Junkyard Find: 1983 AMC Eagle SX/4 Sport

Ahh, the AMC Eagle! So much car-industry history wrapped up in the Eagle, which was a highly innovative machine made during the very last gasps of American Motors (and continuing as a Chrysler product, briefly, before Chrysler killed the Eagle and kept the name for its new marque, which was then slapped on a rebadged and modified Renault 25). Since I live in Colorado, I see Eagles on the street all the time— there are several daily-driver Eagles living within a few blocks of me— and I see them in the local wrecking yards. So far in this series, we’ve seen this ’79 wagon, this ’80 coupe, this GM Iron Duke-powered ’81 SX/4, this ’82 hatchback, this ’84 wagon, this ’84 wagon, and this ’85 wagon. The AMC Spirit-based SX/4 is much less common than the larger AMC Concord-based Eagles, so today’s find (in Denver, of course) is quite interesting.

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Junkyard Find: 1979 AMC Spirit DL

The AMC Spirit-based ’82 Eagle SX/4 Junkyard Find that we admired last week was an interesting car, but it was pretty well picked over and started its junkyard career as a basket case. In the very same Denver junkyard, however, sits this much nicer and more complete ’79 Spirit DL. It was so nice, in fact, that I had to buy some parts from it!

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El Diablo Went Down To Georgia: The 1981 VAM Rally AMX

Sales of the Gremlin-based AMC Spirit in the United States were pretty dismal, but perhaps that was just the result of the suits in Kenosha choosing the wrong ad agency. Let’s head south of the border to see how VAM, which built certain AMC models under license for the Mexican market, pitched the ’81 Rally AMX.

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  • Cprescott Yawn. The dinoaur death rattle.
  • Cprescott I'm sorry. There should be zero subsidies for whatever vehicle you want to buy. The automakers are lucky that even this stupid law exists.
  • Cprescott Just what we needed - another one in that segment.
  • MaintenanceCosts They're probably paid a bit more than they're worth, because relationships among boards are a bit incestuous, and the CEO always gets the benefit of the doubt among buddies. But there's no question they can add enough value to justify very high pay.The real problem is that they're not taxed enough. A mere high wage earner can have an effective federal tax rate of over 30% under some circumstances. These guys usually pay more like 10% to 15%, because they are able to structure their finances so that much income is deferred and much of the rest is capital gains. The rules around timing should be stricter, the capital gains rate higher, and they should pay the same effective tax rates as their second- and third-level reports.
  • Cprescott No. Whatever the company wants to pay for Executive help is up to them and their stockholders. Since they are the only ones who live this job 24/7/365, they should be well compensated. I've been a GM for decades and that is my responsibility for the same period; I cannot imagine trying to run an entire company with all of the potential snafus that arise.