Adaptive Headlights Becoming Legal in United States

On Tuesday, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) announced it had finalized a rule permitting automakers to install adaptive driving beam headlights on modern vehicles. Despite having pioneered automatic headlamps in the 1950s, the United States has been hesitant to implement automatic leveling and directional beams. In fact, imported vehicles equipped with adaptive headlights have been modified to adhere to regional safety laws for decades.

But the implementation of light-emitting diodes, high-intensity discharge lamps, and even upgrades to tungsten-halogen bulbs has made forward illumination substantially brighter. If you’ve been driving a while, you’ve probably noticed increased glare from oncoming vehicles (especially if you’re in an automobile that’s situated closer to the pavement). Directional beams are supposed to help alleviate the problem and have been getting more attention from U.S. safety regulators. However, that’s only part of the reason why the NHTSA suddenly feels better about approving them.

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  • Oberkanone There is nothing wrong marketing your products to wealthy customers. GMC is fully adopting this strategy. Seeking affordability, look elsewhere.
  • Sobro At least the filing wasn't for alphanumeric gibberish. Just alpha gibberish.
  • Oberkanone Does $63,350 include $1,500 mandatory optional Onstar?
  • Kendahl $1,500 is a good reason to turn OnStar into OffStar. I guess that means writing off Buick, Cadillac and GMC. The more garbage manufacturers stuff into otherwise very good vehicles, the less likely I am to trade in my 15-year-old Infiniti G37S. It's mechanically sound at 70k miles.
  • Kcflyer Great looking rigs. Too bad there in such short supply.