U.S. Pedestrian Deaths Reach Highest Level in Decades

While the preliminary data from the National Safety Council shows 2019 being a safer year for cars operating in America, its report noted continued concerns regarding pedestrian safety. Additional data gleaned from the Governors Highway Safety Association’s (GHSA) assessment of pedestrian deaths by state shows that those traveling outside of cars aren’t enjoying the same safety enhancements as those sitting comfortably inside the cabin.

Its report estimates that 6,590 pedestrians were killed in 2019. The figure represents a 5-percent increase from 2018 and is the largest number of deaths the United States has seen since 1988. The situation, however, isn’t as simple as the big numbers suggest. Despite pedestrian fatalities gradually creeping up since 2009, only 30 states actually saw an increase in their total number of deaths last year. The GHSA now projects a pedestrian fatality rate of 2.0 per 100,000 people. While that’s also the highest rate the country has seen in years, it’s actually far lower than automobile fatalities — which currently averages around 11.0 per a population of 100,000.

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As Pedestrian Deaths Spike, Safety Group Puts the Spotlight on SUVs

We’ve already told you that, while traffic fatalities dropped in 2017, pedestrians deaths showed the opposite trend. Now, preliminary data from 2018 suggests pedestrians deaths rose to their highest point since 1990 last year, and one group claims high-riding crossovers and SUVs are a big part of the problem.

How big? According to the Governors Highway Safety Association, pedestrian fatalities involving SUVs rose 50 percent in the past five years.

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  • Inside Looking Out Ford also was bankrupt with his first company that became The Standard of the World.
  • 28-Cars-Later If only some kind of gasoline/electric... hybrid... existed.
  • Wjtinfwb Cool cars that drover pretty well, thank to the Benz bits underneath. But that interior.... Chrysler must have sourced interior materials to Lego or Mattel. I spent a week in a rented 300 Touring of this vintage, very enjoyable car to drive but the interior would have made an old Isuzu i-Mark blush. No sale at any price.
  • Wjtinfwb The airport I fly out of and frequently rent from when driving (VPS) has no facilities for charging an EV. It's just an open, unsecured lot that requires getting the agreement and keys from the counter in the terminal. I doubt Hertz would want to invest in the infrastructure needed to add Hi-speed EV charging stations in an open air, unsecured lot. Bigger airports like Atlanta or Baltimore have dedicated garage facilities for rentals, but the majority of secondary or tertiary markets airports are open air lots like mine in NW Florida. Plus, unless you're planning on only driving a few miles a day who wants to deal with finding an EV charge station that is working then standing around for hours while Hertz's car gets recharged. Rental EV's are The answer to the question no one asked.