1997 Toyota Supra Mangled After Mechanic's Wild Crash

Chris Teague
by Chris Teague

The fourth-generation Toyota Supra became the face of tuner culture after a certain wildly famous car movie made it look untouchable on the streets. That popularity has led to a monstrous increase in prices for the cars, and as one Colorado mechanic shop just found out, crashing one that doesn’t belong to you can come with equally monstrous consequences.


A video posted to Facebook shows the incident, in which a shop tech got too enthusiastic with the throttle and lost control of the car. He can’t get a handle on the car and ends up plowing through a roadside barrier. The video doesn’t capture much of the crash, but we see a flash of the mangled car as the filming car passes.


The Drive reported on the story and reached out to the Englewood Police Department, which told the publication that the driver was not the car's owner. Police also confirmed that he was taken to a local hospital after the rollover crash, but the person filming told The Drive that the driver was fine.


Trey Grube, the person filming the crash, said that the driver had followed traffic laws before the crash. Given the temperatures in Englewood earlier this week, it wouldn’t be surprising to hear that the tires were inappropriate for the weather or that they hadn’t been warmed up properly beforehand.


Either way, the Supra’s owner may pursue legal action against the shop, depending on how the after-crash discussion went. Clean turbocharged Supras from that era are routinely listed with six-figure price tags, so it’ll be up to the shop’s insurance (or lack thereof) to make the owner whole.

[Image: Screenshot from 1320 Video via Facebook]

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Chris Teague
Chris Teague

Chris grew up in, under, and around cars, but took the long way around to becoming an automotive writer. After a career in technology consulting and a trip through business school, Chris began writing about the automotive industry as a way to reconnect with his passion and get behind the wheel of a new car every week. He focuses on taking complex industry stories and making them digestible by any reader. Just don’t expect him to stay away from high-mileage Porsches.

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  • Zerofoo Zerofoo on Jan 12, 2023

    I suspect each parties' lawyers will make a buck and the owner of this now smashed vehicle will get coupons for free oil changes.

  • Festiva Rob Festiva Rob on May 25, 2023

    One less car on the streets, one more car in the junkyard. 😢 JUST LIKE MY GOOFY AHH TESLA MODEL X!!! 😡

  • Bkojote Allright, actual person who knows trucks here, the article gets it a bit wrong.First off, the Maverick is not at all comparable to a Tacoma just because they're both Hybrids. Or lemme be blunt, the butch-est non-hybrid Maverick Tremor is suitable for 2/10 difficulty trails, a Trailhunter is for about 5/10 or maybe 6/10, just about the upper end of any stock vehicle you're buying from the factory. Aside from a Sasquatch Bronco or Rubicon Jeep Wrangler you're looking at something you're towing back if you want more capability (or perhaps something you /wish/ you were towing back.)Now, where the real world difference should play out is on the trail, where a lot of low speed crawling usually saps efficiency, especially when loaded to the gills. Real world MPG from a 4Runner is about 12-13mpg, So if this loaded-with-overlander-catalog Trailhunter is still pulling in the 20's - or even 18-19, that's a massive improvement.
  • Lou_BC "That’s expensive for a midsize pickup" All of the "offroad" midsize trucks fall in that 65k USD range. The ZR2 is probably the cheapest ( without Bison option).
  • Lou_BC There are a few in my town. They come out on sunny days. I'd rather spend $29k on a square body Chevy
  • Lou_BC I had a 2010 Ford F150 and 2010 Toyota Sienna. The F150 went through 3 sets of brakes and Sienna 2 sets. Similar mileage and 10 year span.4 sets tires on F150. Truck needed a set of rear shocks and front axle seals. The solenoid in the T-case was replaced under warranty. I replaced a "blend door motor" on heater. Sienna needed a water pump and heater blower both on warranty. One TSB then recall on spare tire cable. Has a limp mode due to an engine sensor failure. At 11 years old I had to replace clutch pack in rear diff F150. My ZR2 diesel at 55,000 km. Needs new tires. Duratrac's worn and chewed up. Needed front end alignment (1st time ever on any truck I've owned).Rear brakes worn out. Left pads were to metal. Chevy rear brakes don't like offroad. Weird "inside out" dents in a few spots rear fenders. Typically GM can't really build an offroad truck issue. They won't warranty. Has fender-well liners. Tore off one rear shock protector. Was cheaper to order from GM warehouse through parts supplier than through Chevy dealer. Lots of squeaks and rattles. Infotainment has crashed a few times. Seat heater modual was on recall. One of those post sale retrofit.Local dealer is horrific. If my son can't service or repair it, I'll drive 120 km to the next town. 1st and last Chevy. Love the drivetrain and suspension. Fit and finish mediocre. Dealer sucks.
  • MaintenanceCosts You expect everything on Amazon and eBay to be fake, but it's a shame to see fake stuff on Summit Racing. Glad they pulled it.
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