By on March 4, 2015

Integra1998

When a publication like Barron’s is getting in on the “Japanese classic car” story, you can be sure that this is more than just a flash-in-the-pan phenomenon of aging boomers looking to buy the 240Z they lusted after in high school. It also helps that most Japanese cars, save for the Toyota 2000GT and an all-original Nissan Skyline GT-R “Hakosuka” with the original S20 engine, are within the reach of most potential classic car investors.

Aside from obvious candidates like the Acura NSX and the Toyota Supra Turbo, I think that there are some solid gems that will fetch decent money or be otherwise desirable in the future. Front and center is the Acura Integra Type-R. Most of them have been crashed, stolen or modified. I don’t think they’ll ever hit the same heights as a Hemi Cuda, but they occupy a similar place in the imagination of the Fast and Furious generation. I’d also add the Mitsubishi Evo and the third-generation Mazda RX-7 for similar reasons. Any other candidates?

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167 Comments on “Question Of The Day: Japan’s Future Classics...”


  • avatar
    Josh_Howard

    Slicktop (no t-top) Z32. 2600 were shipped to the US between ’89 and ’96. I stumbled across one as my first Z car, and boy are they rare. All were NA (222hp 3.0 V6 with variable timing), but this is where they get even more rare… everyone motor swaps them. They’re the lightest 300zx and sexy to boot. I’ve got #149 of 162 built in Nissan Super White. Will it be worth a ton? Probably not… but it’ll always be worth much more than the thousand dollars I paid to pull it out of a backyard and save it. Runs great!

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      But I don’t want a 300ZX without t-tops and twin turbo. Although, I think your non-TT version will last longer.

      • 0 avatar
        Josh_Howard

        That’s the thing, because this specific style was more track rat, they got beat to death or hacked and swapped. A twin turbo is the easy part. Drive a T-top car on the track… most places won’t let you. There is a HUGE difference in their ability to flex.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I wouldn’t track it. If I’m buying a 300ZX, I want it to look sweet (t-tops), and have twin-turbo badging (because early 90s!!!). If I wanted to track a Nissan, it would be a 510 or 240SX. All the 240SXs in this country are used up though. SR20DET swapped and beat to hell.

          • 0 avatar
            Josh_Howard

            Everyone wants a turbo. That’s sort of the problem. The turbo cars also tend to have quite a few issues that always need ironing out. Have seen quite a few go 500hp on stock internals though. Those VG motors suck to work on but sure are stout. Most I could ever hope for is 200 or so at the wheel. BLEH! At least it sounds good, right? ;)

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Your plan is a better long term plan. Cheaper acqusition costs, cheaper to run, and has better longevity. Plus, the chances of finding a Z32 TT that isn’t a complete disaster is low.

    • 0 avatar
      juicy sushi

      I was just about to suggest this one.

      The Z32s were great cars, and largely forgotten now. I remember the R&T comparison review between it and the latest version of the 944. Might be one of the best reviews I ever read.

      • 0 avatar
        Josh_Howard

        Totally forgotten. I didn’t even really want one. It just sort of fell to me as a backup for what I wanted. After I got it home, I learned how rare the car was. They made far more Z32s than Supras for America. But, most all Z32s were 2+2s, T-top cars, or Twin Turbos. You couldn’t get a Twin Turbo slicktop in the US because Nissan wanted to make fat profit. Heck, my ’93 was a $29,000 car back in the day. Brakes are ridiculous and the grip is insane. They’re largely forgotten because they don’t drift like a 240sx/silvia. They also require motor maintanence that would make a GTR owner feel sympathetic. The timing belt change alone is a nightmare for those that aren’t skilled with a wrench. Totally worth it for the high revving, high hp (for the time) V6.

        • 0 avatar
          JMII

          The twin turbo Z32 is quicker then my Z33.

          The guy who bought my 2003 350Z new must have thought it was going to be collectible because in 10 years it only saw 18K miles. It was clearly garage kept and completely original, right down to the bag the wheel locks came in.

          I’ve kept it mostly original too just because almost every Z has been modified to hell and back. However its really hard to resist changing things once the track day bug bites. Its always just one bolt-on away from perfection. I am keeping all the old parts and only doing things that can be reversed: so far just brakes and audio system upgrades.

          • 0 avatar
            Ryoku75

            “I’ve kept it mostly original too just because almost every Z has been modified to hell and back.”

            This is true, you’ll have better luck finding a factory Z31 than a factory Z32.

            I blame Gran Turismo

          • 0 avatar
            Josh_Howard

            Yuppers. Mine is far from perfect and is getting modified to improve worn out parts. It isn’t quick, but boy does it handle well. I don’t mind seeing cars with mods, but damnit… make it seem as if the factory did them. That’s my goal. Going ’99 spec for the look. It was voted top 10 most beautiful car for a reason. Thing has simple lines that have mostly aged well.

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          I prefer mods that not only LOOK factory, but are installed with the utmost care and attention to detail, stuff like that can get downright artistic.

          If you mod a car either do it well, or don’t do it at all.

          • 0 avatar
            Josh_Howard

            Exactly. The only thing I have that doesn’t look factory is the black wood Nardi racing wheel. I figured an airbag from 1993 was not a safe thing to drive around with.

          • 0 avatar
            bodayguy

            I agree. I don’t think this fascination with ORIGINAL cars will be there on cars from the 90s and on. Tastefully modded can be great. Remember, these are the cars everyone in my gen grew to love because of Fast & Furious. That wasn’t a stock Supra, no way.
            And let’s remember how much the older gen of car lovers adored hot rods.
            Everyone needs to stop worshipping originality.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    2003 Acura CL-S 6MT

    Might take 5 or 10 more years but the 2010-2014 TL SHAWD will probably be souught after. I dont’ think the 2009+ TSX will be as desirable, but the 2004-2008 ones are pretty popular. I won’t ever buy another because the damn radio sucks and can’t be replaced.

    Pretty much any Japanese classic will have a stick shift. Adds to the rarity.

    The Altima coupe hasn’t grown a huge fanbase yet, but I think in time it will. along with the G35/37’s.

    2009-11 RX8’s will eventually, since their engines are more reliable than the 1st 5 years of production. Just not enough time has passed.

    GT86… well it has to be discontinued first. Too soon.

  • avatar
    raph

    “are within the reach of most potential classic car investors.”

    Heh, not for long. Car investors are an absolute plague to the hobby.

    I absolutely positively enjoyed watching all those buffoons go ape-shit over the first gen S-197 GT500’s paying upwards of 80-90k for a car that cost less than 50k and now routinely goes for 20-30k depending on mileage.

    Equally tasty is the thought that they wont recoup their investment mostly likely well beyond the time somebody tosses them into the clay.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      “Car investors are an absolute plague to the hobby”

      I can do without them myself, the more expensive classics get the harder it is for people to get a cheap example and enjoy it.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        Exactly, you have guys who lament the lack of young people entering the hobby while they cook up plans to restore some vehicle and retire off the proceeds when they ship it off to their favorite gaggle of old drunk guys mindlessly trying to outbid each other.

    • 0 avatar
      PunksloveTrumpys

      “Car investors are an absolute plague to the hobby”

      While I see the point here, and fully acknowledge the snobbery, ridiculous values pricing newcomers out of the hobby etc, I’d never go as far as calling it a “plague.”

      There are PLENTY of classic cars that are not in any stretch of the word “expensive”, and young car enthusiasts can (and are) using them as a first step on the ladder of classic ownership. They might have 4 doors instead of 2, and be garden-variety (in their day) rather than rare and precious, but they are classics nonetheless.

      What we are seeing now is a repeat of what happened during the 1980s classic car boom, thousands of cars were snapped up by investors looking to make a quick profit and who subsequently ended up getting burned. Many of these “investments” were restored professionally because it was believed their value would increase so much the restorations would be financially worthwhile. Then as now, even barn finds and complete rusty wrecks are being bought, restored and sold for a profit as long as the fun lasts.

      You may have guessed it. When it comes to classic cars I say anything which ensures more survive for future generations to experience (whether by gazing at them in museums or taking ownership when the values of those minters finally crashes back to Earth), should continue unabated.

  • avatar
    210delray

    First-generation Acura Legend coupe. Smooth lines and delicate roof pillars — looks like a hardtop at first glance.

  • avatar
    Frankie the Hollywood Scum

    CRX SI and Civic SI. If you can find an example that was not owned by scumbag Steve.

    • 0 avatar
      Crabspirits

      Scumbag Steve: “I want to find a clean example”

      RIPS OUT INTERIOR, INSTALLS ROLL CAGE WITH BIRD POOP WELDS

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      A guy that mountain bikes with me has a 1999 Si that he has owned since new. Completely stock. Hasn’t been daily driven since 2009 or so. I drove it once when he dislocated his shoulder and needed someone to drive him home from the mountain bike trails. It is starting to feel a little loose as the bushings are pushing 16 years old, but the engine still loves to rev.

      • 0 avatar
        Superdessucke

        Sweet. You should call dibs on that one if he sells. Finding those 99-00 Si’s in stock conditions is rare. You’re more likely to see Bigfoot on the West Coast than a stock Si.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      CRX especially. If you can find a clean one, they are already fetching close to 10K

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Here’s my list (assuming we’re talking unmolested examples), for now:

    -Gen 1 WRX STI
    -Gen 2 Legend Coupe
    -Celica GT-Four All-Trac Turbo
    -240SX (Revised version, 1997-1998)
    -Gen 1 Q45 non-grille
    -300ZX (late turbo examples)
    -Isuzu VehiCROSS
    -3000GT VR-4
    -3000GT Cabrio

    • 0 avatar

      VehiCROSS…great idea!

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      I’d add:

      * Acura Integra Type-R or GS-R
      * Lexus IS300 (the original, Altezza-based one)
      * Lexus SC300/SC400
      * Lexus LS400 (original)
      * Mazda FD RX-7
      * AE-86 Corolla (yeah, I know…)
      * 7G Celica GT-S (this is a highly underappreciated car; I’d hazard it’s a better Integra Type-R than the Integra Type-R)

      From the oddball category:
      * Toyota Van LE, Previa SC, or Previa 5MT
      * Suzuki X-90
      * Honda Insight (original)
      * Toyota Prius (original, Echo/Yaris body)
      * Any really well-maintained Toyota Cressida or Datsun/Nissan 510/Maxima

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        And the IS300 SportCross must be considered separately from the base IS!

        I would subtract the X-90 because it’s so g-d awful!

      • 0 avatar
        energetik9

        The only ones I’d add:

        -Toyota MR2 (superchaged and Turbo – 2 diff generatons)
        -Mitsubishi Starion Turbo
        -Toyota supra turbo (although this is really already there)
        -Most any Mazda Miata

        Maybe:
        -Mistubishi 3000GT
        -Isuzu Impulse Turbo

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I meant to add the MR-2, definitely. Especially the middle version which looked so modern. The final one, not so much IMO. Convertible only? Bleh.

          • 0 avatar
            energetik9

            I agree. Even though I have always heard great things about the Gen II MR2, it’s just not exciting at all.

            I owned a Gen I MR2 back in the day. I was always impressed with that high revving engine and the (at the time) fantastic transmission and ergonomics. It was a fun car.

          • 0 avatar
            energetik9

            Damn, that was supposed to be the Gen III that ins’t eciting. Typo

          • 0 avatar
            Quentin

            I find myself browsing autotrader for gen 1 MR2s every few months. I don’t know what it is about the 80s styling that I enjoy more and more as I get older.

        • 0 avatar
          70Cougar

          Starion Turbo–great call. It was like a 944 that went through the Japanizer!

      • 0 avatar
        gessvt

        Love Psar’s list. I’d add

        Toyota Land Cruiser FJ60
        Toyota Cressida wagon
        Nissan Maxima wagon
        Nissan 180SX (hotter version of the 240)
        Toyota Corolla SR-5 (coupe, liftback or fastback)
        Subaru BRAT
        Subaru XT6

    • 0 avatar
      TW5

      Yeah. Celica GT-Four. Good call.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    in what form will be they most desired? Bone stock as the day it was new or the with the whale tail and 5″ exhaust.

    I respectfully submit that finding unmodified units will be such a chore it could make the whole enterprise not worth it.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    There was a long thread on Honda-Tech about this a few years back and they even coined a term for it (GEH- Golden Era Hondas). For Hondas here’s what I’m seeing:

    – ’92 Integra GS-R- only available in 1 year, had a B17C engine which was the only time that engine was used, only available in mint green and black I believe. Not as good as the 94-01 GS-R that replaced it but definitely rare and important (first DOHC VTEC 4 banger in the US).

    – 94-01 GS-Rs- the peak of the “double wishbone era” FWD Hondas. Nuff said.

    – 99-01 Civic Si- Not that great IMO but highly sought out. Best of that breed and very nostalgia heavy. They saw an uptick last decade and came back down but I think stock Electric Blue and yellow ones will see an uptick again.

    – 03 CL Type-S 6 speed- again a 1 year special; decent looking/driving coupe that lets you get the awesome J32 V6 without those god awful 5ATs that plagued Honda during this time. Not full on collector status but they have probably bottomed out on depriciation.

    Some non-Hondas I see gaining traction:

    – Any SR20DE equipped FWD Nissan- SCC gave these things visibility and since they are not as popular they are much rarer than same vintage Hondas, but they are just as good. The rarest gem is probably the 98-99 Sentra SE sedan. Plagued by beam rears from Nissan’s bubble pop cost cutting era, but light and spry.

    – Celica All-Trac- look it up.

    – MX-3 V6- Mazda was really on a tear with its bubble economy indulgences and a 1.8L V6 in a one off coupe pretty much embodied this. Doubly rare because it’s a Mazda and was no quicker/better than something like an Integra GS-R while being a lot less practical.

    – Galant VR-4- the EVO before the EVO and a symbol of Mitsubishi’s level of confidence in the US in the 80s. Heavy as FUARK but 4G63 equipped so who cares? Also hella rare, I think they only made them in like 88-90 if that.

    – SVX- the un-Subaru. Loaded with ahead of its time tech. Again not really that great of a drive and def a ripoff at the time which made it rare. But still a car with a great story and low sales numbers. No stickshift though.

    The Japanese bubble economy spawned an era of greatness and wanton recklessness we will never see again… I think the classics from that time will be the cars that were just straight up good, and the cars that were flat out weird. It’s a shame we only got the tip of the iceberg… cars like the FTO and Stagea and others really went full on weird.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I thought about including the SVX but decided against it. It’s just not desirable enough for any reason other than the styling. They weren’t especially reliable in a mechanical sense, nor were they fast or track-ready with all that weight and AT only.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      I forgot about the MX-3 V6. You might want to add the 323 GTX.

    • 0 avatar
      quasimondo

      Galant VR-4’s are rare, but an even rarer Mitsubishi is the Colt turbo. 1500 made for only one year (1989), and given a turbo 1.6 liter version of the 4G63T.

      Another rare Galant (production numbers unknown) is the Galant GS-X, which was a VR-4 without the turbo or the troublesome four-wheel steering.

      Even rarer than both is the AMG Galant. Back in the days before the tuning company was purchased by Mercedes-Benz, they did a bit of side work for Mitsubishi. The result was a tuned version of the FWD Galant GS, with a bespoke body kit and spoiler, and some mechanical handiwork that bumped the non-turbo 4G63 engine to 170 hp from a stock 135.

      And speaking of the aftermarket, I’m surpised nobody thought of the Stillen 300ZX with it’s giant wing that was undoubtly ahead of its time.

    • 0 avatar
      snakebit

      Re: the 1992 and 1993 Integra GSR. As I posted before, they’re worth it for the unique gearbox ratios, more like the Type R box than the one in the 1994 and newer GSR. As for colors for the 1992-3 GSR, IIRC, they came in that unique(to GSR) metallic green, plus white and red. I don’t remember black, but then I don’t have the sales folder at work to check that color. I wouldn’t list the 1994 and newer GSR on any collector list, but it’s actually a more practical choice for day-to-day driving than the older version, principally because the gearbox ratios on the older GSR seem better suited for the track.

      The 2003 CL-S six speed manual in theory should have been a BMW contender, but the throws of the cable shifter seemed very balky for a sport coupe. My last co. car with Acura retail was a white six speed with Nav, and I preferred the 2004 TSX six speed over the 2003 CL-S I had afterwards, smaller car and nicer shifter, both things liked about the TSX.

  • avatar

    The big money in Japanese cars is going to be what I used to think of a “supercars” back in the day. That means NSX, Turbo Supra, Turbo 300 ZX, and Turbo RX7 Maybe the 3000GT etc. These weren’t ordinary cars that regular guys with Joe jobs usually bought back in the day. They were high-end then and will be high-end in the future, but that is the nature of collectible cars

    The cars we mere mortals owned that will be collectible in the future will be the 240SX, maybe the 200SX, the CRX, Celica GT, the twin-cam Corolla etc.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      These special cars could be given to you for safe keeping, because we all know you won’t drive em! ;)

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      “The cars we mere mortals owned that will be collectible in the future will be the 240SX”

      Which is hilarious because between a buddy and I, 3 S13s were turbo’d, parted out or LS swapped and flogged hard then scrapped. Now they’re desirable as all hell and decent examples are pulling actual money.

      I blame the drift wannabes and the “stance” crowd. I’d rather the cars be crushed than see them roll around with idiotic amounts of negative camber.

    • 0 avatar
      Crabspirits

      The 3000gt was a flop from the get-go, and pretty unremarkable. They are also not fun to own. I don’t see them ever being valuable. You could say the same about the Subaru SVX.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        The 3000GT weighed as much as the QEII. My friend in high school had a Dodge Stealth R/T TT. It was a sweet looking ride that the ladies liked, but it was a let down to drive.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I think the looks, and VR-4 version of the 3000GT are enough to carry it to desirability.

      • 0 avatar
        bosozoku

        You’re right about the 3000GT, and even moreso about its unloved cousin the Dodge Stealth. However, for the Gran Turismo generation that grew up calling the 3000GT “GTO” because of the aforementioned video game, and boosting virtual examples to 1000+ HP to race on circle tracks, they will be held in high esteem as collectibles regardless of the reality behind owning or driving one.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    A guy down the street from my vacation home has a bight yellow Datsun 510. I lust after that Bluebird every summer.

  • avatar
    Pantherlove

    s2000, probably with the AP1 being more desired.

  • avatar
    John R

    I’ll add another DSM gem, the Eclipse GSX. AWD with the 4G63 motor (although only tuned to make 200-ish HP).

    An unmolested, non-damaged example might be as rare as an Integra Type-R.

    • 0 avatar
      bosozoku

      T’was the ultimate object of my high school auto lust. I saw so many turn into rancid, neglected sheetmetal turds in the decade and a half since that I can hardly remember how great they looked brand new. I’m normally into subtlety with my cars, but I’d drive the hell out of a mint GSX (or Eagle Talon, even) with hoop spoiled, hood bulge and all.

  • avatar
    snakebit

    If we’re discussing Japanese cars that were exported to the US, I too would nominate the gen three RX-7s and all NSX’s. For Integras, yes, the Type R and I would also nominate the 1992-3 GSR because of the special-ratio gearbox(in combo with VTEC motor)

    With the same standards that we favor the 1965-66 Mustangs(even though a ton of them were built) I would name the 1990-97 Miata, with a premium on the special editions and ‘M’versions.

    The 2000GT, an obvious choice. Also the 1960’s two-door Land Cruisers in original stock condition and as the Con-Ferr conversions (fitted with Chevrolet small block V8’s).

    Back to Honda, and the S-series chain-drive roadsters and coupes, and certainly the S2000. Strictly as museum pieces, I would nominate the N600 and Z600 mini cars that Honda began US imports with. I know I’m forgetting other landmark Japanese cars, and I’m interested what other cars people will suggest.

  • avatar
    Rick

    Collectable Hondas?

    That’s easy! Any Honda that everyone wants but then “modifies them” to death.

    Try to find a stock early Civic Si, a last year 160 HP Del Sol Vtec, or a CRX. The kids modify them and either ruin them or wreck them.

    Plus, they were fairly inexpensive when new so when they became wrecked or just used up they were thrown away.

    I think the same goes for some of the older Toyotas. An early 80’s MR2 indecent shape is getting hard to find. Wait another 15-20 years. They will be gone.

    Basically, look for a car that was interesting or fun but disposable.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    Which will be more collectible? The rare USDM survivors, or the imported-from-the-homeland versions?

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      That’s a good question. I am curious about how much the JDM S13 Silvia/240SX will go for now. We are now at 25 years for the earliest versions with the turbo engine.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        Looks like 10-12k from these guys: http://www.japaneseclassicsllc.com/. Subtract $2500 or so for nonturbo models.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Don’t show me sites like that! I want the PAO and that little Honda Kei van.

          Driving around in the summer, roof open on my light blue PAO. Yessss.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Aaaaa

          http://www.japaneseclassicsllc.com/1989-mz20-toyota-soarer-turbo-7mgte-aerocabin.html

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Oh no. Now I want a Silvia AND a Sunny truck. That 1986 Sunny truck has divorce written all over it…

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Just get a 240SX and some Silvia light panel assemblies. And while you’re at the shop, pick up your wife a Navigator because that’s what she really wants.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            She has to wait for the 2015 Navi to drop to 35Kish. Good thing she’s driving an MkT that she really likes instead of a smaller Edge or Fusion or something. I would have had to bite the bullet on a Navigator with the 5.4L and terrible interior.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    88-89 Chrysler Conquest/Mitsubishi Starion – I’ve been pushing this as a future classic for about 7 years now.

    05-06 RSX Type S – I’ve been eyeing them for a while. A low mile one still goes for the upper teens.

    97+ Prelude SH – nearly impossible to find with less than 100k miles.

    Have you seen what has happened to early 70s Celicas? The last gen GTSes may have to be on the list.

    I’m really starting to appreciate the 94-97 Accord coupe’s looks. With the right treatment it can look like a mini Legend.

    Don’t forget the Eclipse GSX.

    I also think there will be value in older SUVs too, like the Trooper and 4Runner.

    And, fingers crossed, the 2007 Subaru Legacy GT wagon.

    • 0 avatar

      The Starion is a good call. I see them on Craigslist every now and then and they still look awesome.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        Ohhh the Starion, to this day its still the coolest looking car from that era. Loved those oversized, blocky fender flares.

        I would love an unmolested CRX-Si too. And I wouldn’t mind having my ’89 Prelude Si back (in school bus yellow too).

        I owned a ’96 Eclipse GS-T so the GSX is high on my list too. The twin turbo RX-7’s are also drool worthy.

        The problem is unlike the muscle car era when certain options made for very limited production numbers almost all these 80s/90s JDM rides were built (and sold) in big numbers. Sure they were all riced out and thus finding an original one makes them “rare” I don’t think they will be valuable. For example CRXs only came in 3 colors all with the same black interior and just one option I think (a sunroof) so the only thing that makes a CRX valuable is that it survived. At time they were popular and thus all over the place, but not “special” in anyway. However when the ‘Cudas came out certain models were already rare or special because money was tight and not many people checked all those option boxes.

    • 0 avatar
      TW5

      Yeah, the SUV’s were nice too. I remember everyone wanted a QX4, Land Cruiser/LX, and the Acura SLX back then. Wasn’t the SLX just a trooper or something like that? Strange days, but fun.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        The SLX was indeed a Trooper, and really didn’t have anything on it beyond the Trooper Limited’s options, except Acura badges and different wheels.

        The SLX is pretty rare though, because everyone saw through the facade.

        The QX4 still catches my eye to this day. I saw a facelift one in black just yesterday and noted how sharp it was.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    Pre-facelift B9 Tribeca?

    Too soon?

  • avatar
    montyz81

    S130, Z31, Z32; Maxima SE
    Prelude, GS-R
    Miata

  • avatar
    TW5

    I don’t think Boomers are driving the trend. Boomers are buying the muscle cars from their youth, and their modern iterations. The Japanese classic movement is Gen X and Gen Y feeling nostalgia for they cars they wanted as kids or the cars they grew up riding in.

    I definitely feel a bit of a buzz for Japanese cars like the CRX Si and Integra Type R. Almost any Honda from the mid-80s to mid-90s is quite nice, including Acura NSX. STI Subarus from the mid-90s are also quite interesting.

    I’ve never been a huge fan of the 300ZX, Supra, 3000GT, or RX7. It was the sport variants of everyday cars that always intrigued me.

    • 0 avatar

      I believe that muscle car prices are a bubble economy that’s going to burst one day. Boomers spent a lot of money on these cars and as they age will either be looking to cash out on their “investments” or simply letting them go as they no longer drive them. Certain cars, the original numbers matching Hemis, Big block Fords and Chevrolets will hold their value, but the cloned out cars, I believe, will eventually drop off.

      The problem with Japanese collectible cars is the people who will buy them. Gen Xers and Millenials live in an economy that is a lot different than the baby boomers had. A lot of Millenials don’t even have daily drivers, why are they going to buy a collectible? Gen Xer’s cars are 80s rigs like my Shelby, IROCs or 5.0 Foxes. Many of these aren’t very desirable.

      TLDR is that I don’t see this new wave of collectible cars reaching the highs that the muscle cars did, and I see the muscle car prices starting to drop in the future. The investment of the future is Beanie Babies and Alf POGs.

      • 0 avatar
        Crabspirits

        Yep.
        I think we’ve reached a point in society where the fallacy of the collectable is very apparent. Gone are the days where sports cards and Beanie Babies will be worth anything. To make a point, name something currently made, that is geared as a “collectable”, and is actually popular?

        Value of certain cars will wane for sure. People will go for things they actually want to drive and are easy to own. Very few will invest in a car as a collectable.

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          “name something currently made, that is geared as a “collectable”, and is actually popular?”

          The only thing that comes to mind are Amiibos, but even then it seems that ONLY collectors are buying them up.

          • 0 avatar
            mike978

            Certain LEGO sets have appreciated in value because once they stop making a particular set that is it, it never comes back.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Why did I open my Lego Black Seas Barracuda pirate ship when I was a kid?!?!?!

            I wanted the Lego airport monorail when I was a kid. I bet that thing is like $2000 now.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @bball

            Duh, because the pirate ship was awesome. But what I know you didn’t do was take the center hull plates from your brother’s example, add it to yours to make it longer, and then build a WWI style battleship on top of it.

            Monorail? This was a thing?

            http://www.bricklink.com/SL/6399-1.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I did not do that but I wish I would have. I guess I would have needed a brother though.

            I have never seen the monorail in person. That picture is the one, but it only exists, forever in my mind, in the 90s toys r us catalog.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I hope you’re happy now you make me want to go back home and dig out the Legos to rebuild that ship.

            “I guess I would have needed a brother though.”

            No problem, I’ll sell you mine.

            This isn’t the same one as it is from the SPACE series, but here is a monorail for sale:

            http://www.ebay.com/itm/Lego-Set-6991-MONORAIL-TRANSPORT-BASE-From-1994-RARE-100-Complete-TRAIN-Retired-/361221915225?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item541a810259

            Ok here is the “town” monorail, incomplete, for two and a half.

            http://www.ebay.com/itm/LEGO-Town-Classic-Airport-Shuttle-6399-Incomplete-Manual-24-Track-Pieces/321665258208?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D28772%26meid%3Ddf61f2405efb4d108a90860ebc9b15e1%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D361221915225&rt=nc

            …and here it is NIB for… four dimes? Holy crap.

            http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-Lego-Classic-Town-6399-Airport-Shuttle-Sealed-LEGOLAND-Ships-WORLD-WIDE-HTF/191522090002?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D28772%26meid%3D629aeb05e77244548c18630f258bc910%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D321665258208&rt=nc

          • 0 avatar
            Quentin

            Black Seas Barracuda was re-released in 2003, btw. I was in college and didn’t have the $100 or $150 available. Now I can’t find it for less than $500 and it is basically the only set I’m missing from the late 80s Pirate theme.

            I have all of the current running Lego modular sets dating back to the original that was released in 2007 except for one. That one is over $1000 everywhere I’ve seen it because it was such a limited release. Out of the 9 that I have, I still haven’t built 3 of them yet. When they discontinue the series, I’ll probably be able to sell them for more than I paid… but I’m sure I won’t. Legos will likely be the family heirloom. haha

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I like how people in NA pluralize it as Legos, rather than just saying “Lego” (UK English) to refer to all pieces as one. They are clearly separate and differentiated pieces, and should be plural.

            Now I wonder how Australians say it.

            As a child, I wanted K’NEX so badly! Seemed like an engineering uptake on Legos. My mom refused, because “You’ll leave little pieces all over the carpet! And I’ll suck em up in the vacuum!”

            I was so devastated.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Well I’m from the midwest and we like to puralize everything. Wal-Marts, Krogers, Targets, etc.

            Quentin-

            So you have all the buildings, islands, ports, and so forth? I’m impressed.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I have trained the singular Kroger into my mind, because I don’t like how it sounds when I hear people say “Oh I went to Kroger’s.”

            Plus, they are headquartered here, so I feel we Cincinnatians should carry forward the name properly.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I don’t like how it sounds either. Meijers instead of Meijer is the most common adding of the s around here.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I forget about that store, because I never shop there. It’s far too expensives.

            There are also many fewer of those around here than Kroger locations.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Quentin

            We had so many we put them in bins. After building the sets however, I frequently took them apart to build completely new things and thus I don’t even know if i could put the original sets fully back together.

          • 0 avatar
            Quentin

            bball – I actually came across a huge collection of legos that still had the original boxes and instructions 5 or 6 years ago. It had a lot of the castle/forest sets and was really pirate heavy. I made an offer and bought the whole lot (the same guy/screenname showed up on ft86 club… something about being a man-child and driving a BRZ/FR-S haha). It might be missing a small set here or there, but all of the major sets are complete and most of the secondary sets are there. I built them over a Christmas holiday a few years back and felt like I just had the best Christmas ever.

            I need to go through Bricklink and catalog what all I have. The Porsche, Ferrari, etc sets are calling my name now. I’ve disassembled mostly everything I had and did a rudimentary sorting of everything so my daughter can play to her heart’s delight when she gets old enough.

            Corey – I credit Lego bricks (see what I did there?) to me becoming an engineer. My brothers and I would build farms, racing boats, monster trucks, airplanes, towns, etc. We only had a limited number of blocks to make our theme. That caused me to get really creative on how I built what I wanted with what I had. We would basically start with a theme and build until we had barely any blocks left. I was never a Knex fan because Knex didn’t have the aesthetics of the real thing. It didn’t satisfy my artist side. Lego has the building method side but also the aesthetics side where Knex seemed so purely function rather than form.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        Some things have intrinsic value that goes beyond simple nostalgia. The values of 1920’s, 30’s, 40’s and 50’s hot rods hasn’t particularly dropped since their original owners died off, I wouldn’t expect the values of 60’s and 70’s muscle cars to either in real terms. The Barrett-Jackson prices are inflated, however.

        You don’t need to be from the generation the car was built for to appreciate it.

  • avatar
    Crabspirits

    None of these cars will ever be auction blockbusters. They will just be highly desirable, rare cars that will carry a value of @$10k in today’s money.

    -Z31 300zx Shiro edition, Straman convertable, and to a lesser extent, the Anniversary edition.

    -Last gen Starion/Conquest

    -First and Second gen Rx7, after most of the “needs engine” Craigslist ads are gone.

    -Rx8

    -1st gen Scion xB will be the VW bus of later generations. Release Series models will be worth more, with RS 4.0 Torched Penny being worth the most.

    -Toyota FJ

    -Nissan Xterra

    These will be worth far more.
    -R32 Skyline
    -Nissan S13/S14 with SR20 engine swaps, and JDM bodywork, but nothing else modified.
    -Mid 80’s Toyota 4×4 pickups
    -Evo’s and STI’s

  • avatar
    Mjolnir427

    Murano CrossCab. Lower production numbers than most Ferrari models, limited appeal. I seriously believe that in 20+ years these pieces of crap will be “desireable” as an investment.

    • 0 avatar
      John

      Good point – cars considered hideous when sold (in low numbers), with bizarro styling sometimes become a hit with time – Edsel is an example.
      Not Japanese, but Aztecs are cheap now….

  • avatar
    Felis Concolor

    From the 2-state-legal files, Suzuki’s ultra rare LHD LJ50, especially in full hard shell configuration. Only sold in Hawaii and Alaska via a specialty importer in the early 80s, their sales numbers were as diminutive as their original dimesions. When I got word the upsized Samurai was being introduced as a 50 state vehicle in the mid 80s, I harangued a few friends who expressed interest in them to “get yours now while it’s still hard to get.”

    Those precursor LJ50s are among the rarest Japanese vehicles sold in the US market in the past 30 years, and it’s been 20 years since I actually saw one being driven around.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I think someone has to know about it in order for it to catch collector eyes, right?!

      Look at this, lmao.

      http://www.motogallur.com/resources/LJ501.jpg.opt435x582o0,0s435x582.jpg

      • 0 avatar
        Felis Concolor

        [grin] SHH!!!! I’m planning to rent a Promaster Van in order to transport my Haflinger to the work yard; you’ll blow my cover! [/grin] I know there’s a “yo dawg” meme in there somewhere…

        Oh yeah, to address your question of a few days ago, I definitely feel the next few years will provide a golden opportunity for young people willing to enter the trade professions, as a lot of the old masters of fabrication are passing on or passing away. The man who helped make my project car’s engine and steering mounts look like factory fit jobs, then filled someone else’s request for a body rotisserie by whipping one up before lunch. It was uncanny how he quickly measured, cut and welded lengths of square steel tube along with fitting bosses and cutouts for greater convenience of use. It was a hot summer day, so after quickly spraying the finished pieces, it was left out in CO’s intense sun to rapidly cure. It was in use the very next day.

        A lot of these people are truly sketching with steel and aluminum and other alloys, and there’s always demand for the sort of hand fabbed restoration and cleanup work which saves precious days or weeks on a custom project. Like dot matrix printers which rule the world of multipart printing, there will always be a need for classic analog craftsmanship and troubleshooting skills; the time is now for those who enjoy using their hands to hit the ground running in the blue collar world.

        On a wild tangent, we can thank a California motorcycle speed shop for passing on the skills which are now producing some of the finest loudspeakers to hit the market in the past decade.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Haha thanks.

          I think the trades thing is a tough sell for many. If you’re not a basic mechanic, or learn what you need to know from your grandfather or dad to use in the family business – how do you know what to go to school for? Where you’ll find a job?

          It all just seems so limited, and very susceptible to a technology disruption rendering all your skills obsolete.

  • avatar
    Kendahl

    Are there any sound examples that haven’t been riced out?

  • avatar
    ccd1

    What about the Mazda RX-8 R3? If any RX-8 becomes a collectible, this would be the one

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    This just occurred to me.

    I have seen the 80’s SR5 pickups with 4×4 bring some pretty stout money at meecum auctions.

    I would love to get my hands on one that is not totally rusted out, would be an easy resto job to clean up and have a reliable classic that was also useful. I don’t think these were modified to the extent the civics were, as an example.

    I might also add the Suzuki Samauri as well to this list.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    The ’88 Toyota SR5 4X4 reg cab truck with the “Custom Cab” (upfitter stretch) and 22R turbo/5-speed.

  • avatar
    izzy

    Mazda Rotary Pick up. And rx2, rx3.

  • avatar
    akatsuki

    # Toyota

    2000GT obviously
    Sports 800
    Mk IV Supra
    Mk I and Mk II MR2
    AE86
    FJs of all vintages except the most recent plastic one
    I could see the SC430 becoming a classic maybe
    LFA should be up there but are rotting on dealers lots – so maybe
    IS300 / Altezzas maybe

    # Nissan

    240Z
    Z32
    510
    Skylines
    Maybe the gatling gun Q45 or J30
    Patrols – maybe
    XTerra – maybe

    # Subaru

    Any STI
    Old foresters will have boxy Volvo cred

    # Mitsu

    Any Evo
    Maybe the 3000GT VR-4 Spyder
    Their Dakar winning SUV

    # Honda

    S2000 AP1 > AP2
    NSX popups > fixed headlights
    S800

    # Mazda

    Anything with a rotary will probably do well

  • avatar
    Speedygreg7

    There are so many….

    These lists usually concentrate on the FD (93-95) RX-7, but I would include all RX-7s. The original SA/FB has been appreciating for several years now and nice GSLs are $5000 plus and GSL-SEs higher than that. Ten years ago, these cars were damn near free.

    The FC (86-91) is the hardest to find in decent condition, barring the convertible which had a different customer to begin with. Nice convertibles seem to be all over. The coupe however, was so reliable and so useful as a daily driver that most got used up. Many of the rest have been converted to one of the most popular SCCA chassis out there. Finding a clean, original FC RX-7 coupe (NA and Turbo) is very, very difficult. Prices will rise.

    I’d also add that Toyota trucks through 1994 are sought after and will appreciate as will the 93-97 FZJ80 Land Cruiser.

  • avatar
    kinsha

    I have a low mile 1991 Prizm GSI great shape. Not many made or survived. It’s a garage queen and never driven in the elements so it doesn’t turn to red dust. Rust free with every option including electric sunroof. Do not know if it will ever be collectible but I sure get a lot of comments on it the older it gets.

    • 0 avatar

      I’ve been looking for one myself. They are exceedingly rare, and the hatchback version is practically impossible to find. Would love to see pix of yours.

      • 0 avatar
        MR2turbo4evr

        I have the Toyota version. My uncle imported the car from Germany and later sold it me. Here’s a picure: http://smg.photobucket.com/user/MR2turbo4evr/media/3-1.jpg.html?sort=3&o=18

        The car isn’t mind but in pretty good shape. Has about 150,000km on it.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I nominate:
    Mazda Miata

    First gen RX-7

    Toyota MR2 (and likewise MRS)

    Lexus LS400 (I’m surprised this hasn’t shown up)

    Acura NSX

    Datsun 240z, and likewise 260z

    Those aside I honestly can’t think of that many super-desirable Japanese cars without venturing into gray market imports.

    Mitsubishi 3000GT? Most say it drives like a family sedan, and non turbo models are FWD. We have a local one with doughnut front wheels for whatever reason. Most are modded in tasteless ways.

    Honda, Acura? Again you’re dealing with bad mods most of the time, lots and lots of motor swaps for smaller Hondas, and finding a stock exaust is like finding a unicorn. The CRX might gain traction if people don’t mind their delicacy.

    Toyota CeliSupra? These might go up in value, earlier examples can be found stock on the cheap. Later FnF Supras? Foghet about it, they’re all riced out by now unless if you’re importing.

    Nissan S13, S14? These suffer from AE86 syndrome, ho-hum looking cars popularized by drifters thus almost never stock. Good luck finding a stock example.

    Between all of these cars you have a wave of forgotten Japanese cars that may go the way of the Ford Falcon, cheap and adequate transportation, but mostly forgotten.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    My kingdom for a Prelude, preferably an Si BB2 with 4WS or a BB6 with manual trans.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    2005-2006 Altima SE-R, is another one. Probably more of a 4DSC than anything they’ve made since.

  • avatar
    sprkplg

    Non-STI bugeye WRX. Like 90% of the other cars mentioned, unmodified ones will be hard to find and sought-after.

    Mazda MX-6, especially 2nd gen

    2nd gen. Nissan Pulsar NX. Don’t forget the Sportbak!

    Sentra SE-R

    Subaru XT

    And while I don’t think they’ll ever be “classics,” those old 4×4 Tercel wagons are only going to get increasingly funky-cool.

  • avatar
    2drsedanman

    Seems like the pricing is starting to go up on early/limited edition Mazda Miatas. I also wonder about the long term value of the 2000-2005 MR2 Spyder; limited production numbers may work in their favor.

    As far as Civic SI/CRX being ragged out, I remember the same happening to first gen Chevy Camaros and second gen Chevy Novas. There was an interview with a guy in, I think Hot Rod magazine, who had a huge collection of chevy parts and cars. He remarked that he never thought twice about cutting up or modifying first gen Camaros. “They were just another cheap, light weight car to us back then”. Those cars now in good shape certainly bring the money.

  • avatar
    ccd1

    Mazda Speed 6

  • avatar
    Numbers_Matching

    My answer – after following the hobby for 25 years – only a very few Japanese cars will become big money classics. Most of the cars listed above were neat, funky and maybe even cool, but don’t expect a massive following. These cars will end up being the ‘cue the comercial’ cars when passing by the Mecum auction platform.

    As mentioned above, when the Boomers stop spending, the values of ALL classic cars will fall.

    – typical carmudgeon

  • avatar
    marc

    I only know Toyotas well, so here’s my go at it…

    1985 MR2
    1985 Celica GTS convertible
    1986 (not 1986.5) Celica Supra
    1987 Supra Turbo
    1988 MR2 Supercharged
    1991 Lexus SC400
    1992 Lexus SC300 (manual)

    I think these hit a sweet spot-

    They were from the beginnings of the golden age of Japan. Not quite Supra Twin Turbo time yet, but a definite sign of what was to come.

    They were desirable makes at the time. They may not have been hanging up on teenagers’ walls, but they certainly elicited ooos and ahhhs.

    If they can still be found, they will not be too expensive. So appreciation can happen more quickly than newer cars costing thousands more.

    Importantly, these are very specific years (first or last), body styles, engine-tranny combos that give a bit of rarity. I think that will help their collectability.

    I intend to own one of these in the next couple years.

    • 0 avatar
      Lightspeed

      1998 Lexus GS400, 300HP sedan that will run 150mph and basically last forever with care.

      • 0 avatar
        marc

        Great car, great ad campaign….”something wicked this way comes.” But I didn’t include it for the same reason I didn’t include the LS, Cressida, IS, or even 1993 Giugiaro-penned GS…4 doors tend not to be collectable.

        I should have included the 1988 Celica All-Trac Turbo.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Lightspeed has a GS, and is thusly a little over enthusiastic about the model.

          They made far too many for that ever to be collectible. And agree on the four doors.

    • 0 avatar
      Marko

      The last few model years of SC300/400 and/or the manual SC300 should turn out to be the most valuable, especially the 1997 (first year of facelift, last year of manual) – only 120 were produced. How many of those have not been beat on or totaled?

      Actually, I never realized how rare ANY manual SC300 is. Less than 4,000 total were built over six model years!

      • 0 avatar
        marc

        @Marko, I think you make an excellent point and are completely correct. I debated including that model in my list, as it completely fits my criteria, but its rarity means I have never come across one in my searches, and I am unlikely to do so. If I could find an unmolested 97 manual with low miles in good condition, I would snap it up in a minute. I hope there are some hiding somewhere with the other unicorns. But I presume anyone has one knows what you are saying and is guarding their future classic carefully.

  • avatar
    George B

    I see the collectible Japanese cars mostly being interesting looking and/or fun coupes from the late 80s to 2000s. Not necessarily going for muscle car prices, but prices high enough to preserve the ones in reasonably good condition.

  • avatar
    285exp

    1985 RX-7 GSL-SE

  • avatar
    rocketrodeo

    A few to add, in no particular order:
    Mazda RX3SP, Cosmo
    Toyota Celica AllTrac turbo
    Gen 1 Honda Accord
    Gen 1 Acura Integra special edition (try to find one)
    Datsun 1600, 2000 Roadster

    • 0 avatar
      cimarron typeR

      Mk2.supra,mk1 sc’d mr2,mk2 mr2 turbo,all of them white with blue interiors,nothing more jdm than that color combo.
      Any alltrac.
      The Isuzu Impulse “Tuned By Lotus”.

      1st gen Acura Legend coupe MT in brown w tan leather.
      Rx7 gxlse
      Rx7 fc turbo2 mono white
      Silver z32 TT,the “Pornographers car” per Top Gear
      None of these will ever be crack 15k in value but ultimately more enjoyable than a 55 chevy to a Gen X dude like myself

  • avatar
    honda_lawn_art

    Toyota Land Cruiser / Lexus LX, especially ones with locking differentials. They were very expensive in their day, but also very good. I see them as the International Scout of 10 years from now.
    Additionally, the ’91 – ’99 Montero and perhaps the later unibody Montero, which had center locking diff’s as standard.

    • 0 avatar
      mkirk

      They ain’t so cheap now either. Pay when you buy or pay your mechanic.

    • 0 avatar
      bosozoku

      Most of the Land Cruisers and LX with locking diffs are being sold to buyers overseas, especially in the middle east, where they are THE all-purpose vehicle to own.

      • 0 avatar
        mkirk

        There is a solid community for them here. Frozen diff lock actuators mean a Soccer Mom owned it and it has probably never seen the dirt. Were I to do it again I’d go with an early 91-92 with the 3FE motor, swap the later full float rear diff and add my own lockers. They go for way less than the 1FZ-FE models from 93 up and are mechanically simplier beasts. Plus they are more rugged inside with less leather and power stuff. Really closer to the FJ60 than the later LX models. Just don’t be in a hurry to go or stop. They are underpowered and braked.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    1976 Chevy LUV… in powder blue…

    I’m running away fast, now!

    • 0 avatar
      cimarron typeR

      Actually the LUV is quite soughtafter for the mud drag racing crowd.It has a stout frame and readily accepts v8 swaps and the LWB version is ideal for that,er,application.

  • avatar
    Slow_Joe_Crow

    For post 1980 Japanese cars I’d go for a Mazda 323GTX, the turbo 4×4 rally car and I’d also want an early Miata since many of those have been run into the ground. A bone stock Integra would also be special since most have been modded and crashed. I also really like the FD RX7, which is also worth collecting since they are great to drive but their propensity for mechanical failure will increase their rarity value.
    Further to that a good early NSX would definitely be worth collecting.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    My Japanese garage:
    1st Gen Sentra SE-R
    3d Gen RX-7
    Cressida with a Supra motor swap
    Mailaise era Celica
    Early Honda Prelude
    1st Gen LS400
    Toyota Trekker
    Desert Tan FJ60 Diesel with 5 speed
    The specific FJ80 Diesel with the bullet holes and missing windshield we drove around the FOB on my first tour to Baghdad
    My 90 Miata I sold for too cheap with the motor from my 04 Mazdaspeed MX-5
    Civic 4×4 wagon
    Subaru XT…that’s right.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    I always wanted an MX-3 V6.

    And that is literally all I am actually able to contribute to this discussion. (I know it was mentioned above, just throwing in my 0.02)

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    Datsun 2000 roadster with the Competition package will be reasonably valuable at some point, particularly the ’67s. It was a giant killer at the track, and with 150 hp it was more of an E-type stomper than it was a rival to 4 cylinder sports cars from the UK or Italy.

    Toyota FJ40s are already silly money.

    Million dollar Toyota 2000GTs are challenging assumptions about rich guys being tall.

  • avatar

    based entirely on aesthetics:

    1. early-mid 90s generation civic
    2. All integras
    3. the first two generations of Forester, when that car was the automotive equivalent of the plaid flannel shirt. Ugly, but in a good way, and loaded with character.
    4. ’98-02 Accord.
    5. Accord wagons
    6. Toyota MR2
    7. all mazda 323s
    8. S2000

  • avatar
    doublechili

    What?! No votes for the 1981 Dodge Challenger in two-tone paint made by Mitsubishi?!

    It will certainly be rare. :)

  • avatar
    mnm4ever

    I don’t think any of these will be collectible. Perhaps a very small number of mint showroom condition high end models like the NSX or RX7, but nothing that was just a regular car. The NSX is hard to sell now and people really love them… Just not enough to actually buy one for the insane asking prices.

    Older Japanese cars will be quirky and appealing to guys like me who will buy them but only when they are cheap, and they will be cheap because the market is so small. The problem is they simply aren’t that nice, the appeal is all nostalgia. They don’t age well, they have too many electronics to go bad, it’s not easy to source parts, and all that plastic just degrades. I love my MR2 but a new FRS or MX5 beats the pants off it in every category except price. Old muscle cars have a huge industry to support them, that doesn’t exist for the imports.

  • avatar
    PentastarPride

    I’ve predicted that ’90s-early ’00s Hondas/Acura/Toyotas will be *the* car that my generation will covet and collect down the road, like the Boomers and their Mustangs, Camaros and Chargers, no doubt about it.

    That is if our dictatorship of a government doesn’t ban vehicles that employ an internal combustion engine when we Gen Y’ers are getting gray hair.

    If I ever decide to own classics, it would be a mix of LH platform Chryslers from both generations–Intrepid, Concorde/Vision, New Yorker/LHS, 300M–for sure.

    If I could have more room in the stable, the ’94-02 Ram truck (preferably one with a Cummins), and yes, an NS platform Chrysler minivan or three (’96-’00). Maybe a Neon and a Grand Cherokee too.

  • avatar
    kuponoodles

    JDM Altima Bluebird SSS.?

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