT same would happen in the US if fullsize pickups ceased to exist or cost 3X what they do now.

            US pickup sales are in no way strong enough to drive up OZ/NZ midsize pickup prices, but fullsize US pickups are readily available down there. Raptor or whatever. It just takes a whole lot of money.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            US pickups are not “readily available” in Australia. They’re essentially handmade conversions that cost a fortune and are imported by third-party conversion companies under low-volume rules (although the latter will be changing with the Rams.)

            Clearly, the market is not large enough to entice Detroit to build RHD versions of these on their assembly lines. They’re a niche. Australia has a low population compared to the US and will not provide enough scale to justify such an effort, and has gas prices that are higher than the US (although lower than in Europe.)

            There’s no comparison to the mass produced trucks from Thailand that are being imported directly by the OEMs, including Ford and GM.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Yes they only import a very limited number of US ‘used’ fullsize pickup to convert to RHD. These things make them extremely expensive, but very easy to find and buy one tonight if you have big money to throw around.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Robert Ryan and BAFO don’t work that way. They have to use a regular cab stripper as an example WHICH ARE NOT AVAILABLE IN NORTH AMERICA. And with a ‘bed delete’ cab chassis too!!!

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Mark Stevenson,
        No they would not save money. Toyota does not see the Tacoma and Hilux as a single job lot, quite different for different markets

        • 0 avatar

          Bupkis = nothing. I am not saying they would save money.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @ Mark Stevenson
            If different markets, different needs Toyota tries to bring down the costs as much as possible

          • 0 avatar

            @RobertRyan

            True on diff markets, etc.

            Toyota tries to bring down ITS costs as much as possible while trying to charge consumers as much as they’ll bear without causing them to buy from the competition. Don’t kid yourself.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Mark,
            I view Toyota as a company that offer very little in its vehicles and charges a premium.

            It has worked for Toyota so far. But how much longer I don’t know.

            People will become wise of Toyota and it’s pricing.

            Toyota cars a reliable with the use of outdated tech, like the Hilux.

          • 0 avatar
            formula m

            @big al
            There is no way your trucks tow 6000kg. That’s over 13,200 for a non heavy-duty truck. Doesn’t make sense.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          PCH 101,
          Totally right, they would need to converted as a result, they are a total niche, Even so ,not being Niche, they sell possibly sell 3,-4000, bulk would be HD’s On the other hand non USManuafacturers Have no problems selling RHD vehicles

    • 0 avatar
      Onus

      The new tacoma isn’t actually new. I doubt it cost toyota much to throw new sheet metal on a truck thats engineering costs are long since payed for.

      If they wanted to change the US model they would have to change a ton of factory tooling whereas changing the sheetmetal doesn’t require much in the way of changes.

      • 0 avatar

        It’s a helluva lot more new than the previous refresh. Updated transmissions and a new Atkinson-cycle V6 will make the category interesting.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @Onus,
        The Taco is a heavy remake on the old.

        I do think Toyota will put a lot more effort into refinement.

        Even though the Hilux has remained number one here in Australia, it’s lost lot’s of ground and it will be very hard for Toyota to get it back.

        The new global pickup offerings are very good.

        Toyota needs to pull a rabbit out of the hat.

    • 0 avatar
      Signal11

      The Hilux and the Tacoma diverged some time ago and are now very different trucks. The Hilux has different frame construction, suspension and is a vastly more capable work truck with payload ratings on the heavy duty versions that rate out to about even with modern American top end 1/2 tons. It also rides like it. The Tacoma is, for all its strengths, made to spend most of its life on nice American roads.

      Tacomas are the wrong truck for Africa and Hiluxes are the wrong truck for North America.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        We don’t have huge payload on midsize trucks. We have lawyers.

        They must be talking ‘static weight’. They’re still small brake components, plus a long list of midsize parts given HD capacity.

        The Nissan Navara is just a Frontier with huge payload and RHD.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al From 'Murica

          I’ve driven some LHD ones. You hit the nail on the head…It was my Frontier with way less power and a way worse ride. Great for Afghanistan, not so great on the interstate.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Big Al From Murica,
            Have your driven the 420ftlb, 7 speed Navara?

            I don’t think Afghanistan is a good basis to make or pass any judgment regarding the availability of motor vehicles globally.

            It isn’t indicative of what is available worldwide.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            Al, these are global trucks the Department of Defense and State Department purchase and import for use in country…not Afghan spec trucks. Some are nicely equipped. For SUVs we got a mix of 70 series troop carrier Land Cruisers and Defender 110s. All LHD, 95 percent diesel. I have driven the Navarra with the top diesel, though it was the D40 truck, not the new one. It was nice and I believe capable, but the VQ40 was still a rocket by comparison even with the manual vs auto.

            Afghans by and large drive old Hilux Surfs, Old Corollas, Motorcycles, donkeys, and whatever other used stuff finds its way in to the country. New cars in private hands seem pretty rare.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            Al…Not Afghan Spec. These are vehicles purchased abroad and imported by the Department of Defense and State Department. Some are quite nicely equipped. Afghans by and large don’t do new vehicles. Donkeys, Bikes, and feet. Old Surfs and Corollas if they are well to do.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al From 'Murica

          I climbed under a Navarra and even went so far as cross referencing part numbers because I had nothing better to do one day. Yes, Frontier vs Navarra differences are mainly power train and stated payload capacity but the bones are remarkably similar. I believe it has a higher real payload most likely, but then again it rode like it had much stiffer leafs.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        The expectation in the media is that the Hilux and Tacoma will return to platform sharing. It would be sensible to do that.

        That does not mean that they can’t have different ride and handling characteristics.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @Signal11,
        Actually the the Taco sits on a newer chassis. The Hilux is roughly based on the older platform, hence very agricultural.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        I never said they’d do it, Signal, I just said it would be more economical for them if they did–and they’d probably make more sales overall, too.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Vulpine
      I said in a similar post, there would be confusion In what category, they would be put in the U.S.. These are “1 tonne ” vehicles outside the U.S. minimum 2,200lb payload. That really does not go with a Tacoma

  • avatar
    Athos Nobile

    This thing will become again the benchmark. And it will sell like hotcakes.

    Not a believer? See the current one, old as it is, still rules.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Yea I’ll take the Tacoma, This one looks just as bad as the Colorado, crossover styling, near horizontal windshield, and engine choices that would be unacceptable in small cars makes this extremely unappealing.
    Our outgoing Tacoma looks more modern and appealing than this.

  • avatar

    Forget that silly VW Amarok. It makes me want to cry that we wouldn’t appreciate and therefore can’t have *this* truck in the States. No, really, I want to cry. Full-sized trucks are just too big and brutish, while this Hilux looks athletic and sporty, yet can hold its own as an actual work truck.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Agree this is a nice looking truck. But since we will not why cry over spilled milk?

      BTW I saw the “mid-size” GM twins at Barret Jackson in WPB – they are HUGE. I haven’t checked the specs but they seemed bigger then my Dakota which I’ve always found to be “right sized”. And my Dak has the same 4.7l V8 found in the full size Ram so its a real truck as far as I’m concerned. It tows my boat and with the tail gate down has hauled some sizeable loads.

      • 0 avatar
        fvfvsix

        Yes, they’re huge – but somehow they still somehow look ill-proportioned when compared to their full-size counterparts. I don’t know how GM managed that.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      Not being an A$$, serious question…What exactly is it that you are looking for in a work truck that the current crop of midsizers can’t do but still wouldnt be better served with a half ton? I drive a Frontier and I’ve had it loaded down with a bed full of ceramic tires and pulled 4000 pounds with it on multiple occasions. I wouldn’t want to do it all the time, but if I did I’d probably want the larger bed afforded by a fullsize anyway. Just seems like there is a very small niche where the midsizer would make more sense and the rest is just preference.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @Big Al from Murica,
        Work might be a good start?

        The US with it’s pickups make a large vehicles with low work capability.

        The potential is there for them to work harder.

        But, to do that would definitely increase the cost of a pickup.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al From 'Murica

          Funny thing Al, I was just down at the construction site where my house is being built and there was all manner of full-size trucks full of tools, lumber, and all sorts of things. I assume construction qualifies as work.

          When it comes to work I can certainly see how having a larger bed would be very beneficial. There was an awful lot of Hardiplank 4×8 siding in one that I can’t for the life of me figure out how one would fit in my Frontier without a whole lot of creative tie downs and likely a lot of broken siding. It was pulling a trailer of the stuff too. I don’t know what it weighs but it is masonry and not light. It was a GMC by the way. GMT900 IIRC. Plenty of all makes though and even a T100. Closest thing to a compact or midsize on the site was a Transit Connect.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Big Al from Murica,
            It’s the amount of work.

            What you 1/2 ton pickups do in the US is largely done by FWD Vans in the EU, midsizers here.

            The US full size if you read my comment could do a lot more for their size.

            Essentially there is a lot of potential in them.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            “What you 1/2 ton pickups do in the US is largely done by FWD Vans in the EU, midsizers here.”

            @BAFO – Well what choice do they really have? Like it, or lump it, or LEAVIT ALONE!!

            “The US full size if you read my comment could do a lot more for their size.”

            Yep. If they were marketed for the OZ market they’d have a proportionate capacity to midize. 10,000 lbs payload F-150s!

        • 0 avatar
          formula m

          That’s why HD pickups cost a lot. A 1/2 ton pickup can handle anything up to 4500-5000kg, not 3500kg like a Mazda BT-50 truck over in Oz. 1/2’s just don’t ride super stiff like commercial grade vehicles.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @formula m
            U.S. 1/2 tons get a 8,000 to 8,500lb rating here, more like the bottom figure

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @formula m,
            First up what percentage of US pickups actually are bought with the capability you speak of.

            Very few.

            You just can’t use the 5% of the US pickup market as the norm.

            This indicates to me that your comments are just that. A comment of little value.

            As for my GVM, sorry I should of stated GCM.

            My fault.

      • 0 avatar

        Oh, I just don’t like driving today’s crop of full-sized trucks. They’re too big, and they don’t handle well, IMO, compared to mid-sized trucks. But that’s just my opinion.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @Kyree S. Williams – To yourself and the others, it was a battle of trucks and midsize lost. You’re welcome to that view, but it’s not clear why.

          You’re not in the market for a fullsize anything and that’s fine. But you’re also not in the market for compact roadsters.

          Markets dwindle from lack of buyers, lack of profits, or both.

          But why don’t we see fans of compact sporty 2-doors taking out their frustrations on fullsize pickups and their ecstatic owners?

          And have you bought a midsize pickup lately. If you’ve always looked a rhubarb pie on the menu but never pulled the trigger, don’t be surprised if it’s gone by the time you do.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al From 'Murica

          I can respect that. I’d love an F150 but my Frontier feels like a boat in Louisville. I can’t imagine trying to park a Ram or something.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          “@BAFO – Well what choice do they really have? Like it, or lump it, or LEAVIT ALONE!!”

          Vastly more than you get in the US

          “Yep. If they were marketed for the OZ market they’d have a proportionate capacity to midize. 10,000 lbs payload F-150s!”

          Should be a stand up Comedian

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Kyree S Williams
      Well if you had the choice, you could buy it as it is in LHD/RHD, built for changing regulartory specs across the globe

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        You know, have you ever worked on one of these? Try to pull the ECU from a LHD Frontier. One can see how easy it would be to remove it were the truck RHD based on the design. It was probably easy when Nissan put it in too…I assume prior to that pesky engine and stuff went in.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Big Al from Murica,
          They were designed as both,not primarily RHD, Si it should not be a problem

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            I agree, it should not be. The ECU has 4 bolts to attach it to the engine compartment. The ECU has 2 holes and 2 open slots. In RHD the slots are on the bottom so you use your hand to put the bolts in, slide the ecu in and only have to stick the wrench down in that tight area with NP room to turn it for a half turn. In LHD this gets reversed and it is a thousand tiny little turns to get the damn screws in.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I think someone put up a banner in the styling department office before they started one morning.

    NEEDS MOAR MITSUBISHI

    • 0 avatar
      cpthaddock

      … and given Toyota’s past styling crimes against humanity, that’s not necessarily a bad thing!

      Come to think of it, this is about the 4th Toyota product I’ve noticed recently that isn’t too bad to look at. Ever since the Echo, I learned to avert my gaze at the prospect of a new Toyota design. Now, we get a Corolla that’s quite trim, followed by a Camry that follows the same theme nicely. By far the biggest shocker is the Lexus RC – a Lexus that could be described, with a straight face, as lust-worthy .

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    If THIS Hilux REALLY is going to be sold stateside with V6 and turbodiesel options, it’s going to absolutely CONQUEST sales from F Series, Silverado, etc.

    I don’t even like trucks (as I don’t need one) but would invest in a Hilux Dealership b/c this thing would become the default choice and gold standard for anyone needing a serious work truck (see athos and signal’s comments above – this will not only murder scrap midsizers now put out such as crappy Colorado, but Ford & Chevy would lose full size buyers to this) who isn’t so brand myopic
    (” ‘Murica – even if hecho en Mexico”).

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      p.s. – I hope Toyota has a Plan B to build this stateside because Ford, GM, and FCA will lobby Congress & Executive Branch like little girly men to keep a true Hilux off the menu of U.S. Consumers’ choice at all costs.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        Umm…didn’t they sell the HiLux up until the Tacoma split sometime in the mid 90’s? My Aunts early 80’s something even says HiLux on it.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          We got it here yes – but it was known only as “Pickup.” I don’t believe it was ever actually sold here as the HiLux, but someone might correct me there.

          It split in the early 90s when we got the Land Cruiser looking T100, which was a HiLux. It existed alongside the old Pickup model, until that turned into the Tacoma.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Our 89-94 pickup was a funny ‘halfway’ point as far as Hiluxes are concerned. Body/fascia was the same, except we never got the neato crew cabs and those old school beds with outboard attachment points on the bed. We obviously didn’t get the awesome diesel variants, but the biggest difference was that our Pickups all had torsion bar-based independent front suspension on the 4wd models, rather than the solid front axles the Hiluxes had. The independent front end gives better control and rides nicer than a solid front axle, at the expense of ultimate durability and articulation/wheel travel over rocks and such.

            Then, as the US ‘Pickup” became the Tacoma, it gained new double wishbone front end that rides smoother and actually has better wheel travel (awesome offroad) than the torsion bars, but again it was a step in the wrong direction durability speaking. The Hilux, in turn, transitioned away from a solid front axle to a torsion bar independent front end much like our Pickup did decades earlier, and for the same reasons I’d imagine.

            Toyota is very deliberate in how it tailors their vehicles for different markets, it is interesting to observe. Will the latest Hilux now transition to a Tacoma-like double wishbone front suspension?

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @CoreyDL,
            Toyota diverged it’s midsize offerings.

            The Taco was needed to be built on a lighter and cheaper platform, so the Surf was used.

            The Hilux continued on globally as it was a stronger vehicle globally. The Hilux (current) is based on the older chassis.

          • 0 avatar
            Quentin

            I don’t think that is correct. The Surf is more closely related to the Land Cruiser Prado than anything else. The Prado/Surf/4Runner all have a fully boxed frame while the Tacoma has a C channel frame.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Quentin,
            The Taco is based on the Surf.

            The Hilux is based on the old chassis.

            The Surf platform was a cheaper platform to manufacture.

            The “Surf” chassis comes in differing levels of strength.

            It is used on Prado’s like you mentioned, but also the FJs, 70 odd Series Landcruisers (high strength version) and of course Taco’s.

            The Taco’s, US Surf and FJs are using the lightest version of the chassis.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Big Al,

            The US Tacoma is an odd duck in that it doesn not share its frame with any overseas Toyota that I know of, hence the frames are outsourced to a company here in the US (Dana).

            The US 89-94 “Pickup” is part of the(N80 through N130) generation of Hilux that spanned 1988-1997 globally. The corresponding US 4Runner 1990-1995 (Hilux Surf internationally) used this same fully boxed Hilux frame. The only difference between the US and global Toyotas at this point is the switch from a solid front axle to independent front suspension using torsion bars.

            For the next generation of US trucks(95-04), now called Tacomas, a unique frame was used, made here in the US, of a C-channel type, made by Dana Corporation. This is the one that rusts in half. The 4Runners still came entirely made in Japan, with a fully boxed frame, shared with the J90 body Land Cruiser Prado, a ‘medium duty’ configuration. The global Prado, US 4Runner, and global Hilux Surf all share the same double wishbone front end, which is also used in the Tacoma.

            The 2005-current Tacoma continues to use its own C channel frame with the same front suspension. The 2003 4Runner shifted to the Prado 120 body/frame and continues to this day to be a Prado derivative.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @gtemnykh,
            I do think you’ll find the Taco chassis is the Surf Chassis.

            As for the “C” section, this is only from the rear axle back.

          • 0 avatar
            Quentin

            Big Al, no. The Tacoma is a c-channel frame from the middle of the cab back. The 4Runner/LC Prado/FJ are fully boxed from nose to tail. How is that the “same” chassis?

            As far as other load bearing things go, the rear suspension design is completely different (coil versus leaf spring). Front suspension design is similar. Drivetrains are/were similar in the US.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @CoreyDL,
            Sorry, you are correct.

            As for the same. If you read my comments they are based on the same platform.

            They aren’t identical as different strengths are required to suit the chassis’s different applications.

            I do know on the 70 Series the chassis are the strongest. The Taco is the weakest.

            Ford even do the same with their pickup chassis. The “same” chassis comes in different ratings.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      It’s not going to be sold stateside, also not to be a ….. But I see this a lot on this forum and it’s quite ironic among other things;
      “I don’t like trucks, but all trucks owners would like x better because I think it’s better” multiple iterations of that are possible, but the point is, if you don’t understand the love for large trucks, repeating information you find salient isn’t worth a nickel. Hilux are great when your options are that and a horse drawn wagon, and thus they have worldwide appeal. You don’t see Hilux pickups towing a backhoe safely at 75MPH through highways for a reason.

      The Hilux competes directly with a very similar version of our new Colorado, and unless you find the Colorado stealing major sales from the FS3, don’t expect the Hilux would do the same. There’s a reason Toyota doesn’t sell it here.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        95% of the ginormous, cartoon testicle F Series/Silverados/RAMs with the faux front Mack fascias have empty beds, are cleaner (waxed to an icy finish) than my 10 year old vehicle, and are being driven to Buffalo Wild Wings or Staples.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          That doesn’t mean people want smaller trucks. The market has spoken. Things may change in the future, but a Hilux would do as well as the Tacoma, which is what it would probably be named here.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            The original Hilux into the 90s was almost a piece of art, the new one carries a check it can’t cash. If all the old trucks hadn’t rusted out 10 years ago I would love to have had one to beat on, the new one? No thanks.

            I meant for this comment to follow Pch and merica below.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @bball40dtw,
            I do think you’ll start witnessing a slight change in attitudes towards the full size pickup in the US.

            The changes will be caused by demographics. The real supporters of the full size pickups are getting old.

            The US is urbanising more and more. Add to that the new capability and refinement offered by these current gen midsizers and you will have some defect to them.

            I’m not stating the demise of the full size. As for the foreseeable future they will sell.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Al-

            I agree that eventually midsized trucks will grow in popularity. I don’t know when or how big the market for those trucks will be. I know that I would prefer a Ranger over an F150 because of size constraints. There is, however, no plans to bring it over here at the moment. Going out 4-5 years, the action items in that area are Explorer/Aviator, SuperDuty, Expedition/Navi, and additional engines/transmissions to the F150. Ford thinks the 10-speed + new engines on the F150 will make a smaller truck a non starter for the foreseeable future.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @bball40dtw,
            First up I would like to see our Rangers/BT50s come with the 2.7 EcoBoost. But the market for these will be more or less limited to Australia and some Gulf States.

            I do think Ford with it’s push in the US pickup market is going to struggle. By struggle I’m not stating Ford will not sell lots of F Series, but they will take a hit. Aluminium was the wrong answer for the public. It might sate CAFE and the EPA, but not as many consumers will take to them.

            GM has done a better job. The Colorado Canyon release has given the vehicles enough lead time to generate interest over the Taco.

            The Taco will stay on top. This was the case here with the release of our current new midsizers, Hilux still rules. It also lost ground as a percentage of the market.

            But our Hilux is second if you place the Ranger and BT50 into the one basket.

            The new Navara which is released next month is apparently going to lift the benchmark for our pickups. It’s coming out with a trailing link coil assend and is supposed to ride as well as a Maxima. Not bad for a vehicle with a 2 500lb payload and a 7 800lb tow.

            The interior of the Navara looks superb. I can see why people now want a midsize over our more traditional SUV, ie, Prado, Landcruiser, Patrol, Pajero, etc segment.

            Also, the new midsizers tow as much as the large SUVs and are getting better FE. In my case over 32mpg (US) on the open road.

            The new Hilux has a lot of ground to make up on the old as people are starting to shy away from it.

            I do think Toyota globally will face the same or similar challenges confronting Ford in the US with pickups.

            Toyota and Ford will have good offerings, but they will not be competitive enough.

            I think Toyota in the US with the Taco and the next hopefully “XD” Tundra has done a far better job with product placement.

            But, I do think the future star (next several years) in the US pickup market will be Nissan.

            Nissan could possibly stagnat the growth of the HDs by the Big 3. Remember most HDs are the lighter 250/2500s. The V8 Cummins Titan will be a really good pickup.

            A sort of in between vehicle. The next Frontier will be the size of the Hardbody/D20/22. This is another in between size vehicle.

            Nissan will do well with this formula, until other manufacturers come on board to challenge them.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            Al the D20/22 sized Frontier replacement in the US is dead, the next Frontier will be Navarra based. You can read all about it on these very forums but being the dude with his finger on the pulse of the midsize truck market I’m sure you knew this. Rumor is a small 4 cylinder Cummins Diesel to compliment the confirmed Cummins V8 in the Titan. If this happens I will probably buy one but I am not holding my breath. Lacking that my Frontier will hopefully last until the kids go off to college and I can do an regular cab full size.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Big Al from Murica,
            You are actually incorrect.

            The next Navara will come in a wide body and a narrow body.

            The narrow body was initially earmarked for struggling nations. The US will adopt this platform.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Stop it about the Titan. It will continue to be irrelevant in the US. People buying 3/4 and 1 ton trucks are not going to buy a Titan. They just aren’t. The guy with a SuperDuty that has a Scorpion V8 diesel is not wandering over to the Nissan dealership.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @bball40dtw,
            The new Titan will be a bit of a shock to you then.

            The XD will stagnate the lower end of HD sales. When the next Tundra comes out in a “XD” version it will again impact the lower end of the HD market.

            This is my prediction. You can have your views, you are entitled to that.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          And?
          Is every WRX covered in rock chips, every Camaro/Mustang spinning a hi-lift can, every minivan carrying 8 passengers, every motorcycle used as a form of transport vs leisure. Many old trucks only exist because they weren’t worked to death. I don’t understand why a truck needs to be worked in your mind. It’s a perfect boulevard cruiser in an age where FS trucks are the only option.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            ^^^THIS. Truck without 2000 pounds of manure in the bed 24x7x365 = Poser, Boss 302 that never sees a track Or Brown Diesel AWD wagon motoring along with one dude in it wearing a turtleneck in June around Metro Atlanta = COOL!!!

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @Big Al From ‘Merica – Midsize pickups are an absolute hit with the lyfestile crowd, but not for real work, unless it’s very light duty. Anything more, and they cost too much in lost time/revenue. Any Tacoma or Frontier can do the trick perfectly fine for their intended purpose, but there’s always the occasional hipster that wants what no one else has. An “exotic” Mahindra, Proton, Ssangyong or something.

            Midsizers are major hit with the light service industry though. Delivering parts to pizza. Window cleaning to exterminators.

            They have no have choice in OZ/NZ/SEA. Like it or lump it! So they give midsize pickups crazy payload figures so they’ll shut the hellup. And to keep decent productivity without forcing medium duty trucks. There’s obviously a huge gap of several pickup classes missing in between. How can a truck guy not be bitter about that???

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            You know, DM, in your effort to insult somebody, you finally hit on exactly WHY people want smaller pickups. “… but not for real work, unless it’s very light duty.” For those people, that IS “real work”. They don’t need a full-time heavy hauler if all they’re doing is DIY home repairs and gardening. They DO need an open bed to carry the materials and tools that are frequently too dirty or smelly to carry inside an entirely closed-in vehicle.

            As such they’re certainly not willing to pay the high prices for a vehicle with the comfort they want just to get the ability to occasionally carry the things they need. They’re certainly not willing to drive something so huge that they can’t even reach some of the places they may want to go. Remember, with mirrors out the Ram 1500 is 103″ wide–that’s over eight and a half feet wide and the average parking spot is now barely nine feet wide today.

            So a mid-sized or even compact pickup is a much more convenient size for their purposes and means they don’t need a trailer to carry their purchases–especially when said purchases are a spur-of-the-moment choice now forcing the driver to run home, hook up the trailer and make a totally separate trip back to the DIY store or garden shop. Those trailers are a make-do for people who really WANT a small truck and simply can’t get one. For every one of those tiny utility trailers you see getting pulled behind a CUV, I can guarantee you that if a compact truck were available, they would buy one.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          “The customer for a compact or midsize truck is completely different compared to a full-size customer.”

          Mike Sweers, lead engineer for the Tacoma and Tundra

          http://www.automobilemag.com/auto_shows/detroit/2015/1501-q-a-with-2016-toyota-tacoma-chief-engineer-mike-sweers/

          He’s right. You may as well argue that the RAV-4 competes head-on against the Suburban. Different demographics, different price points.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            I think midsize truck buyers break out into 3 categories. 1 = Fleets, 2 = Offroad/lifestyle types (Tacoma and Frontier Pro 4x types), and 3 = Cheap Bastards like this guy that need a basic truck, need 4 doors, and don’t want to spend 30 grand minimum to get it.

            Yes there are those out there that just want a smaller truck but in my experience you folks tend to talk more about buying trucks than actually buying them. There is always something that is a dealbreaker.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “The Hilux was originally designed, says Kevin Hunter, president of Toyota’s design division in California, as ‘a lightweight truck with big tires on big wheels. It was meant as a recreational truck, a truck people could have fun with. They also have a really high ground clearance, which means they’re ideal for off-road work.’ ”

            http://www.newsweek.com/why-rebel-groups-love-toyota-hilux-74195

            These things were originally intended to be youthful alternatives to Corollas and Celicas. But the market has changed, and they are no longer as cheap as a compact car or more efficient than the average car, i.e. gas guzzlers that once dominated American roads. It’s no wonder that they have declined in popularity.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Big Al from Murica,
            You are incorrect with the uses of the pickups (irrespective of segment) in the US. It is broken down into two broad categories.

            1. Working/business pickups,

            2. SUV/Car/daily driver alternative pickup,

            3.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Pch101,
            What compact pickups are available in the US currently?

            Is there any? This is news to me as I do follow the global pickup market quite closely.

            Is the US receiving those Stradas from Brazil?

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            Your right Al…what the hell do I know. I mean I am just a North American Mid Size Truck buyer. I realize putting my money where my mouth is makes me an anomoly here and all, but jeeze.

            BTW, I have driven many of these global midsizers…TATA, Mahindra, the current Ranger, the HiLux, the Navara, the LC70 pickup, the little Mitsubishi that looks like the Hilux in the picture, Great Wall…I’m sure I’ve missed a few. They are not even on the same planet when it comes to refinement as say an F150. My VQ40 outclassed all of them by a huge margin and is an absolute rocket compared to all of them. I have probably driven more midsize pickups than 99 percent of this forum, maybe even you and your little RexRyan Buddy and owned 2 Rangers (first and third gen), and a final year S-10 and a first gen Bronco II so you can take all of your snark and shove it…I speak not from my ass on the experience of small and midsize trucks.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al From 'Murica

          “95% of the overpowered, cartoon testicle Corvette/Porsche/Camaro/Mustangs/Cars owned by BigTrucks with the faux rear quat exhaust have car seats, are driven slower (Routinely drive around them clogging up the left lane) than my 3 year old Midsize Truck, and are being driven to The Mall or Starbucks.”

          There ya go DeadWeight…fixed it for you.

        • 0 avatar
          runs_on_h8raide

          Truth!!! Some dude down the block from me as a RAM 1500 Laramie…it never leaves his driveway.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        “but the point is, if you don’t understand the love for large [small] trucks, repeating information you find salient isn’t worth a nickel. Hilux are great when your options are that and a [full sized truck] horse drawn wagon, and thus they have worldwide appeal. You don’t see Hilux pickups towing a backhoe safely at 75MPH [at all] through highways for a reason.”

        Note how changing the excuses to emphasize big over small, the argument is equally valid. There are a lot of drivers (and I do mean a LOT) who don’t need or WANT a full sized truck but need and WANT the convenience of a proportionally-sized smaller truck with an open bed. The simple fact that sales of the Colorado are still growing at an accelerating rate shows that roughly 80% of their buyers are coming from some other vehicle while about 20% are coming from full-sized trucks. If you offer the people what they want, they WILL buy it. If you don’t, they’ll go elsewhere; not always in the direction you expect, however, as Ford learned when the dropped the Ranger. Fewer than 20% of Ranger owners bought an F-150 and the Tacoma saw a significant up-tick of sales at the same time. Now the overall market for these slightly-smaller trucks is growing roughly in proportion to the growth of full-sized truck sales.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @ Vulpine,
          When the price of fuel starts to rise, see the sales of your ” Lifestyle Vehicles” Midsizers tart to rise

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Vulpine, let’s just be honest with ourselves. High blood pressure lowers your life expectancy, just move to AU and buy all the small trucks you want, the market doesn’t exist for more small lifestyle pickups in America.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “…the market doesn’t exist for more small lifestyle pickups in America.”

            You’re making an assumption based on literally NO data. How can you possibly know if any market exists or not if there are no vehicles available to fill that market? The simple fact that CUVs are forced to drag around tiny utility trailers proves there is a market for compact trucks. I’d be towing one myself, if my HOA didn’t prevent it. (No trailers to be parked in yards where they can be seen by ANY neighbor; all such vehicles must be parked in overflow lots.) Guess what, those overflow lots are filled with junk cars, campers and boat trailers 90% of the time. And every one of them has either been broken into or stolen. With the small utility trailers, a metal thief can simply walk up and toss it in the back of a pickup truck and sell it to a recycling yard for pennies on the dollar and the owner is out whatever they paid (10′ trailers run about $500 around here).

            It only goes to prove you have no idea of what kind of market may exist for a true, compact, pickup.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @Vulpine – Is it better to lose money on trucks you build? Or on trucks you DON’T build? Losing the Ranger freed up an assembly line too. About 1 in 5 ex Ranger buyers have been stepping up to obscenely profitable F-150s. Those sales ALONE may be replacing all ex Ranger profits.

          Yes I’m saying the Ranger was mildly profitable because of the old tooling/R&D.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @DiM,
            You logic is limited. This is restricting any real analysis of the situation.

            Thus reducing your problem solving ability.

            Here’s a better idea and it suits more or less what you stated in regards to freeing up full size production capability within the US.

            Why can’t all midsizer enter the US from sources external to NAFTA?

            This would free up more production capacity within the US for the manufacture of full size pickups.

            What is stopping this?

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Most of the vehicles not in America are that way because they can’t pass our safety standards and emissions standards. I would start there.
            It’s easy to design a truck/any vehicle to pass all major safety standards in one stab, but many manufacturers aren’t willing to build their vehicles to that competence. It would be unfair to all our manufacturers that do build them to meet that standard if we let beer can vehicles from China sell willy nilly.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Hummer,
            Are you for real, or are you trolling?

            First up I stated to have the pickup built outside of the US. Really what has this got to do with safety if they are manufactured to meet US standards?

            Second, in actual fact many mainstream global pickups have been at a 5 star ENCAP for a period of time longer than US pickups.

            Seems to me the US is following suit here.

            Maybe you should read more about the what is going on prior to submitting one of your comments.

            Do you think the US is the only “modern” nation in the world that uses standards?

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @ Hummer,
        No the Colorado is a lifestyle vehicle, to a certain extent so are full size 1/2 tons in the U.S., Hilux primarily a work vehicle

    • 0 avatar

      Unfortunately, I don’t think Toyota has any plans to sell the HiLux here, but if they did, it would definitely need to be built in North America.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        It would just be the Tacoma. They wouldn’t sell the Hilux and Tacoma side by side. That would be silly.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Why not just the HiLux, bball? That would really be the cheaper option for Toyota anyway, since that’s their biggest selling truck model worldwide already.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Well yeah. But they would still call it the Tacoma here. They have 20 years or something of selling Tacoma’s here and have built a brand name. Even if it’s now a Hilux, Tacoma means something to US trcuk buyers.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Vulpine,
            Seeing the payloads for a Tacoma is roughly half that of a Hilux, I guess they would need to change a lot more structurally

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            You’re missing the point, Robert. They wouldn’t need to change a thing on the HiLux–just kill the Tacoma and leave it at that. Cuts the engineering staff somewhat, true–but that also means the cost of production will be that much lower as one design would truly be ‘global’. Done right, that one design should be able to meet all the minimum safety requirements of all regions, perhaps only requiring a minor part change in the case of lighting.

            Economy of scale, you know?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Also, stop comparing payload ratings of trucks that are not sold in the US to ones that are. Same thing with tow ratings. A Hilux sold here would have similar US tow and payload ratings to the Tacoma.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “stop comparing payload ratings of trucks that are not sold in the US to ones that are.”

            You’re expecting way too much from these guys.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I know. I know better, but sometimes I just can’t help myself. It’s just such blatant misinformation.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Misinformation is the norm for the small truck jihadists around here. God forbid that you try to teach them anything factual.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            ““stop comparing payload ratings of trucks that are not sold in the US to ones that are.”

            But that’s exactly the gist of the argument. WHY AREN’T THEY? If, as has been claimed so many times, there were true competition for truck customers in the US, why are we limited the the extremely small selection we have?

            And no, don’t go on about how the market is dead for them; let the market speak for itself. It hasn’t been able to now for over 40 years.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            It’s hilarious that you’re always demanding answers, when you don’t understand any of the answers that are provided to you.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            It’s even more hilarious, Pch, that despite being shown proof that your answers are untrue and illogical multiple times, you insist they are the only possible answers.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Vulpine
            I agree with BBall, how would you market a Midsize with an almost 3/4 ton payload capacity? It would not fit into current U.S. classification

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Simple. You don’t advertise it as a heavy hauler, you advertise it as a convenience vehicle capable of hauling a refrigerator or a tree, a lawn mower or a snow blower. You advertise it as a homeowner’s vehicle, not a farm or ranch truck. Take a look at pretty much all the full sized truck ads; they’re ranch, farm or construction vehicles with absolutely no interest in being a simple but effective home utility vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Deadweight,
      Yes it will do all that, spot on comment

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Vulpine,
        At least it would be unique for Toyota. People would find it does a lot more than that, towing lightweight 5th Wheelers 26-30ft. Still that capability in what appears to be normal midsizer would be a talking point

  • avatar
    jonnyguitar

    Just returned from Latin America where these are everywhere.
    I liked them and wish I could get one. Ford rangers are also very common. Does anyone know the origin of the new ford Rangers they have in Latin american countries?

  • avatar
    redav

    Two thoughts:

    1. Did they just stick a computer monitor on the dash?
    2. “Euro-Taco” – Hmmmmm, Euro-Tacos (drool). Or should that giro-tacos? IDK.

    • 0 avatar
      kmoney

      “Did they just stick a computer monitor on the dash?” Possibly a version of this?

      http://www.ubergizmo.com/2014/08/toyota-intelligent-system-uses-nexus-tablet/

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    They would be better off selling the 70 series Land Cruiser Pickup. It would be easier to justify the higher cost with the Land Cruiser badges and it is different enough from the Tacoma that they would be less likely to canabalize each other Plus it is a serious enoug offroader to go at it with the Jeep. I would love that, but that doesn’t mean it is a wise business choice…just less unwise than the HiLux and the Tacoma on the same lot.

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    Am I the only one that thinks if they did a highlander with a bed that it would look like this?

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      It looks like they made it attractive for car buyers and ignored the truck buying crowd. Usually that’s good for a high initial take and then low sales as the fad of the new model fades, PT cruiser style.
      I don’t possibly see why anyone would buy this if they intended to work it, it would incur too much damage to keep usuable, and as a personal vehicle, to keep acceptable. The offroad versions of the Colorado, (new Tahoe), and surely this really make you question WTF were people thinking.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Big Al From Murica,
      By the looks of it you are the only one that considers this so.

      A Camry based Hilux????

      I suppose the F-150 is based on a Focus??

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        Talking appearance there guy…reading is fundamental.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Hummer,
        No not 20yr old but 40yr old, still on the roads as long as they pass registration. Most go to newer models better dynamics. Brother in Law has a 20yr old Hilux he uses to pick up items from Big Box stores in Australia. Has 500,000 miles, but still chugging on

  • avatar
    MeJ

    Does anyone here have any real world experience with the Tacoma and the HiLux?
    Are they really as durable as there reputation claims? (I’m thinking of that old Top Gear episode).
    I’m seriously considering a mid-size truck as my next vehicle. I like the Colorado, but I’m drawn to the Tacoma’s (perceived(?)) durability.
    Any thoughts?

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Tacomas are very solid trucks, and have insane resale values for a very good reason. Now, much has been said about their C-channel frames (not fully boxed) and what that may mean for durability/longevity. the 95-04 trucks had a massive recall for frame rust, to the tune of Toyota installing new frames, or buying trucks out for 150% of their value. The 05′-15′ trucks still use a C channel, but there haven’t been frame rust-through issues yet I don’t think. They have gotten a bit cheaper built IMO, the 95-04 is a total beast (aside from frame rot), they’re just damn near unkillable with either the 2.7L 4 cylinder or the 3.4L V6. Lower ball joints are a stressed component due to suspension design (they’re under tension), and more than a few failures have been recorded where the wheel basically comes off ‘unexpectedly.’ They won’t just rattle around for a while loose, you have to check them with a pry bar carefully. My brother has worked on a few of each generation and he’s convinced the older trucks are better made. He did wheel bearings on a ’05 or 06′ with 80k miles, the seals aren’t as good of a design as the older ones and water/dirt gets in and ruins bearings. The older trucks never had that kind of issue. Just anecdotal evidence of the type of stuff that may have gotten lost in translation from the older generation to the new.

      I saw lots of each down in Mexico: US market 1st gen Tacomas bouncing down the dirt roads, loads of “PreRunner” V6 2nd gen trucks, and global Hilux pickups in 2.7vvti guise. But they were vastly outnumbered by Nissan hardbody and NP300 pickups.

  • avatar
    runs_on_h8raide

    What if Toyota also sold them as a Lexus…would they call it the Lexus HiLux? Maybe the iLux? DLux? Perhaps its just RLux if we get it altogether?

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      The Lexus version would be called the Lexlux and either be EV/Hybrid, or have a V6 that runs so smooth you could stack a pyramid of champagne flutes on its hood while running it WOT on a dynanometer & rolling ball bearings down its horizontal panel gaps.

      • 0 avatar
        runs_on_h8raide

        oh come on DW…that marketing campaign wouldn’t work!!! You need some sort of actor with a deep voice, like Laurence Fishburne telling us why we need it ;)

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I do think the new Hilux will have it’s challenges cut out.

    With a number of new and very capable, refined global midsizers all making a name for themselves it will not be an easy fight.

    Toyota has relied heavily on it’s 80s/90s reputation in it’s sales.

    Toyota has built very reliable and boring vehicles. Toyota do charge more for nothing substantial as well.

    I do think this will be the same. A good solid vehicle that will be overpriced.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    @Hummer,
    “You don’t see Hilux pickups towing a backhoe safely at 75MPH through highways for a reason.”

    How do you make a comparison between different class of vehicles.

    I could also state you don’t see many F-150s pulling road trains in the Northern Territory.

    Makes about as much sense.

    You know, I have yet to see a US 1/2 ton pickup tow a backhoe.

    I actually don’t see may US 1/2 ton pickups work. They generally have a scratch free bed with one person behind the wheel.

    Similar to the way we are using pickups.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I doubt you have spent much time in Americas flyover country. Also I’m not sure if your doubting F150s towing? I’ve personally pulled 8k-9k with a 1/2 (Chevrolet) 4.8 V8, that was slow, it was probably also overloaded but other than having a high 0-60 time it didn’t seem to mind. I don’t see anyone pulling 8-9k with a 2.X 4 cylinder, and if they did they certainly wouldn’t do it long.

      Either way I’ve said it 500 times, I don’t care how anyone uses their trucks, key word, “their”.

      On second thought, I just noticed this..

      “How do you make a comparison between different class of vehicles”
      I have never tried to compare mid-size pickups to half tons, that’s you buddy, I don’t expect any midsize truck to support the abuse half tons are designed for.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @Hummer,
        WTF?

        Taxes imported pickups???

        The more I read your comment the more they remind me of a movie I once watched……Deliverance.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @Hummer,
        Your comments;
        “I have never tried to compare mid-size pickups to half tons, that’s you buddy,”

        Another;
        “You don’t see Hilux pickups towing a backhoe safely at 75MPH through highways for a reason”

        So what is the above in aid of??

        Boy, I would like to pass a nice, warm and fuzzy comment in your direction, but you make it very hard.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          You have stated multiple times 1/2 pickups were weak and pointless beside your midsize world pickups, that’s my basis, I made the statement for you specifically, I don’t expect anyone to ever put a world midsize through the same stress a 1/2 can take.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Hummer,
            Your 1/2 tons fall apart, they are not built for the pounding Global Midsizers do. Some U.S. Poster commented on what he saw in South America, Mexico., similar comment about how fragile current U.S. 1/2 tons are

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            What about South America?
            Multiple 30+ year old half tons some as old as the late 1960s tooling around my town still doing work, seem to hold up pretty well.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            RobertRyan,

            I believe you’re referring to me talking about what sort of Toyotas and Nissans I saw. Well that’s not the full picture. If Nissans of various ilk make up about 50 percent of the mix of pickups that I saw in Puerto Vallarta, and Toyotas maybe 15%, the rest is all old US 1/2 tons. Mexicans love base model F150s, beat up old GMT400s, Dodge Rams, you name it. The American trucks make up that remaining 35% of what I saw. The big driver behind the Nissan dominance is localized production and therefor affordability. Yes they’re also amazingly sturdy and I saw them overloaded to high hell, but they’re not somehow more capable than the larger US trucks.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            “What about South America?
            Multiple 30+ year old half tons some as old as the late 1960s tooling around my town still doing work, seem to hold up pretty well.”

            Some as old as the late 1960’s. How many would pass muster, being registered in a 1st, 2nd world country. I think they would go to the dumper

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            They are on the road, definately still working, Americas still a 1st world country…

            1/2 pickups are built strong enough to do that, by your comment I’m guessing midsize trucks are pretty useless after 10-15 years.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Hummer
        Depends what you call a Backhoe? I have seen Pickups here pull a small backhoe at highway speeds. Someone
        with a Daihatsu ultra small light truck carry a medium sized backhoe in the tray at 70mph

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          I was thinking along the lines Kubota M59, 8-9k pounds.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Hummer
            The Daihatsu had something like that, he was hitting 70mph,cruising speed limit
            Only time Global Pickups use gooseneck or 5ver hitches is towing 8,000lb 5vers
            Gooseneck hitches on Pickups rare here, most are bumper tows

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Can’t say I’ve ever seen anything less than a HD1500 with a 5th wheel here. It’s not worth the stresses it puts on components.
            For pennies more you can buy a 3/4 truck to pull much more, much safer.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @Robert Ryan – They’re risking a lot of things pulling that much weight, legal in OZ/NZ or not. Physically, it can be done, but in North America, we choose to avoid situations that could hurt someone and land us in jail. You’r living in the Wild West.

            Here, there’s a right truck for every job.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @DiM,
            How can it be anymore dangerous in “Oz” towing a 8 000lb fifth wheel behind a vehicle that weighs 4 700lbs or a 5 500lb vehicle towing a 9 000lb backhoe with at least a 2 000lb trailer under it.

            Doesn’t add up, does it?

            I don’t know if your Canadian/Spanish education covered basic arithmetic, but it does appear the US vehicle’s ratio of weight towed in comparison to the “Oz” vehicle is larger.

            So, which vehicle is the most dangerous at towing using your analogy?

            It seems your cognitive abilities are limited.

            If I were you I wouldn’t try and debate in any discussion prior to the use of Google for research and a calculator for arguments like you just presented.

            To assist you I have a link that provides tutorials for people like yourself that have some challenges.

            I used these types of tutorials when I was responsible for our Math and Physics students at our College. This course isn’t advanced. It will suit your current level of math proficiency.

            Give it a go, as it will help develop you.

            http://www.coolmath4kids.com/arithmetic-lessons.html

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @BAFO – Why would you compare a 5th wheel trailer on midsize vs a ‘bumper tow’ on a fullsize? Oh that’s right, you’re BAFO.

            Rocket Scientist my A$$!!

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @DiM,
            You are the one who made the original comparison.

            In actual fact, looking at the information presented the 11 000lb backhoe/trailer on the bumper is far, far more dangerous than towing from a point over the rear axle.

            But, now we are getting into physics.

            First, complete the link I gave you, once we can have your math competency up to 8th grade, I’ll give you some physics tutorials.

            This will be a long process. But one day if you allow me to mentor you we’ll have a fair debate on equal terms.

            At the moment it isn’t fair on your part.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            It’s not that big of a deal in America, I’ve towed 8-9k with a 1/2 FS with the tiny V8, only because the 3/4 trucks were in use. But in a normal situation, if someone needed to tow 8k+ more than once or twice they would spend the extra ~$1000 and step up to the 3/4 ton pickup.

            I certainly found the 4.8l V8 lacking, but with that said, I wouldn’t think twice about leaving the skinny pedal pushed all the way to the floor for 5 minutes or more. I couldn’t possibly say the same for the tiny engines they use in these global trucks, not only would normal driving be compromised, any towing would be downright scary.

            Forget how the trailer is being pulled, if the truck can only do 25 MPH up a long hill the dynamics of the pull isn’t exactly high on my list of fears.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @BAFO – Why do you comment, but not follow along? I didn’t set up the scenario. But I just want to know why you can NEVER do a straight apples-to-apples comparison. Massive difference between a ‘bumper tow’ and 5th wheel. And obviously the optimal scenario involving backhoes includes a 3/4 ton and up. That’s standard protocol in North America, not just for safety, but for not constantly replacing the same worn and broken parts over and over and over. Especially transmissions and rearends.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            “Can’t say I’ve ever seen anything less than a HD1500 with a 5th wheel here. It’s not worth the stresses it puts on components.
            For pennies more you can buy a 3/4 truck to pull much more, much safer.”
            Designed the 5vers to be towed the Global Misizers. No they are not stressed,

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Someone driving a midsize wouldn’t even be considering such a tow in the first place–which is the whole point about having different classes of truck. Not everybody–not even 1% of everybody–will ever have a need to tow an 8k-9K# load. Why should they be forced to have the capability if they will never, EVER, need it?

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            You know Hummer, you’re either not very old or not very observant; back in the ’80s there were quite a few fifth-wheel campers specifically designed to be towed behind compact pickup trucks like the Nissan Hardbody, Toyota, S-10 and Ranger. You don’t see them now simply because there’s no compact trucks to tow them. Instead, ultra-light teardrops and others have been resurrected because they’re the only type light enough to be towed behind current CUVs. Watch what happens if true compact trucks come back.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      Ive seen it. Most that are going to work their trucks line the bed. Mine is scratch free, yet I had a bathrooms worth of busted up tiles rattling around back there last week. Yay Monstaliner! There was just me behind the wheel which is lucky as I am pretty sure it was over loaded.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I don’t like the looks of it. If this is what the rest of the world gets then I’m hoping for an increase in the Chicken tax.

    I’m sure we will see an Americanized version of the Hilux. GM went that route with the Colorado/Canyon.

    Small trucks appear to be more polarizing than gay rights…….

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      Lou_BC
      It looks a bit like the U.S. Colorado. Yes a version of this will be the new Tacoma. Unfortunately, the reasonable looking
      Ranger, looks bit like this Hilux as well in the new 2015 version
      http://www.caradvice.com.au/thumb/960/477/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/2015-ford-ranger-wildtrak.jpg

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    My problem with all of the Australian trucks is that the “ruger in the console” option is not available at any cost.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Truth be told some of you guys are afraid of midsize trucks. Midsize trucks are just another product and will not compete against your large half tons. If you really were for free competition and more choice you would not fear the midsize trucks. What difference does it make to you, you can buy the biggest and most expensive truck that you can afford. As for compact trucks, please name me a true compact pickup available new in the US?

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