By on June 9, 2022

Now that fuel prices are approaching levels you probably never thought you’d see in your lifetime, black-market gasoline has become a thing. Local reports coming out of Nevada are claiming that thieves have begun loading up trucks with stolen gas so they can sell it at a discount. Considering the average price per gallon now exceeds $5.50 for the region, it’s easy to see why some people might be willing to roll the dice and buy discounted fuel of an unknown origin.

But the most lucrative scheme is to transport stolen gas into California, where the prices exceed $6.30 across the state. Here, thieves can sell their ill-gotten petroleum at broader margins. But it takes a special kind of vehicle and a little planning not to blow the additional profit on the trip itself. Tankers aren’t exactly easy to come by and are hardly the least-suspicious way to haul around stolen fuel, so thieves are modifying trucks and vans that can pass as light-duty vehicles. 

“Unfortunately, with the rise in fuel prices, we have an increase in fuel theft,” Lt. Jeff Swanbeck, from the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department’s Financial Crimes Section, told Fox5 KVVU-TV.

Local authorities have suggested that criminal organizations are utilizing small fleets of modified utility trucks to effectively swipe as much fuel as possible during normal working hours. While this requires thieves to break the pump itself, modifying it to dole out more gasoline than intended, police suggested the vehicles themselves could encourage passersby that the unit was being serviced. In most cases, nobody seemed to notice any criminal activity until long after the trucks have been loaded with thousands of dollars in fuel and driven away.

From KVVU-TV:

“These thieves are very sophisticated. They will take a truck that looks just like a normal truck, like a freeway service truck, and there is intricate pipping inside them,” added Lt. Swanbeck.

One make-shift gas tanker, towing a horse trailer also filled with tanks of stolen fuel, was stopped by Metro in Jean on the way to California where the gas can be sold for more than in Nevada.

Investigators say the thieves are brazen. They steal gas in plain sight, in front of people filling up at the pump who have no idea a crime is being committed right next to them.

“They will open up the gas pump itself and there is a series of gears inside there, and they are smart enough to figure out how to manipulate the gears,” explained Lt. Swanbeck.

In some cases, the LVMPD claimed that trucks would rotate in and out for hours until they’ve managed to swipe thousands of gallons in gasoline. Though, based on some of the accompanying footage, not all of the vehicles appear to be technological marvels. Several looked to be little more than pickups with external tanks welded onto the bed. Others were cargo vans that were simply loaded up with numerous tanks connected by a series of hoses.

But several were pretty decked out, featuring pumps of their own and massive tanks hidden behind fake tool chests or within custom truck beds. One vehicle intercepted by the police had three 350-gallon tanks hidden beneath a truck topper and was towing a horse trailer that was also loaded up with stolen fuel. It was stopped on its way to California where it would have sold the precious liquid to residents for less than it could be bought at the local gas station. Criminality aside, it was an impressive feat of engineering.

Police are operating under the assumption that some fuel is being sold in Nevada, where fuel prices exceed the national average. But that most thieves will be heading to California to maximize the amount they can charge for a gallon of gasoline. Interestingly, diesel was not mentioned. With a national average of $5.72 per gallon and trucks going idle as the cost of delivering goods has started to exceed existing contracts, I’m actually surprised it didn’t make a more appetizing target.

[Image: Siripatv/Shutterstock]

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67 Comments on “Black Market Gasoline Now Available On West Coast...”


  • avatar
    Jeff S

    This should not be a surprise to anyone. As gas prices go up there will be more theft.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    The American sense of entitlement to cheap gas is astonishing.

    Europeans pay $7-10/gallon, which includes higher taxes, and no black market ensues. If you think they’re just a bunch of compliant socialists, then you’ve made my point.

    Anybody who lived through the 1970s gas spikes knows it could happen again, but today’s hysteria is a repeat of those times. http://bit.ly/HJxni4

    It won’t be long before someone gets hurt hauling large quantities of fuel around.

    • 0 avatar
      ahintofpepperjack

      I hear that argument all of the time. But the fact is unlike Europe, large portions of the United states have no or limited public transport. And the majority of our goods are transported by truck. The United states was built for the automobile and because of that, affordable fuel is essential for our economy to function. If people can’t afford the gas to get to work, or trucking companies can’t afford the diesel, that becomes a big problem for everyone.

      • 0 avatar
        conundrum

        @jackpepper

        And is your idea of Europe that it is one urban sprawl with buses and trains going everywhere? And what do you think the majority of goods are hauled in over there? I’ll give you a hint — trucks.

        You Americans need to get out more and see the world. The USA isn’t as exceptional as you believe.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Let’s see here. Mexico, Italy (lived there), Germany, Austria, France, Belgium, England, Romania, Lithuania, Afghanistan, Iraq, Hati, Japan and the territory of Guam.

          Yet I still think the United States a pretty exceptional place. I’m sure you’ve seen more of the world than my little travels though and are far better qualified to pass judgement on “us Americans”.

          Additionally one of the factors driving high gas prices is “you Europeans” perpensity to drag the entire world into conflicts because in this case you can’t hear your homes without buying fuel from a dictator.

          Maybe spare is Americans the lectures (and maybe even leave us out of your new conflict for a change).

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            And if America has a “sense of entitlement” about gas prices, don’t you Europeans have a sense of entitlement about the cost of your national defense? More of US GDP goes to defending Europe than your average European nation. Good lord we are pretty much funding one of your countries fight against Russia. To loosely quote Col. Jessip in “A Few Good Men”, I’d rather you just say thank you.

        • 0 avatar
          wjtinfwb

          Planes and Ships leaving the USA every day. Feel free to get on one and take your piss-poor attitude about America with you.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Much of the United States is built around mandatory car ownership, but there’s absolutely nothing about it that requires the fleet fuel economy of those cars to be 20 mpg. We made that choice because we wanted giant vehicles that can go twice the legal speed limit and are as cheap to buy as possible. We could double fleet fuel economy without the slightest change to US land use (and, in fact, even the totally car-centric parts of Europe use much more efficient cars than we do).

        • 0 avatar
          285exp

          It’s a good thing that the only people who are hurt by high gas prices are bubbas who tow their bass boats with their big old pickup trucks and soccer moms who sit in carpool lines idling while waiting to pick up their brats and not poor people who are often the 2nd or 3rd owners of a 10 year old SUV or full size American barges because that’s what they can afford. Y’all’s sympathy and concern for the less privileged is heartwarming.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        ^^ This!

        I’d love to see how many people in this country are having to choose between food or medicine, or being able to drive to work!

        All that would have to be said was that “we will let the Keystone Pipeline go forward, and do what we can to facilitate oil production and drilling,” and the cost per barrel would probably drop enough to get the U.S. average price per gallon down into the low $4 range. (The global geopolitical stuff is responsible for the rest, in my admittedly uneducated opinion.) But since the current administration is anti-everything-but-unicorn-farts-and-glorified-golf-carts, that’ll never happen! The market is driven by speculation on the future cost, and supply and demand! Less supply = higher prices, given inelastic demand, since we’ve still gotta get to work!

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          “inelastic demand, since we’ve still gotta get to work!”

          Let me translate that for you:

          “inelastic demand, since we’ve still gotta drive F-150s and Tahoes to work!”

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            So the poors that can’t afford gas should run out and buy a new car? Because that’s really the only folks getting hosted here.

            Or did you plan on the net payers subsiding those new vehicles?

            Yawn. Better get that bus pass!

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Gas has been volatile for as long as most Americans alive today have been alive. People should not buy vehicles that will break them if gas doubles, because it was going to happen at some point.

            But you gotta show off that lifted F-250 to your bros.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Nor should they buy or rent houses that stretch them too thin, have children they can’t afford or take out loans for degrees that offet them no hope of paying for said loans. Yet again, I find myself on the hook for those dumb decisions made by others. In light of that, why shouldn’t they expect Uncle Sugar to do something about gas?

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “have children they can’t afford”

            That’s what government funded abortion is for…

        • 0 avatar
          RHD

          Oil companies exporting gasoline from the US by the tankerload exacerbates the tight supply. They are playing the market like a fiddle, and reaping many billions of quarterly profits.
          The answer is to use less gasoline by driving a little less, inflating your tires a bit more, slowing down a little, and going solar + electric.

          I’m looking forward to a nice cold winter with NO “natural gas” (which is actually methane) used to heat my home – just a couple of heat pumps and my solar panels. Eff ’em.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            In addition to that, maybe we could elect leaders that you know…lead for a change

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            Exactly the oil companies choose to export gas and diesel and much of that Keystone pipeline Canadian oil is refined at Gulf Coast refineries and exported because it is more profitable. Oil companies are not a charity they are accountable to their stockholders and the stockholders demand maximum profits. Unless the President and Congress uses emergency powers and stops the exporting of finished oil products there is not much that can be done. There is nothing in the US Constitution that states that citizens have a right to inexpensive gasoline and diesel. Blame the current President or even the past President if that makes you feel better but that’s all you will get. I worked in the oil and gas industry for years and have in previous posts detailed how the industry works. We have an inalienable right to Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness but affordable fuel is not a right protected by our Constitution. In the early 70s there was a Windfall Profits Tax on Oil Companies and there is the Sherman Anti Trust Act but then you have to prove that there is price fixing and collusion among the oil companies.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          I’m not sure that Keystone Pipeline would have much effect on oil prices. A lot of oil refineries do not want Canadian tar sands oil. It has a high Sulphur content and is very thick. It’s more costly to refine.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @Lou_BC–Few refineries can refine high sulfur oil and the ones that can are larger newer refineries. Oil varies in quality depending on the sulfur content with the lower sulfur content being the most expensive to buy but yielding the most refined product. No one likes to pay more for gasoline and diesel but short of nationalization and more regulations which will not work and will lead to even more shortages.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            What I was saying essentially is that ANY initiative which would potentially get more product on the market, any product, would likely bring futures down a bit. Yes I’m aware that quite a bit of the Keystone product may have been destined for export. But just the act of taking potential product off the market, as Biden did on his first day in office by halting the Keystone, is going to have the speculators bidding up the price because of less supply. Same as when gas hikes when production is constrained by weather, refinery disruptions, whatever.

            The worst thing was when oil started to be traded on commodities markets, opening things up to speculation. @Jeff S, if any of what I stated is bovine feces, apologies!

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          Keystone would make precious little difference. The silly inefficiencies encouraged by the local retardocrats’-, and idioticans’-, hysteria over a scary little septuagenarian at a Vodka bar, cuts effective supply more than what Keystone could have any hope making up for.

          Unless, perhaps, some law was passed barring export: As long as others are willig and able to pay more, Americans won’t get the bid.

          Underlying problem is:
          A barrel of oil sold in China, is used to produce $250, and quickly increasing, worth of goods. Hence, someone in China can afford bidding up to that.

          While in America, a barrel of oil sold, is used 70% to drive around in a 10mpg truck, either chasing ambulances or collecting unearned “rent.” In both cases producing a big, fat nothing. While straight up discouraging, and making it more expensive, for anyone to do something productive. While the remaining 30% is used to produce such “valuable” goods as bomb craters halfway around the world. Just so that stupid people can cheer for even stupider people fighting over who can act the stupidest.

          It shouldn’t take a Rothbard to figure out who will be able to afford the winning bid in more and more oil auctions going forward….. We’re effectively a third world country now. And more ad more so every day. And people in thord world countries, always struggle affording stuff. Including gas.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @stuki – true

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “Keystone would make precious little difference. The silly inefficiencies encouraged by the local retardocrats’-, and idioticans’-, hysteria over a scary little septuagenarian at a Vodka bar, cuts effective supply more than what Keystone could have any hope making up for.”

            Not true friend. The oil is getting shipped regardless, is it easier to ship via a pipeline or rail? In fact you can send multiple products through a pipeline….not so with a single train car.

            Further, I ask this…what would it have hurt to complete it? Maybe that $40 billion we pi$$ed away would have been better spent finishing Keystone XL and the border wall. Certainly completing those would not have hurt anything.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            “I ask this…what would it have hurt to complete it?”

            It certainly wouldn’t hurt to have it completed. More, cheaper, easier transport is always better than less.

            But as far as what Californians pay at the pump, it’s what’s technically referred to as a drop in the bucket. As you say, it’s already shipped via rail car.

            Now the monkeys have deemed and found and decided that oil ad gas demand in Europe is somehow better served by silly roundabouts of buying and shipping oil frozen then reheated then frozen then hand carried in buckets from Katmandu, such that the Katmanduians in turn have to hand carry theirs in from Russia. Instead of, as intelligent rational people would do, Russia simply shipping it to Europe over an already 99% completed pipeline. In volumes massively larger than what Keystone would carry. That has meaningful effect on oil prices. Ditto idiocies involving Iranian oil, Venezuelan oil, what have you. Not completing Keystone is silly, but it’s one of the idiot regime’s least consequential idiocies as far as pump prices in California is concerned.

            As for “Border Walls”, like speedbumps (this is a car site…): Again: More, easier, cheaper transport is always better than less. One of the truest signs of a genuinely useless idiot, is one is too incompetent to compete at more, better, easier, cheaper himself. So he instead obsesses over making transport harder for other, less incompetent people as well.

            As the Founders said: Trade freely with all; entangling alliances with none. Or, translated to more vulgar contemporary English: Get the F out of other people’s face, and stay there!

        • 0 avatar
          Bike

          OMG Keystone Pipeline. Take it easy friend, the planet’s struggling a bit at the moment.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      What’s more astonishing is the passing of judgement on people who you don’t know. Actually, it’s not really that astonishing anymore. It’s expected.

      Let’s blame regular people who, regardless of what they drive, are getting bent over a bicycle rack. Way to channel Mayo Pete and his ilk who think people who are struggling can run out and get an EV.

      What a gross perspective.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        I’m not suggesting anybody get an EV.

        Higher gas prices will inevitably cause a lot of pain and ripple effects.

        But I don’t feel too sorry for people with 72-month payments on 15-mpg grocery-getters, who are also so stretched to the limit with every other luxury that a bump in gas prices is all it takes to ruin them financially.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          I don’t feel sorry for most people you want to give my money to. Students that can choose their gender at 5 but can’t read a student loan contract at 18 come to mind. People that made poor choices and now live paycheck to paycheck and can’t pay their rent when things go bad would be another example. People that despite 30,000 years or so of humans being here yet they seem unable to figure out how babies are created make my list. Yet you want me to pay for all of those clowns’ mistakes. But buy a pickup, no way…eff that guy.

          This is fun…I can do rash generalization and stereotyping too!

          What about the trucker bringing your groceries that has to charge more making your food go up? Sucks to be you if you can’t eat I guess. Maybe grow a garden or get a rifle and hunt

          Well, forget that last one….we know you don’t care for rifles. Well good luck chump.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      >>The American sense of entitlement to cheap gas is astonishing.<<

      no, but your comment is revealing

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        Sometimes the truth stings.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          If you don’t think there is a European black market for fuel then you have never spent any time around a US Military installation over there where servicemembers get tax free fuel @SCE. I once got a Busso v6 in an Alfa 75 rebuilt for the princely sum of 400L of tax free gas coupons in the mid 90’s. Had a headgasket done on an E30 Wagon for half that IIRC. People literally traded them for…umm…shall we say companionship.

          Perhaps you arent as well traveled as you seem to claim.

          Truth is you are fine with people subsidizing plenty of [email protected]$$ery but you don’t like big trucks so thats where you’ve drawn your line in the sand. That’s fine, but don’t pretend it is because you are smarter than everyone else…you just look down on those folks. Thats cool, I feel the same about many other stupid people. You still expect me to subsidize those idiots though.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “ The American sense of entitlement to cheap gas is astonishing.”

      I’m not sure if the above statement is more arrogance or ignorance. Either way it’s loaded with both.

  • avatar

    It is all expected. Black markets is a part of socialist system. Black market was widespread in Soviet Union because most goods were “deficit”. Or take prohibition era – the same thing. The current administration tried to suppress oil and gas production and as a result you get more black market and related to that surge of crime.

  • avatar
    markf

    Funny how gas prices always go insane when the guy in office has a “D” after his name.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      An “R” was in office during the 1973-74 gas crunch, and in 2003-08 when prices doubled.

      It’s easy to verify the facts, but much more fun to blame the incumbent Democrat.

      https://www.randomuseless.info/gasprice/gasprice.html

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        >>but much more fun to blame the incumbent Democrat.<<

        biden and his minions said he was going to do this and he did – so there is no blaming the incumbent Democrat, just giving him credit for the one promise he kept

        and the American people will show who they blame in November

    • 0 avatar
      theflyersfan

      Adjusted for inflation – the highest average gas prices for each recent President:

      George W. Bush (R): $4.27 (Wars all over the Middle East)
      Barack Obama (D): $3.97 (Start of administration left over from Bush. When he left, it was around $2.35)
      Ronald Reagan (R): $3.65
      Jimmy Carter (D): $3.57
      Donald Trump (R): $2.89
      George H.W. Bush (R): $2.30 (I’d argue the Iraq invasion and war was too short to greatly impact gas prices for the long-term)
      Bill Clinton (D): $2.19

      I’d say it’s pretty split between the parties and deals more with geopolitical events and natural disasters more than what a figurehead run by lobbyists and lifers in Congress do.

      And, yes, these gas prices suck, I never thought I’d see prices like this when I returned to the US, and it shouldn’t cost over $50 to fill up an MX-5.

      Then again, I once paid over $11/gal in Italy and that AmEx bill was quite an eye-opener.

      • 0 avatar
        Master Baiter

        “Adjusted for inflation – the highest average gas prices for each recent President:”

        Why is the highest price the right metric? Why not average price? And why not include Biden?

    • 0 avatar
      pwrwrench

      “Funny how gas prices always go insane when the guy in office has a “D” after his name.” Yeah, like that Nixon guy and his follow on Ford. Not that Carter did much better. It’s a more complicated situation than party affiliation. Have to go back to FDR and the agreement made with the Saudi’s in 1944. See the film “Bitter Lake”.
      To the subject at hand; Locally long before the current price increase of fuel, there were some guys that robbed local stations. They had trucks that would be expected to have a big tank. Such as propane or septic service. They had some way of getting the pump to run on and got several thousand gallons of gasoline from one station over a few weeks. Due to a chance they got caught. There’s probably others taking their place.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    “fake tool chests…”

    Now I’m sad.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Found out this morning about ‘ECX’ screwdrivers (thank you youtube) — might be helpful if I get stuck changing out another round of duplex outlets someday.

      Bought a bag of Type S mortar last week and put it to good use fighting Masonry Entropy — drove over to pick up my check this morning and decided to go buy that screwdriver set (unavailable online for some reason, so hey, back to in-person shopping). Well the one place didn’t have them but they did have $140 worth of other Milwaukee hand tools and then the other place (which you hate but it’s out of ignorance) had $70 of stuff I couldn’t live without (including a good price on R-134a). Felt so good that I even dribbled $20 of expensive petrol into the tank of my motor car.

      So anyway, the lady who wrote me the check firmly believes that gasoline prices in the U.S.A. are too high — and she intends to exchange her Pathfinder for a RAV4 Hybrid just as soon as the dealer can obtain one for her. So her gasoline expenditures will be cut in half. I believe this is what Well-Dressed Smart People refer to as “Demand Destruction”?

    • 0 avatar
      Bondtrade

      “I’ll drive that tanka!” – Mel Gibson as Mad Max.

  • avatar

    Well, I don’t think many that are upset about gas prices truly are due to their actions. I still see those larger vehicles which usually get lower mpg idling outside a store while it’s owner is inside shopping. A few have made this point which boils down to: if you don’t like the price you pay for fuel CHANGE YOUR BEHAVIOR- plain and simple. Drive less, plan your trips to be more efficient, maybe get rid of stuff you don’t truly need (entertainment related expenses mostly), live a more austere life. Won’t happen, of course. I am reminded of a radio skit in which the person is told by their doctor to eat less junk food and exercise more to improve their health situation. The patient replies “Don’t you have a pill I can take!!??!!” Yeah, it’s too much of a sacrifice for some to make to actually improve their situation.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      @THX1136–Well stated we have all been accustomed to having more and getting more stuff much of what we never even use. I am not saying it is bad to have nice things and to strive to better yourself but there is only so much happiness and satisfaction you can get from having more. My wife and I are going thru stuff we have accumulated in a house we moved in almost 21 years ago and still have things we are going thru that we haven’t used much in 36 years of marriage. I have been combining trips and have getting rid of stuff. My wife and I are having a 1 story patio home built with 1,649 square feet and a two car garage moving from about a 4,000 square foot house including a walk out basement and a 3 car garage. Both of us are looking forward to living simpler with less stuff. Having less stuff frees you up a lot. Not saying everyone should downsize like we have nor am I saying it is bad to strive to have nice things but we have reached a point in our lives where less is more. Bought a new hybrid Maverick and have been getting 40 to 50 mpgs and my wife’s 2013 CRV AWD is not great but with 25 to 30 mpgs is not exactly breaking the bank. I do feel for a lot of the younger generation starting out but they too will have to start out with less and build up to a point where they have a better life. There is Dave Ramsey and others out there which are good resources to use on how to cope with rising costs and saving for a rainy day. For most of us our wants are greater than our needs.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      I’ve always said that you should be able to drive whatever you want, and that the government shouldn’t force everyone into Trabants, glorified golf carts, or whatever! So go ahead and buy that coal-rolling whatever!

      Just don’t b!tch to me if geopolitical or other forces conspire to hike the price, and please don’t put me or other drivers at risk because of your choices! (I refer to the fairly recent Escalade in the front of the funeral procession forming behind them at the end of my freeway onramp this morning—you probably could have measured the acceleration of this clown using a sundial! There were at least two other drivers who flashed the “you’re number 1!” salute as they went around them! Enough that for once, I didn’t join that particular chorus!)

  • avatar
    jmo2

    Queue the Big Three sliding toward bankruptcy because all they have on offer are gas guzzling SUVs and Pickups. How many times does it have to happen?

    I seen a bunch of folks shocked to discover that their Passport or Highlander get dramatically worse has milage their their old Accord/Camry.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Even something like an HR-V is going to do worse than the Fit it effectively replaced! I had one as a loaner a couple months back, and I was honestly surprised at how bad the gas mileage was!

      It’s because anything taller is going to compromise aerodynamics, which affects fuel mileage, all else being equal.

  • avatar
    jmo2

    And feel free to buy all the F150 King Ranch Editions, Suburbans, Grand Wagoneers that you want. That’s great! But for the love of God don’t bitch to me about gas prices. Gas prices always spike. How many times does it have to happen before folks wise up?

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Why are you shocked? People expect me to pay for their student loans and expect to be allowed to not pay their rent but still remain in the house. But gripe about fuel prices and you are entitled. LOL…OK pal. Don’t b!tch to me when you can’t afford to feed the kid you made either.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “And feel free to buy all the F150 King Ranch Editions, Suburbans, Grand Wagoneers that you want. That’s great! But for the love of God don’t bitch to me about gas prices. Gas prices always spike. How many times does it have to happen before folks wise up?”

      You realize that the issue here is that gas prices are up 100% since Xiden took office. They doubled in a year and a half. Sorry that I bought my boat and the vehicle to pull it when gas prices were reasonable. Sorry that, while we accept fluctuations in price $0.50-$1.00, we get a little irritated when gas goes up by 100%.

      People have every right to complain about gas prices and the complete inaction by our government to curb them. There is NOTHING wrong with cheap gas and there is NOTHING wrong with driving what you want to drive from small, fuel efficient cars to 6.4L Grand Wagoneers. But to just sit back and take our government allowing this is stupid. It has FAR reaching effects throughout the economic landscape and even that doly Janet Yellen has said she was wrong on inflation.

      But I am glad you care so little about people that you don’t want to hear the pain this is causing them.

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    It is easier to steal these days with most all fuel tanks being plastic – a battery drill and a bucket to catch the gas. In the old days you needed an ice pick and a hammer to get through the metal tanks – watch out for sparks, Eugene!

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    My mechanic of 20+ years recently retired. Rather than trying to find another honest, independent mechanic to keep our 2 vehicle that are 10+ years old running, I decided to ‘trade them’ while their value is at its highest and acquire a new vehicle.

    Well, was I shocked and dismayed. The majority of dealers in a 20 mile radius are only taking orders for vehicles to be delivered in 3 to 4 months. One is asking more for a year old demo, than the MSRP if I order the identical vehicle new.

    The exceptions being full sized pick-ups and the largest of SUVs. Those they have on the lot. For example within a 30 minute radius of my home, I have the choice of dozens of brand new F-150s, some Rangers and exactly 1 in stock Maverick.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Arthur Dailey
      I found the same problem. A local dealer told me x 2 that they could get me a diesel Colorado but come in to see a salesman to discuss. I went in and was told, “nope” we can’t get you one but we have some full-sized trucks for the same price.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      @Arthur–You might want to look at Carvana and similar types of buyers they will offer you more money and pick up your vehicles and take care of the paper work. Carvana offered considerably more than the dealer and dealers are notorious for chiseling customers on trade ins giving you the lowest possible trade in usually at the value of a vehicle with high mileage and poor condition. Most dealers will not even discount new vehicles you are lucky to get one at MSRP. Tough to find a good mechanic and there is a shortage of good mechanics. Few younger mechanics take the time to properly diagnose a vehicle and many are learning on the job usually at your expense.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Jeff, Thanks. That is one reason why I am looking for new. I no longer have a mechanic that I can trust to assess a possible used car purchase. And since I will be semi-retiring soon and my wife is retired, the next vehicle purchased will most likely be expected to provide about 15 years of service. Until 2016/2017, during my ‘adult’ ((21 years and older) years I had never kept a vehicle that was more than 6 years old.

        Carvana does not operate in Canada. Our vehicle retail market is considerably different than in the USA. Most dealerships are now owned by consortiums. Manufacturers do not cater/specialize in those with poor credit as Canadian lending regulations are different. Due to zoning laws, our new car dealerships are rather ‘cookie cutter’. There is usually little to no difference between a Kia dealership and a BMW dealership in structure/appearance.

        Canadians buy per capita more pickups, hatchbacks, and base model (Quebec spec), and smaller vehicles than Americans. And due to salt/winter and more stringent vehicle safety/certification requirements our vehicles do not stay on the road as long, on average.

        Ford’s website showed about a dozen Mavericks in inventory in our area. When I called the dealers they all laughed. There is one actually at a dealership unsold but they are asking about $44k for it, plus dealership fees.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          @Arthur–I retired the end of last December. Preparing to put our house up for sale and have been fixing things up and getting rid of an accumulation of stuff. Building a new place in Arizona which is considerably smaller but easier to take care of and just the right size for 2 people. I got the Maverick at just the right time and my wife’s 2013 CRV AWD has just 28k miles so we will be keeping that for at least a few more years. I usually keep my vehicles longer than most with a 99 S-10 almost 21 years, 77 Monte Carlo 15 years, 77 Accord 17 years, 08 Isuzu I-370 truck 12 years and most of the others at least 10 years. I doubt in the future I will keep my vehicles as long as I have in the past. Moving I will have to find new mechanics, doctors, and everything else.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Arthur Dailey – Agreed that most dealerships are owned by “consortiums”.
          The sleezebag that started the publicly traded entity that owns 1/2 the dealerships in my town bought most of the others on his own with information gained as an insider. He was dismissed as CEO and is under litigation by his former company. All of “his” dealerships are slime.

          The only chain that isn’t a slime pit is a small dad/son outfit that owns 3 small dealership’s in 3 towns.
          They couldn’t get me what I wanted so they called in a favour with a large rival chain and we all got sh!t on. There is no honour with thieves and/or car salesmen.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      I recently sold my 2001 Accord to some teenagers who just had a kid and bought a 2019 Mercedes S450 CPO for myself. I did OK price wise, because nobody really wants full size luxury sedans any more. I feel pretty good about it, as it was built before Covid, and it’s an absolutely lovely car to drive. They were also offering 0.99% loans. Can’t beat that with a stick.

  • avatar
    gregtwelve

    Our country as “The land of plenty” is gone. Is it a global plan abetted by our corrupt leaders?…maybe. As anAmerican working his ass off for 50+ years and continuing to work because I have no pension, I suddenly find my
    investments have dropped 30+%, The money I have in the bank losing at least 10% of its buying power per year, and my house going down in value. I consider myself very lucky compared to younger people with families and debt.

    I am looking forward (NOT) to the winter and paying $6.50 per gallon (or possibly more) for fuel oil to keep warm. To say I am not optimistic about the future is an understatement.

    It was great to hear Sen. Debbie Stabenow tout how she didn’t care what the price of fuel was as she passed gas stations in her $60K plus electric ehicle. I recently read a statement by an energy expert that stated that the entire global production of lithium is only enough to manufacture 1 million electric vehicles per year. The total world vehicle production per year is around 70 million vehicles.

    It appears oil will be needed for many more years and assuming the progressive anti-fossil fuel sentiment continues to limit supply the net result will be a precipitous decline of everyone’s standard of living. We will see it first with famine in the “underpriveledged” poor parts if the world. Yes food production depends on oil based farm equipment
    and fertilizer.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    “I am looking forward (NOT) to the winter and paying $6.50 per gallon (or possibly more) for fuel oil to keep warm. To say I am not optimistic about the future is an understatement.”

    According to jmo2 above, you don’t get the right to complain because you chose this and you know that fuel oil fluctuates. So suck it up buttercup!

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    I was having a hard time affording gas, so I recently purchased a Porsche Taycan.

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