Study: Electric Cars Cost More to "Fill up" Than Gas

Matt Posky
by Matt Posky

study claims fueling costs now lower than ev charging at home

A Michigan-based think tank has claimed that it now costs less to drive an internal combustion vehicle 100 miles than to charge up a comparably all-electric vehicle using home charging. Though this claim comes with a few caveats, starting with acknowledging that this only applies to “midpriced” vehicles based on the national average for fuel and electricity rates.


"The run-up in gas prices made EVs look like a bargain during much of 2021 and 2022," the Anderson Economic Group’s Patrick Anderson told Automotive News in a recent interview. "With electric prices going up and gas prices declining, drivers of traditional ICE vehicles saved a little bit of money in the last quarter of 2022."


From Automotive News:


An analysis of late-2022 fueling costs by the Anderson Economic Group (AEG) says midpriced ICE drivers are paying about $11.29 for 100 miles of driving, an average of 31 cents less than midpriced EV drivers who charge at home.


The switch is the result of fuel costs dropping by over $2 and falling below upward trending home-charging costs, AEG explained.


Prior to that, it was reportedly cheaper to charge an EV than fuel a comparable internal combustion vehicle. But this would also mean that any claims about electric cars being cheaper to run when national gasoline prices were averaging less than $3.00 per gallon (e.g. 2015-2020) are now doubly suspect.


Then again, this is also a report coming from a group that may have clients who would prefer to see things framed a certain way. This has frequently been the case with studies championing EV ownership and the blade can cut both ways. We’re often critical of any research coming from entities that may have corporate or political ties and this situation is no different.

It's similarly worth remembering things might be different where you live and everything being discussed here focuses on countrywide averages.


However, the data being offered here is reasonably clear and highly specific. In fact, AEG stated that luxury EV drivers managed to maintain a cost advantage in the fourth quarter of 2022, noting that the cost-benefit gap over luxury ICE drivers had still narrowed to $7.56 from $11.20 per 100 miles. While the group said it had hoped to likewise tackle the pickup segment, it doesn’t yet have sufficient data to publish anything concrete.


The final takeaway from the study was that commercial EV charging remains higher than the alternatives, with the cost for mid-priced vehicles seeing no significant change. At an average of $14.40 per 100 miles, it remains the most expensive way to get around town.


[Images: Maridav/Shutterstock; Anderson Economic Group]

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  • Mark Mark 4 days ago

    This is what it cost to drive a Tesla Model S Plaid for 11k+ miles in one year. You would pay more to drive a Yaris that far, never the less a performance car on the Plaid level.


    I don’t know where they got their math, but mine is actual real world results.


    We live in a cold climate and have removed our wheel covers, both of which hurt range, so your mileage may vary.

  • Ollicat Ollicat 2 days ago

    VoGhost


    Dont' you see what you are saying? You are making people even MORE dependent on government by saying they can get government loans for $50K solar systems. Why should the government be involved? And guess what, many if not most people live in the city, or in apartments and have no place to put $50K solar projects. On top of that, you still need to afford those loans and PAY THEM OFF. That is a concept foreign to most liberals who are used to the government giving them everything.


    Secondly, you said previously you only use your own solar power to "fuel" your car. Now you say you use super chargers. Get your story straight. And in your neck of the woods, you may have a supercharger every 20 miles. Please visit the rest of the country one day and experience reality where that is not the case. And your car will take longer to fuel than an ICE car. You can't go from 0 to 100% in 5 minutes.


    3rdly, EV's are the most destructive form of land travel known to man today. But you have been conned because you see only what your car does when it travels. You don't see how power is made, how it is transported, the trillions being wasted to build out the fraudulent EV infrastructure, and then of course, the incredible land raping process of battery manufacturing. You remind me of a commercial I saw where a lady had a check engine light on her car but instead of dealing with it, she just stuck a smiley face sticker on it and that made her feel better. She just denied reality because all she wanted to see was a happy face. That is what an EV driver does when they put blinders on their own eyes thinking they are "saving the planet."


    Lastly, you are dreaming about oil product under Biden. I just looked it up. Oil production peaked under Trump's last year and has yet to reach that level. And let's not even mention canceling the Keystone pipeline for Canadian oil. Oh yeah, and cobalt, the number 1 use of cobalt in the world today is for lithium batteries, IE, EVs. Oil production does use cobalt but at a micro fraction of what your EV's use. You are drunk on the EV lies.

  • FreedMike It shouldn't be offered in the color shown in that picture, for starters. Make them all Soul Red. I would say there should be two: a "classic" Miata with conventional power, and an EV version. Imagine a Miata with 300 lb/ft of instant torque. I'd be interested.
  • Bobby D'Oppo A relatively mild price increase over the CX-9 for what appears to be a genuine, thoroughly premium effort from them. The styling looks understated and handsome to my eye, but is understated really what a buyer in this class wants today?
  • IBx1 No auto-braking nannies, no heavy hybrid system, no soulless electric motors. Kill the name and call it something else if it loses its path.
  • Redapple2 Great car. Wish I fit.
  • Redapple2 Ford. Too many stories to ignore. They used to have near honda quality. Jeez.EBFlex speaks more truth.
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