By on July 3, 2009

TTAC’s B&B are a tough crowd. After we published that Germany, for the second month in a row, saw a sales increase of 40 percent over the same period in the prior year, a month-by-month accounting, complete with graphs was demanded. That request was fulfilled. Then, more demands.

The handover of data on Germany’s auto exports was insisted on. Sorry, don’t have, except for the vague statement that Germany usually produces 6 million cars, of which it usually exports 3 million, the other 3 million are consumed at home. This is likely to change as the home market is on fire while other markets tank. With the EU in its various permutations, the definition of “export” is getting blurred anyway.

A request for an explanation of Germany’s seasonality was made; the explanation given.

The interest in Deutschland’s macro economy is flabbergasting. To satisfy the hunger for hard Teutonic data, here is the total breakdown of new car registrations in Germany for the month of June, provided by the ever so efficient Kraftfahrt-Bundesamt, the German equivalent of the NHTSA. (The KBA is also dear to the heart of German drivers, because it keeps a tally of the brownie points awarded for one’s driving skills.)

For those who are a bit rusty with their German, here some handy phrases:

Neuzulassungen von Personenkraftwagen im Juni 2009 nach Marken: Registrations of new passenger vehicles in June 2009, by brand.

Marke = brand

Anzahl = quantity

Anteil in % = Share in percent

Veränd. in % gegenüber Juni 2008 = Percent change versus June 2008

To figure out the rest is left as an exercise to the student.  Now put that on your Hamburger and eat it. (For a moderate fee, more data will be provided on a case-by-case basis.)

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7 Comments on “Data, Data, Über Alles!...”


  • avatar
    sutski

    haha, thanks Bertel. Thats all the data I can handle on a friday morning! Surprising though to see so many +scores for the difference between jan-june ’08 and jan-june ’09…Can this be solely attributed to clunkers scheme I wonder ?

    I guess without looking deeper (and in fact from pure guess work) it would appear that smaller cars have helped a lot of companies (e.g Fiat (500), Seat (Ibiza), Alfa (147andMito) Suzuki (swift) stay positive and the bigger car makers Jag, Landy, Jeep, merc etc have suffered the most…I guess that is why Aston are doing the Cygnet and FIAT are about to attack the USA with the Fiatsler 500!!

  • avatar
    Boston

    The german luxury set ain’t doing so hot unfortunately.

  • avatar
    John Horner

    Is Germany’s C4C program actually cost the government there any money when you net out the VAT taxes and registration fees triggered by the additional sales?

    I just plugged a hypothetical $30,000 new vehicle purchase into my state’s handy dandy new vehicle tax and registration fees web tool https://mv.dmv.ca.gov/FeeCalculatorWeb/newVehicleFees.do and got this result: “Grand Total Registration Fees: $3,208.00” Wow, that $3,500 C4C voucher is looking mostly like a transfer from the federal government to the state government. I think German’s VAT rates are even higher than California’s fees.

  • avatar
    ragtopman

    Wealth transfer. It’s what government does. C4C is the perfect example.

  • avatar
    petrolhead85

    Thanks for the data Bertel. The one that surprised me was the brand with the biggest sales increase – Lada +138.2% !!!! You mean to tell me that between January and June, 2704 people looked at all the great small cars you can buy in Europe and said “nein, I’d rather drive a Lada instead.”

  • avatar
    MBella

    petrolhead85, I’m with you. I just looked up their prices, and Kalinas in Germany with an 8V engine were over 7,000 euros. With a 16V it was over 8K. I can’t believe there were 2704 chumps, so I’m assuming a great bit of rebates.

  • avatar

    I don’t know which of the Lada models sells best. Can’t imagine that it is the Kalina. Never have seen any of these on the street.
    Perhaps it is the Niva? A small, rugged offroader with no frills. Now you can also have the 2107, which gives you the Fiat 124 feeling. At least, they are no eyesore.
    But let’s not forget that Lada still has a dedicated ownership in East Germany. The Lada infrastructure might be quite good there.

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