By on November 12, 2021

2023 Acura Integra Prototype

Last night’s unveiling of the new Integra in L.A. wasn’t a surprise, given the number of teasers released by Acura over the last few weeks. There was a general consensus it would be a four-door hatchback of some ilk, and would very likely share many parts with other members of the House of Honda.

The 2023 Integra (technically a prototype but we all know that 99.9 percent of this vehicle will make production) did indeed appear as a four-door hatch – thankfully not as a tall-riding crossover – complete with a turbocharged engine and manual transmission. This didn’t stop keyboard warriors bleating from the depth of their parent’s basement that “ThIs Iz NoT a ReEl AcUrA” thanks to the 2023’s abundance of doors compared to the 3rd-gen coupe everyone remembers.

Here’s a newsflash for all those nimrods: The Integra has always been available with four doors.

Sure, most of us fondly remember the 3rd-gen Type R, a machine that sells for exorbitant sums whenever one appears on Bring A Trailer. This trim represented but a small percentage of actual Integra production of course, with plenty of lesser four-door models making their way into the hands of John Q. Public. Some cars were even equipped with (gasp!) an automatic transmission! This is what last night’s naysayers conveniently forget, as they gaze back with rose-colored glasses to a time in which most of them weren’t even born; not all Integra models were the type raced by Ja Rule on his way to failing to secure a tasty ménage.

2023 Acura Integra Prototype

Anyway. Back to the car. The new 2023 Integra will be marketed as a premium sport compact, one which will surely be hucked as the first factory turbocharged Integra. A 6-speed manual transmission will be offered in concert with the 1.5-liter turbo mill, and pricing will start under $30,000. If you’re wondering, that Indy Yellow Pearl paint was indeed cribbed from the NSX, and boots on the ground have said Acura spox suggest that retro-esque name banner could be offered as an accessory if enough people ask for it.

Speaking of styling, Acura describes the Integra’s roofline as ‘dramatically sloping’ thanks to its hatchback design. We will note the strong character line on the side of the car, one which dips aggressively toward the front wheels once it reaches the front fender. This could be part of the reason why the Integra looks a bit taller than it actually is from some angles, particularly in full side view with no other vehicles nearby as reference tools. We’ll reserve final judgment until we see it in person.

2023 Acura Integra Prototype

No official power numbers were given, but it’s safe to assume there will be at least 200 horses under the hood since it shares bones with the new Civic Si. Torque should be in the same neighborhood as well. Look for a similar suspension setup as in the sporty little Honda such as fixed-rate dampers and brakes which outperform a standard Civic. Your author is also of the opinion that Acura will introduce a Type S variant within the next couple of years. Will it show up alongside the next Civic Type R and pack over 300 horsepower? We’ll have to wait and see,

The launch of the 2023 Acura Integra will mark the first time for Integra to be built in America when it begins mass production next year at the Marysville Auto Plant in Ohio. Set to be built on the same production line as the Acura TLX, Integra will join all-new Acura models sold in the U.S. in being built in Ohio.

No, it isn’t a coupe; get over it. We look forward to jumping behind the wheel next year.

[Images: Acura]

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75 Comments on “Acura Introduces New Integra, Internet Explodes...”


  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    In the bottom photo it looks like someone stepped on a Mustang Mach-E. That said, I think this has potential, simply because the Civic Si on which it’s based is such a strong foundation.

    I was on record a month ago guessing that the Integra would be 250hp and $35k, and it looks like I shot a bit high on both fronts; I’m curious if this is due to some market research at Honda suggesting that the 35-year-olds who grew up idolizing the original Integra are a bit less flush than previous generations were at the same age, meaning less cash for less dash is a more realistic option for them.

    • 0 avatar
      MoDo

      Not really, anyone that was into integras 20 years ago has long moved on in lifestyle and automotive taste.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Not everyone.

        Some still try to retain at least some standards, despite the rest of the worlds having long since collapsed around us.

        This new Integra is getting awfully big. Not helped stylingwise, by the “Mustang edition X6” styling highlit in the bottom picture. The Integra looks to really be a TL by now.

        Strangely, The Camry Company has become the new standard bearer for cars which makes enthusiast sense. More so than Integra era Honda and BMW. With the 86 and the GR Yaris. Properly sized, proper number of doors, and with their priorities largely in the right place.

        • 0 avatar
          Ol Shel

          the Yaris will sell dozens of units, and the 86 is so unpopular that they had to share the design with Subaru to justify it.

          If Acura wanted dismal sales, a 3-door would have accomplished that. And really pleased the interwebbers who weren’t going to buy one anyway. Enthusiasts are a poor and dying breed. They don’t get the cars they want because they don’t buy the cars they want.

          (I like the fun stuff too, but I don’t feign outrage when the brands decide to produce models that will sell.)

    • 0 avatar
      Varezhka

      I think the car you had in mind was the upcoming Type-S with the 2L Turbo from Civic Type-R.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      We’re getting a new Integra. Woo-hoo!
      Hopefully the new Legend won’t be too far behind.

      Oh, by the way, Honda, the “INTEGRA” sticker on the side is on crooked. It’s going downhill, which isn’t what you’re trying to do here.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    It makes sense to me that the 1.5T would be the volume engine, but I sure hope there’s a 2.0T Type S (or would they dare to name it GS-R?) with a stick coming later.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “The new 2023 Integra will be marketed as a premium sport compact”

    I don’t think they understand the term “compact”.

  • avatar
    make_light

    I don’t understand the uproar (it’s exactly the car any reasonable person would have expected), but if there’s no AWD option, I would be hard pressed to choose this over a Civic hatch given how good that model is now. Lack of AWD would also make it a tough sell against the new A3. Even though I find newer Audis to be disappointing, I think most people would gladly spring for the greater brand prestige and all-weather capability.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      The new A3 is going to be a disappointment – the Quattro version, which is the one you want, is going to be down power substantially from the ’21, and Audi didn’t address the tiny back seat and trunk from that model.

      Hard pass from this former A3 owner.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      An A3 with AWD is going to cost considerably more than the Integra. And based on my past experience knowing Integra owners, they kept their cars a long time. The A3 isn’t built for that customer.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “A 6-speed manual transmission will be offered in concert with the 1.5-liter turbo mill, and pricing will start under $30,000.”
    “but it’s safe to assume there will be at least 200 horses under the hood

    If true, this hurts the proposition of the $29k Civic Sport Touring hatch even more. I don’t really get why Honda won’t offer a Civic Si hatch. The sedan is fine but the utility on the 5-door is ridiculous.

    I wonder what type of automatic will be offered on the Integra. Will it be a CVT a DCT or conventional?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I don’t think it’ll matter – this car doesn’t offer enough performance for the money for the hot-compact buyers, and doesn’t have the name bling the badge snobs want.

      For $30,000, they should have put the 2.0T in this. That would have made it a fairly compelling entry-lux value play against something like an A3/A220. As it is, there’s no reason to take this over a Civic Si.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “As it is, there’s no reason to take this over a Civic Si.”

        You can get it with two pedals and/or as a 5-door.
        The Si (for now) is sedan and manual transmission only.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Let’s break down how that appeals to the three major groups Acura seems to be targeting here:

          1) Sport compact buyers: So, the Si has a stick (which I like better anyway), and it’s three grand less. Sold. If I wanted a hatch, I’d buy a GTI, which will go faster than this will.

          2) Integra fanboys: Whatever, my teenage daughter just wrecked the Yukon, so I have to replace it now.

          3) Brand snobs: It’s not a Mercedes? Like, OMG…yecch.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “If I wanted a hatch, I’d buy a GTI,”

            I think assuming a likely cross-brand change is a bit of a leap.
            And, if you want a Civic Si automatic this is basically what you’ve got.

            I don’t think this is going to light the sales chart on fire but it’ll do better than the ILX and probably about the same as the 2G TSX.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        “there’s no reason to take this over a Civic Si.”

        It will presumably have the heated seats and auto climate that Honda took out of the latest Si. That would be enough by itself for me to step up—assuming the difference in curb weight isn’t huge.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          @ajla:

          There’s nowhere to go but up for the ILX sales, so yeah, I think it’ll be an improvement. But I don’t think it’ll be a big success.

          @dal:
          Three grand for heated seats and automatic climate control is a pretty stiff.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          I still maintain that you can see the dual-zone auto-climate in the pix of the Si interior.

          Like others have opined, I would have expected this to have a K20T in Accord tune, at least! That could have hit 270hp easily on 93-octane, as from what I’ve heard, that 2.0T is a little underrated.

          Hopefully, they have interior execution and fitment which is a cut above the Civic, on par with the Accord, just as the 2nd-Gen, the one which beget the Type-S, was! Otherwise, there’s no compelling reason to choose this over a Sport Touring Civic Hatch or Si, at least from what we can see now.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            Just looked at the Civic page on Honda’s site. So apparently they can get economy of scale by saddling LX, Sport and Si Civics with single-zone ACC. Color me disappointed, and I stand corrected. Especially since even the lowly LX had dual-zone last time around, or at least I thought it did! (Had an Insight base loaner from the dealer a month back when I had the fuel pump recall addressed on my Accord, and THAT was a single-zone unit, though the IP itself was identical to the Accord Hybrid’s.)

  • avatar
    ravenuer

    Guess I missed the internet “exploding”.

  • avatar
    carguy949

    I’ve owned 3 Accords over the years, the most recent one a 6 speed V6 Coupe, so I have a soft spot for Honda. I test drove an Integra back in the 80s and almost bought one. But now I have a 2014 Tesla, a new one on order, and wonder where is the Acura to tempt me away from that? Instead of rehashing a car from decades ago they should be introducing a Model 3 competitor. And maybe call that the Integra.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “Instead of rehashing a car from decades ago they should be introducing a Model 3 competitor. And maybe call that the Integra.”

      Wayyyy too expensive, which is why they have not done so and instead refreshed the Civic.

  • avatar
    CoastieLenn

    I wish I could find numbers, but I’d wager a not-insignificant amount of pesos that the VAST majority of Integra’s sold thru the entire model run were 2 door. I also feel like Honda knows this. This is why the internet exploded. Not because it’s basically a carbon copy of a Civic in side profile (less a little hatchback goodness) with a TLX front end, but because there were SO much higher hopes for a coupe or a 2 door hatch if it was going to wear the Integra name. If they knew they were going to be exclusively 4 door, they would have been better off calling it the TSX and leaving the integra name dead.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      I really think the problem is the styling. They hinted at 4 door hatch from the very beginning

    • 0 avatar
      Ol Shel

      Maybe Honda should have called this 4-door a coupe. People eat that sh!t up when BMW does it.

    • 0 avatar
      NotaTeg

      A DC2 coupe in manual typically sells for $3,000-$4,000 online, in decent shape. While there are GS-R sedans with less than 140k miles for $1200 or less. The facts are simple. The sedan was unattractive back then, and this lazy attempt to sell more Civics by ripping off the Integra name is a slap in the face. Coupes outsold sedans through the 90s 10-1.

  • avatar
    KOKing

    I don’t think the problem is with the car. It certainly seems like the right configuration to ACTUALLY SELL in this day and age. But calling it the INTEGRA (and painting it yellow trying to tie it to the DC2R) was the problem. FWIW the first Integra I have memories from in high school was a family friend’s dark blue 5 DOOR. The raucous cacophony of DOHC VTEC mayhem didn’t come for almost another decade.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Back in the day, the Integra was always a better-performing Civic, and you couldn’t really buy a Civic that performed as well. Now you can. I don’t get it.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      And there lies the issue with using the name Integra. They want the pedigree of the name to be a boost for sales, but by doing so you saddle the car with expectations that it might not be able to provide. Just like the “new” GTO in the 2000s…Acura would have been better off naming it something else.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Looks great to me, but it will need more than a retro name and “A” badge to differentiate it from the Civic.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Nice looking car, but I’m not impressed. Who, exactly, are they aiming this at?

    The performance-compact buyer is going to figure out pretty quickly that this is mechanically identical to a Civic Si, just with a higher pricetag. That’s going to be a tough sell. There are plenty of alternatives at the same basic price point that offer better performance (VW GTI/GLI, WRX, Elantra N), and others that offer the same performance for a lot less money (Elantra N-Line, Forte GT). But the biggest competitor will be the Civic Si, which seems like a far better option. I don’t see this car finding many buyers in this crowd.

    The Acura-fanboy, remember-when-I-got-my-first-BJ-in-my-old-Integra crowd would probably just take the thirty grand they’d spend on this and find a good used Integra.

    The badge-snob crowd is going to ignore this because the Acura name has zero bling value.

    I think the mistake Acura made here was forgetting that while the Integra was always a dressed-up Civic, it usually offered a pretty substantial performance bump over the Honda that justified the higher price. That’s not the case here.

    Now, if they’d used the 2.0 engine from the Accord Sport, and priced it about the same, they’d have a pretty compelling model.

    As it is, I’d pass, and I think this model is going to have an uphill battle finding many buyers.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    There is literally nothing about this that says “Integra” to me.Not even the big Integra script on the side, which reads more like “weak sauce.”

  • avatar
    Boff

    Interested in this car because (nostalgia) my first car was a ’92 Integra LS 3-door (in teal, of course). In those days, you could clearly see the Honda roots but the Acura was a big upgrade in many ways. At first blush, this seems closer in looks and specs to the Civic Si. As good as that car seems to be, this is a disappointment.

  • avatar
    AK

    I’m in the demo for this (37, drive a manual, looking for a new affordable ‘sporty’ car) but I just don’t have any interest in Honda’s 1.5 turbo. It sucks.

    If this Integra had the 2.0t from the accord with 250hp, it would be on my list. It looks better than the new GTI and WRX.

    As things are, I’ll be getting a BRZ/86.

  • avatar
    Tirpitz

    This is a car I’m interested in. I am looking to get two cars over the next couple of years because the newest vehicle in my fleet is now 7 years old and I will have a new driver in less than 3 years.

    Honda had a good shot at selling me the new Civic hatch but based on price, utility and MPG I chose to order a hybrid Ford Maverick. That may prove to be a mistake as quality might not be job one but if so I don’t think I’ll have much trouble unloading a pickup.

    I will still need another new car besides the Maverick and moving up to the Integra to avoid a CVT was attractive. If the Integra was fun to drive and reliable I’d be convinced. But what Acura showed is so far not very impressive. No talk of handling. No mention of an alternate to the Civic CVT other than manual which I’m happy to see for those who want it but not something I need. Using the 1.5 turbo motor which has had oil dilution issues. A roofline that might make the backseat headroom compromised. I actually like getting 4 doors but the Integra don’t look all that different from the Civic hatch.

    Unless the Integra handles like a dream I’ll probably go look at something else.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Honda had a good shot at selling me the new Civic hatch but based on price…”

      The nonSI Civic (both sedan and hatch) are very nice vehicles that need about a $3K price cut on every trim.

      • 0 avatar
        Tirpitz

        I’m afraid nothing is going to be seeing any price cuts with the inflation train having left the station. One of the reasons I put in a Maverick order now is that I’m pretty confident the price will only be higher for a 2023 model year truck.

  • avatar
    kjhkjlhkjhkljh kljhjkhjklhkjh

    So heavier due to luxury addons .. same 200hp powertrain. Looks like a fanboy accord with a givemeaticket yellow paint job.

    Jesus… this is a poor pooooor effort.

    Like someone mentioned I hope there is a GSR or type-r , RSX something with the 2.0 and a better tune state. right now this looks like a money grab on old people ..

  • avatar
    ajla

    I seem to be the only person on here that kind of likes it but I don’t buy cars like this in the first place. So basically Supra all over again. Maybe it’s because I don’t have much attachment to either old Supras or old Integras.

    Considering how many “stick or GTFO” I’ve read here over the years, I am a little surprised that people aren’t happier about a newly available $30K manual transmission hatchback that isn’t built by Volkswagen.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I kind of like it too – I just don’t think Acura is giving people any really compelling reasons to buy it. I could see a far more compelling sales case if Acura had given it a substantially higher level of performance than you can get in a Civic. This car, with the 2.0T, becomes an interesting proposition at $30,000 or so; with the 1.5, it’s a fancier Civic with a “legacy” name.

      Far as the manual is concerned, I’m all for choice, but I think powertrains have evolved to the point that a stick isn’t really a must-have anymore.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        The cheapest Accord 2.0T these days is $33K and ​the nicest Civic hatch is $29.5K. I just don’t see a 2.0T Integra for $30K being in the cards.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Keep in mind the Accord 2.0T is a size class up from the Civic, and it’s automatic-only, so the transmission alone probably accounts for a grand or so of the price difference.

          Besides, I said “$30,000 or so”. A grand or two extra for this car with the bigger engine seems reasonable. And so equipped, you have a better-performing alternative to a comparably priced A3 or A220, both of which start at $34,000 for the FWD versions.

      • 0 avatar
        DungBeetle62

        I’ve seen a lot of criticism about a perceived lack of power, but aside from the R-Types, back in the day the Integra and RSX both really weren’t that scorchingly high on the power. The differentiating factor seemed to be a Civic was SOHC with 16-valves and an Integra was DOHC. Point being, not unlike a Prelude, it was a jewel in ride and handling that was quick but no record-breaker and maybe a longer list of standard features justify the price. For the same money you could get an Eclipse Turbo, and Honda’s reaction was essentially “OK then, go for it cheapskate.”

        My own hope was simply Honda would leverage this opportunity into justifying a 3-door or coupe body for the platform. You’re sharing a ton of componentry here at a “premium price” so maybe there’s a case for it. Sadly, not only that, but I think the front’s got the biggest grille of any Integra ever offered. To me, that front view seems to scream “We basically renamed the ILX”.

        Nope, the Miata RF is safe as my next purchase. The spirit of my old 2000 Prelude remains gone.

  • avatar
    dwford

    The fact that this new “Integra” has 4 doors is NOT the problem. The problem is is that this car is nothing more than a cynical marketing exercise. Take a new Civic hatchback, keep the entire greenhouse and body in white, slap some mildly different sheetmetal on it and call it an Integra. Heck, the photo of the stick shift they released a few weeks ago shows a very similar center console and the exact same shift knob as the Si. This type of product development was roundly criticized for decades when the Detroit 3 did it. Now we know why the new Civic Si only comes as a sedan: to give this car a reason to exist.

    Yes, every prior Integra was based on the Civic, but at least they got totally unique sheetmetal and mostly different engines. This car is the product of obvious corporate infighting. Clearly some at Honda wanted this car and some did not. So the pro-Integra camp got to build their car, but with a tiny budget that forced them to reuse way too much of the Civic.

    The car itself is only the first problem. The second problem is the reveal itself. Taking a page from Cadillac’s CT4-v/CT5-V reveal, Acura made a big deal about it, but failed to realize that the presentation was a huge letdown. Remember Cadillac having to back pedal after revealing their new V cars that were way down on power? Remember how they pumped them up big time, even though they were really only the mid range cars? Acura just did that with the Integra. The only engine they talked about was the 1.5T, so the Si motor. We all assume that this is the base motor for the Integra. So why are we all here to hear about a new performance car, only to see just the base car??? They didn’t make this mistake with the new TLX, revealing the Type S first. They should’ve waited until they were ready to reveal the whole product line.

    Given their obvious constraints, Acura should’ve just revealed the 2nd generation ILX and not gotten peoples’ hopes up.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I pretty much agree with all of this. I like the looks of the Integra, and I like that there IS a Integra, but they needed to give it a bigger engine. This feels like a missed opportunity.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      May be they will add a port injection to this one. On original they took SOHC and made DOHC. Doubled the cams. Now, may be time to double the injectors.

    • 0 avatar
      N8iveVA

      I’m not completely sure they have any of the same sheet metal. Comparing the profiles the Integra looks longer from the rear door cut lines to the tail, and the cut line for the top of the hatch looks to be further towards the rear than the Civic when looking at the rear quarter windows.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    A lot of you are assuming identical tuning to the Si. We still don’t have a power rating yet. You could get a bit of old-Integra character and a bit of space from the Si at the same time by giving the Integra a bit more boost. That would push the power peak (and maybe even the redline) a bit higher, at the expense of a bit of low-end torque. How would people feel about 225 hp and a 7000 rpm redline from the 1.5T? I’d feel pretty good about it.

  • avatar
    turbo_awd

    On the low end, Kia Forte GT manual starts at $25K, has a manual + 200 hp (1.6T). Not as good, but $5K cheaper.

    On the higher end, this is priced a LOT like the K5 GT (the old Optima) – that starts at $31K, has 290 hp, 311 lb-ft from a 2.5T with an 8-speed DCT. Honda quality ain’t what it used to be.

    If they come out with a Type S that’s really a Type R, will it be $42-45K? That would be a really hard sell compared to say an STI, or base Stinger or Golf R.

  • avatar
    DAC17

    Why, in God’s green earth, does anyone care about internet idiots??

  • avatar

    Not in my garage. I would rather buy Civic and save money.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    Land Ark
    August 13th, 2021 at 12:33 pm

    When I read the headline I assumed they were changing the name of the ILX to Integra.

    After reading the article I’m convinced they’re changing the name of the ILX to the Integra.

    This should, but doesn’t excite me. The Integra was a fantastic car. It, on paper, could be exactly replicate-able today without any real effort. But, it will not be replicated and will be a disappointment. It’ll be a fine car that does everything well. Just like every other car for sale today. It’ll enjoy a first year sale success with drop off every year until it is killed in 2026 and replaced with an electric crossover.

    At least the Integra actually had a 4-door version since this will NOT be available with fewer than 4 doors.

    ————–

    So far so good. Though I’m a bit concerned with my prediction of a good first sales year.
    Now, let’s get ready to see an interior that is indistinguishable from any other brand of vehicle with digital gauges and an oversized-poorly integrated screen for infotainment.
    It looks like a fine car that I will consider for my next purchase before quickly eliminating it in favor of something else.

  • avatar
    tedward

    I dont know, Im exactly the person for who this kind of thing is good news and I’m not excited. We’re replacing the GTI soon and this is definitely a gti competitor, far more so than the si. But…they didn’t budget to do so with that drivetrain, and the rebadge is giving me more than a bit of 90s gm vibes. I know honda has always been indifferent and cynical towards acura, but this is a bit much.

    There’s a big subjective difference between a 1.5 and 2.0t. They can easily run at power parity obviously, but there’s no option but to give up some combo of rev range, linear pull, smoothness etc… The engine is a mistake that the civic version barely gets away with. All of the competitors at 30k have better drivetrains, regardless of how long ago they were released.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    I’d rather have a Levorg.
    STI Sport EX please.

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