By on November 5, 2014

02 - 1979 Chevrolet LUV Mikado Down on the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinOnce Toyota Stouts and Datsun 520s began selling in sufficient numbers (in spite of the Chicken Tax) to attract Detroit’s attention, the idea of selling small pickups— without actually tooling up to build them— seemed appealing to the Big Three. Chrysler had the Mitsubishi-built Plymouth Arrow pickup, Ford had the Mazda-built Courier, and GM had the Isuzu Faster-based Chevy LUV. Each type rusted with great eagerness and were near-disposable cheap, so they’re all very rare today. I see maybe one LUV per three years of junkyard visits, so this ’79 LUV Mikado grabbed my attention right away.
07 - 1979 Chevrolet LUV Mikado Down on the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThe Mikado option package, if we are to believe online sources, gave the buyer striped seats and a three-spoke steering wheel (plus the cool-looking Japanophilic fender badges).
03 - 1979 Chevrolet LUV Mikado Down on the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThe three-spoke wheel is there, but I don’t see any seat stripes. Perhaps the owner of this truck swapped in a later Isuzu P’Up bench.
06 - 1979 Chevrolet LUV Mikado Down on the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThe G18 engine, making 80 horses. 21st-century Americans require at least that much power for their lawn tractors, not to mention a crew-cab in their “small” pickups. The G18 was also found in the “Buick Opel” (an Isuzu-ized Opel Kadett sold in North America during the darkest days of the Malaise Era).


Now there’s even more to LUV, for everybody!

Did anyone buy the 4WD LUV?

This Thai-market Isuzu Faster Spacecab ad is for a second-generation truck, but I had to include it due to the little spaceman.

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69 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1979 Chevrolet LUV Mikado...”


  • avatar
    FormerFF

    If you’ve never driven a 1970’s Japanese pickup, you’d have a hard time imagining just how small the cab was. I’m only 5′ 11″, but when driving one of these I had to sit with my knees splayed out to avoid the steering wheel. But, if you’re sufficiently motivated, you’d be surprised as to how big of a person would fit in a small car. The guy who built our race engines was 6′ 4″, and he and his Irish Setter routinely got around in an MG Midget.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      I specifically drove a Chevy Luv for two different companies I worked for in the ’80s and at 5’10” I did NOT feel cramped behind the wheel of one. More interesting is the fact that they were both three-pedal models so I had to move my feet around a lot with in-town driving in those trucks. However, they did prove their mettle as one was used by an airport FBO to pickup and deliver aircraft parts (most notably I would transport propellors from Chattanooga to Atlanta for rebuild and back again) while at the other job it was used to pick up and deliver televisions and console stereos for an electronics repair shop. In both cases their high comparative gas mileage was one of its strongest benefits but the relatively large open bed let it carry anything and everything we needed to carry–including multiple quite heavy rear-projection televisions. Compared to today’s Road Whales, those little trucks were REAL workhorses.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      I remember when I borrowed a friends mid eighties Mazda for a small trip, how painfully small the cab was. Really to the point of being useless IMO. When I bought my compact Toyota in ’93 that truck needed to work and have some utility, so anything less than an extended cab, 4WD V6 was out of the question.

    • 0 avatar
      Lack Thereof

      For our race LUV, we actually started with an extended-wheelbase longbed model, then used a sawzall to shorten the bed and stretch the cab, building the world’s only extended-cab LUVs. Pretty much necessary to keep the drivers head from bouncing off of the rollcage.

      We actually stumbled on one in this same shade of blue at a Sacramento-area Pick n Pull a while back – not a Mikado, though. At the time we were hard up for brake parts so we grabbed most of the front brake components. Those solid front rotors are special-order-only at the parts store now, and forget about trying to find ANY of those caliper brackets.

    • 0 avatar
      Jimal

      I worked for an auto parts store in the 1980’s, delivering parts around town. The guys with seniority drove the Rangers and S-10s, so us young guys ended up with the older Couriers and LUVs. I don’t remember the cabs being particularly cramped (I’m 6 foot) but what I do remember is the rust. Those trucks were past it by the time I started there, but in order to save money (and to collect a large debt from a local body shop) my boss had all the trucks repainted. By the time the repairs were done on the older Japanese trucks – the LUVs in particular – they were more bondo than metal.

    • 0 avatar
      brianm12

      My Father is 6,10 and drove my Chevy LUV 80′ for a year. Regardless, i’m 6’1 and LUV my car a lot.

    • 0 avatar
      rbgolfn2

      I traded my dirt bike for my first truck which was a 1979 black Chevy LUV 4×4 Mikado. The front seat was black vinyl. I had it for a long time and replaced the motor twice the cost for a rebuilt engine installed was around $350. I used it 2 hallwood and it never got stuck until I bashed a hole in the front differential while hill climbing near Lone Rock at Lake Powell and then it was A2 wheel drive after that.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I think the “striped” seat is there, as there is -one- stripe! And the trim of the seat (and fabric) matches that of the door. I think this is the special Mikado seat.

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    I was just commenting on the Mazda B-Series pick ups of the 80’s.

    They were uncomfortable little snots that just kept on going. Sans the rust, I have NEVER seen one without at least a little rust.

    Then there’s the LUV. In my 29 years of age, I remember seeing these guys, but not nearly as much as the B-Series pickups.

    I do believe they had diesel LUV’s…? I’m sure the acceleration was something to write home about :)

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      Never drove a diesel LUV, but I did drive a diesel Mazda B2200. I once tried to pass someone on a two lane road in it. I downshifted, put the pedal to the floor, and moved out into the other lane. After a few seconds of negligible acceleration, I gave up on the idea.

      Even worse was the “performance” of the VW Caddy diesel, the Rabbit based El Camino looking “truck” VW built in the late 70’s and early 80’s.

      • 0 avatar
        raresleeper

        I bet it was smooth shifting, too.

        I remember my buddy’s dad had one. Of course, it was badly rusted throughout.

        If you didn’t grab on to something, you’d get thrown about during the shifting. The interior, even in not bad condition, was about as comfortable as a jail cell.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      When a truck is meant to be a work vehicle, its rate of acceleration is relatively unimportant; you don’t want to be throwing your cargo around in the bed even if it IS tied down! That said, of the two LUVs I mention above, the one used for the electronics repair shop was a diesel and would often go two weeks before needing refueling and still handled city traffic well enough. Of course, knowing what gear to use when helped a lot too; manual transmissions offered a two-gear advantage over most automatics.

  • avatar
    Roberto Esponja

    Senseless that anyone would junk a vehicle in this kind of condition. Maybe it’s just me, but I think it’s a waste.

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    From the time I hit middle school (1986) to when I graduated (1994), these were extraordinarily popular among male teachers. Probably a dozen between all the schools I attended.

  • avatar
    turbosaab

    My parents had one, purchased new, believe it was a ’79 as well. While I can’t recall the specific failures, the reliability was abysmal*, it left us stranded all over the northeast and by the mid ’80’s it was a dead rusted hulk parked behind our barn.

    *even for the standards of the day. For context, at the time they owned the LUV, my father’s daily driver was a basket case late ’60’s Citroen DS which he’d purchased for $100 and resurrected while my mother drove a nicer ’66 DS

    • 0 avatar
      raresleeper

      DS?

      Nice. Beautiful cars.

      But with finnicky hydraulic systems that are not to be serviced by the faint of heart.

    • 0 avatar
      3Deuce27

      Actually, the LUV 1.8 and its transmission and rearend were quite durable.

      I pulled the head on mine at about 120,000 miles and the cylinder bores were like new, and the head didn’t need rebuilding, did it anyway. The problem wasn’t valves, but an emission valve that kept popping. I did run Mobile One synthetic oil from about 1,500 miles on.

      Both of the LUV’s I recently bought, have their original un-rebuilt engines, the transmissions shift smoothly and run quietly. The original paint on the 4-WD one, cleaned up nicely with NuFinish. Haven’t worked the original paint with patch paint on the 2-wheeler, and won’t till I get back from the upcoming cross country Winter trip in it, but it should clean up nicely, though, it will get new paint.

      I have no reservations about driving this 35 year old truck from Oregon to Texas, then Florida and back with a lot of side trip miles over the two month trip, on the way and back. I will leave it in Atlanta, Texas when I hit the Whiskey Trail in a Ford Super Coupe, that will be the last trip for the Super Coupe with its Supercharged V-6, as it will get a new heart transplant with a crate Aluminator I will be hauling from Oregon to Texas in the back of the LUV.

      My old, bought new 4-WD 80′ LUV got very good mileage in town and on trips. Doing forest roads in Hi-4-WD, she would consistently get 22MPG. In 2-WD, 28-31MPG was managed easily. Unfortunately, the 85′ 720 4-WD I replaced the LUV with, never even got close to those numbers, but I still have it with only 117.000 miles on it. It will go to my son, if he ever gets a drivers license.

      Maybe I should start buying these old compact pickups and sell them back East… nope! Despite the talk here about the little utilities, everything I see back East are big pickups with 4-WD, driven everywhere at 80+ MPH and with the requisite huge tires, sound like fighter jets flying low altitude terrain on radar. The country road in front of my place in NE Texas, has 70MPH speed limit, we can’t even drive that fast in Oregon on the freeway.

      http://www.nufinish.com/car-care/car-wax-vs-car-polish

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    “To sit in solemn silence on a dull, dark dock
    in a pestilential prison with a life-long lock
    awaiting the sensation of a short, sharp shock
    from a cheap and chippy chopper on a big, black block.”

    You see it should have came with Gilbert and Sullivan Mikado Quotes on the seat covers. That would have let all your passengers know how classy you were. :P

  • avatar
    Feds

    LOOK HOW SHINY THE PAINT IS!!! This would honestly park front row in most classic car nights in Ontario. Stupid salt belt.

  • avatar
    DeeDub

    That first ad ends with “Built for Chevrolet in Japan by Isusu Motors Limited.” Did Isuzu change their name at some point a la Toyoda/Toyota or did GM just not give a sh*t about spelling Isuzu correctly?

  • avatar
    Crabspirits

    Samantha was a wreck.

    Samantha’s face was wet with tears as she held the chrome cap with one hand while threading on the remaining lug nuts. She encountered a stripped stud…and remembered. Birds chirped in the spring sunshine outside of the dim garage. Sam sat in the Snap-On roller chair, held her face in her hands, and let the tears fall between her fingers.

    “Where’s that brother of yours?”, Sam’s father said, pushing the fresh snow out of the way with the side door of the garage. Samantha took a break from working the 400 grit on the flank of her truck. She pulled her dust mask down and observed her dad standing in the doorway amidst a swirling winter. Steam blew like a speeding locomotive from his coffee cup. He raised it up to his lips hidden somewhere in the impressive growth of facial hair, taking a sip, and then grimacing. He flung the coffee out into the white snow, making a melty brown anomaly. “Get in here. We need to give this truck some luv.” Tony darted inside, and stomped the snow off his boots. Her father added, “Your mother sure can ruin a good pot of coffee.” The siblings chuckled.

    “So much sandinggggg.”, Tony complained. The old man watched from his snap on chair, and spun around to turn on the dusty vintage radio. “There’s gonna be a heartache tonight, heartache tonight…” Tony gave two more brushes to the bondo on the driver’s door. “It’s good I think.” Pops smacked his lips disapprovingly, creating ripples in the grey carpet of beard. “Nope.”

    Finally, it was time. The garage heater cooked the small space up to 100°, and fanned the clear plastic hanging from the rear bumper. The kids watched the maestro work the HVLP deftly around the Chevy, coating the Luv in a brilliant smurf blue hue.

    The little pickup looked like a million bucks already. “You guys missed some masking back here.”, said dad. He tried to clean the overspray from the bumper with a rag. “Shi^. Gonna have to get some more acetone.” Tony struggled with the wheel. “Uh, dad?” The old man came to inspect. “Ah, yeah, you’ve knackered the threads. Well…I’m off to the parts store again.” Sam and Tony watched their father climb up into the lifted K5 Blazer through the spiderwebbed window pane. They waited for the cherry-bombed duals to fade off into the distance before going back to the house to resume consumption of thanksgiving leftovers.

    Samantha wiped tears from her face, and looked out the bay at the pristine K5, eyeing the slack cable hanging from the Warn winch. It was probably the last thing the old man touched before being struck and killed while helping a stranded motorist. A gallon of acetone, one wheel stud, and a receipt was found on the passenger footwell. Samantha didn’t know how to put the stud in. Her mind was just lost from looking at it, flooded with a variety of emotions. Then she didn’t know where her father put the screws for the grill. She couldn’t do this anymore. She promised herself she would finish the Mikado for pops. It was a promise she would have to break.

    “It’ll be fine on only 5 lugs. Don’t worry about it.”, said the stranger from behind the wheel of his new purchase. He waved to his companion in the battered scrap truck to take off. Samantha assured the man, saying “Like I said, I don’t know where my dad put the title. I’m sure you can just fill out a form from the DMV and get one.” The gentleman in the idling Luv didn’t seem concerned in the slightest. “Don’t worry about it. Thanks a lot.”

    Samantha watched the CHEVROLET on the tailgate until it vanished around the turn at the end of the street.
    “(sigh)”

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I would have taken the badge m’self.

    It looks like it would be fun to randomly stick to something else.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Jeeze ~ I was in The Mikado in grade school in 1961….

    Anyway , the seat has obviously been re covered as well as the rig re painted .

    I see no rust anywhere ! not even the battery tray and these things rusted like VEGAS f’chrissakes , why the hell was it junked ?! .

    The carby is clean , obviously was touched not long ago , even if it blew blue oil smoke a basic overhaul would be cheap and easy , this thing shouldn’t have been scrapped .

    Mind you I never really like these but it’s a time capsule of sorts and yes , little Japanese Trucklets were amazingly good Work Rigs .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Looks kinda big to be a “small” truck.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I do consider this Izuzu along with the Datsun 620 pickup as the nicest looking small pickups of their era.

    I do remember seeing a 4×4 short wheel base version at a local Holden dealer back in 1977 and thought it was a great looking little vehicle.

    Even in Australia those little pickups from that generation didn’t endure the test of time. Not many are on the roads here either.

    The US manufacturers attempted to get onto the little pickup band wagon and screwed it all up with protectionist measures etc.

    With the way the world is changing now is the time to start looking at alternative vehicles that will achieve much of what larger vehicles do.

    It has worked with the US family car. A Camry is now considered a good size family hack.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Well, it appears the overly zealous spam filter stills runs amok.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Methinks this might be related.

      WordPress 1.5 released 8/31/14:

      “Added several efficient new trackback spam filters to further improve speed in processing trackbacks and blocking spam, which means even lower server load and improved overall scalability.”

      “Made several improvements to the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.

      Updated the spam filters.”

      https://wordpress.org/plugins/wp-spamshield/changelog/

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        The server workload will be reduced especially when it dumps as much as this new version of WordPress is doing.

        I wonder how much traffic is being lost by companies that are using this version of WordPress? Hmmm…….

        Net traffic on a website equals cash.

        What bugs me is there is only a “we are working on it” statement from the guys that run TTAC. I do understand they are constrained by the owners.

        I do recall organisations that I work for who produce garbage software and have a “live with it” attitude. But, private business??

        • 0 avatar
          Advance_92

          For-profits are as bad with technology as anyone else. Usually something sold over a few rounds of golf.

          Hope someone grabbed the Mikado badge before the truck was crushed.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          This is the problem with the technology treadmill as I call it, you have to stay running on it no matter the issues you encounter and simply hope the next version works properly.

          Personally I’d simply roll back the version until something promising comes out, assuming the IT/implementation/deployment team even has a rollback strategy in place.

          Additional: A tale of two applications. One is an ASP and .NET 2.0 hybrid (in VB *shivers*) which originally was developed in 2000, the other is a .NET 4.x web product which uses a messaging based architecture and NHibernate for its DB access and was developed for Silverlight starting in 2009. I was originally hired to maintain and enhance the first product in 2011 because it became clear to mgt its replacement product was not going to be 100% ready by summer 2011. Granted the ASP based product I support is garbage on the inside and I’ve taken it as far as it can go, but this product in FY13 made nearly 9,000,000 out of its highest volume implementation (about 450,000 customers) and we have seventeen other smaller implementations. After you factor in my team’s payroll, IT costs, and any additional IT support for all eighteen instances, you’re left with a fair amount of profit. Meanwhile the whiz bang product has probably cost $25,000,000 in payroll and IT costs since 2009 (new dev has about 50 expensive people inc two directors), and I doubt it has generated even a fifth of that in revenue. This year alone we had to hire contractors to replace the Silverlight forms with HTML5, I’m sure in payroll time for employees and with contractors this cost us at least a half a million. But that’s what happens on the technology treadmill, you get on it and you have to keep up. Meanwhile garbage grade code and decade old technology still show a profit.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Additional: A tale of two applications. One is an ASP and .NET 2.0 hybrid (in VB *shivers*) which originally was developed in 2000, the other is a .NET 4.x web product which uses a messaging based architecture and NHibernate for its DB access and was developed for Silverlight starting in 2009. I was originally hired to maintain and enhance the first product in 2011 because it became clear to mgt its replacement product was not going to be 100% ready by summer 2011. Granted the ASP based product I support is garbage on the inside and I’ve taken it as far as it can go, but this product in FY13 made nearly 9,000,000 out of its highest volume implementation (about 450,000 customers) and we have seventeen other smaller implementations. After you factor in my team’s payroll, IT costs, and any additional IT support for all eighteen instances, you’re left with a fair amount of profit. Meanwhile the whiz bang product has probably cost $25,000,000 in payroll and IT costs since 2009 (new dev has about 50 expensive people inc two directors), and I doubt it has generated even a fifth of that in revenue. This year alone we had to hire contractors to replace the Silverlight forms with HTML5, I’m sure in payroll time for employees and with contractors this cost us at least a half a million. But that’s what happens on the technology treadmill, you get on it and you have to keep up. Meanwhile garbage grade code and decade old technology still show a profit.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    The chicken tax did not apply to that model year, due to the cab chassis exemption that was in place at that time.

    GM responded to the end of the cab-chassis exemption by developing the S-10, which led to Isuzu rebranding the Chevy Luv as the Isuzu P’up.

    So ironically, the chicken tax resulted in more vehicles being available in the market, not fewer. A fact that would surprise the small truck jihadis if they only knew about this stuff.

    • 0 avatar
      -Nate

      Not so much ‘ knew about ‘ , it’s more if they _cared_ about the facts , haters don’t .

      In 1971 an (obviously rich) High School mate of mine bought a new Ford Courier mini truck ~ he was derided by many but it was indeed a very capable little trucklet and withstood his constant abuse , it even still ran after he hit a tree head on going about 50 MPH ~ he was able to find some parts in a junkyard from a side swiped rig and more or less drunkenly cobbled it up to run and drive again .

      A few years later I got an Auto Parts Delivery gig driving a mustard yellow one with four speed , it still had the Dealer’s big decal in the back window : FORD’s NEW 1800 CC IMPORT ! .

      Also a sturdy little thing , I hauled many a V-8 or cylinder heads etc. in it and being a young man I childishly thrashed it mercilessly although I quickly learned not to _ever_ squeak the tires because someone would hear and call my (lazy,grumpy old fart) Boss who envied and hated my youthful exuberance ~ he was always ful of post WWI Hot Rod stories and didn’t appreciate how much his stories affected my driving style =8-) .

      In those pre collision days I was still 6’1″ but I have short 34″ legs so the cab was O.K. for me to spend all day in .

      No radio kinda sucked .

      -Nate

  • avatar
    April

    My Dad brought home a brand new 79′ in the same blue color. Definitely a culture shock compared to the traditional domestic trucks but gasoline prices were insane. IIRC the only issue were noisy engine lifters and a appetite for oil.

  • avatar
    mikeg216

    I live in Ohio and I’ve only seen a few and never a 4×4

    • 0 avatar
      Firestorm 500

      I almost bought a 4 X 4 like this one in 1980.

      When my wife and I went back to actually buy it, it had been sold.

      We went and bought a Toyota SR5 long bed 4 X 2 instead. Also in blue, but darker.

  • avatar
    3Deuce27

    Reg; “Did anyone buy the 4WD LUV?”

    I did, an 80′ with the Mikado trim, which had bucket seats in a red checked pattern. It was black so I had a pin stripper friend of mine, stripe a double red line the length of the LUV, while I painted the factory slotted steel wheels black and put a red stripe on them. It was a good looking package with the Fiberglass canopy with a similar paint and stripe treatment.

    Recently I picked up an 80′ two wheel drive LUV and a few weeks later an 80′ 4-WD, both Mikado’s, both in great shape and no rust.

    Here in the NW, especially SW Oregon, we don’t have a rust/salt problem, so there are a lot of survivor small 60’s/70’s/80’s pickups, from clapped out 4-wheel mudders to nice original daily drivers.

    A few days ago I went to look at a Toyota stout in driveable condition.

    Years ago I did design work for a Motorhome/modular home builder, their parts pick up vehicle was the then new 65′ Datsun 520. That was my first experience with a small pickup and I liked it a lot, but it would be another 13 years before I bought a little pickup. I still lik’em.

    Yesterday, I looked at a pristine 85′ Mazda B2000 with 99,000 miles and its matching canopy. But, the small pickups I would like to find, are the Mazda Rotary pickup, and the rare, but still out there, Courier EV’s produced from 79′ to 82′.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    Anyone else see “mikado” in the title and expect to see something about a steam locomotive? Forget this. If you want to see a quality Mikado in operation, go out to Colorado and catch some of the Rio Grande’s finest k series locos in action, or if you’re in the south, enjoy the return of 4501.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      +1. Hopefully the Austin Steam Train Association will get theirs together in the near future; be great to see it stretch it’s legs again.

      • 0 avatar
        tjh8402

        @Jhefner – there’s one in Austin Tx they’re working on? that would be fantastic. Something else to do when I go out to the races. I’ve been to Ft Worth 3 times in the last 3 years and every time I go, Grapevine Vintage Railroad isn’t running their steamer so I keep missing that one. I’m sure there are other ones of note that I just can’t think of, but 4501 is all over facebook so that’s the first to come to mind and I’m a D&RGW foamer so the K’s will always get lots of love from me.

    • 0 avatar
      3Deuce27

      Reg; “Anyone else see “mikado” in the title and expect to see something about a steam locomotive?”………. NO!

      The term Mikado (御門 or 帝 or みかど), literally meaning “the honorable gate” of the imperial palace, referring metaphorically to its occupant and to the palace itself.

      The locomotives were probably named after the name of a popular English play, the 1885 comic opera by Gilbert and Sullivan, that saw wide spread performances for many years in Europe and North America. Mikado, the ‘Honorable Gate’ had another colloquial term ‘The Iron Gate’. The iron ‘cow catcher’ sort of looks like a gate, and I suspect that was the impetus for naming the standardized locomotive class of two sizes. Just speculation on my part.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mikado

      • 0 avatar
        tjh8402

        @3Deue27 – the story I’ve heard over the years is the same one listed in the wikipedia entry for the 2-8-2 wheel arrangement: that the name comes from a Baldwin Locomotive 2-8-2 built for a Japanese Railroad.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2-8-2

        • 0 avatar
          3Deuce27

          Thanks for the link, it pretty much supports part of my conjecture on the origin of the naming. Seems, no definitive info is available on the use of the term as it applied to the locomotives. I like the reference to the Iron Gate, especially when it relates to a highly visible part of a locomotive. Not as easy as Katana to know what Mikado actually refers to. Somebody must know…col!

          “The class name “Mikado” originates from a group of Japanese type 9700 2-8-2 locomotives that were built by Baldwin Locomotive Works for the 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm) gauge Nippon Railway of Japan in 1897. In the 19th century, the Emperor of Japan was often referred to as “the Mikado” in English. Also, the Gilbert and Sullivan opera The Mikado had premiered in 1885, and achieved great popularity in both Britain and America.[4]”

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        While you may be vaguely correct about where the name came from, that’s not WHY they were named such. The name for that wheel pattern on a steam locomotive came from the fact that the design was specifically built for a Japanese order–it was never intended for use in the States. However, for whatever reason the order was canceled, several locomotives had already been built and had to be sold somewhere and an American railroad bought them. The design proved itself very capable, especially in the Eastern half of the country and it soon became quite popular with marques like the Southern Railroad, who IIRC became the largest single user of the type.

        So the Mikado got its name specifically because it was originally built to be a Japanese locomotive.

        • 0 avatar
          3Deuce27

          Reg: “So the Mikado got its name specifically because it was originally built to be a Japanese locomotive.”

          That it was designed and built for the Japanese, doesn’t explain why the term Mikado was select. Any number of other terms or names could have been used. Did the Japanese typically call their locomotives Mikado? So, I still contend that we don’t know definitively why the term was selected. If you find out, please post it.

  • avatar
    namstrap

    I could be wrong, but I was always told there were no 1985 Mazda pickups. The 1986 was going to be a big body change, and since there were so many unsold 1984s they would eliminate ’85s.

  • avatar
    namstrap

    Back in the early seventies I worked in parts at an Datsun dealer. We used to do tune-ups and regular maintenance on Chevy Luvs, Opel GTs, and Isuzu Bellets. They had Hitachi ignition systems and our points, condensers, caps, rotors, coils etc. all worked.
    At the time, it seemed that the GM dealers didn’t want to have anything to do with them after the sale.
    My favourite Japanese truck to drive was a Dodge D50 with the 2.6 engine. It had lots of power, and the standard transmission was excellent. It was black with huge orange and yellow decals on it, and the seats were really nice buckets done in bumble bee colours. A little too loud for my tastes today. I had to get rid of it when the cost for oil exceeded the cost for fuel.


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