By on April 8, 2015

12 - 1988 Pontiac Fiero Formula Down On the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Murilee MartinAh, the Pontiac Fiero. So much potential, but ultimately a disappointment for The General. I see the occasional Fiero during my wrecking-yard wandering, but it takes a special one to inspire me to shoot photos. This screaming yellow ’86 Fiero GT was one, and today’s final-year-of-production ’88 Fiero Formula is another.
01 - 1988 Pontiac Fiero Formula Down On the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Murilee MartinGM saved money on the original Fieros by using a parts-bin suspension (Chevy Citation in the rear, Chevette in the front) and the not-so-sporty Iron Duke four-cylinder pushrod engine, instead of the Fiero-only suspension penned by the engineers and the bespoke aluminum V6 of their dreams. By 1988, though, the Fiero finally got the suspension intended for it… just in time for the end of production.
20 - 1988 Pontiac Fiero Formula Down On the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Murilee MartinThis car looks to have been picked over by junkyard vultures, but it’s still possible to see that it has all sorts of options. Air conditioning!
06 - 1988 Pontiac Fiero Formula Down On the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Murilee MartinIs it possible that we’re looking at a 419,807-mile car here? The off-centeredness of the odometer numerals may indicate mechanical troubles rather than an incredible number of miles.

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96 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1988 Pontiac Fiero Formula...”


  • avatar
    Jimal

    I remember what a big deal the Fiero was for GM back in the mid 80’s. My father worked for a GM division at the time and they had this traveling road show that visited the plants. The centerpiece of the one show I remember – it had to be 1983 – was a pair of pre-production Fieros; one with the body installed and the other with no body panels.

    A Fiero is still on my automotive bucket list. I don’t know what I’d do with it, but I still want one.

    • 0 avatar
      Wscott97

      The Fiero is still on my automotive bucket list also. It’s such a great looking car and fun to drive.
      I remember learning how to drive a stick in my friends Fiero. He kept yelling at me for spinning out his tires at each stop light. He never let me drive it alone.

    • 0 avatar
      anti121hero

      I know what I’d do. Swap in a supercharged 3800.

  • avatar
    Marone

    This car did have high hopes and now seems to to illict a smirk. Nice idea…poor execution. Reminds me a bit of the Solstice/Sky years later.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      Not a fan of the Solstice/Sky. It could have been a great contender but that transmission was lacking.

      A friend of mine’s dad put a Ferrari GTO kit on a V-6 Fiero when I was in High School. He went all out. Factory emblems, stock exhaust, stock lighting, etc. He even built the matching GTO side mirrors. I even remember something like a $5000 paint job in Rosso Corsa. It was impressive in the day and it was a quality kit that had all the right lines. I wonder how long it held up and what it would look like today. :)

  • avatar

    I just picked up an ’86 SE 2m4 notchback for this summer’s rehab project, always wanted one. They’re definitely not the nimble, lightweight car you’d think it’d be. Still fun to drive though, you just have to be patient. The online community is awesome, however. Makes the work that much easier.

    And that steering column could be worth gold. That was the first thing I had to fix.

  • avatar
    Athos Nobile

    I guess we are looking at a 2.8 V6, Multi Port Fuel Injection motor in there. Dual exhaust, must have sounded nice.

  • avatar
    CaptainObvious

    I too remember the “buzz” about this car when it first came out. Despite all of its faults it’s still a great-looking car.

  • avatar
    JMII

    The wife of the guy who works on my boat has a gold and black model in perfect, mint, showroom condition. It really is a great looking car, a true mini Ferrari. Shame that it had all the typical GM shortcomings: parts bin items, cheap interior, crappy engine… and the whole catching fire problem. Always thought these would make great project cars, especially with the various kits. As long as you don’t take the thing too seriously it would be a hoot to turn one into a wanna-be super car.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Parts bin vehicles means cheap parts, and if they are used correctly, it’s just as good as a specialty part but doesn’t drive up costs nor make it impossible to find the parts in 20 years. Neither engines can rightfully be called crappy, the iron duke although slow was reliable, and the 2.8L from the 60V6 Family is the only set of V6 engines I would ever happily own. Reliable, simple, and sound great.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “2.8L from the 60V6 Family is the only set of V6 engines”

        I think you’d better schedule an appointment for confession at the Church of 3800.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        “and the 2.8L from the 60V6 Family is the only set of V6 engines I would ever happily own.”

        Ugh terrible. There are so many better V6s out there that don’t puke gaskets with nearly as much frequency. Also, different length pushrods for the intake and exhaust valves? The most rage.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Are we talking about a RWD 60V or FWD 60V?
          I’m used to the RWD version, never had a problem with the intake gasket. I’ve pulled the heads from a 2.8L, I can guarantee the pushrods are all the same length after accidentally getting them mixed.

          Additionally the 3.4l in an S10 is excellent on fuel mileage.

          And again, I love that sound.

        • 0 avatar

          the Fiero had the iron head 2.8 which has equal length pushrods. It also makes 140hp and 173lbft of torque just about off idle.

          I had the mass air version of this cars MAP based engine in my 6000-STE. Good little performer actually, and very tractable, only got breathless as it got near redline (near 6,000 rpm)

          As it was, the iron 2.8s aren’t the gasket puking later aluminum head 2.1/3.1/3.4 from deathcool.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            texan,
            I thought the 2.8/3.1 was a pretty solid engine, even in aluminum head form. Things only really got questionable once they moved to the series 2 version…aka 3100 engines.

            I’ve had a few (including a Fiero GT) of the 2.8’s and 3.1’s and never had any issues with them. I did have one 3100 (bought used with 40K miles on it) that sucked down oil like it was a 2 stroke.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            There were other 60* engines that had unequal length pushrods, that’ll make you rage the first time.

            There were so many iterations, it’s hard to keep track, but IMO there was little redeeming about any of them. If you managed to get one that didn’t blow an intake or head gasket (yes even pre dexcool era) they’d leak oil like sieves from their stupid valve covers onto the crank sensor and ignition coils and cause ignition problems.

            Don’t get me wrong, they can be long lived if kept up on. There’s a beat up Sunbird sitting behind my shop with a bunch of miles that still runs OK, but they aren’t redeeming engines. Saying they sound good in comparison to a 3800 is like comparing what types of farts sound better than others. They both sound like ass.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Mine is pre-dex it has no crank sensor, and the ignition coil is mounted well above the entire engine. Also with Rubber gaskets leaks aren’t really a problem, so long that is, as you remember to put a dab of RTV where the Head and intake meet.

            I didn’t say it sounded good compared to a 3800, honestly I have no recollection of the 3800s sound, I’m holding it up to the sound of a V8, though very distinct in its own way.

            And actually I have been around a Impala with the later 3.4, it has been, and still is untouched; though that’s not exactly evidence that proves otherwise obviously, I know the later ones have there problems.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        I agree, the 60 degree V6’s were sportier engines than the 3800, and sounded great. They were also very light. I liked them in turbo charged form myself.

        • 0 avatar

          the 3800 was a great powerhouse, but it was not an enthusiastic revver. the little six was a much more willing dance partner.

          • 0 avatar
            matador

            The 3800 isn’t that bad at acceleration. I have one in a LeSabre (Series I), and the big girl can move. You just move quickly… and composed.

            May I interest you in a Supercharged 3800?

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          They were really decent engines. Keep the dexdeath out of them they produce good power, sound almost V8ish, and rev pretty well. All in all, considering it was developed mid Malaise Era, a good solid B plus. Sure its no VQ but it owes nobody any apologies.

      • 0 avatar
        Athos Nobile

        Ditto, the 2.8 sounds heaps better than the 3800.

        My best friend used to drive a Celebrity with the 2.8; I drive a car with the 3800. I liked the sound of the 2.8, not so much the sound of the 3800.

        Another V6 that sounds sweet is the 3.5 that Mitsubishi stuffed into Magnas here.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    The Fiero was the ‘cheap knockoff’ of the MR2.

    So GM had to cobble it together and put it for sale before the MR2 hit the market. GM has to be 1st on the market with another OEM’s original idea. So designs get thrown together hastily. I don’t see what’s wrong with being 2nd.

    The early MR2 was the clear ‘better’ of the two, so I bought one (used). Of course from a chick, gently driven and post warranty. Then drove it like it was stolen!

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Uh no.

      The Fiero was first picthed in the 70s as a plastic bodied commuter car, and was supposed to come out in the 1982 MY. The Fiero can even trace it’s roots back further to the 60s, when John DeLorean and Pete Estes tried to get the Pontiac Banshee built. It ended up being a project that stopped and started a number of times.

      The Fiero’s problems have more to do with GM internal politics and slashed budgets.

      • 0 avatar
        gearhead77

        Beat me to it, bball. Fiero was supposed to be a Smart for the 80’s in a way and I guess Toyota introducing the MR2 changed that mission?

        This car typifies GM’s “great idea, poor execution” business model. I do like the way the last year car looks, especially in Formula trim. I was going to buy one for cheap a few years ago, but just couldn’t do it.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        I remember a remarkably candid and revealing C/D article that came out when the Fiero did. It told the story of how the immediate Fiero project was the brainchild of one guy down in the bowels of GM Engineering. He cobbled together the car, produced around an X-car drivetrain flipped backwards and a chopped existing chassis so it’w would be affordable to produce. He showed it secretively one by one to officials up the line, and got a couple of them excited about it.

        Until it ran into a high-ranking Pontiac Division official named John Schinella. (I remember his name after all these years solely because of the white-hot hate this story engenders in me.) He pronounced that the car was a nice idea and all, but it didn’t have “a Pontiac face.” He then unilaterally proceeded to completely screw up the proportions of the car. I think it was something like shortening the hood 5 inches, moving the interior forward by a like amount, crazy Frankenstein surgery. Then he pronounced the car fit to proceed, and in that condition it did. Presumably this was all so he could take the credit for “fixing” it.

        I tried a bit but never found out what happened to that jamoke. Of course, the Internet would not enable me to confirm whether he went on to his deserved outcome of spending all eternity fellating Ed Cole and Roger Smith as he fried in hell.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Feel the hate flow through you.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The prototype (2nd gen? I’m confused) was pretty good. I like how the brake lamps create a continuity with the side trims.

            http://gafieroclub.org/pics/pip/1990_Pontiac_Fiero_Prototype_Coupes_(Large).jpg

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          GM gave the guys developing the Feiro a $400 million budget, then cut it to $300 million after 1980 sucked so hard.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            bb
            more like they had to fight to get anything, and then had to pretend it was a super economy commuter just to get it built (there was an economy model that was rated at 40mpg for the 84 model year.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Right, they originally pitched it as a 50 MPG two seat commuter. Never hit the 50 MPG though.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            Actually I was wrong, it was rated at 50mpg for 1984.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        No doubt GM kicks around a lot of *ideas*.

        The Banshee was front engine and inspired by the Mustang Concept. The Camaro and Opel GT were what the Banshee later became.

        I realize the MR2 showed up a year later, but that doesn’t mean it didn’t light a fire under GM when they saw Toyota moving forward with it.

    • 0 avatar
      Lack Thereof

      Both launched for ’84, I think. If the MR2 was first to market, it was only by a matter of months.

      The MR2 was a truer sports-car out-of-the-gate. The Fiero, on the other hand, had to be pitched to GM heads as a high-economy 2-seater commuter car in order to get greenlighted… which is how it initially ended up with compromises like freeway-float spring rates, X-car suspension in the rear, and the Iron Duke as the base engine.

      An 88′ Fiero Formula 2.8, like the one photographed here, is the ultimate version of the Fiero.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        The Fiero came out first. GM started production in late ’83. I think it was almost a year later when the MR2 hit US showrooms.

        It’s too bad the Fiero didn’t stick around long enough to get the Quad4. Noisy as hell but it put down the power.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Quad4? Yuck.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The HO Quad4 churned out more HP than many of the GM V6s at the time. Alas, Danio is right, it would explode.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          The HO quad 4 would have been cool in these cars. Until it blew a head gasket or tossed a rod.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            Funny how Car and Driver originally called the Quad 4 a “jewel of an engine”…what a bad call. My friend went right to Honda after her car needed four figure engine repairs at 70K. Yeah it could produce some power. But how a design that had such a short life could make it into production is beyond comprehension. And, to make things worse, the balance shafts that were originally rejected for cost concerns had to be installed anyway…after the reputation of the engine was trashed

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            The car magazines routinely laud anything new from GM as being fantastic and at least on a par with the imports. They don’t let on that GM’s most recent effort is still a practical joke until buyers have found out on their own.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            Car and Driver does not analyze or predict reliability. The Quad4 was both torquey and happy to rev, with a nice growl. It seemed like a great engine when it worked.

            The “Twin Cam” that followed had those things but was also smoother and much more reliable. My only complaint about the final iteration is that the water pump is driven by the timing chain.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            “My only complaint about the final iteration is that the water pump is driven by the timing chain.”

            I once had a serpentine belt come apart on a Volvo white block (5 cylinder) a few miles from home and I was grateful that my water pump was driven off the timing belt.

            Just another perspective.

            (Granted, if I’d had the car a long time and, say, the water pump seized and took out the timing belt with it, then I guess I might have a different opinion!)

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I don’t have great things to say about the longevity of the Q4, but I can see how the engine would get a good review in a “First Drive” type scenario.

            The Northstar family is another good example of an engine that makes a positive first impression which isn’t backed up by the trying ownership experience.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            As long as I’m within a few hundred miles of home, I’ll take being stranded by a serpentine belt failure over having to change a water pump on a Twin Cam!

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            The same magazine would soon be describing the Q4’s NVH as bolts in a blender, so I DO NOT see why it would merit a positive initial review.

      • 0 avatar
        Crabspirits

        The 1st gen in “Indy” trim and the 2nd gen GT’s are some of the best looking cars GM has ever made.

        Best engine swap for these would probably be a Nissan SR20VE with ITB’s. They don’t feel very good with a lot of weight back there.

  • avatar
    Lack Thereof

    I think that last image is of a slightly newer Pontiac.

  • avatar

    No way this is an ’88. The 88’s rear pillar extended almost all the way to the back. This is a prior year variation.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      That was only on the GT. This is an ’88 Formula.

      • 0 avatar
        Roberto Esponja

        dal20402 is correct, I almost bought a 1988 Formula at Ernie Von Schledorn in Milwaukee, right after I graduated from college. Decided instead to go the “sensible” route and bought a used car, but that yellow V6 Fiero Formula has always stayed on my mind…would love to have just like it nowadays.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    One of my work associates bought a last year Fiero.
    There was some quality issue with that new front suspension package, I think he had pieces replaced on warranty 3 or 4 different times.

    These have become interesting engine swap platforms, I’ve seen Northstars, Buick 3.8 supercharged, Ecotec, and LS versions.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    I remember someone bringing one of these by the VW Shop when they were just released , it was red & cute , I thought GM would sell boatloads of therm .

    Questions :

    What caused the engine fires ? . an easily fixed item ? .

    Where is this : either that’s some Ghetto/Barrio/White Trash place or that Yard is soon to close ~ I can’t imagine anyone looking out their windows into a Junk Yard all day long and not pissing & moaning to City Hall constantly…

    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      PonchoIndian

      Nate

      The engine fires were caused by a bad combo of things (and in reality I believe there were actually very few engine fires, like right around 100 actually reported).

      There was a bad batch of connecting rods that would blow a hole in the block. The early 84’s had specified a 3 quart oil capacity, which accelerated the connecting rod problem. For the most part the fix was to change the dipstick out and change the required capacity to 4 quarts…I could be off it’s been a while since I’ve read the book on the development of these.

  • avatar
    RonaldPottol

    Um, the Fiat X1/9 came out in 1972, and was widely available in the US market the whole time. Econobox fwd (from a Fiat 128) stuffed behind the seats, wrapped in a cool body. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiat_X1/9

    So, if anyone is stealing anything, it’s Toyota and GM stealing from Fiat and Bertone.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    Man, I’ve grown to love me some Fiero.

    Wonder if some aftermarket company makes the 1988 suspension as a retrofit for older Fieros.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Dave was a dreamer.

    The windows and sunroof of the Fiero were open as Dave felt beautiful spring air coarse through the interior and he enjoyed flogging the tired 60V6 between the stop lights of Rt 19 North. The Fiero sounded so sweet after takeoff, it almost made up for the car’s advanced age. He acquired Fiero as a junior in high school and it dutifully carried him to Community College five days a week. He enjoyed the dated styling cues as he felt his Fiero was unique in a sea of jellybean Hyundais and leased BMWs. Dave’s mother face-palmed his purchase of the car but four years and many junkyard trips later here the Fiero was still running strong as he made the turn into the shop garage.

    “Did you fix the brakes yet?” the grizzled mechanic cried out as he saw the bright red car stop.
    Dave parked the Fiero and replied from inside the car “Yeah I put new pads and rotors on at home. What else was wrong with it Greg?”
    “Nuttin I don’t think” Greg replied as he wiped his hands with a GoJo stained rag. “Just have to run it through emissions”
    “Where’s Chuck?” Dave asked as he stepped out of the car.
    “He’s running a car around for the test, I’ll take yours in now. Where are the keys?” Greg asked while holding out his hand
    “Cool. They’re right here” he said dangling the keys which Greg took.
    Greg sat in the driver’s seat and yelled to Dave “What’s the real mileage, its not 419 thousand is it?”
    “Just put 119 thousand” Dave replied as he entered the doorway to the waiting room.

    The waiting room of the shop was a most unique one, more a cross between a man cave and an office than a waiting room. He said down in the comfortable but dated seafoam green recliner next to the popcorn machine and turned on the CRT television. Fortunately the shop had extended basic cable, but as he flicked through the channels he couldn’t find anything interesting to watch. Dave settled on the History Channel’s special on Genghis Khan and patiently waited to hear news on the Fiero. He saw the Fiero pull in through the half open door to the garage and watched as Greg towed out the rusted pre-OBDII emissions machine then attaching it to the Fiero’s exhaust. Dave checked his phone and noticed a text message from Kaleigh which made him smile.

    “Ya know, that TV was actually a Volvo training monitor from 1987 I rigged up” Chuck said as he stood in the doorway. Dave turned his attention away from his phone and replied “Yeah Chuck I know, you tell me almost every time I come in here”. Chuck took a final heavy drag from his cigarette and flicked the butt into the parking lot. Smoke danced all around his person as he stepped into the man cave office. His blackish grey hair pushed out from under his ball cap and his eyeglasses were old and worn. He said down in the matching seafoam green recliner next to Dave and drew a deep sigh.

    “I’m tired; so tired Dave” Chuck said “Greg get yer car?”.
    “Yeah he’s got it, he’s running the smog test” Dave replied, then hesitated “I hope it passes”.
    “Me too we can’t give you another exemption again, three is the max”.
    “Yeah” Dave said as he nodded and turned his attention back to the History Channel.
    “While yer here, we’ve been having trouble with our AllData computer if you want to take a look”.
    Dave turned back to Chuck and gave him a look of slight disbelief. “Do I have Geek Squad tattooed on my forehead?”
    “No, but I thought you might want to help out the shop going to computer school and all” Chuck said surreptitiously.

    Dave cleared off the dated manuals on the vintage office chair and sat down in front of the AllData computer. He touched the mouse which removed the screensaver and revealed a Windows XP computer. Right clicking the “My Computer” icon to reveal its properties, he noticed it was Windows XP Service Pack 1 which was surpassed around 2004. He cleaned dirt off the front of the old beige desktop to reveal a “Gateway 2000” logo.

    “Chuck, what the hell is this?” Dave asked sarcastically with his eyebrows high on his face. Chuck stood behind him and leaned over his shoulder.
    “Its our shop computer. AllData is a program we use for shop manuals on all of the cars though I think 2010” he replied while clicking the AllData icon. “The issue is we can’t get on the internet and we get all of these popup messages telling us the computer is infected every few minutes or so”

    The AllData program loaded but a poorly typed error message occurred on top of the AllData program indicating the computer’s owner needed to buy SpeedNow product to “speed up the computer”. Clearly this machine was infected with some kind of spyware Dave thought as he searched the error message on Google. He pulled a USB storage device from his keychain and plugged it into the USB1.1 port on the rear of the desktop. He copied the “ComboFix” installer from his USB drive and executed it on the computer, the familiar DOS window appeared and indicated ComboFix was running and “it may take awhile”. Dave spun around in the chair to face Chuck.

    “Ok, this thing is clearly infected. I’m running ComboFix on it which is a free program which will hopefully remove the spyware. I’ll install ClamWin on it when its done so you’ll have some semblance of anti-virus, but you really should look into backing up this computer and probably replacing it.” Dave said.
    “Money’s tight and besides that software costs like 5 grand” Chuck replied.
    “Okaaay” Dave replied. “We’ll have to figure out a way to back it up”. They both turned to the right as Greg entered the room.

    “Fiero won’t pass smog” Greg said sadly.

    Dave felt a punch to the gut as he heard those words. The Fiero’s fine. She drives fine, and he just spent $110 in parts and an hour of his time installed new front brakes. Sure she’s a little rough around the edges but she’s got, character. She’s a dream. Dave’s dream. He stood up and walked through the man cave office to garage and the running Fiero. He opened the door and sat on the cut up fabric of the driver’s seat. He fiddled with the HVAC vents. He revved the accelerator listening to that sweet 80s exhaust note. The dream can’t be over.

    “Look, I know you have an emotional attachment to the car and all but you gotta suck it up” Chuck said leaned over on the driver’s door. “Sh** happens. Dreams die. Some things just aren’t worth saving Dave. You can’t keep watering a dead flower”.
    “What am I gonna do Chuck, I have to have a car. Finals start soon. I need to see Kaleigh” he said as he pounded the steering wheel.
    “I may be able to help you” Chuck said as he pulled open the driver’s door “Walk this way”.

    Standing behind the shop, Chuck took Dave past a few dead cars including an 80s Saab and a smashed in Volvo 850 wagon to two seemingly new looking vehicles parked beside each other hoods facing them.

    “I got this ’99 Deville and this ’93 Volvo 240.” Chuck said pointing at the cars. “The Cadillac belonged to some 94 year old mother of one of my customers which I am selling on consignment. The car has forty six thousand original miles. She wants five grand”. Dave walked along the side of the Cadillac and dragged his fingers across the long hood, noticing the grey carriage roof and the “D’Elegance” emblem on the rear quarter panels. He pulled open the heavy door and sat in the couch-like driver’s seat starting up the Deville. The car smelled new and he stared at the holy icon of Jesus Christ hanging from the rearview mirror. Dave looked up at Chuck now standing just outside of the open car door.

    “Five grand, eh” Dave said. “But this is Northstar isn’t it?
    “Yup” Chuck replied.
    Dave turned right and gazed at the long white Volvo 240. “Whose Volvo is that?”
    “Its mine, no consignment” Chuck replied.
    “How much?” Dave asked.
    “Eh, two grand; and you keep looking at my computers” Chuck said looking Dave straight in the eye.
    “Lemmie take the Volvo for a spin?” Dave asked with a big smile.

    http://www.shmoop.com/little-prince/flower.html

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy

      Bravo!

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Thanks.

        You should thank Shirley Manson though, she recently saved my life in a manner of speaking.

        youtube.com/watch?v=4luq5WEFwrM&list=PLADA7EEF3D2DD30D2&index=2

    • 0 avatar
      Crabspirits

      Using GoJo instead of Zep F-10 like a newb. Can’t do basic computer troublshooting. No wonder they can’t get an archaic Fiero in sound running condition to pass smog. Poor Fiero.
      California… (shakes head)

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Can you do computer troubleshooting on an ’88 60V6?

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          Heck yeah you can. OBD-I. Get out the old Snap On brick or count the blinks from the check engine light.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m reaching here but I was under the impression OBDI didn’t come out until 1990, at least as a “standard”. Some mfgs prior to that did have morse code like diagnostic systems (Cadillac with the 4100 and Volvo’s 700 and 200s got them at least by the mid 80s IIRC)

          • 0 avatar

            paperclip does wonders on GM OBD-i cars. (it came out in 1981) on all but the caddies.

            Not much to go wrong on an EFI GM car, but the carbed ones can be a bear.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            Was the early eighties stuff really “OBDI”? I thought that was the GM CCC system for Computer Command Control…

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            “paperclip does wonders on GM OBD-i cars”

            There was an old word processor, for the Commodore 64, named “PaperClip.”

            ((drops mic))

  • avatar
    Timothy

    Love how the tach wound past vertical. Not sure why. It’s weird.

  • avatar
    Thorshammer_gp

    Like others have said, this is definitely a car I’d love to drive at some point- I always loved the look of the GT-trimmed models. In the meantime, I could really use some parts off of that Grand Prix next to it…

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    That black ice air freshener – is that in a 96-98 Grand Am?

    edit: Nope, they had round vents.

    Sunfire?

  • avatar
    Chan

    These “forgotten” GM sports cars are always a treat to see.

    A well-restored example would probably still be impressive out on today’s roads. That said, I have yet to see one with the infamous F355 body kit.

  • avatar

    Had a GF with one when it was new. It would roll along OK at 80, but when pressed, the Iron Duke wasn’t a sport engine, and the front suspension, big tires notwithstanding, didn’t do a lot. Compared to my VW first gen Scirocco, or my GLH, it was really, really bad. I dreamed of getting the 2.2 turbo four in the GLH swapped into the Fiero.

    Good memories about the girl, less so about the car. Worse, they fixed it and then killed it.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    I saw a pristine MR2 on the highway last weekend. Still see them on the road a bit. The Fiero would have killed its marketability off with quality issues, but the MR2 couldn’t have helped. There was just no reason beyond loyalty to a logo to buy a Fiero over a 2 year older MR2.

    • 0 avatar
      PonchoIndian

      The Fiero sold better than any of its competition each and every year it was in production. The only reason the MR2 and others were still around is because they were sold globally so they had a larger market to sell to allowing them to have a business case to keep them going for a while longer, although not all that much longer.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        The MR2 actually was sold until 2005 in the United States, so it hung on for quite a while. But, yeah, all of the other Fiero competitors around the same time (Nissan NX, Honda CRX/Del Sol, Mazda MX3, Geo Storm, etc) all died by the mid or late ’90s. Setting the Fiero’s design issues aside, I’m sure GM could see the handwriting on the wall, and decided not to spend more money on any re-designs.

        My theory is that the Mitsubishi Eclipse / Ford Probe killed them all.

    • 0 avatar
      PonchoIndian

      LGT, the same could be said for the MR2 as far as buying preferences. Unless you’ve owned one or both I’m not sure you can really throw that net and expect it to catch anything.

  • avatar
    engine_block

    hi im just wondering although i doubt you’ll read this but im collecting the badges/emblems from cars and i was wondering if you could help me out because i see in your posts cars that i would never see in my area

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